Wednesday, 12 December 2018

Alternate Best Supporting Actor 1987: Bill Paxton in Near Dark

Bill Paxton did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Severen in Near Dark.

Near Dark, although not anything too special, is a fairly unique horror film about a young man (Adrian Pasdar) randomly finding himself being taken in by a group drifters/vampires after being bitten by a young woman.

Bill Paxton plays one of the vampires, and perhaps is the best expression of the different sort of tone that Kathryn Bigelow's direction is trying to create as this sort of grunge horror. Now don't get me wrong, I'm all in for the dark and more directly evil portrayal of the lead drifter Jesse played by Lance Henriksen. Henriksen isn't too far off a more typical Dracula in some ways. Paxton though offers something a bit different. This is, I suppose, should be expected as Paxton, for better and worse at times, was a unique performer. There's an energy, an off-beat quality inherent in Paxton that ensured he stood out in his films, though these results were sometimes mixed. Near Dark offers the right type of avenue for Paxton's boundless enthusiasm, where he so often seemed to refuse to phone anything in. This in the role of Severen essentially the punk rocker vampire, where Paxton makes a rather wonderful choice for the role. This is to play Severen as someone who just is absolutely having a blast in being a vampire, lacking the qualms of some of his younger (looking) compatriots, and the pretense of the older Jesse.

Paxton plays the part as just some sleazy dude who became a vampire, and just is loving the life. Paxton oozes these carefree amorality that he dips with a certain darkly tipped humor in this smiling indifference. What is probably my favorite scene in the film isn't really a horror scene involving Severen, though it does have some terrible implications, where he prepares himself for a night on the town, while practicing some quick draws, before hitching a ride with his eventual victims. It's a marvelous bit of physical acting of Paxton who simply owns the display like a lounge lizard. Paxton's work has this distinct lack of shame in the right way as it so effortlessly realizes Severen as a unique monster, by playing him as a man who thinks he has nothing to lose. Paxton dials it up, and manages to be menacing in this approach by showing what can be so threatening of, for the lack of a better word, a scumbag who has nothing to lose. Paxton verbalizes this unabashed glee in the life of the night which typically involves lots and lots of killing. The near lack of any pathos in Paxton's work, besides a moment of frustration towards the pathos of one of his companions, is what makes Severen truly come to life as a character. Paxton brings a bit of anarchy to every single one of his scenes making the whole film better for it. I especially enjoy him in the action showdown near the end of the film where Paxton plays it as though Severen is having the time of his living death, even when he's about to be run over by a truck. His "come at me bro" as pictured above, is simply a magnificent expression by Paxton that might as well sum up this performance. It is just an entertaining turn by Paxton, which throws a crazed curve ball at a well worn type of villain.

63 comments:

Calvin Law said...

This is such a strange film. I’m not sure whether I liked it or not but this is possibly one of Paxton’s most Paxton-y performances and like you I thoroughly enjoyed it.

Calvin Law said...

And whenever your ready your Life Itself rant

GM said...

1. Downey.Jr
2. Patton
3. Smith
4. Paxton
5. Cheung

Lezlie said...

Changing my predictions a bit:

1. Robert Downey Jr.
2. Kurtwood Smith
3. Will Patton
4. Bill Paxton
5. Roy Cheung

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Ellen DeGeneres's Oscar monologue in 2014?

Luke Higham said...

1. Patton
2. Downey (From the trailer, that comeback line resonates so much today)
3. Smith
4. Paxton
5. Cheung

Luke Higham said...

Michael McCarthy: Your ratings for The Favourite cast.

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Do you think Leonardo DiCaprio would be a good fit for these 50s film roles?

J.J. Sefton
Reverend Harry Powell
J.J. Hunsecker
Private Prewitt (Think The Departed)
Any of James Deans roles (90s or maybe early 00s Dicaprio I'd imagine)

Matt Mustin said...

Louis: Have you ever given your thoughts on Nicolas Cage and Holly Hunter in Raising Arizona?

JackiBoyz said...

1. Patton
2. Downey Jr.
3. Smith
4. Paxton
5. Cheung

Matt Cofrancesco said...

Louis: What are your top 5 Mickey Rourke performances?

Fake Louis said...

Life Itself is the most breathtaking experience one could possibly envision. Step back Scorsese, Spielberg, Welles, Bergman, Lynch, and Kurosawa, in fact just forget them because the greatest auteur of our age has come forth, that's right the writer of Cars, Dan Fogelman. Such a daring experience to make a film as though films did not exist and you wanted to introduce the idea of storytelling, but both your hands were broken, and your tongue was cut out. Even your eye lids seared off your face to prevent A Diving Bell and the Butterfly situation to occur. Yet you still went about it despite these injuries to produce the most awe inspiring...

*gets hit by bus*

Louis Morgan said...

Alright was that method of giving my thoughts a little annoying, perhaps convoluted beyond belief, did I exhibit far too much pretension for my own good? Did you feel like punching me through the screen? Well that is but one feeling you'll experience when facing one of the most mind boggling, self-indulgent, dumpster fires of a film that ever existed in Life Itself. Another film, along with the like of "Collateral Beauty" and "The Book of Henry" where the writer causes one to question if he is perhaps some alien attempting to replicate his poor understanding of human life. You know where grieving husbands talk about masturbating to their therapist for no identifiable reason, before committing suicide in their office, where mothers state their love of dead in-laws, where everything happens you know, because Life Itself is an unreliable narrator. Or maybe just a bad narrator, you like a crap one, you know like Matthew Broderick in Christmas Story Live bad. You know what I'm saying? Not an honest interaction to be found, with the most manipulative methods one could imagine, and just cacophony that results in one pondering how powerful an ego must be to inflict such a curse upon mankind.

Emi Grant said...

I'm honestly now tempted to request Oscar Isaac in that film just to see more of Louis (and maybe Fake Louis) writing like this.

Calvin Law said...

Hot damn.

Calvin Law said...

And ratings and thoughts?

Louis Morgan said...

Tahmeed:

Hmm, I'm not a huge fan of DeGeneres just in general, I tend to prefer dry over enthusiasm for hosting duties, BOB NEWHART FOR OSCAR HOST, but I digress. It's wasn't bad monologue by any means though in terms of striking enough reverence with taking something out of it at the same time. Not an amazing blend in my view, but not bad.

Bryan:

Sefton - (Don't quite see it, as I've never seen him pull off an overt cynicism.)

Powell - (Can't see it at all, Elmer Gantry on the other hand...)

Hunsecker - (I think he'd be a better fit for Sidney Falco. Maybe he could pull it off, though I've yet to see him do the sort of domineering quality needed for such a role, same problem with Powell really.)

Prewitt - (Can see it, but it could honestly go either way, as it could go Departed, or could go Gangs of New York.)

Cal Trask - (No, as he just seems like the "good" brother to me, maybe expand that role and get Joaquin Phoenix or Casey Affleck as Cal.)

Jim Stark - (DiCaprio is actually very charismatic, though in an active way, rather than the slyly passive way Dean was. Making it again not quite the right fit, though I could see him working as Stark in a very different approach though.)

Jett Rink - (Here's one where I could actually see it working, as an even more devious riff on Jordan Belfort)

Matt:

I think somewhere, I'll have to have a look.

Matt C.:

1. Angel Heart
2. Sin City
3. The Wrestler
4. The Pope of Greenwich Village
5. Rumble Fish

Anonymous said...

Life sucks.

Bryan L. said...

Louis: I'm guessing Life Itself is this year's, uh, that one movie Will Smith did...something Beauty or something...

How do you think Leo would do as Elmer Gantry? And with that in mind, would Lancaster have worked as Jordan Belfort in the 50s?

And lastly, your 2010s choice for J.J. Sefton and J.J. Hunsecker? I came up with a Stalag 17s cast the other day and he's the only one I drew a blank on.

Calvin Law said...

Bryan: I suggested Glenn Howerton as Sefton before, and as for Hunsecker I think Liev Schreiber could be a good shout.

Bryan L. said...

Calvin: Oh, Howerton would be great. If only Hollywood gave him the time of day...

I could see Schreiber as Hunsecker too.

Anonymous said...

Louis: While he was never in consideration for the part, think Michael Wincott could have worked as Rorschach? He has the voice part down IMO.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Thoughts on this scene from Whiplash.
https://youtu.be/RSDmo-gJ8XY

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Ratings and thoughts on the Life Itself cast.

Have you watched any other 2018 films recently

Louis: Your TV top 5s for 2018.

Calvin Law said...

I’ll probably be watching Roma at some point over the next day.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Well there is no reason to really go cast by cast member, the only person I'll really single out is Mandy Patinkin who manages to escape the film with at least his dignity intact. The rest though have two setting for their expression that of the most twee depiction of glee, or that same extreme maudlin, holding in gas face, as shown by Will Smith in ole CB, and even Fassbender in The Snowman.

Bryan:

I think he'd be a great Gantry, having the exact sort of energy for the role, that would play to his sort of physical charisma he has, as shown in Wolf in particular. He'd be a great religious con man. And yes to the second question with that more petulant devious side of Lancaster in mind.

I'll also put my support behind Howerton, though like with Kwai, I think Ryan Reynolds could work in that role.

Schreiber would be a great Hunsecker, alternate though Jon Hamm.

Anonymous:

Yes, quite easily.

Tahmeed:

The first time I watched the film I wasn't sure of that scene, however I think it is an essential one on reflection. In that shows us the world outside of his existence with Fletcher, showing essentially how little his accomplishments and hard work matter with his own family, and the way they are put down in favor of minor accomplishment in sports. Teller is great in the scene by essentially showing this pained insular focus that lashes out at that indifference to what he's done.

Luke:

Roma
Three Identical Strangers
Disobedience
First Reformed
Won't You Be My Neighbor?

Series:

1. Barry
2. Patrick Melrose
3. The Little Drummer Girl
4. Better Call Saul
5. Cobra Kai

Actor:

1. Bill Hader - Barry
2. Bob Odenkirk - Better Call Saul
3. Benedict Cumberbatch - Patrick Melrose
4. Dan Stevens - Legion
5. Jeffrey Wright - Westworld

Actress:

1. Florence Pugh - The Little Drummer Girl
2. Rhea Seehorn - Better Call Saul
3. Thandie Newton - Westworld
4. Rachel Keller - Legion

Supporting Actor:

1. Zahn McClarnon - Westworld
2. Henry Winkler - Barry
3. Glenn Howerton - It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia
4. Michael Shannon - The Little Drummer Girl
5. Zach Woods - Silicon Valley

Supporting Actress:

1. Aubrey Plaza - Legion
2. Kaitlin Olson - It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia
3. Jennifer Jason Leigh - Patrick Melrose
4. Jean Smart - Legion
5. Anna Madeley - Patrick Melrose

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thoughts on the films and ratings/thoughts on the casts.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thoughts on Pugh, Hader, Winkler, The Little Drummer Girl and Barry.

Luke Higham said...

And Michael Shannon.

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Seems like Reynolds has the same type of sensibilities Holden had, as I think Holden could've worked as Paul Conroy in a 50s Buried, directed by Hitchcock.

I am VERY glad you liked Barry btw, even though I think the episodes directed by Hader are a step down than the rest, although he's still outstanding in front of the camera either way.

Calvin Law said...

Thought Roma was amazing. Cuaron is probably my director win.

Also I will concur that Cobra Kai is kind of awesome. Really need to watch Barry, and The Little Drummer girl, too. So glad Pugh is becoming one of your favourite young actresses working today.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Roma is indeed great, I guess I'm not *quite* as passionate as some, but that's almost meaningless when others have been throwing around words like masterpiece, and greatest of all time. It is a largely mesmerizing experience, and a notable directorial achievement by Cuaron in creating such an atmospheric piece that makes the often mundane quite remarkable. Have to give a director credit that makes trying to inch a car into a garage somehow captivating. It brilliantly realizes its story largely through visuals and does so extremely impressively. Creating a unassuming power to its images that just slowly build in potency, and finding so much in singular acts, that have been depicted before, however not quite in this way.

Aparicio - 4.5(It is indeed a director's film without a doubt, and Cuaron's efforts are what you take most from the film. Aparicio though gives a wonderfully naturalistic turn that is essential in helping to create and maintain this specific portrait by Cuaron. There is a never a break in this and the performances are an essential part of this even if they aren't really often the focus. Aparicio though gives a good unassuming turn that quietly conveys the emotions most often in a very internalized fashion. The few moments of a more overt performance are very much earned, and honest to the character. Aparicio delivers in these scenes and gives striking turn even if technically overshadowed in a certain sense.)

Tavira - 4(She gives a good performance as well though in a way it is as almost an enigma in a way due to Cuaron technique. In that we get fits of expressions of change, that help to change the course of elements of the film. Her performance delivers though in every one of these changes making them natural at every point, even if we more of tune into some of the more extreme moments when they come directly towards Aparicio's Cleo.)

Louis Morgan said...

Might as well talk about the two documentaries at the same time. As I have to admit I did not think Won't You Be My Neighbor was a transcendent documentary. Don't get me wrong, it is good, but I think the archival footage, that is readily available, does most of the work. I don't think the additional interviews add too much, other than those with Francois Clemmons, well at least I don't think they make it any better than that retrospective that was hosted by Michael Keaton. It's good, but I don't think it does anything extraordinary with its fascinating subject. Now Three Identical Strangers, takes its fascinating subject, and invigorates it. This is from the presentation of the story itself which it unravels as captivating mystery. It goes further though in finding a real power in its interviews that supplement its subtle recreations, and archival footage. It is great as essentially gives you the interesting little human interest story, than unravels it towards some unsettling places.

Disobedience isn't a film quite loved or anything, but I liked it just fine. I think it did well to avoid many of the pitfalls with these types of films that posturing or cliche rather easily. Although I do wish there was a bit more exploration into the world, that is likely alien to viewers, and a bit less of sort of lingering mood moments. I think though it was effective in examining the central subjects with maturity that develops in a particularly striking conclusion.

With that said no one needs to request Nivola.

Weisz/McAdams - 4.5/4(Felt she eased back on most of the tendencies that typically set me off of one of her performances. I felt there might be quite the danger of this as the "rebel" against the traditionalists sort. I felt though Weisz delivered those scenes in particular especially effectively actually. In that she makes them tempered in a certain way that seems reflective of very old fights that she has mostly given up. I also liked in particular the way she portrayed her reactions with McAdams in that there was no overt lust on her part, in fact she portrays some accommodation. Weisz approach is that she has perhaps moved on mostly, unlike her relationship to her deceased father. A subtle internalized depiction of that grief with conflict of unresolved feelings, defined by a clear love subverted by her break from tradition. Weisz gives terrific work finds a real nuance in the role that I think could have been misplayed as too much of a firebrand. McAdams has a very difficult role on the other hand and although I did like her I don't think she quite pulls it off fully. This in this attachment to Weisz's character and her religion with equal measure. She portrays the former well, but the latter mix is a complex idea that I think falls a little short. Not that she's bad, but she doesn't excel with what she has. She's certainly still good, but I think a great performance was capable with the material.)

Anonymous said...

Louis: Thoughts on this scene from Persona:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RfPjC2Fbd3w

Emi Grant said...

Roma was amazing indeed. While I still have to watch Shoplifters and Burning, I'm confident Mexico might have Foreign Language Film in the bag.

I'd agree with the exact same ratings of Louis.

Charles H said...

I would love to see Koreeda get an Oscar, but i think Roma is destined to win, & a deserving win at that.

Calvin Law said...

Roma, Burning, and Shoplifters would all be excellent winners, and another contender, Cold War, wouldn’t be a bad choice either.

Luke Higham said...

Saw Aquaman. I enjoyed it well enough despite how cheesy it could be.

Anonymous said...

Louis: what are rating and thoughts on tommy lee jones and beverly d'angelo in coal miner's daughter

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

I'll say I didn't love First Reformed as a film, as I felt Schrader fell into some heavy handedness quite often with his screenplay, though I did feel his direction was a lot more assured here than some of his other efforts that seem to ponder around a style. As his men on the "edge" films I'd say I preferred Mishima, perhaps even Light Sleeper, though it is certainly a whole lot better than Adam Resurrected. It most strongly corresponds to though his scripted only film Taxi Driver, particularly in structure. There were definitely things I liked about but Schrader does come close to bashing you in the head with his message.

Pugh - (Well the series itself greatly benefits from a properly cast actress, unlike Diane Keaton who was in her later 30's in the original film. Pugh thankfully is the proper age which is essential to finding the right place for the character this being this maturity in manner, yet still naivety in spirit. Pugh finds the right place for the actress who is very strong willed, but breaks this down effectively when her view of the world is destroyed by the harsh if not deranged realities of the world of international terrorism. Pugh is excellent in finding the balance in her performance in creating this incisiveness as her Charlie is able to essentially apply her trade and works within the spy world, against the growing discontent and unease to the ends that it brings. She's fantastic in finding this combination that realizes a real conflict within the material, a far more palatable journey than the one in the rather tepid original film. Although there are several things better about this adaptation, Pugh is perhaps the greatest improvement creating such a compelling character at the center of it all.)

Hader - (Although he won the Emmy for comedy I have to say that this isn't really a very funny performance from him, outside of his portrayal of Barry's awkwardness in the acting class. Although even that is firmly within the nature of his rather dramatic character. That's not criticism as this is downright amazing performance by Hader, as what works so well is how his convincing serious portrayal bounces off the more overt caricatures around him. Hader though on his own is extremely convincing in portraying this simple man who has been bludgeoned by life and manipulated by those around him. Hader creates a such powerful empathy, and real pathos in his work. Creating such a sense of the emotional decay and hardship within the the man's PTSD, and I was surprised just how poignant his performance is throughout even as the character does some particularly dark deeds. Hader's work is outstanding as he not only never feels miscast but somehow he strikes just the absolute perfect tone within the material that still makes the comedic marks hit while delivery such an emotional punch at the same time.)

Louis Morgan said...

Winkler - (Winkler on the other hand is just really funny in his part as he gives really a series of conflicting elements to one singular wonderful performance. In that on one end we get this smug excessively assured attitude that is hilarious, but along with the real passion of a proper coach, that is also hilarious. We get a rather pathetic man who's only place of power is among is more pathetic students whom he exploits, which is also hilarious, against his performance that is also genuinely charming when he puts it on. Winkler is just a delight every time he is onscreen giving just a riotous portrayal of really a jerk who you can't help but like.)

Shannon - (I will say I am extremely happy to have seen this performance, as we get Shannon to show off his range a bit rather than just being called to be deranged. Don't get me wrong he's great at being deranged, but he can do more. That side isn't seen here, except one scene where his character is testing sound proofing almost to give the audience one proper Shannon scream. I will say though I also noticed here though that Shannon's laugh as a bit of a Ray Liottaesque idiosyncrasy to it. Anyways beyond that though this is a very reserved yet incredibly compelling portrayal by Shannon as this quiet operator. Shannon realizes though such a force of personality within his quiet, demeanor, that also has this certain haunted quality within it that so brilliantly suggests that character's past and motivation. It is quietly remarkable work as he makes such a unique character within his oeuvre in particular and is wholly convincing in this realization of a man who does anything but fly off the handle. Instead Shannon works with his eyes, and a more subtle expression to realize the precision, but also the very reserved emotion that defines the man.)

Barry is one I must admit I'm quite surprised they managed to pull off and for it to work as well as it does. This is with that specific ambition to be both this serious examination of a man traumatized by war and violence, against just a silly "Hitman in an unlikely scenario story". It manages to do both extremely well as it has a real intensity, and power to it, while also just being really funny too.

The Little Drummer Girl I'll admit probably takes less for me to like it as I'm simply in for le Carre adaptations from the outset. This though righting an adaptation of that tepid 80's version, but again this time getting the casting right while also bringing in Park Chan-wook of all people to direct it. Carrre/Park does not seem the most obvious choice but I found it to be an often fascinating pairing in creating a sort of seething emotionalism within the cold world of espionage. Although I wouldn't say there are no missteps I found it a largely gripping adaptation, with some particularly powerful and unique moments as fashioned by Park's vision.

Emi Grant said...

Since my local cinema would rather bring awful films instead of any other hot film at the moment, I unfortunately took the terrible decision of watching The House That Jack Built instead of Aquaman...

I really hope I get a concussion so I can fully forget every single thing about that hot piece of worthless garbage.

And to think people call Charlie Kauffman and Aaron Sorkin pretentious.

Robert MacFarlane said...

In defense of First Reformed, I'll just say the bluntness of its environmental message tapped into to my personal greatest fear and that I found that it mixed especially well with existential despair.

Calvin Law said...

Got to saw Can You Ever Forgive Me? and like pretty much everyone else on here, loved it. Easy 5’s for both McCarthy and Grant.

Calvin Law said...

Also Louis your thoughts on Anthony Carrigan on Barry?

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Happy birthday Robert :)

Anonymous said...

Louis: And also thoughts on Sarah Goldberg and Glenn Fleshler in Barry?

Luke Higham said...

Happy Birthday Robert.

RatedRStar said...

Happy Birthday Robert.

I still need to catch up on most of the Oscar contenders, thankfully im off after the 21st till the 3rd and hopefully leaving my job soon anyway.

Luke Higham said...

Ethan Hawke - First Reformed
Ben Foster - Leave No Trace/Galveston
Ryan Gosling - First Man
Willem Dafoe - At Eternity's Gate
Robert Redford - The Old Man And The Gun
John Huston - The Other Side Of The Wind
John C. Reilly/Joaquin Phoenix - The Sisters Brothers
John C. Reilly/Steve Coogan - Stan & Ollie
Lucas Hedges - Boy Erased
Yoo Ah-In - Burning
Daveed Diggs - Blindspotting
Alt. Lakeith Stanfield - Sorry To Bother You
Bonus: Marcello Fonte - Dogman

Reviews for The Mule aren't as strong as I would've hoped. So a 4.5 for Eastwood at best I think.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Before posting Downey's review, could I have your thoughts on Life Fades Away.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the production design of Beau Geste.

Bryan L. said...

Happy Birthday Robert

Luke: That sounds like a great Alt. lineup, and it looks like John David Washington might be a spoiler after all for Hawke and Gosling, although I'm still holding hope out for the latter.

Luke Higham said...

Bryan: Hawke for me personally. I just hope BAFTA don't go with the exact same five as SAG.

Luke Higham said...

For the lineup page screenshot though, just the Reilly performances opposite Foster's.

Bryan L. said...

Luke: I liked Hawke a lot in First Reformed too, though I'm afraid I can't say the same for the film. I guess we'll have to wait and see if either makes it.

With that in mind, who do you think will get the fifth slot in the BAFTA lineup? Since they always like to switch it up for that one it seems haha.

Luke Higham said...

Bryan: I wasn't as keen on a re-watch but I really love his performance.

I think Gosling has a better shot to be honest.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Also thoughts on the production design of Sabrina. A site recommended people to watch the film before decorating their house.

Bryan L. said...

Luke: I'm not sure if First Reformed is a film they'll respond to, but I think Foy is a lock for First Man at BAFTAS, and maybe some of that love will transfer to Gosling, so I can see it.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Ben Feldman in Silicon Valley?

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Just finished seeing About Time for the first time, and damn did I love it. In fact, if Calvin hadn't requested Domhnall Gleeson, I definitely would have done so myself.

Mitchell Murray said...

Tahmeed: Thoughts on McAdams and Nighy?

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

A brilliant scene, in terms of cinematography, direction, and of course acting. An example of doing what Bergman does so well in being able to evoke such powerful emotion even without a direct depiction. This being such a striking erotic scene only conveyed through the words and the performances of the actresses.

Calvin:

Carrigan - (He is perhaps the most overtly simply hilarious performance in the series giving such an enjoyably goofy turn. This in his over the top accent and really over the top everything with such a personable attitude that makes him anything but threatening. Instead his work simply is comedic gold every time he's onscreen, added to it that Corrigan usually plays creepy shifty types, making his outgoing attitude all the more enjoyable to watch here.)

Anonymous:

Goldberg - (I will say some of her stuff was perhaps the weakest part of the series in that I felt her work perhaps caused a little to much of a rift in terms of sympathizing with the character. In that her performance doesn't quite strike the perfect tone in terms of the drama and the comedy leaving her as a bit of a caricature. She has good moments to be sure in there particularly her dramatic acting moments they don't quite add up though in terms of her entire work that doesn't quite balance itself out perfectly. Not a truly bad performance, and thankless in many ways though.)

Fleschler - (Very similar to Corrigan though with perhaps just a touch of actual menace to him, though again notable as the series has another notable heavy playing just a complete goofball in the end. Fleschler too is very funny in being so over the top in his portrayal of the completely incompetent crime boss who has quite the bit of cordiality within his actions. Fleschler to is pretty hilarious in just playing towards the comedy so heavily, and being quite funny throughout.)

Anonymous:

Rather impressive work in Beau Geste in that the production design is an essential element of making a real sense of place in the desert so to speak. It does that and otherwise finds the right style in the starkness of it all. AN example of straight forward in the best of ways, as it avoids an overt romanticism that fits the story beautifully.

Not bad advice. Sabrina's production design is that again of just an essential straight forward proper glamor for the period in particular. It doesn't show off itself, rather it just seems all just so pristine that it is absolutely perfect, and doing it with such ease.

Tahmeed:

Feldman - (His performance is pretty limited however Feldman is consistently funny any time he shows up in portraying the right combination of a genuine precision with a comic indifference of his mostly casual, yet not incompetent lawyer. I honestly wouldn't have minded more of him as he's fun whenever he does show up.)

Luke:

An Orbison song actually in contention? Of course its going to win for me...seriously though it is just wonderful work by Orbison, that made the whole film worth it frankly since I had not heard it before watching it. Also a bit of added poignancy given Orbison sang it just a few months before his death. As usual the delivery is impeccable in technique, and emotional passion by Orbison's vocals. Add to that is typically dynamic instrumentation that just builds with the lyrics, which are essential Orbison in terms of the pathos within it. A proper grand ballad, loved it.