Tuesday, 15 January 2019

Final Oscar predictions (aka I don't want a three page comments section)

Picture:
  1. A Star is Born
  2. Roma
  3. Blackkklansman
  4. The Favourite
  5. Vice
  6. Green Book
  7. Bohemian Rhapsody
  8. First Man
Next two would be Beale Street and Black Panther. Again predicting (hoping) the 5% #1 votes rule, by tech branchers, will get First Man in. I think the same could happen for Beale Street. At the same time feeling this is what could prevent Black Panther from making it.

Director:
  1. Alfonso Cuaron - Roma
  2. Spike Lee - Blackkklansman
  3. Bradley Cooper - A Star is Born
  4. Yorgos Lanthimos - The Favourite
  5. Adam McKay - Vice
The controversy around Peter Farrelly is striking at the exact moment, that might not push the film out but I think could be enough to give McKay and Lanthimos the edge over him. I'd love to see Pawel Pawlikowski pull a Bennett Miller and get in over McKay, however I don't foresee that happening.

Actor:
  1. Rami Malek - Bohemian Rhapsody
  2. Christian Bale - Vice
  3. Bradley Cooper - A Star is Born
  4. Viggo Mortensen - Green Book
  5. John David Washington - Blackkklansman
Same as before, again can Hawke, Gosling or Dafoe surprise? It has happened before, like Tommy Lee Jones in In the Valley of Elah, who had no industry precursors mentions but got in over a younger crop. But the odds typically are against it.

Actress:
  1. Olivia Colman - The Favourite
  2. Glenn Close - The Wife
  3. Lady Gaga - A Star is Born
  4. Melissa McCarthy - Can you Ever Forgive Me?
  5. Emily Blunt - Mary Poppins Returns 
The fringe contenders again need to be surprises. I'll admit I was tempted to go with Yalitza Aparicio, however will they make Blunt wait again? Maybe. But I'm predicting her anyways. The bigger surprises usually happen here rather than Actor though,  like Ruth Negga, Charlotte Rampling and Marion Cotillard in Two Days, One Night, so it's not off the table the question though is, who would it be? Maybe Aparicio, Collette, Kidman, Davis or Pike. Though playing it safe.

Supporting Actor:
  1. Richard E. Grant - Can You Ever Forgive Me?
  2. Marhershala Ali - Green Book
  3. Adam Driver - Blackkklansman
  4. Sam Elliott - A Star is Born
  5. Sam Rockwell - Vice
Well my hesitation before around Rockwell being a Globe overreaction has been lifted by his BAFTA nomination. Curious to see if a dark horse will happen, but it doesn't seem too likely.

Supporting Actress:
  1. Rachel Weisz - The Favourite
  2. Emma Stone - The Favourite
  3. Amy Adams - Vice
  4. Regina King - If Beale Street Could Talk
  5. Claire Foy - First Man
Again probably wishful thinking in terms of order, however it is hard to call someone who has been snubbed by both actual overlapping voter groups a lock for a nomination let alone a win, in the case of King. Although Adams seems safe enough now, her role is minor, but sometimes that just doesn't matter. Foy hopefully is bolstered by First Man's tech comeback as indicated by the guilds. Robbie is hanging around too, but her position is certainly flimsy. Blunt is also possible for her other performance, but being ignored by her hometown group does leave a major ? there.

Original Screenplay:
  1. The Favourite
  2. Green Book
  3. Roma
  4. Vice
  5. Eighth Grade
The category isn't deep enough for the controversy around Green Book to stop it here. The top four seem pretty close to locks, barring some MAJOR snub. It's all about that fifth spot really, and typically there is some Indie feature to garner the lone spot. Eighth Grade has the momentum, so that will probably be it.

Adapted Screenplay:
  1. Blackkklansman
  2. Can You Ever Forgive Me?
  3. If Beale Street Could Talk
  4. A Star is Born
  5. The Death of Stalin
The top four seem in a strong position at this point. Going with the Armando Iannucci surprise, as he managed to get in with In the Loop, which was the sole nomination for that film.


Animated:
  1. Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
  2. Incredibles 2
  3. Isle of Dogs 
  4. Ralph Breaks the Internet
  5. Mirai
Given last year's nominees the change in voting system obviously has skewed the nominees in a far more populist direction. That makes the top four given, though as with The Breadwinner last year there's probably enough there to get something like Mirai in.

Production Design:
  1. The Favourite
  2. Mary Poppins Returns
  3. First Man
  4. Isle of Dogs
  5. The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
Hard to predict honestly past Poppins and The Favourite, as I could see a lot of random notices here.

Cinematography:
  1. Roma 
  2. First Man
  3. The Favourite
  4. A Star is Born
  5. Cold War
Typically these lineup with the ASC nominees, unless there is an established cinematographer they want to bring back, that gives Delbonnel an outside change for Scruggs, but I don't see it happening.

Costume Design:
  1. The Favourite
  2. Mary Poppins Returns
  3. Mary Queen of Scots
  4. Black Panther 
  5. The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
I wouldn't put it past them doing something stupid like giving Bohemian Rhapsody a nomination here, but I'm hoping for the inspired, and BAFTA supported, Scruggs nod.

Editing:
  1. First Man 
  2. A Star is Born
  3. Roma
  4. Vice
  5. Blackkklansman 
A MOST editing Vice nomination, and a best picture contender support nom somewhere (like Three Billboards last year), maybe to Blakkklansman, could be either The Favourite or Bohemian Rhapsody as well.

Makeup and Hairstyling:
  1. Vice
  2. Stan and Ollie
  3. Suspiria
Typically some of the most random nominations can be found here. They love transformation to famous people in the case of Vice and Stan and Ollie, (hopefully they won't go for a bad overbite piece for Bohemian Rhapsody in that vein). I could see Suspiria making it given how extensive the work is there.

Sound Editing:
  1. First Man
  2. A Quiet Place
  3. Solo
  4. Incredibles 2
  5. Mission Impossible: Fallout
More sounds the better typically in this case, plus they tend to like action Pixar here.

Sound Mixing:
  1. First Man
  2. A Star is Born
  3. Bohemian Rhapsody
  4. A Quiet Place
  5. Mary Poppins Returns
The category for musically inclined films, and there are plenty of them to go around.

Score:
  1. First Man
  2. Mary Poppins Returns
  3. Isle of Dogs
  4. If Beale Street Could Talk
  5. Black Panther
Given Hurwitz's random snub at BAFTA, I could see any one of these five missing out as well. 

Visual Effects:
  1. First Man
  2. Solo: A Star Wars Story
  3. Avengers: Infinity War
  4. Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom
  5. Solo: A Star Wars Story
Support for the film is the only way the extremely dodgy effects found in Black Panther, will make it. Solo, Jurassic World, and Ready Player One, are beloved by few, but they definitely have a lot of effects to go around, which is all that is needed as evidenced by Kong's nomination last year.

Song:
  1. "Shallow" - A Star is Born
  2. "Trip a Little Light Fantastic" - Mary Poppins Returns
  3. "All the Stars" - Black Panther
  4. "I'll Fight" - RGB
  5. "When a Cowboy Trades his Spurs for Wing" - The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
Anything past the first three is going to be random, so might as well indulge in some wishful thinking with my #5.

Documentary Feature:
  1. Won't You Be My Neighbor 
  2. RGB
  3. Three Identical Strangers
  4. Free Solo
  5. The Silence of Others
Honestly just pick five, as even "locks" miss out frequently in this category.
  1. Roma
  2. Cold War
  3. Burning
  4. Shoplifters
  5. The Guilty
Like Doc, this category is extremely squirrely so any way is fine, though Roma and Cold War are probably safe. Again I'll indulge in some wishful thinking with my #5, but hey maybe it's run time alone will help endear itself to voters off the shortlist. 

168 comments:

RatedRStar said...

Haha I am glad you did this, I am certain I asked for this on previous years as lol, got there in the end.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: If you're watching it tonight, thoughts on Boy Erased and ratings/thoughts on the cast.

RatedRStar said...

I can see a dark horse somewhere, I just can, with Green Book in the controversy pit at the moment, I am very curious as to where Viggo Mortensen places since some sites have him as a surprise snub. Rockwell getting in over Chalamet or Eliott seems quite likely now.

I had a bizarre nightmare that Richard E.Grant or Adam Driver could be a huge snub for some reason, dont know why though, is Richards film losing momentum?

Anonymous said...

If there is a huge surprise similar to Shannon in Nocturnal Animals, I see it being someone like Steve Carell for Vice, someone who looks like he could sneak in.

RatedRStar said...

Surprise snub/nominee where are you????

Bryan L said...

Understandable haha To be fair though, I don't think that comments section would've gotten as big as it did if the Golden Globes hadn't awarded Best Drama to Bohemian Rhapsody, since we were all quite vocal about it.

Louis Morgan said...

RatedRStar:

I doubt Grant will be snubbed, his film has performed to what has become its expectation, (McCarthy, Grant, Screenplay), so it seems like that should continue. I also do think it has an outside chance to over perform in with a Picture and potentially a Heller nom (though sadly there's been no strong push for her).

Anonymous said...

Louis: your top 20 naomi watts acting moments

Anonymous said...

Louis what are your thoughts on this boy's life. And your rating and thoughts on the cast

Robert MacFarlane said...

My NGNG prediction: Spider-Verse gets in Picture.

Calvin Law said...

My NGNG is Michelle Yeoh getting in for Crazy Rich Asians.

Emi Grant said...

NGNG: Ryan Gosling is getting in, damn it.

Matt Mustin said...

NGNG: Roma wins Best Picture.

Bryan L said...

NGNG: Barry Jenkins gets in for Director.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Garry Marshall and Barry Levinson as filmmakers?

Charles H said...

NGNG: Burning wins foreign language film

Michael McCarthy said...

NGNG: The ceremony will be hosted by Deadpool.

Razor said...

NGNG: Holmes & Watson wins Best Adapted Sceenplay.

RatedRStar said...

It would be so cool to have Michelle Yeoh as an Oscar nominee, I always think she and Zhang Ziyi should have been Oscar nominated for CTHD.

Calvin Law said...

Yeoh would have been far more deserving than Roberts, Allen, and Binoche, and dare I say it, even Burstyn. And Zhang would've blown that competition out of the water.

Anonymous said...

Louis: If you've seen Ready Player One, your thoughts on it and ratings & thoughts on the cast.

RatedRStar said...

Zhang Ziyi did recieve SAG, Golden Globe and Bafta nominations for Memoirs of a Geisha, so it was not totally out of the question that both could have got Oscar love at some point.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: have you seen Crazy Rich Asians yet.

Bryan L said...

Calvin: I have. It's...not bad honestly. I didn't have trouble getting through it.

Wu-4
Golding-4
Awkwafina-3.5
Yeoh-4.5
Chan-3.5
Santos-3
Jeong-3

Everyone else is fine.

Calvin Law said...

I definitely liked it the most out of everyone on here, I’ll admit it’s nothing amazing but it’s stayed very well with me.

My ratings would be:

Wu - 4
Golding - 3.5
Awkwafina - 3
Yeoh - 4.5
Chan - 3
Santos - 3
Jeong - 2.5
Yang - 3.5
Mizuno - 2.5
Pang - 2.5

But yeah pretty much every performance is more than fine.

Calvin Law said...

Also they’re re-making Hunchback, with Josh Gad as Quasimodo. Honestly...I could see that.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: It's great to see that they actually give a shit about it since along with The Black Cauldron, it's a film they've distanced themselves from even at Disney theme parks.

Luke Higham said...

Hopefully, they'll hire Philip Quast as Frollo or The Archdeacon.

RatedRStar said...

I did like Crazy Rich Asians well enough I guess, my biggest worry going in would be that Henry Goldings character would just be charming and nothing else, just a generic male romantic.

Bryan L said...

Calvin: I also liked how Yeoh didn't play her part as a caricature, when it would've been very easy to do so.

Louis: Who would you have cast instead of Damon in The Departed? Ewan McGregor comes to mind as an alternate, since I think the actors that play the two leads must be contemporaries themselves.

Or do you think he could've given a better performance?

Calvin Law said...

Edward Norton would’ve been my choice.

Bryan and RatedRStar: Honestly Golding’s character kinda was that...but I didn’t mind. It was nice to see an Asian version of that trope in a rom com, being afforded that luxury of a role which is just a commonplace for white actors. Also, the Asian female characters weren’t fetishised which was nice. As a film it’s very slight, but I think I speak for many when I say that it means a lot that we got representation in such a format. And there is some depth, as Bryan mentioned in Yeoh’s performance that I didn’t even pick up first time around.

RatedRStar said...

It wouldn't be a complete shock to me if Yeoh was nominated, I would say the role could be considered Oscary in a way.

Augusto BSF said...

Just saw Shoplifters, and, wow, what an ensemble. One of the best of the year. Alright, that's no surprise coming from Koreeda. And if anyone knows any moviemaker that directs children better than him, please tell me.

Mitchell Murray said...

Saw "Boy Erased" today, which I found to be an effective film about a very distressing topic. Joel Edgerton offers another strong directorial effort, here, as he retains the tension of his 2015 feature, but also skillfully navigates the nuances of the real life story. He never crosses that line so as to show any person as an exaggeration or stereotype; Instead, Edgerton successfully conveys the motivations of the people trying to convert Eamons, while staying focused on the experiences he went through, which again adds to the realism of the whole project.

My only slight nit pick is the fact that Russell Crowe and Nicole Kidman speak with southern accents, while Lucas Hedges uses his natural North Eastern voice. This was a little distracting for me at the start, though I suppose it would've been equally distracting had Crowe and Kidman followed in Hedges' footsteps, and spoke in their native Kiwi and Australian accents, respectively. That's a minor complaint, though, since I found the overall movie quite compelling. I liked the song "Revelation" as well, and felt it worked for how they used it at the end.

Crowe - 4/4.5 (A very good late career performance that serves as the strong element in the film, though its honestly nice to see Crowe in this dramatic form to begin with. Crowe is always believable in his interpretation of Eamons' father, and refrains from simplifying the guy's actions at any point. Crowe captures the man's conflicting beliefs (IE his love for his son and the doctrines he follows) very well by combining them in his scenes, as opposed to shutting one of them off at any given time. As as result, the moments he does share with Hedges are among the best in the whole picture, particularly his final conversation which is terrifically handled by Crowe. He completely realizes the goals of his role thanks to his quality performance, and after finally viewing the film, I'm rather disappointed that his work hasn't been cited all that much.)

Kidman - 4 (Kidman should really think about continuing these maternal roles, honestly, as she leaves a notable impression in a somewhat underdeveloped part. Though this portrayal doesn't quite reach the heights of her "Lion" performance, she still reflects the needed warmth and concern even during the smallest of reactions. Kidman offers the required poignancy for every interaction she has with Hedges, and when called upon to do more, she more than meets the challenge.)

Edgerton - 3.5 (Edgerton technically follows the same path of his first self directed performance from "The Gift", in that he actually restricts his own contribution in favor of his leading performers. When he is on screen, however, Edgerton does convince as a misguided "teacher" - if you can even call him that - by displaying the right sort of command and presence, but also displaying Sykes at his most callous and ignorant.)

Everyone else is fine, but a film like this genuinely lives or dies on the strength of its focal performances.

Emi Grant said...

Louis: Thoughts on High Life's trailer?

Calvin Law said...

Oh yeah, I got around to The Other Side of the Wind. Wasn’t a fan, I have to say, but I’ll be interested enough in the reviews.

Calvin Law said...

Augusto: it really is a great ensemble. I have issues with the film but none whatsoever with the acting.

Bryan L said...

Calvin: That one didn't really do it for me either honestly.

Also saw Boy Erased. I'm in agreement with everyones' thoughts.

Hedges-4.5
Crowe-4.5
Kidman-4
Edgerton-4

Everyone else is good.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Louis: Thoughts on this? https://youtu.be/aH4kiI4oTng

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the production design of King Kong 1933 and Casablanca.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I saw If Beale Street Could Talk and Bohemian Rhapsody. The former is my second favorite of the year. The latter is my second worst of the year.

Emi Grant said...

Robert: Thoughts on Malek?

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Eh I instead didn't do myself a favor, and watched Suspiria. Luca Guadagnino either needs a new editor, or someone to tell him that it's okay to trim parts of his vision. Once again his work is laborious in terms of its pacing, and heavy handed in its execution. Now heavy handedness in execution can honestly work in the horror genre, and replicating Argento it makes sense to do so. Nonetheless you also have to make it captivating, which despite some remarkable technical elements including the score, the makeup, and the choreography, I found it frankly most often dull more than anything. This is even with throwing everything into a pot in terms of the thematic elements both in the text and subtext of the film. It sadly doesn't makes these elements cohere, nor does it realize them in any effective fashion either. Much of the film sadly feels like but an exercise, and rather a misguided one.

Johnson - 2.5(Sadly she doesn't have a character to work with and is just kind of there. Things that should happen with her character are meaningless since we never get to know her other than that she is the "main girl". Nothing happens there though, and Johnson cannot elevate it.)

Swinton - 3.5(I actually thought her purely Swinton work was the least impressive here, as it just felt excessively standard from her here. There just wasn't anything she brought to the chilly teacher that we haven't seen her do far better many other places. Her work though as the elderly man though is almost remarkable. Sadly her vocal performance is not at all convincing. Her physical work though is rather impressive, and as is her emotional work within the part. This is especially notable as she really does bring the emotion through the makeup quite remarkably to the point I wish that story actually was realized past seeming to be a random framing device to give the story any structure. Her last bit is purely grotesque but as is the point I suppose.)

Goth - 4(I actually found her work managed to elevate her moments to an extent as she was rather haunting purely through her moments of interaction and reaction to the horror elements. She delivered an actual emotional quality attached to those moments that was far more than just surface horror. Although I don't think she had enough to do, what she did do with what she had was impressive.)

I didn't feel anyone else was of note one way or another, and think they rather wasted Jessica Harper.

Electra Glide in Blue is an ambitious yet in the end rather clunky film about the corruption of police through the character study of one short patrolman. It is definitely a film that could have only existed in the 70's and does hold a definite interest for that. It doesn't come together sadly as a dramatic narrative nor a character piece. I didn't mind watching the film though.

Blake - 4.5(A strong turn by him though as he delivers this unique presence once again through a rather dynamic way with scenes. He is especially fascinating how he sort of owns his height to the point that it creates this definite charisma in the performance, and he takes that further here by almost wielding it as this power within the character. He commands his moments so effectively, and creates such fascinating little character even when the writing is a bit flimsy. This is as the film also tries to intertwine this
with going up in the ranks through working with a corrupt detective. In these scenes though Blake finds a complexity in the character in his moments of reacting, even if the story line is quite weak. Blake though works this effectively into a surprisingly moving portrayal of the cop learning to do the right thing. Sadly the film rushes this but Blake actually delivers on his end to give a consistently captivating performance in an underwhelming film.)

Anonymous:

Haven't seen it.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Well onto Marshall who is a populist filmmaker through and through. More than anything though he works as someone who wants to make a mainstream feel good picture. This intention sadly is often misguided when it is ill-fitting to the material. This in the examples of Pretty Woman and Frankie and Johnny. In both examples he's dealing with more complex ideas yet wishes to churn them towards fluff. The potential depth is darkness so he avoids it or tries to handle it in a way that is more than a little awkward. His best film is the Flamingo Kid where he can sort of funnel the darkness through single villain, which seems to help with his intention to really a make straight forward story. His methods are basic, his directing workmanlike to be sure, though he did have enough of a knack to hit the public's adoration I suppose. Although I'll say his best work to me, was in the acting capacity, for his hilarious one scene work in Lost in America.

Anonymous:

I suppose I ought to watch it, since I might as well be a Spielberg completest.

Calvin:

Finally, in regards to Hunchback, the one remake I want to see. Let's get Lin Manuel Miranda as Clopin, asap.

Need to get to it.

Bryan:

Yes in regards to McGregor, however I do think doing an American accent typically feels like a struggle for him, and kind of reduces his charisma.

I'd go with Calvin's choice.

Emi:

Visually rather stunning, quite the mind trip alone from the trailer. Very much seems to evoke pre-Star Wars sci-fi, a la something like Silent Running, or even THX 1138, though with modern aesthetic. And on that point Pattinson looks promising in another "70's leading man" type of role. Have no idea what to exactly take from it story wise, but I'm intrigued to say the least.

Robert:

Honestly...looks like my kind of musical.

Anonymous:

Iconic doesn't begin to describe King Kong's work given there are several unforgettable sets that are all part of the greatness that is that film's technical design for the time. The production design of course being an essential element of the visual effects at every point through its particularly memorable creation of the Empire State Building's top, the jungles of Kong, even the Broadway stage, and of course the gates themselves that are sort one of the great sets of cinema (destroyed quite memorably in front of our eyes in Gone with the Wind).

Casablanca's an interesting case in that certain constraints probably helped in that the film has one of the best airfield scenes for the time, by doing it in such a minimalist fashion involving the darkness and fog. Although it's barely a set it is a great piece of production design. Now all the sort of incidental set work and design is good an all, but really the king of it is Rick's bar. That set is one of, to use the word again properly, an iconic set of cinema. The funny thing is it is all the little touches that make it so memorable, as a little thing such as the exact placement of the piano just someone makes it some place unforgettable. It is subtly dynamic work, and just pristine that evokes an unquestionable, conditioned, Hollywood glamor that few other films could come close to even for that time.

Bryan L said...

Louis: Do you see Montgomery Clift being a good fit for these 2010s film roles?

Tanner Howard
Trooper Phillip Krauss
Jeff Gillooly

And when I previously asked about Brando as Tanner Howard, you mentioned that he never really played that type of supporting role. Are there any such roles that you think he could've been great for in his lifetime?

Alex Marqués said...

Has anyone seen Ethan Hawke's Blaze? I've read great things about the lead actor's performance.

Emi Grant said...

Alex: I might watch it this weekend

Giuseppe Fadda said...

I’m sad you didn’t like Suspiria, but I’m glad you at least liked the score, the choreography and especially Mia Goth’s performance. I have to disagree with you on Johnson’s performance though.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Thoughts on the editing and sound design of Alien and Apocalypse Now.

Bryan L said...

Hmmm I honestly didn't like either of Guadagninos films that I've seen (his last 2), so I'm not sure that I'll get around to Suspiria.

Giuseppe Fadda said...

I think Call Me By Your Name is a masterpiece. As for Suspiria, I completely get why someone would not care for it but I personally loved it. I actually though it was even better than Argento’s version and far more challenging intellectually.

RatedRStar said...

I do like the original Suspiria but I dont understand why people hold that as the masterpiece rather than Deep Red which I have said many times I think is easily his best film.

Giuseppe Fadda said...

I love both Suspiria and Deep Red and think they’re both masterpieces, but I wholly agree that Deep Red doesn’t get nearly as much as acclaimed as it should.

Also, I have to say I actually don’t love Dario Argento. I loved the two aforementioned movies, but the rest I’ve seen from him range from fine to pretty terrible (at least in my opinion).

Calvin Law said...

I liked CMBYN but having a hard time mustering up motivation for Suspiria. Hated A Bigger Splash though.

Saw Vice. What a waste of a cinema ticket, should’ve seen Mary Queen of Scots instead. I think I’d concur with most on here apart from Bale who I honestly found a bit underwhelming. Good SNL impression but nothing more, and I felt the best performance in the film was easily Sam Rockwell since he was almost entirely just going for the ‘Bush is a numpty’ angle. I’m not going to get into McKay now, I don’t wanna blow a fuse.

Bale - 3/3.5
Adams - 2.5 (not bad but I can’t tell you a single thing I found memorable about her performance)
Carell - 2 (could go lower)
Rockwell - 3.5
Plemons - 1.5 (could go lower)
Whigham- 1
Pill - 3 (honestly one of the better parts of the film and actually I thought those scenes though tonally weird brought the best out of Bale too)
Perry - 3 (avoids most of the worst elements of the film, not that the scenes he’s in are any good but they’re not really terrible)

Anonymous said...

Louis: And also thoughts on the direction and cinematography of High Noon.

Bryan L said...

Calvin: I can see your reasoning for Adams, and she hasn't really stayed with me honestly, apart from her first scene.

I'd go with a 3.5 for Bale too now that I've thought it over, since I will give him that final speech of his. And it is interesting that this kind of like his performance in American Hustle, since he also at least tries to hold the movie together.

Calvin Law said...

Bryan: MUCH preferred him in American Hustle. But yeah I do think he does his best.

Giuseppe Fadda said...

I thoroughly disliked Vice but I’d still give Bale a 4. I thought he did the best he could do with the paper-thin writing of his character. Of the supporting cast it’s actually Pill who left the biggest impact on me. Adams was okay but the nomination would be a bit much. Rockwell is fine in a one part. Carell is rather obnoxious in most of his performance, but his final scene is actually quite good.

As a whole, the performances were not really an issue for me (except for Whigham and Plemons, though the latter’s role was already ill-conceived). I just found the direction, the editing and the screenplay to be so unsuffearable that I couldn’t really care for them.

Emi Grant said...

I think I'm going to be alone in giving Bale a solid 4.5 then...

Charles H said...

Vice is a film that gets worse the more you think about it. I would give Bale a 3 now, and Rockwell a 3.5.

RatedRStar said...

There is actually a big possibility that this year could have the worst 4 winners for acting possibly ever if you combine them together, Bale, Adams, Close and Ali.

RatedRStar said...

I did like Bale enough but I am starting to agree that Rockwell in his short time actually made more of an impression.

RatedRStar said...

There is a tiny part of me that wants Adams and Close to finally win but its so underwhelming, career award in capital letters lol.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

RatedRStar: I know, I mean, if I had my way with the winners from the probable nominees:

Actor: Cooper (Although Malek would be deserving too)
Actress: Colman
Supporting Actor: Grant
Supporting Actress: Weisz or Stone

Luke Higham said...

Tahmeed: I don't mind 4.5s winning, so mine would be.
Actor: Cooper or Malek
Actress: Anyone but Close (McCarthy, Colman, Gaga and Blunt)
Supporting Actor: Grant, Elliott then Driver
Supporting Actress: Anyone but Adams (Stone, Weisz, Foy and King)

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thoughts on any recommendations or 2018 releases with ratings & thoughts on the casts.

Bryan L said...

I still think Grant is going to win.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Well rounding it out with Barry Levison who'd I'd say is easily the best of those three directors, at least when glancing at his early career, his later work though is a bit less consistent to say the least. If you merely take his earliest work Levinson's career is that of a rather dynamic filmmaker with his late-term period coming of age/group of friends film, in Diner, a completely different film in the mythical The Natural (I have problems with that film, but Levinson's direction is not one of them), then an underrated adventure film in Young Sherlock Holmes, an interesting, if imperfect, comic dual character study in Tin Men, a fairly effective war comedy in Good Morning Vietnam, then his best picture winner in Rain Man, which didn't need to win best picture but is a fine road movie on its own terms. That run isn't of a great filmmaker, but it is of a good one with a definite ability to vary his talents to different genres, and tonal styles. There are hiccups in there, GM,V, for example struggles in its darker elements a bit, but the work is consistent. His work from the 90's on though just became a bit of scattershot nonsense that often struggled with tone, the creation of a cohesive vision, or even there was enough of a vision, it just wasn't that good of a film. I don't hate, or even dislike all of his films that came afterwards, You Don't Know Jack's good for example (then again The Wizard of Lies was rather dull), but his own work lacked anything truly remarkable. His initially notable start just didn't realize itself into anything eventually. He's not a hack mind you, but he became someone who's own work won't get into the way of a good script, but also doesn't add much to it.

Anonymous:

The perfection of Apocalypse Now's editing, in its original theatrical cut, is an example of why there is a point where the filmmaker needs to let their project go and exist as it does. In that the original cut essentially reigned in the madness that inflicted Coppola and realized it into a masterpiece. The film is technically ripe with errors within the film, technical errors, that don't matter when the film works as a dramatic piece, and also are more likely to occur with an insane production as was the case with Apocalypse Now. The greatness of the editing is both in terms of the grand scale, and the small scale. In the grand scale they took the miles of film shot by Coppola, and found not only a cohesive but a compelling narrative with a dramatic thrust, and removed all that fatty nonsense about French Plantations that got in the way of the film's momentum. The same is true for each and every individual sequence that was left in. This being a film where the editing is so essential, whether it is realizing the onslaught of a helicopter attack, the delusions of a drunk Willard, or even the primeval moment in the end. Each sequence and style of editing per each sequence is attuned to those moments, and amplify their impact within the story. It is a film that edits with purpose, not with pride, allowing a moment of two characters simply to talk, this being amidst other moments of overlaying cutaways to say Willard's narration. The editing of every scene matches it yet coheres to create the captivating journey that is the film.

Louis Morgan said...

Alien's editing on the other hand is quite a bit different, rather than funneling madness, it is the realization of a far more concise vision. This though still is narrowing down Scott's long takes, and the best choice from those. This type of editing is particularly notable in fact given there is the precise moment of when to cut, to create the atmospheric mood of the setting without becoming bored. Alien is especially brilliant example of this type of editing where the pacing feels just right, the takes are long, but just right to ease you into the space. This is all the more remarkable in this instance is how important the sequences going on in terms of creating the horror of a moment, leading up to it, and bringing out the monster in just the right time. Alien executes this flawlessly and is essentially the standard to set this type of horror.

Both film's sound design is an essential element of each. Alien though it is perhaps paramount to the film in being part of the horror, and creating to life the ship. Take any sequence from the film the sound is terrifying in its lurid detail as it is as careful in creating sort of the grime of the ship as it is in creating the, well Alien noises of the Alien. Those of course are the focus and brilliant bit of sound editing, but the overall design of it all is extraordinary. It plays with both silence, and essentially normalcy to make every moment that much more vivid, therefore making the horror of the film much the same. Of course Apocalypse Now the same year is also an outstanding feat in that unique art. Now every sound sounds "real" so to speak but so much more. Take the Ride of the Valkyries which is such a magnificent mixing of the score, the sounds of the helicopter, and every moment of interaction between the soldiers. Of course it is about the measurement between the amplification of the large, as that sequence is at an epic scale, and also giving that detail to quieter moments. The most notable perhaps being the Do Lung Bridge sequence, which has bullets, explosions, yet is so quiet in its design, that helps to make it such a haunting scene of lost souls.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Although I don't love High Noon due to its heavy handed, repetitive and oddly sloppy at times screenplay, High Noon's direction is quite often magnificent. Fred Zinnemann offers a very different perspective on the western genre, as he made his initial name for more intense character dramas, and that can be seen through the way he approaches the film. Zinnemann shirks an overt romanticism rather find a certain grit, for the time, and quietly isolates his western hero. His work, more so than the script, creates the tension in and around Will's fateful journey to 12oclock. Although he isn't able to make the film wholly overcome its pitfalls involving the script, it offers a unique perspective into the genre.

The cinematography by Floyd Crosby has a similar attention in mind, and actually hides its hands rather brilliant. In that it is competently though quietly shot in a way in its initial scenes, and rather intimate for a western. This is until the the titular moment where it broadens its scope so effectively that has a magnificent effect. In that it finally gives a greater view of the scene but now with only the single man on screen creating a grater isolation even when broadening the perspective.

Luke:

Boy Erased I felt was a good, though not great film, mainly in how effectively it avoided the wrong avenues that could've been taken with the story. It would have been very easy to fall into an over the top and overt melodrama. Edgerton though I found finds the right restraint much of the time to realize the emotion of each situation powerfully, and even lets some of the most horrifying sequences play out so quietly, yet so effectively in that approach. Now I don't think the film quite achieves greatness, I think partially due to the narrow narrative offered probably by the memoir, for example it would've been interesting to find out more about Edgerton's Sykes than we do. It's handling of the structure also isn't quite perfect in terms of the flashbacks, however it definitely works in overarching sense to create a moving film.

I'll save Crowe and Hedges.

Kidman - 4(Her performance is nearly a retread of what she did in Lion except with a southern accent. That being said, it is a good performance even in that retread. She manages to not overdo that accent, and also manages to thrive in just giving an overall naturalistic turn portraying a loving mother. I like how unassuming yet effective much of her work is in showing the support of the mother, even as she is just going along with support his mistreating, making her sort of outburst moment absolutely earned and certainly quite powerful in the moment.)

Edgerton - 3.5(This is certainly a good performance as I like that Edgerton tempers his work to show the cruelty in the way he delivers his lines, of extreme mental abuse, with this sort of grand standing as though he is rescuing them with his words. There is a certain desperation he brings with these moments, and the brief moments we see him aside of his duties that are quite effective. Again given where the character ends up in the post script I wouldn't have minded some expansion though Edgerton does well with what he gives himself to do. And I guess one can say with this and The Gift, he's certainly generous in that regard.)

Alwyn - 3.5(Pretty effective in just a few minutes of screen time creating a real horrifying extreme without falling into any ridiculous stereotype.)

Dolan, Sear, LaTourette - 3(All effective in different ways of showing the different states of dealing with their horrible situations.)

Flea - 3(Pretty terrifying in his few minutes of screentime as he not only is convincing of the brutality of the character, but also this strange emotionalism within it.)

Louis Morgan said...

A Midnight Clear I found to be a pretty interesting film. It reminded me a lot of Sam Fuller's war films that offer this very unique look at the infantry. It is all about the characters and sort of the small scale stories found within the units. I like even with some of the nick names of the characters, everyone feels like actual people in its haunting little tale of a little skirmish.

Hawke - 3.5(Typical early Hawke, which means definitely good even if not excessively remarkable. This is another one of his turns of sort of the observant lead which he certainly handles well offering more than just reactions. He conveys the right emotion within it adding well to the more emotional situations.)

Berg - 3.5(Berg as an actor seems to be going for a bit of early Mickey Rourke type of thing (though perhaps that came at the wrong time for his acting career given where Rourke's went), which is fine I suppose, and he actually does pull it off well enough here.)

Dillon - 3.5(Wanted more of him though I think he did well in portraying sort of the battle hardened ptsd of sorts where the character goes.)

Whaley - 3.5(One of the few times he doesn't play a creep or a weasel I think. He's pretty good actually at doing the exact opposite finding a real honesty in the sort of positive heart that defines his character. He finds though the right sort of tragedy in the desperation of trying to be "good" where sort of evil is required to exist.)

Sinise - 4(Essentially the opposite of Whaley's work as a man who has essentially given himself up to his situation. I liked how Sinise essentially played the part as a man who is literally painfully insane from his war experience, something we see from him right away in the film, but he effectively keeps it as this constant state of anxiety and fear that is the man.)

Alex Marqués said...

I don't know your criteria for a 4.5, guys, but I don't see why Malek is so much better than, say, Jamie Foxx in Ray. It's the same kind of performance, and I think Malek's lip syncing is way more distracting. Unless you want to think he's better because you like him more as an actor.

Calvin Law said...

Alex: I liked Foxx in Ray, I’d give him a 4 and like him just the same as Malek in general. I will say that Foxx probably has the more spot on impersonation of Ray Charles’ mannerisms in general and Malek did better with the stage persona. And I would say Mercury had a bit more depth in his portrayal than Foxx.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Malek and Bale are essentially on the same level for me: Technically accomplished performances underserved by scripts disinterested in building characterizations. They’d both be probably 3.5 from me.

Calvin Law said...

And I agree with mostly everything on Boy Erased except I definitely found it great, if not masterful due to a few nitpicks. I want to ask you what you thought of ‘Revelation’ but might wait just in case it gets nominated at the Oscars. So glad you’re saving Crowe and Hedges.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Do you have time at all to watch The Prince Of Egypt.

Louis Morgan said...

Alex:

This has nothing to do with Malek, but my problem isn't what Foxx does per se Marion Cotillard lip syncs as Edith Piaf and that's a brilliant performance, but the trick William Potter is making it seem natural and to create a compelling character that goes beyond the mannerisms. For me there's nothing to Foxx's work other than his surface mannerisms that feel excessively artificial, because he doesn't take the role of Ray Charles beyond them, in my view.

Anonymous:

I'll be able to watch it soon.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: After the 2018 reviews, will you be moving on to 2013 or the animated lineup. I personally would like the latter to come much sooner than later.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the scene from King Kong 1933 where Kong fights that snake-like creature in his lair. It's something that to this day, some special effects artists wonder: "How the heck did they do that?"

RatedRStar said...

My problem with Foxx in Ray is those goddamn mouth movements, its so awkward to see, at least Malek I felt was far more natural, not to mention, Mercury was a flamoyant performer, so it makes sense for Malek to be more overt, Ray Charles is not over the top at all lol, so seeing Jamie Foxx do those wahhh wahh mouth movements was just so bad lol.

RatedRStar said...

2004 was a pretty terrible year for the Oscars actually, Foxx, Swank, Freeman and Blanchett (she is good) is a pretty underwhelming winners lineup.

Alex Marqués said...

You really thought the scene where he sings in front of the band for the first time didn't feel forced? Can't say I agree... and Foxx was way more believable in his music scenes than Malek in the live AID scene IMO, but anyway, I don't think Foxx is THAT bad nor that Malek is THAT great, both are solid impersonations (in the latter's case, with distracting giant fake teeth included).

Alex Marqués said...

That being said, considering he had to work with Singer, I guess it was pretty hard for Malek and I'm glad he's getting acclaim.

Calvin Law said...

Alex: to each his own I suppose. Best Actor this year is pretty boring IMO (would have much rather had Gosling, Hedges, Hawke contending instead) but I can support Malek and Cooper out of the definite nominees.

Calvin Law said...

RatedRStar: Yeah, 2004 wasn’t great. Ideal lineup would’ve probably been Cheadle, Winslet (though I still need to see Moreno), Owen, and Madsen.

Alex Marqués said...

Yeah, I think Hawke is way stronger than the others (from the ones I've seen)

Charles H said...

I think the line up for lead actor this year is weak. If Mortenson, Ali, Chalamet, or Bale win Oscars it will not age well for them.

RatedRStar said...

One thing that might cheer some people up, most of the Oscar predictors........are predicting that Ethan Hawke will be nominated over Washington.

RatedRStar said...

There is a dark horse somewhere...I just know it, this season has been too bizarre.

RatedRStar said...

Viggo Mortensen is still the one keeps cropping up in terms of who could get snubbed, is it possible that Washington and Hawke get in like in 2011 with Oldman and Bichir sneaking in?

Matt Mustin said...

I saw a Star Is Born again (which absolutely holds up on a second viewing, by the way). Cooper is very, very safe as my Best Actor win, and I'm gonna bump Gaga up to a 5 as well. Honestly, that's the rating I should've given her from the beginning, based just on "Shallow" and that entire final sequence alone.

Bryan L said...

Matt: I gotta say, A Star is Born is staying with me better than I thought it would. It might make my Top 10 for the year when all is said and done.

Anonymous said...

Honestly, I just hope they stop remaking A Star is Born. They're not bad films (with the exception of the 1976 one), but to me it's like: "Do we really need another one of those films? Wasn't three films or two films enough?"

Matt Mustin said...

Anonymous: They kinda comment on that in the dialogue itself.

Matt Mustin said...

Green Book won the PGA, but before people freak out, I'd like to point out that The Big Short and La La Land also won in their respective years, so it's not a done deal yet.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Fuck it, I’m bowing out for the season. Wake me when Episode IX comes out.

Bryan L said...

I guess all the precursors decided to collectively give A Star is Born the finger.

Charles H said...

This does swing things Green Book's way, once again

RatedRStar said...

Ignore that comment on Mortensen, I think he is definately getting nominated now lol, Kingdom Hearts 3 soon yayy and even Resident Evil 2 coming soon lol so there is that for me to also be excited about if Oscar doesnt go right this year.

RatedRStar said...

One thing that I would like to in the Oscar nominations is a nice balance in terms of nominations, like films like Cold War, Ballad of Buster Struggs, Burning, If Beale Street Could Talk and Boy Erased to get at least one nomination from something like what Silence did in 2016.

At least then we could go "well a lot of good films were recognised at the Oscars rather than them being completely shut out"

Louis Morgan said...

In regards to the PGA win, I think I'm going to be using this clip more than I would like this season:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aRq1Ksh-32g

In terms of predictions though, it is worth noting that PGA voting ended before the Globes Win, and before a few of the controversies emerged around some of the filmmakers. So it may not be a done deal...I mean hopefully not.

In terms of A Star is Born, it is worth noting that every Star is Born has sort of been the bridesmaid every time. As despite a collective 17 nominations between the three previous versions, they have one only a total of two competitive Oscars (1976-Song, 1937-Story) and an honorary color cinematography award (1937). 2018 ought to add more to that nominations total, but it quite easily could only add one more win to the "grand" total.

Anonymous:

Without a doubt a very impressive scene particularly in terms of the intertwining of the two monsters that doesn't feel like they are just being pushed together. The moment where Kong is choking is especially great as conducts far more reality to the creature than you'd expect and is remarkable.

Robert:

Understandable reaction.

Anonymous said...

Louis: So I've read some interesting facts about the 1968 Planet of the Apes film:

J. Lee Thompson was the original director;
Brando, McQueen, Lancaster, Peck, Newman and Connery were all considered for the main lead;
Ingrid Bergman turned down the role of Zira, but later regretted not doing the part;
Edward G. Robinson originally played Dr. Zaius;

Thoughts on these facts?

Anonymous said...

Thoughts on any recommendations/2018 releases with ratings & thoughts on the casts.

Calvin Law said...

London Critics Awards (honestly the Brits seem to have the right idea this year).

Film of the Year: “Roma”

Foreign Language Film of the Year: “Cold War”

Documentary of the Year: “Faces Places”

British/Irish Film of the Year: “The Favourite”

Director of the Year: Alfonso Cuarón, “Roma”

Screenwriter of the Year: Deborah Davis and Tony McNamara, “The Favourite”

Actress of the Year: Olivia Colman, “The Favourite”

Actor of the Year: Ethan Hawke, “First Reformed”

Supporting Actress of the Year: Rachel Weisz, “The Favourite”

Supporting Actor of the Year: Richard E. Grant, “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”

British/Irish Actress of the Year: Jessie Buckley, “Beast”

British/Irish Actor of the Year: Rupert Everett, “The Happy Prince”

Young British/Irish Performer of the Year: Molly Wright, “Apostasy”

Breakthrough British/Irish Filmmaker of the Year: Michael Pearce, “Beast”

Technical Achievement of the Year: Lukasz Zal (cinematography), “Cold War”

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Happy to be a Brit today.

Luke Higham said...

I'm amazed with the amount of critical support Hawke's been getting, that to not even get a nomination is absolute bullshit.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Heston, despite some iconic line readings, is not at his best in the film overall. I however don't think any of the alternates would've worked too well beyond McQueen and especially that period Connery. That's interesting in regards to Bergman, however I wouldn't want to take away one of Kim Hunter's few notable non-streetcar roles from her. Robinson could've played Zaius in his sleep, however Evans's performance is nothing to sniff at.

Anonymous:

Crazy Rich Asians, hmmm. You know I can like fluff, it's occasionally delicious marshmallow goo, but man it is easy to drown in it. I'm all for a Hollywood production led by Asian actors finding recognition, and being supported general, but let's face it this film isn't The Last Emperor. I hope the success of this film will help to encourage moron executives to be less stupid when it comes to green lighting films, but I don't think it needs recognition as one of the best films of the year. Because it just is not that, and nor was "I hate" Love Actually one of the best films that year. Now I liked this film more than that overdose of sour molasses mind you, but it is very much in the same vein. Now keep I mind I think there is such thing as a great romantic comedy, though largely a lost art this day, and this film's not it. Having said that I don't think it's bad, well most of it. The adultery subplot felt like "scenes deleted" rather than a natural expansion, and some of the performances where dialed a little too far even for the tone of the film. It's an above average version of the average modern rom com, which is still a far cry from say a Billy Wilder rom com. But hey either way, I do hope good things come from this film's success. Like maybe the return of John Lone....please?

Wu - 4(Her performance though I will say helped to elevate the film beyond its trappings. Her work gives a real honesty to the material that goes beyond sort of the big strokes set around the character. She manages to create genuine emotional moments within her work, while also fulfilling the needs of being just the sort charming romantic lead she's suppose to be.)

Golding - 3(There's not much to his character other than sweet hunk, but with that in mind I think it would've been very easy to be very bad in this role. Golding though is a rather charming dude, and carries his part nicely.)

Yeoh - 4(I rather like Yeoh as an actress so I wish there was a little more meat to this role other than just the disapproving mother, who has a secret depth. Something we've obviously seen before, however Yeoh manages to pull it off nicely with her performance as she manages to hit the colder remarks without seeming over the top, yet still with enough naturalism to be more convincing in creating any sense of warmth in the role.)

Awkwafina - 3.5(The required wacky friend role, which the gold standard of is probably Philip Seymour Hoffman in Along Came Polly, this is the role where a bit of being a bit much is allowed, but one must still pull it off. I felt she did so and managed to give an amusing turn, though I think they probably should've asked her onscreen family to perhaps tone it down it down a bit.)

Lu - 3(Speaking of the Last Emperor, she's pretty good here though very limited.)

Pang & Mizuno - 2.5(I thought both were fine, but just didn't have much to do.)

Yang - 2(Eh I think I've had enough of Jian Yang for awhile. Though nothing against Yang, as I think he is more talented than the caricatures he's given to play, so I hope he gets the chance for a better role soon.)

Png & Chan - 2.5(They're not terrible however they're not quite good enough to really make their section seem more than a bit of melodrama thrown in for "substance".)

Jeong & Mun - 2(A little of them goes a VERY long way.)

Louis Morgan said...

The Prince of Egypt I have to admit was a bit of a mixed bag, now let's avoid misinterpretation of that statement as I think it went from amazing to okayish. The animation is frequently outstanding, there are fantastic sequences throughout, the final plague in particular is amazing, the score is great, and most of the songs are pretty good. Having said that I do think the general tone clashes with the sort of 90's kid's movie humor thrown in by the priests, and in many ways I was getting Hunchback of Notre Dame flashbacks in certain moments. I also feel the film almost engages in a shorthand with DeMille's film in a way, as so many moments deserve more of a moment yet are rushed through, though probably to maintain the PG rating. Moments like Moses murdering the slave driver, and his exile just feel absurdly rushed. In fact the whole film feels a touch too eager, though again its cramming an epic in just over an hour and half, so I get it, even if it doesn't entirely remove the flaw. I also did like the one really alternate approach in the Ramses/Moses dynamic, which adds something new to the story, and really realizes the best parts of the film in terms of the actual character interactions.

Kilmer - 3(His work is fine both as God, and as Moses. I don't think it is too notable though but certainly serviceable work.)

Fiennes - 4(Terrific work from him actually as he manages to capture the sort of raw intensity you'd expect from Fiennes as Ramses, yet he is particularly effective in realizing the certain vulnerabilities of the character both in terms of his attempt at a loving relationship with his brother and fear of being seen as a weak leader.)

Calvin Law said...

Louis: there’s actually a role in the books that Lone would be perfect for, Yeoh’s wife. Having said that I’d rather he return in something else. Dune, perhaps. Or I’d love to see him work with someone like the Coen Brothers, or hell if we’re talking about returns to the silver screen David Lynch. Glad you liked Yeoh and Wu though!

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your top 5 scenes of The Prince Of Egypt with thoughts. Thoughts on the songs and score.

Anonymous said...

Louis, The final plague scene is indeed brilliant. I hope you liked the opening as much as I did.

Augusto BSF said...

This year I think (and hope) that BAFTA, SAG, DGA and PGA go each one to different films: The Favourite, anything there (but fingers crossed to either Blackkklansman or Star is Born), Roma (or Klansman) and, of course, Green Book, respectively. I only see Farrelly's movie winning WGA from now on. So, oscar night, it could go anyway.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: I know you might want to re-watch First Man before saying this but how would you rank the three films of Chazelle you’ve seen? Because honestly with my re-watches and the more I think about it, First Man is not only my favourite of his films, IMO it blows Whiplash (which I do love) and La La Land (which I do like) out of the water,m.

Mitchell Murray said...

Calvin: To respond to your question, having seen "First Man" once, "Whiplash" twice and "La La Land" a few times, my ranking would be:

1) La La Land
2) First Man
3) Whiplash

I'll admit not many films within the past couple years that have given me as much joy as the Gosling/Stone vehicle. The strength of "La La Land" in terms of technique and performance overshadows what is honestly a pretty familiar narrative - which is why "First Man" could very well usurp it given a re-watch.

Calvin Law said...

Also Louis, your thoughts/ratings for the Into the Spider Verse cast.

Mitchell: I have more than a few issues with LLL but overall I do agree that the technical elements and charm of the leads do make up for it for the most part.

Charles H said...

I think the ranking is rather easy for me. 1. First Man, 2. La La Land, 3. Whiplash. As great as the latter 2 are they don't reach the emotional heights and achievements that First Man got from me. Also as a cheat i think Gosling is better in First Man then La La Land

Emi Grant said...

Personally...

1. First Man (by a very narrow margin)
2. Whiplash
3. La La Land

Bryan L said...

Calvin: I've only seen Whiplash once but alas...

1. La La Land
2. Whiplash
3. First Man

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

My Chazelle ranking would be:
1. First Man
2. La La Land
3. Whiplash

Matt Mustin said...

Chazelle ranking, having only seen First Man once.

1. La La Land (My love of this film is well-documented.)
2. Whiplash
3. First Man

I ADORE all three. The man is a giant.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Guys, what would be your favourite romantic comedies of all time? My top 5 would be:
1. La La Land
2. It Happened One Night
3. About Time (easily my #1 of 2013)
4. Groundhog Day
5. The Awful Truth

Charles H said...

1. La La Land
2. The Princess Bride
3. The Apartment
4. Groundhog Day
5. It Happened One Night

Matt Mustin said...

Tahmeed: If La La Land counts, it's my number one, although I'm not sure it does, because I've never really considered it a comedy. Aside from that though, I would say Groundhog Day and The 40-Year-Old Virgin are a couple I really enjoy.

Bryan L said...

Tahmeed: I'm afraid I'm not too well-verses in romantic comedies, but It Happened One Night would definitely be on there.

Calvin Law said...

1. The Princess Bride
2. The Apartment
3. Punch-Drunk Love
4. Say Anything
5. About Time

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

I knew I was forgetting something, The Princess Bride would be my #2.

Emi Grant said...

Would Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind count?
Because that'd be easily my favorite

Calvin Law said...

Also, forgot about The Shop Around the Corner and (technically speaking) a couple of Chaplins would be in there, though I don’t know if you’d count some of them as romcoms (maybe The Gold Rush? City Lights?)

Calvin Law said...

Emi: if that counts that’s easily my #2.

Matt Mustin said...

Emi: That would by my favourite too, but I don't think it does.

Mitchell Murray said...

Tahmeed: An interesting question because while I'm not a huge fan of the general "rom com" formula, some of my favourite movies have strong romantic elements in them. I can't say I have a definitive ranking, per say, but some of the films I can mention would be as followed:

The Princess Bride
La La Land
Jerry Maguire (Mostly for Cruise, admittedly).

Seen "About Time" a while back and I remember enjoying it. I also didn't mind the likes of "40 Year old Virgin" or "Crazy Stupid Love" - though with the later, the cast DEFINITELY helps.

Mitchell Murray said...

Oh, and Eternal Sunshine as well..

Thanks Emi.

Mitchell Murray said...

.....and while I'm at it, "Adjustment Bureau".

I think I'm good now.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Calvin:

1. First Man
2. La La Land
3. Whiplash

First Man was the first one to really sell me on Chazelle. La La Land was charming and had a great Stone performance, but also had a lot of questionable filmmaking choices I didn’t care for. Whiplash is the cinematic equivalent of an angry, whiny LiveJournal post from 2001 about what a dick Chazelle’s music teacher was. (In fact, I’m postivie such a post probably existed at some point.)

Emi Grant said...

Robert: Well...I personally believe Whiplash is a masterpiece that will go down as one of the defining films of this decade, but to each their own, I guess...

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

The only real gripe I have with Whiplash is due to the disturbing implications of its ending (that relentless abuse can actually lead to good art). And then I read Damien Chazelle's interpretation of the ending, which was that Andrew would die in his 30s of a drug overdose. That doesn't completely forgive it, but it still makes a bit more sense.

Aside from that, I consider the rest of it a tightly edited and written and masterfully acted film. In fact, I rewatched it recently, and I raised Teller up to a 5.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: you’ll be pleased to hear the Razzies nominated Justice Smith (though snubbed Rafe Spall).

Luke Higham said...

They nominated another Imbecilic president for Worst Actor. :)

Razor said...

Louis: Your bottom 10 films of 2018? Or I could wait and ask you again after the 2018 alternates are done.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your top ten scores from animated films.

RatedRStar said...

I actually think the Razzies have got it mostly spot on this year lol a first for them.

Mitchell Murray said...

Well I'll give the Razzies there sense of humor, particularly in regards to a certain orange hued individual being nominated. Although I do wish "Life Itself" made an appearance, here, as I'm sure many of us can agree.... it was not good in any meaning of the word.

Also, its funny to think of the very real possibility that Mellisa McCarthy could be nominated for both best and worst actress this year.

Bryan L said...

Maybe they thought Life Itself was equally bad on every front, for that matter

And at least they had the sense to not nominate Tom Hardy for Venom, since he's obviously the one thing that tries to make that film work

Bryan L said...

Edgar Wright has announced that his next film will be a psychological horror-thriller set in London, starring a female lead and co-written by Krysty Wilson-Cairns.

Influenced by Don't Look Now and Repulsion

Emi Grant said...

Bryan: Sounds interesting, hope he pulls it off.

RatedRStar said...

Had a bad day at work..again, since I have nowt to do before the Oscar nominations tomorrow, I thought I would binge watch this. Never watched in full before shockingly

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6T8AERZfYQs

Bryan L said...

Emi: He said once on Twitter that he'd like to work with Anya-Taylor Joy, so this could be a good opportunity for the two.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

1. The final plague - (Absolutely visually stunning creating a real sense of horror without being at all graphic in the realizations of the death.)
2. The Opening - (Classic establishing scene for the 90's animated films and this was a particularly powerful example of that.)
3. Parting of the Red Sea - (Obviously a strong standard already set by DeMille, but this too is brilliant visualization of that.)
4. Ramses and Moses conversation after he's returned - (Just a moment that works largely due to Fiennes's work that gives so much honesty to the sense of betrayal.)
5. The other plagues - (Again just so well crafted on an animation front though with a real power to the emotional conviction of the two characters.)

Zimmer's work is quite often extraordinary, 98 was quite a year for him all things considered (as this score would likely be an easy best of the year if not for writing the greatest score in the last 30 years the same year). In that he not only gives the epic-ness one would expect in the grand orchestration, he too captures more of an aggressive more expected animated exuberance with sort of light middle eastern twists in terms of the style. There is such a magnificent blend by Zimmer in terms of employing absolutely everything from voices, to the orchestra to occasionally atypical instrumentation choices, that never feel too much but rather blend to such a potent work. A wonderful mixing though in creating such powerful score that both energizes the film, but grants an often haunting quality as well particularly in the more religious segments of the work.

Deliver Us - (You can certainly see the influence of Hunchback, and Notre Dame in terms of the conception of the sequence. It's a terrific song though in terms of setting up the plight of the slaves....through a pretty catchy, and rather passionate tune. In the chorus it's really well done though in that regard as there is this sort combination between an inspirational chant, but a more genuine anguish need within it. The quiet lullaby though is also beautifully done and is such a poignant intimate work that supplements the grandeur work.)

All I Ever Wanted - (Well what's a Disney film, I mean a Dreamworks film, without a "more" song. In that group though it doesn't add up to much. The lyrics are actually a touch laborious and feel more like exposition. They don't really cohere with really the attempt at a song that wants to be a proper ballad. It doesn't quite get there as it honestly a bit of a mess as a song.)

Through Heaven's Eyes - (Definitely wearing the desire of Dreamworks wanting Schwartz to recreate his Disney work. Not an excellent example of such either. All the marks for effort though having said that it does feel a touch too derivative. Again the lyrics seem almost crammed into the melody at times, and the chorus isn't exactly the most creative. Again it sounds okay, but certainly not a great song.)

Playing with The Big Boys - (Alright I actually rather like most of what is going in this sequence, except for this song unfortunately. As it sounds a little too close to "Be Prepared", and just a far inferior version of that song. This is especially the not so great titular lyric.)

Louis Morgan said...

The Plagues - (A really forcefulness in the vocals, although one where it isn't the easiest to make it out, but a grant bit of epic chanting without a doubt. Great bit of duality, where the lyrics do add a bit more. Also really appreciate Fiennes doing his own singing (Live action Frollo?) which does a bit more emotion against the perhaps overly refined singing voice of Moses.)

When You Believe - (The song that I had heard before watching the film, although I never loved it, but I typically don't love the 90's pop versions all that much, so I didn't quite appreciate it. As the pop version is fine, but this version is AMAZING. This version though I do rather love with the more dramatic and dynamic orchestration behind the central voice. This creating a far more powerful ballad in my view in this version. This also being one of the ballads of here where the lyrics amplify the spirit of the songs all the more. The use of the two voices that blend and empower one another, is particularly remarkable, before segueing into the more light hearted chorus that eventually returns to the main voice though now as a chorus that is rather glorious.)

1. The Secret of NIMH
2. Beauty and the Beast
3. The Prince of Egypt
4. The Land Before Time
5. The Hunchback of Notre Dame
6. Akira
7. The Lion King
8. How to Train Your Dragon
9. The Nightmare Before Christmas
10. Grave of the Fireflies

Calvin:

1. First Man
2. La La Land
3. Whiplash

Though I love all three, First Man though hit me just that sort of "extra" bit that puts it into an upper echelon for me. Now perhaps a tougher question would be ranking the three final sequences, as the man knows how to end a film.

Moore - 4(Gives a very lively performance that captures sort of the right comedic enthusiasm for the character. He thankfully doesn't overplay this making the right sort of earnest awkwardness within his work that makes his performance an all the more endearing hapless hero of sorts. In addition though he absolutely finds the depth in the emotional scenes that create the right sense anxiety in the character and delivers so much more to the role.)

Johnson - 4(The most I've liked him in anything by far. His work though really is terrific though in that he plays with sort of this past its prime heroism. You can kind of hear if you squint your ears, though it has been lost in years of becoming a little too accustom to not quite doing his best. Again love that Johnson does overplay this either, even though he nails the most overt comedic moments, but still finds a real vulnerability in his voice work showing that even as the, half-trying, spider-man.)

Pine - 3(Delivers the most direct heroism in his vocal work, that nicely makes sort of the seemingly "perfect" spider-man.)

Louis Morgan said...

Steinfeld - 3.5(Manages to beautifully bring her charm through her vocal turn here, bringing such an endearing energy to her role. While also though still quickly finding her marks in the quick dramatic moments as well.)

Ali - 3(He's good though I think actually severely underused. The uncle aspect of the film was actually one of my few reservations as I think they should have a bit more time between him and Miles, or maybe a scene between the uncle and the father. As what should've been a big emotional moment later in the film didn't really hit for me because we barely spend anytime with Miles's Uncle. Still Ali's good in his brief time.)

Henry - 3.5(Without a doubt a banner year for him, and this is a nice show of his talent as well. Henry's effective in just bringing a natural sweetness, if properly slightly overbearing as a slightly overbearing father in his interactions with Miles. In addition though finds that nuance in his work to really hit the late emotional moments, that make partially where I think the film could've put a bit more into.)

Glenn - 3(Perhaps the least memorable of the alternate spider-"men", though I still like her approach as sort of a nearly over the top anime style, but not so far that it becomes distracting.)

Cage - 3.5(Hilarious by Cageing it up as much as possible. Cage really overdoes his already notable vocal tics to magnificent effect.)

Mulaney - 3(A properly enjoyable Nathan Lane impression that is perfect for the Ham.)

Hahn/Schreiber - 3(I'll say I liked the sort of originality both brought in their vocal turns, Hahn as an aggressive and menacing, air-head and Schreiber really putting the New York into his Kingpin. I'll say the villains in general were my other reservation. Although they throw a quick, a very quick, motivation for kingpin I thought they weren't particularly interesting. I just think it's a shame they didn't have a little more fun with the villains as the majority of them are just sort of there. I mean perhaps bring in D'Onofrio Kingpin, and the animated series Kingpin, something anything. As it just seemed a missed opportunity, not a major one mind you, but still one.)

Rafe Spall was snubbed HARD.

Razor:

I can give you a preliminary one, although I typically try to tackle the films that are considered good that I've missed. Though I'll occasionally throw in a terrible film for good measure, if easily accessed.

1. Life Itself
2. Gotti
3. Mute (It and Gotti are too much of slogs to be any "lower")
4. Vice
5. Beautiful Boy
6. Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom
7. Venom
8. Annihilation
9. The Wife
10. Bohemian Rhapsody

Bryan L said...

Louis: Your thoughts on...well...Gotti as a film and ratings and thoughts on the cast?

Calvin Law said...

I’m gonna suggest you stay away from The Predator, The 15:17 to Paris, Pacific Rim Uprising, Crimes of Grindelwald, Red Sparrow and The Cloverfield Paradox, because that bottom 10 list looks painful enough as it is. Can I have your thoughts and ratings on the cast of Gotti, and the Pitbull score (if that’s not too cruel).

As for final sequences, Chazelle is a master at that, I’d probably give First Man the edge too (I can’t wait to read what you have to say on Gosling’s performance in that regard).

Mitchell Murray said...

For tomorrow, guys, I'll try and get the best actor line up posted to my blog as soon as possible, in addition to keeping a decent pace with the following reviews.

I just thought I'd mention this in any case, as the current acting fields certainly seem...well...safe, in regards to the performances that keep getting praised, but also in terms of the risk - or lack there of - such campaigns appear to be willing to take.

Bryan L said...

Calvin: Holy shit Red Sparrow was BORING. Francis Lawrence is obsessed with people in rooms talking about the plot of the film, since the last two Hunger Games basically amount to such.

At least Schoenaerts got to be in a high-profile Hollywood film, but as for the rest of the film, YAWN.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Out of those that Calvin mentioned, Crimes Of Grindelwald is the only one I would like you see. I'd like to know your opinion on the twist ending and whether Depp improved with his portrayal of Grindelwald.

Luke Higham said...

And I saw Stan & Ollie. Coogan and Reilly were great.

Calvin Law said...

Luke: True. No one believes me when I tell them about the twist ending. Nor about most things regarding the film.

Glad you liked Coogan and Reilly. I’m not sure if Louis will end up reviewing them but he’ll definitely give them 4.5’s at the very least.

Luke Higham said...

*I would like you to see

Calvin: I hope he'll give an entertaining analysis on that scene in particular.

Deiner said...

Has anyone seen The Hate U Give? I'd like to read your comments on Amandla Stenberg's performance in that movie.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Jeremy Irons playing Ozymandias in HBO's Watchmen.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Lastly, thoughts on Sophie Scholl - The Final Days if you're seeing it tonight and rating & thoughts on Julia Jentsch.

RatedRStar said...

I am off to bed now...

I will come back on when the Oscar nominations are announced, I am hoping that there will be some surprises, that is what always makes the Oscars interesting, even if they are bad surprises, I am excited about who makes it and who misses since it could be in any category.

As always I will say the line

In the immortal words of Captain Edmund Blackadder...

"Good Luck Everyone"

Mitchell Murray said...

Deiner: I saw the film a while back. Stenberg gives an effective performance, I feel, as she conveys the right drive and emotional conflict within Carter's extremely stressful experience. Stenberg's work serves as the needed dramatic core for the type of film she's in, remaining genuine in the reactionary nature of her part, and standing out incredibly well in her biggest moments.

Louis Morgan said...

Bryan:

Ah yes, the important Gotti thoughts. Ever want to watch a derivative, structurally broken, dramatically inert, gangster film? No. But Gotti has so much to offer like it's framing device of the ghost of John Gotti (though I'll admit the less annoying ghost framing device of the year), a terrible score, random song choices only rivaled by Beautiful Boy in that regard. Now sure if you asked the filmmakers what they were trying to tell us about John Gotti through this film, they might just scratch their head, oh wait that's a serious problem. This film mainly just exists and sits there, almost confused on where to go, so it just stays put swearing up a storm.

Travolta - 1.5(He actually is decent in the moment where he reacts to the death of his son, and Travolta is trying here. Sadly that might be part of the problem as he has his constant constipation face on. This is occasionally mixed up with....oh wait that's pretty much all he does otherwise. Travolta has failed with villains, or let's say not nice guys (I don't know what the filmmaker think of Gotti), and this is no different. Travolta just postures his way around with little to no effect on any one or any thing.)

Preston - 1.5(Mostly just there, but her breakdown scene is just horribly performed.)

Keach - 3(He's actually decent as per usual. He doesn't have much of a character but he does his best to sell some pretty atrocious lines such as the "fist of the five Burroughs")

LoFranco - 2(Yeah he's pretty bland, though I'll be fair and say he too is mostly just there. Really part of the problem is no one is as aggressively bad as you'd hope, to at least mix up the minutia of the film)

Calvin:

Too painful to comment on that score.

Luke:

That's an interesting choice to be sure, and it suggests the series will be something very different from the comic/film. As we already a got a mostly shot for shot (though with definite problems) adaptation, I think it's better to get something new. An older Ozymandias is a start (plus this time played by a good actor.)

Calvin Law said...

Louis: your thoughts on the score of Naked?

Calvin Law said...

Also your thoughts on a 2010s version of Sweeney Todd starring Glenn Howerton and Emily Blunt as Todd and Lovett? And your choice of director.

Bryan L said...

Calvin: Maybe Martin McDonagh for director.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Would you ever consider adding runner-ups to the My Wins page or even a seperate one because Psifonian's been making runner-up videos lately.