Saturday, 3 August 2019

Alternate Best Supporting Actor 1963

And the Nominees Were Not:

Tatsuya Nakadai in A Woman's Life

Anil Chatterjee in Mahanagar

Alan Bates in The Caretaker

Rod Steiger in Hands Over the City

Geoffrey Keen in Dr. Syn, Alias the Scarecrow

George Cole in Dr. Syn, Alias the Scarecrow 

Patrick Wymark in Dr. Syn, Alias the Scarecrow


For prediction purposes: Keen out of the Scarecrow men. 

37 comments:

Brazilian Cinema said...

1. Nakadai
2. Keen
3. Steiger
4. Bates
5. Chatterjee

Calvin Law said...

1. Nakadai
2. Bates
3. Chatterjee
4. Keen
5. Steiger

Emi Grant said...

1. Nakadai
2. Bates
3. Chatterjee
4. Steiger
5. Keen

Luke Higham said...

1. Nakadai
2. Keen
3. Bates
4. Chatterjee
5. Steiger (I put him in 5th because he's dubbed apparently)

Luke Higham said...

Louis: You have the 1963 Alternate best actor label instead of 1963 alternate supporting.

Rating and thoughts on Max Von Sydow in Winter Light.

Thoughts on:

Jeanne Moreau - Bay of Angels
Daliah Lavia - Il Demonio
Sachiko Hidari - The Insect Woman
Sophia Loren - Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow
Judy Garland - A Child is Waiting
Julie Harris - The Haunting
Claire Bloom - The Haunting
Francine Berge - Judex

Is Audrey Hepburn a 4.5 for Charade and are Lilia Skala and The Tom Jones ladies all 4s.

Luke Higham said...

Thoughts on the casts of Fighting With My Family and Hobbs & Shaw.

Any possibility you'll see Shazam! soon.

Bryan L. said...

Luke: Your ranking for David Leans films that you've seen, along with ratings?

Luke Higham said...

5
1. Lawrence Of Arabia
2. The Bridge On The River Kwai
3. Doctor Zhivago
4. Brief Encounter
5. Ryan's Daughter
4.5
6. Oliver Twist
4
7. Great Expectations
8. Hobson's Choice
9. A Passage To India
10. The Passionate Friends

Luke Higham said...

Other films to watch:
Dr. Crippen (Donald Pleasence)
Le Doulos (Melville)
Black Sabbath (Mario Bava/Boris Karloff)
The Haunted Palace (Roger Corman/Vincent Price)
Scorpio Rising (Kenneth Anger)
The Raven (Price/Karloff)
X: The Man With The X-Ray Eyes
Muriel
The Thirteen Assassins
The Whip And The Body (Bava/Christopher Lee)
The Third Shadow Warrior
The Damned

Maciej said...

1.Nadakai
2.Bates
3.Keen
4.Steiger
5.Chatterjee

RatedRStar said...

1. Nakadai
2. Bates
3. Chatterjee
4. Keen
5. Steiger

John Smith said...

1.Nakadai
2.Chatterjee
3.Bates
4.Steiger
5.Keen

Razor said...

1. Nakadai
2. Bates
3. Chatterjee
4. Steiger
5. Keen

Anonymous said...

1. Nakadai
2. Bates
3. Keen
4. Chatterjee
5. Steiger

Louis: Thoughts on the voices of Sarah Paulson, Linda Cardellini, Sophia Loren and Jeanne Moreau.

Robert MacFarlane said...

1. Nakadai
2. Keen
3. Bates
4. Chatterjee
5. Steiger

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

I am so glad you're finally reviewing a performance in my native language (Bangla).

1. Nakadai
2. Keen
3. Chatterjee
4. Bates
5. Steiger

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thoughts on the score & main theme from The Great Escape and The Haunting's Production Design.

Calvin Law said...

Guys what would be your choice for spinoffs from the Harry Potter world? For me I’d love to see a miniseries following Regulus and Sirius Black.

BRAZINTERMA said...

1. Nakadai
2. Bates
3. Chatterjee
4. Steiger
5. Keen

Michael Patison said...

1. Nakadai
2. Bates
3. Steiger
4. Keen
5. Chatterjee

Brazilian Cinema said...

Hey louis

Speaking of Steiger, I think you should put his performance on The Pawnbroker in the year 1964. I know the movie The Pawnbroker was only released in theaters the following year, but fuck the release date what matters is the year of film production. For me, Rod Steiger won best lead actor of 1964, if you were the Overall Rank TOP10 would look like this:

1. Rod Steiger in The Pawnbroker
2. Peter Sellers in Dr. Strangelove
3. Richard Attenborough in Guns at Batasi
4. Peter Ustinov in Topkapi
5. Tom Courtenay in King & Country
6. Anthony Quinn in Zorba the Greek
7. Peter O'Toole in Becket
8. Richard Attenborough in Seance on a Wet Afternoon
9. Clint Eastwood in A Fistful of Dollars
10. Dirk Bogarde in King & Country

Luke Higham said...

Brazilian Cinema: He's not changing his rules, end of. Be happy that he loves the performance as much as you do.

Calvin Law said...

What Luke said.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Brazilian Cinema: His rules are his rules, and your rules are yours. Steiger can be your win for 1964, but that doesn't mean that he has to be Louis's win for that year, or any year for that matter. What's important is that we respect each other's opinions, rules and preferences, and be civil about them. That's the way it's always been here.

Mitchell Murray said...

Tahmeed: Here here.

I mean, just to reinforce that idea, I still stand firm in my praise of "Hacksaw Ridge", and my general indifference towards "Hidden Figures". I still have Frances McDormand as my best actress win for 2017, which takes nothing away from the exceptional field she was in. I've voiced my appreciation of Bradley Cooper's "A Star Is Born" (At least in regards to its performances), and if I haven't said so already, I'll officially state my disappointment in Brie Larson's turn as Captain Marvel.

These are all provoking opinions of fairly notable films, and not everyone is going to agree with them, but I feel content in knowing I can voice them on this blogpot in a civil manner, and have equally civil feedback in response.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Russell Boyd, John Seale and Dean Semler as cinematographers.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

von Sydow - 4(von Sydow typically makes the most out of whatever it is that he is given in a Bergman film. This is certainly the case in this instance at the very least, as even though he is not the focus of the film, he leaves a striking impression in portraying such a profound sense of depression. His eyes carrying the weight of a real fear, but also hollowness in terms of any sense of comfort.)

Moreau - (She gives a great performance that entirely makes her film. This being her co-star is more than a little underwhelming. She's fantastic though in bringing such an intensity in the exuberance of the character who seems to wish to just own her existence in the gambling world. She almost develops what would that random Bond casino woman be in a given situation, as she expressive this wish for the high life. Within that though she carries this effective and rather powerful sense of desperation that slowly reveals itself. This as she slowly creates the idea of her manner towards the existence as an attempt to create a blithe indifference to some of her struggles, by only embracing the pleasures she can find. Her work's terrific in finding this balance in creating a believable sense of the way the character slowly comes to terms with herself throughout the story.)

Lavia - (Very much a go for broke performance that is actually quite effective in creating this idea of the woman everyone believes is possessed, mainly just because she's really horny. Lavia terrific though in creating really both sides of this equation. In that she is terrific in playing into the hysteria of the others, particularly in engulfing herself physically within the role particularly in the exorcism scene. She captures an effective mania within it all, while managing to make all the contortions seem honest within the moment. Within all that what really makes her performance work is portraying such small moments of a more tender desire within her lusts, that shows just a very human woman looking for love in a direct way, too direct for her repressed society.)

Hidari - (A nearly extraordinary performance at times, and at least in terms of the portrayal of aging. In that she effectively goes from a virginal girl, to a struggling woman, to a bitter madam through the film and is completely convincing at every stage. She sadly goes a little over the top here and there, however most of her work is rather on point. This again in revealing each part of the character's struggle through the course of life, and is rather interesting in that she gives kind of cold performance. This is as she slowly purges the immediate sympathies for the character, this in creating a real sense of the burdens of the character's life that pushes her towards this cold bitterness to succeed at all costs.)

Louis Morgan said...

Loren - (She's charming and rather funny in the first half, in the constantly need of sex housewife, that loves to show off this fact in order to avoid police. It's an endearing turn particularly in her moments of berating others for sort of getting in her way. The second portion she is quite effectively vapid in portraying the lusts of just a woman more concerned with her position than any one or any man. She flaunts this ego quite effectively and creates a completely different chemistry with Mastroianni in each. My favorite of these being her final sequence as the prostitute with the heart of gold. This is where she is charming and endearing in a completely different way from the rest of the character. She is wonderful in portraying sort of the earnest desire to do right for everyone, I especially love her final teasing, in more ways than one, particularly in how well her timing corresponds with Mastroianni's.)

Garland - (Garland always has a certain lack of confidence in there somewhere in purely dramatic performances. That is evident here, however this mostly still works in portraying the mixed confidence of the character who absolutely wants to help however isn't quite sure how. She manages to find the right sort of broken earnestness within this as there is this effective portrayal of a burden within the fixation of helping a single boy, despite having many. Her arc, I'll admit gets a little lost between the two completely separate and incompatible messages being told by director Cassavetes, and Kramer, however she still delivers a fine performance within the certain limitations.)

Harris - (Harris's performance is one that is a little hard to take, however I do think that is the point, to a point. I do think there are moments occasionally where she could've brought something just a bit more measured, however still I found her quite effective in creating this woman in a truly horrible state of mind. This in also being purposefully insufferable in a way, by being sensitive to all and anguished by any even slightly perceived slight. She's creates the right sense of the woman's state of mind, and one could perhaps seen influence in later portrayals of one driven to madness in the horror film.)

Bloom - (Bloom is fantastic in managing to completely convey and own the subtext within her character. This is in effectively realizing basically the shades of lesbianism within the character, even if is never directly spoken. She conveys though so well though within making it carefully the sole focus. This in also just delivering a real charisma within the role, and the sort of enjoyment, that she teeters between innocent and rather guilty, of rattling each others cages. She underlines though well though by having the moments of fear and sympathy towards Harris' character wholly genuine of someone reacting to their peculiar situation.)

Berge - (Just a fun femme fatale performance in the purest sense. She's particularly good though in basically slowly revealing just how evil her character is. As the film proceeds she plays effectively with sort of this sinister nature, effectively though by always portraying this diabolical greed that defines her more than anything else.)

Louis Morgan said...

Pugh - (Pugh proves once again why she is one of the best up and coming talents, by frankly delivering more a star turn with less extreme emotional stakes than her other high profile performances so far. Her turn is wonderful though in really being less intense but still creating a real sense of the more low key struggle of her character finding herself sort of both inside the ring and outside of it. She hits well both scenes in becoming really believable in each part of essentially her "Paige", while also really delivering well in creating a naturalism in the more humorous moments too.)

Lowden - (Strong work from him as well as he meets with Pugh well in just finding the right tone for the film with his performance. This in creating a proper sad sack performance, though with the right bit of a real passion and earnest that he conveys as very much creating that state. Lowden's good by creating just a believable sense of the frustrations, while also capturing what feels like just an authentic chemistry with Pugh as brother and sister. This both in the moments of support, but also those of more intense jealousy from his own disappointments.)

Frost/Headey - (Both are pretty good in finding enough humor in sort of the over the top nature of their characters, but balancing it with the moments of portraying a genuine concern as real parents as well.)

Vaughn - (In some ways re-doing his work in Hacksaw Ridge as the comic but still intense drill sergeant type. He does that well, downplaying it effectively from that previous turn. What really makes his work stand though are in his sort of heart to hearts where he manages to find the right combination of a sense of bitterness but also genuine warmth and concern when describing his own troubled past he sees potentially reflected in others.)

Johnson & Statham - (I'd actually say both are less their characters from the Fast series and more of just versions of their onscreen personalities. This is that The Rock is more The Rock here than he ever was in the Fast series, and Statham isn't at all the evil Shaw they've completely retconned here. That's fine by me though, as the two are both enjoyable in doing good versions of their onscreen personas. It is a more heightened version of both but it works for the over the top nature of the film.)

Kirby - (Very much steals the show from the men, this in that she is the one person who I'd say perhaps was making a better film, than the I'll admit entertaining one I watched. This as she manages to bring a real dynamic charm to the performance yet is able to set up the more dramatic stakes naturally within her performance as well. This in being on the same rhythm as the two boys in general, but being able to play to greater heights. This in that her segues to the dramatic always feel natural, where even though they can deliver them well enough on their own, Statham's and the Rock's don't feel as earned in the moment.)

Elba - 3(He's a decent enough villain but not a great one. In fact I probably would've gone lower if it weren't for the torture scene where he finally has bit of more fun. I wanted that fun throughout though, as a lot of it is just very standard, if not a bit boring, villain acting from him.)

Gonzalez - (Not in it much but fairly awkward when she is.)

Marsan - (Thought he managed to bring a bit more character than was on the page, a rather short page, for his character.)

Mirren - (Just doesn't really get to have that much fun, preferred her came in Fast 8.)

Curtis - (As to be expected quickly and effectively hits his dramatic notes even though there isn't too much of him.)

Yes.

Note: I've seen Black Sabbath, which doesn't need too much mention outside of Bava's direction and a bit fun from Karloff, and Le Doulos is 62.

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Your cast, decade of release, screenwriter and cinematographer for a Lean version of The Way Back? He definitely would've demanded a better script for the film.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Paulson - (I mean wholly fine if somewhat general, though nothing wrong with that.)

Linda Cardellini - (Lovely low key Italian American accent to be sure.)

Sophia Loren - (Wonderfully and oh so alluring fully Italian voice.)

Jeanne Moreau - (Unique voice both just in general and particularly for French. A certain huskiness but not quite that. A wonderful mix.)

Luke:

The Great Escape's score is certainly up there in the iconic status, being just immensely catching and memorable. This being this main theme as this triumphant war theme, though wholly original to the film from Elmer Berstein's brilliant melody. I love his combination of patriotic triumph in the use of the military band, but also this certain whimsy, of those bass only moments. This captures so well just really the entertaining tone needed for the film. Of course as much as the theme is a great highlight, there is just some terrific additional pieces that makes this score all the greater. This some terrific mood and action pieces. These within the style of the main theme but with fantastic variations. The scoring of McQueen's motorcycle dash escape being a particular highlight in that regard.m

The Haunting's production design is an essential horror element in the film. This in creating this sort of period appropriate, yet not quite, horror aesthetic that is just fantastic. This in each room of the house, especially the particular room, having this unnerving quality simply through this design. The highlight of it all though having to be the spiral staircase that is great horror set piece, but also just quite simply a horrifying set piece.)

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Russell Boyd is perhaps one of the most underrated cinematographers this being that his collaborations with Peter Weir are among the best shot films of the decade. His work though goes beyond those collaborations, in what is his style of sort of this nuanced beauty, that has a great deal of technique yet does so in a particularly low key and naturalistic fashion. This extends beyond his work with Weir, though he certainly uses him the best, as he makes some films better looking then they had any right to be. For example the disposable Doctor DoLittle comedy has a surprising degree of visual panache thanks to Boyd. This as he managed to find ways to at least create something even with the general studio look of the 90's, showing a true talent as cinematographer.

John Seale's work one can easily see how he learned within the state of Weir, as he has a fairly similar style to Boyd, though his typically more overtly grand. This creating always interesting looking films however, again even lesser films. Now Weir too, and George Miller, knew how to use him better than anyone, however his ability is evident across filmmakers. This in this consistency in creating dynamic shots, with often incredible lighting, composition and framing choices as a given. His work isn't a guarantee of visual greatness, but at the very least goodness.

Dean Semler doesn't quite have the same consistency as the aforementioned men, and his heights isn't near theirs. He's shot some more than fine looking films to be sure, Road Warrior, Dances With Wolves is a fine looking film, even if there is unfortunately the rest of it. He's shot some downright ugly films however, Mario Bros, The Last Action Hero, The Longest Yard among others. Now incompetent direction hurts even the best cinematographers, however at least some sense of competence can still be found. His own work though is more than underwhelming in those instances. He has some strong work in his resume still, but those instances are with directors with already a lot of visual panache.

Bryan:

1965+ Lean, Robert Bolt screenwriter, Freddie Young cinematographer.

Janusz Wieszczek: Tom Courtenay
Mr. Smith: William Holden
Irena: Geraldine Chaplin
Zoran: Joss Ackland
Tomasz: Ronald Lacey
Andrejs Voss: Hardy Kruger
Andrei Khabarov: Alec Guinness
Valka: Klaus Kinski

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Lastly, besides The Way Back, are there any modern films you think would've been a good fit for his directorial style?

Although the types of films he made are very rare today I'll admit.

Louis Morgan said...

Bryan:

All of James Gray's films. Arrival, Silence, The Revenant, Foxcatcher.

Bryan L. said...

Maybe not *that* rare I suppose

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the cinematography of The Hustler and West Side Story.

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