Wednesday, 30 November 2022

Alternate Best Actor 2016: Hiroshi Abe in After the Storm

Hiroshi Abe did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Ryota Shinoda in After the Storm.

After the Storm is a quietly powerful tale of a semi-successful but aimless novelist dealing with the shambles of his life. 

As typical for writer/director Hirokazu Kore-eda, he presents a very subdued human story within the theoretical trappings of an overt melodrama. That idea here is presented within the character of Ryota who is a whole lot of things, maybe could even be too much, however that doesn't break his character because of the nature of Hiroshi Abe's performance. Abe naturally endears one to Ryota in the early scenes of the film where we see him spending time with his doting mother (Kirin Kiki). Abe speaks with a hopeless kind of optimism around his mother as he believes in his ability to still be a novelist and a father to his family, even as he's estranged from his wife and hasn't written anything in some time. Abe's performance wins you over, against one's best judgment, because he presents a phony resilience initially in Ryota. Abe shows the right balance between outward confidence and the internalized sense in his eyes that the man isn't nearly as confident as he wishes to project himself. 

We find that Ryota has kind of a strange life as his actual day job is working for a private detective agency and often leads small investigations to uncover affairs more than anything. Abe's performance in these scenes is fascinating in creating this combination of confidence and haplessness in equal measure. There is an intelligence he coveys in the moments of figuring out how to capture the adultery when he can, there is even a smoothness to Ryota in moments. Abe though is as natural in segueing at a moment's notice to showing this less than stellar qualities of the man. Such as when we see him kind of under the thumb of his employer or going about blackmailing a target rather than doing his job. Abe brings this innate desperation that suggests greater anxiety where his confidence but covers that up. A desperation where he conveys in each word this fixation on trying to find some money and get what he believes needs. Abe's performance is convincing on both sides of this, but more importantly, is so convincing in the contradiction. Abe shows the façade he is able to put on to be the detective while it all being an act to try to find some kind of money to pay child support. 

In regards to the issue of child support is where we see the greater truths of the man that Abe delivers with a real sensitivity in his performance, a sensitivity that more than anything reveals a fool. This is as we watch him essentially stalk his wife and son, the latter of whom he may not be able to see if he doesn't pay for the support. Abe really is great because again beyond one's best judgment he does make you see the certain purity in his actions as he finds ways to sneak off to talk to his son. Abe brings a sincere warmth in his manner towards his son, even though at the same time it's his refusal to be responsible that keeps him potentially from seeing his son. Abe is able to realize the hypocrisy without making you hate Ryota almost through the specific naivety about his manner. We see this particularly when he keeps asking questions about his wife's seeming new boyfriend. Abe is able to realize the genuine concern in his voice, a more direct intense jealousy, but also a kind of boyish jealousy all at the same time. He's not quite a man and in that, there is almost a strange excuse he creates within the character in his pestering questions. The specific concern he presents is an honest concern, but also still almost not quite accepting reality making seem less possessive than the behavior might theoretically seem otherwise. Abe carefully maneuvers around the character's flaws, to present them as flaws, but specific flaws around his inability to fully mature as a person. 

Our progression of Abe in a way is not dissimilar, though far less hectic, version of Uncut Gems, as we follow our character who thinks he makes everything work if he just does that one more thing. Abe's performance is lower-key in this regard but is wholly successful in creating this sense of the forward push within the spirit of Ryota that keeps him in this state of desperation. Each time he goes to a pawn shop to acquire a bit more money Abe's eyes carry fixation and his expression the palatable need for this thing to provide him the money. The same as he works every case as the detective, even when playing the smoother operative, Abe's eyes confess a man in this need despite being able to present himself otherwise at times. Abe's performance though isn't as a man slowly falling apart and that is what is so intriguing about his work. He captures that specific juvenile spirit that differentiates him from a truly desperate man in a more expected sense. Take when he gets an easy way to make money, his novel being adapted into a Manga, with even the option to use a pen name to hide his identity for his pride's sake. Abe portrays initially at hearing the money this eagerness and brightness in his eyes in seeing a simple way out. When the full idea comes out he shows someone as immature in the as quick of frustration as he speaks as a man who refuses to accept himself as anything less than what he has constructed for himself, in his own mind at least. 

All of Ryota's schemes come to a head as he weathers a typhoon at his mother's home, while his sister is visiting, and his wife and son will eventually visit as well. His chemistry with his sister (Satomi Kobayashi) is an excellent minor bit of performance between both actors who provide a unique dynamic. This as they are both different yet similar in their way of scheming through life just Ryota might be more delusional about it. Abe and Kobayashi bring this rather likable, even technically antagonistic, interaction where both understand each other with a loving sort of brother and sister understanding, even as they don't express any love to each other. They attempt to foil each other and in that Abe and Kobayashi show it through their casual and comfortable interaction coming from a place of closeness even as it is undermining. After that interaction, he's left with seeing his mother, who to an extent enables his schemes, his wife, and his son. Here you get the best of Ryota and the worst of it, and Abe brings it to life so wonderfully at every step. And that is what makes this such an effective performance because every step, good or bad, Abe makes so distinctly honest in such a natural way. We see this in every moment with his son where in every word there is genuine love and care, just as there is always a quiet tension in his voice of someone knowing he may not get to see his son if he doesn't find the money. In turn, he creates sympathy for him, even if he doesn't deserve it, as tries to steal from his own mother, and seeing a note from his sister beating him to a hiding spot, Abe's reaction is perfection as it is frustration but also almost this certain relief and admiration while being bested. And in this, you see in a way the immaturity as it remains a certain game in Abe's performance as he realizes Ryota's specific appeal and shortcoming. With his wife, Abe realizes this dynamic so authentically as he attempts to win her back. Abe brings a real charm in these moments, as he is the people pleaser, but at the same time, you see it as a boy charming his crush than a fully realized man. He is convincing in making you see why his wife would almost consider reconciliation but is as convincing in showing how this act only goes so far, therefore is unsuccessful in the end. The moment of his wife speaks the fact that she won't take him back is amazing acting from Abe. His reaction is so small yet so powerful as he realizes in his subtle sadness a moment of true maturation as he recognizes it as truth. There is no trying to charm his way through, there is just a poignant combination of acceptance while also trying to hold in his sadness to keep this pain from his wife. Abe in this moment shows success in the failure, as in the acceptance there appears to be a final growth that had so long alluded Ryota throughout the film. Abe crafts unusual arc, yet one that feels wholly natural, and more importantly is a wholly moving portrait of a man coming to terms with his mistakes.  

153 comments:

Anonymous said...

Louis: Ratings and thoughts on the cast.

Calvin Law said...

Glad you loved his performance, he's exceptional. Great review!

Could I have your thoughts on the scene where Ryota and his mother are listening to the radio ('I wonder why it is men can't love the present?') It's such a brilliant scene and encapsulates so much of what I love about Kore-eda's style in a package.

Also, seems like he's a director who's worked for you every single film he's done.

Oliver Menard said...

Kore-eda has some similarities to Naruse, and of course he's most often compared to Ozu (Kore-eda said his work is more like Naruse). But Kore-eda has a style that is completely his own. I can't think of any modern director who has made slice of life/family dramas as beautiful as Kore-eda has done for the past 25 years.

Louis: Your thoughts on the direction and screenplay of After the Storm. Also, have you seen Our Little Sister? I know you covered 2015 but I haven't found your thoughts on it.

Matt Mustin said...

Incredible performance, absolutely.

Calvin Law said...

Saw The Menu, loved it like most it seems. Chau and Hoult were my MVPs but honestly, everyone was on point.

Ytrewq Wertyq said...

RIP Christine McVie

Shaggy Rogers said...

Hey guys
Tell me which Louis' Top 5 Best Lead Actress:
1. Emma Stone – La La Land (I hope Louis surprises us and changes his #1 because I reviewed the movie and I didn't think her performance was great)
2. Amy Adams – Arrival
3. Isabelle Huppert – Elle
4. Ruth Negga – Loving
5. Natalie Portman – Jackie

Matthew Montada said...

Calvin: ratings for the cast of The Menu?

Shaggy Rogers said...

Louis. Speaking of Ozu, I wanted to know if you've watched any of these films directed by him, also your ratings and thoughts on the following performances:
Chōko Iida - Record of a Tenement Gentleman
Setsuko Hara - Early Summer
Michiyo Kogure - The Flavor of Green Tea Over Rice
Hara, Mariko Okada and Yoko Tsukasa - Late Autumn

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Shaggy: Adams is my pick now (La La Land has not stayed with me much at all), but I think Stone will probably remain Louis's #1.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

In terms of pure entertainment, this is one of the best World Cups ever.

Luke Higham said...

Auf Wiedersehen Deutschland

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thoughts on the Indiana Jones trailer.

Marcus said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the 2022 Sight and Sound lists.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: And the Guardians Vol. 3 trailer.

Emi Grant said...

Tahmeed: It has been a sad time for me as a fan, personally.

Tim said...

i have a pretty big problem with that Indy 5 trailer, which is the shots from the chase scenes. The camera is way too fluid and they have that really fake CGI tint over them that just doesn't feel very Jones.

Also, i don't think i like that new version of the main theme

Bryan L. said...

Emi: Same. It was too little, too late. The team didn’t do itself any favors by having to depend on the outcome of a separate game.

Bryan L. said...

Regarding the World Cup, it sure has been…interesting. Plenty of “Wait, what?” moments so far.

Emi Grant said...

Bryan: I blame the manager for about 80% of what went wrong. It's quite frustrating, tbh.

Other than that, yeah. Plenty of odd surprises on this WC. Kind of appropriate for the whole bizarro world feeling of it.

Emi Grant said...

Louis: Thoughts on the new Sight and Sounds list?

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your top 20 rhea seehorn acting moments

Robert MacFarlane said...

I forgot to mention this; I used my monthly request for Screentime Central for Curse of the Black Pearl. These numbers definitely weren’t what I was expecting:

- Johnny Depp - 49:32 (34.63%)
- Keira Knightley - 34:37 (24.20%)
- Orlando Bloom - 32:03 (22.40%)
- Geoffrey Rush - 20:03 (14.02%)
- Jack Davenport - 13:19 (9.31%)
- Lee Arenberg - 12:01 (8.40%)
- Kevin McNally - 11:13 (7.84%)
- Mackenzie Crook - 11:11 (7.82%)
- Jonathan Pryce - 10:52 (7.60%)
- Angus Barnett - 7:18 (5.10%)
- Giles New - 6:49 (4.77%)
- Zoe Saldana - 4:30 (3.15%)
- David Bailie - 3:23 (2.37%)
- Lucinda Dryzek - 2:45 (1.92%)
- Dylan Smith - 0:48 (0.56%)

Mitchell Murray said...

Robert: Honestly, those numbers seem about right to me, especially among the top 5. Depp having 1/3 of the screen time seems low, until you consider he's not even in the first scene, and there are a large amount of conversations/sequences where he's totally absent.

Speaking of "The Black Pearl", there was an interesting bit of trivia I've heard regarding Barbossa/Geoffrey Rush. Apparently, Rush had a theory that people watch movies the same way they read books; In the case of Western audiences, this would mean scanning the screen from left to right. As such, Rush is often seen to the right of his co-stars in "Black Pearl" IE on the left side of the screen.

I can't verify that story 100%, but it's nonetheless interesting to think about what people see first when watching a film/show. It also might explain one of the ways Barbossa became a fan favourite - aside from Rush's clear relishing of the role.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Maki - 4( She has good chemistry with Abe, in that you instantly have a sense of their old relationship and she conveys the sense of the old affection though distanced through the need to move on from his choices. She balances it well to always grant a sense of where she is coming from but also where it is that she came from in terms of their relationship.)

Yoshizawa - 4(It must be said that Kore-eda has his way with child actors obviously, and I've never seen one in his films give an inauthentic performance. Yoshizawa's performance is relatively limited within the scheme of the film, however, his interactions with Abe bring far more complex than just "the son" as you get the sense of affection but also the low-key sense of frustration in his more knowing reactions towards his dad's "Schemes".)

Kobayashi - 4(Enjoyed the wry quality of her performance that always grants the sense of her having a similar manner actually to Abe as her brother, but with a bit more directness in turn both honesty and dishonesty as she flaunts it all a bit more openly.)

Kiki - 5(Wonderfully pitch-perfect performance in playing a lot of notes while within the framework of the semi-doting mother. She plays rather wonderfully within the margins of this to show her own sense of her manner towards her children and their little personal plays and brings such richness in every interaction. Managing to play theoretically conflicting notes of moments of biting understanding while also at other moments seeming to be oblivious. She balances both with such wonderful cunning that manages to be everything with such an ease that you are granted fully her nature. It is a brilliant performance by not really showing off but rather being just so honest in every moment of it, creating complexity even within a theoretical simplicity. Nothing in a moment seems false and she wholly grants you a sense of her relationship with her children is both trying to give her son some path, while also still maintaining a technical distance of control of being the loving mother. In the same way, she balances moments of such earnest wisdom and naturalistic humor, just so beautifully played in every way. )

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Well speaking of Kiki, I think you see how perfectly she plays that moment by being 100% earnest as she attempts to offer her wisdom to her son as they discuss, while then having that comical break that feels as natural even as it funny as she points out her insight. In the scene though you see Kore-eda's specific way who really has a very exact direction even though it is so matter-of-fact seeming, the choice in song, the high versus low angles of his subject, and the cutting between them, is all ideal, just as unless you're purposefully paying attention to it you don't notice it, you're just in this natural seeming though also philosophical conversation but it all amplifies it. 
Oliver:

I can see why he compares himself more quickly to Naruse because of his melodramatic tinges, though Still Walking is VERY Ozu. His direction, of course, is very different from Ozu, just in the matter that he isn't always as intimate of space as the old master would choose, Kore-eda plays around a lot with his choices in angles, and camerawork. It isn't his focus it would seem but it is very essential though in making moments of intimacy but also of distance. A sense of environment or a specific sense of performance. We have that all here that for example throughout the storm itself he very much keeps us in the space, however, before then he plays around this much more particularly when we see Ryota doing his detective work. It again is a direction that is very subdued yet does so much actually in careful choices throughout that amplify in their quiet yet potent ways. 

The screenplay very specifically is one of character exploration with a plot though of the specific set-up climax that is the resolution. Before then we find out who he is, and what he does. In that, there is so much in terms of interactions that paint our protagonist, but also the specific world that he exists in both in his family and in his line of work. Written with dialogue that naturally has moments of simple interaction, greater insight, and just humorous observation. The structure of the screenplay is essential though in providing a resolution that is built into the narrative and provides a specific payoff. A payoff that is earned by essentially showing how the confined space forces one to come to terms with every idea. 

I have not, but will need to at some point.

Louis Morgan said...

Shaggy:

I have seen Early Summer, "Flavor" and Late Autumn, and I believe I've previously given thoughts on those performances. 

Marcus & Emi:

I mean I take any such list as an aggregate of opinion, where I would say you see more than anything current trends but also a focus upon the ambition of technique, with the directors maybe focusing a bit more on the precision of technique. I don't theoretically begrudge any choices listed, there isn't anything that's a real "huh" even though I don't love every film, and there are obviously some films I'd personally include over others. I haven't seen Jeanne Dielman 23, quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles, though I have seen Les Rendez-vous d'Anna, and wasn't exactly my cup of tea, but certainly ambitious in attempted technique, even if it didn't work for me.

Luke:

Don't care for the cinematography, can't we get something closer to the original three? Too artificial looking for me. Additionally didn't really grab, particularly not that arrangement of the theme, hope its better than Skull, but I hardly thought it looked anything in line with Raiders or Crusade. I did like Sallah's opening voiceover though...something at least.

Guardians looks like it could be good, but I was severely burned by Vol.2 however I rather liked The Suicide Squad and Peacemaker so hoping for the best, at the very least Cooper's vocal performance sounds promising.

Mitchell Murray said...

Also, music related question for anyone who's interested: What would be your thoughts on the following songs that I recently stumbled upon?

Just Pretend - Bad Omens
Song #3 - Stone Sour
Things I Do For Money - The Northern Pikes
Break Free - Kingdom Collapse
I'll Make a Man Out of You - Peyton Parrish cover (The song kind of lends itself to hard rock covers, and this is one of the best I've heard)

Marcus said...

Louis: Depp is obviously lead to me in the first Pirates, but does that screen time percentage Robert brought up change that in anyway for you? Also, if he were to move over to Supporting, where would you rank him in the overall?

Calvin Law said...

Louis: so glad Kiki has a 5, too, and agree with everything you've said.

Matthew:

Taylor-Joy: 4
Fiennes: 4.5
Hoult: 4.5
Chau: 4.5/5
Leguizamo: 4
McTeer: 4
Light: 4
Adelstein: 3.5
Barney: 3.5
Brucato: 3.5
Carrero: 3.5
The tech bros: 3

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your favorite performances of entirely "good" individuals, like Douglas in Paths of Glory or Spall in Secrets and Lies?

Matt Mustin said...

Marcus: Why would this change it, he still has the most screen time in the whole cast, if anything it reaffirms that lead is correct.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Thoughts on the Catherine Called Birdy cast?

Anonymous said...

Oop, and ratings too of course.

8000S said...

Louis: According to Peter William Evans in his biography of Carol Reed, before settling on Welles, these were the actors that were considered for Harry Lime:

Trevor Howard
Kirk Douglas
Jimmy Stewart
David Niven
Robert Taylor
Rex Harrison
Robert Mitchum
Cary Grant
Noel Coward

What do you think of these possible choices? A big NO on Taylor for me.

Tim said...

Mitchell:

Just Pretend - it's okay. Has that slight use of autotune on the voice that is not overdone and fits the voice well. Bit then again the melody is a bit repeptitive and doesn't really crescendo, that'S weird. Overall it's fine; will not become one of my favorites.

Song #3 - this one is pretty great. Love the singing, love the vloice itself of course, the lyrics are cool and the melody is catchy af. Love it.

Things I do for Money - could not stand it. Just constantly speaking and then a bit of actual singing every 6 verses or so over background music that sounds like a Hans Zimmer reject. Nope, not my thing. The instrumental bridge was pretty cool though.

Break Free - Nothing special, but not bad. A bit short and the transitions are weird in the beginning, but overall i liked it.

IMAMOOY - Okay, we can talk. That really worked well, especially voice-wise this was really well translated even though i could never get the original out of my head.

Tim said...

Mitchell: yeah, that "reading the screen from left to right" thing Rush believed in (apparently he demanded that especially when he's in the same shot as Keira Knightley or the monkey). I never believed that honestly. I would not even say that's true to paintings, let alone film.

First of all, i would say people are adjusting new shots by the center of the frame and from then on just look at where the most visual information is.

If you want attention in a frame (if you'd even need it in these very quickly edited movies, which you don't) you can get that in a lot of other ways. Most audience members are looking at the person currently speaking or moving. Every Frame a Painting once made a video detailing how Memories of Murder use such techniques.

And his idea that when two people are sharing equal space on screen and that the audiences will not even look on the right side of it when the person on the left side is pretty is, sorry, absolute bullshit.

8000S said...

Louis: Also, thoughts on these leaked recordings of Tim Curry's Joker.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uc3TOa2iAXY

Matt Mustin said...

Top Gun Maverick has won Best Cinematography at the New York Film Critics Circle.

Anonymous said...

Although not a bad performance Keke Palmer in supporting is ridiculous fraud. Come on critics have some self-respect.

Anonymous said...

Louis thoughts on NYFCC?

Louis Morgan said...

Marcus:

Depp is lead from that data. The only thing that info might make one consider is where you place Bloom and Knightley, however I think both are co-leads with Depp.

Anonymous:

James Stewart - It's A Wonderful Life
Kirk Douglas - Paths of Glory
Frances McDormand - Fargo
Tim Robbins - The Shawshank Redemption
Lillian Gish - The Night of the Hunter

Anonymous:

Ramsey - 3.5(I honestly don't think she quite has the full star presence despite being an interesting performer in terms of her specific intensity in relation to her age. At a certain point though I think it becomes more surface than internalized which creates a limitation of her work. That is the case here to some degree though in general, she does have a certain off-beat charm through her unorthodox manner. She doesn't quite carry it all emotionally and there are limits within her performance, though overall she certainly has plenty of enjoyable moments.)

Scott - 3.5(Thought his performance was decent enough in creating the quirky lord dad that is far from your typical lord character in a given film. Scott has enough fun with it to create an eager eccentricity for much of it. I liked him most actually towards the end of the film where his performance becomes more earnest altogether and found him fairly moving in these moments.)

Piper - 3.5(Largely just brings a nice largely supportive presence in a lower key way, but also makes the most of her later scene in terms of the intensity of the physical performance given.)

Hainsworth - 3(Charming enough best friend role if just that.)

Alwyn - 3(Appropriately dashing if just that.)

Kaye - 3(Appropriately grotesque if just that.)

Okonedo - 3.5(Rarely don't appreciate Okenedo, her strange Viola Davis as Ma Rainey impression in Death on the Nile aside, she brings a delightful energy even if I might've preferred to have a bit more of her on the whole.)

Louis Morgan said...

8000's:

Trevor Howard - (I mean I could see it but glad he played Callaway instead, as he was ideal for that role.)

Douglas - (Definitely could see it, particularly that was in his still sleazy pathetic period to a degree.)

Stewart - (Would be VERY atypical but given Stewart's talent could've been a successful against-type turn.)

Niven - (Don't really see it at all and have never seen him play within the idea of devious really.)

Taylor - (This would've been one note, probably a slightly smug approach that would've gotten old fast and left very little of an impression.)

Harrison - (Late 40's Harrison I actually could see him dialing into a more devious streak and it could've worked.)

Mitchum - (Natural fit, would've been great as he can do casual evil with ease.)

Grant - (Unlike Stewart not as assured as his darker turns are typically less convincing. Although maybe it would've been just the right dark turn, but maybe not.)

Coward - (From what I've seen he didn't fully come into his own as a screen performer until later on.
)
Having said that I don't think any beats Welles in the role. 

Ytrewq Wertyq said...

I've been catching up to some 2022 releases recently and as such I've watched The Menu, Elvis and Armageddon Time. The first one I enjoyed very much, though eventually I wasn't a big fan of how Fiennes' character is written as the story concludes. The second one is okayish and it seems more interested in Col. Tom Parker than Elvis himself, but it's supported by its direction, as Luhrmann's style works for a person as flamboyant as Presley. The third one is a format we have stumbled before too many times and I didn't love Hopkins' performance that much when compared to you, guys.

Fiennes-4.5
Taylor-Joy-4
Hoult-4.5 (the best one)
Chau-4
Leguizamo,Birney,McTeer and Castro-3.5
Adelstein, Carrero,Light,Yang and Cyr-3

Butler-5
Hanks-1 (but I was thinking about a Wiseau for his first line or him ranting about "MR PRESLEY's SECURITY!" with an accent that's like a sloppy mix of Latka Gravas and typical Southern good ol'boy)
DeJonge-3
Thomson-3.5
Roxburgh-3
Harrison Jr.-3
Wenham-3
Smit-McPhee-2.5

Repeta-3
Hathaway-4
Strong-4
Hopkins-3.5/4
Webb-3.5
Polk-2.5
Diehl-3

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Predictions Wise:

I mean Farrell and Blanchett following their Volpi Cups with this, is a strong continuation for both. If Blanchett keeps going with this she could get a Day-Lewis style anointment and go straight to the third win. With Farrell I still think it is tougher to get the win still, but this only helps him that much more, particularly as The Whale continues to struggle a bit with its critical reaction.

Tar 100% feels like a NY winner, but still a good get that only helps Blanchett all the more.

Important get for Quan, who could be a sweeper if he keeps going.

Palmer feels like NY's purposeful swerve, as they often do for at least one choice, and indeed category fraud, I don't think she'll be a serious contender.

Rajamouli I think will need to keep getting wins for this to mean anything. This alone probably will not be enough to "force" recognition.

Quality wise: Not considering Supporting/Lead Actor, a strong set of winners, though I do dislike that fraud with Palmer.

Tim said...

so yeah, The Menu is a ton of fun.
Just one little thing. And i mean little, it's not like it really ruins anything.

Is it just me, or were the other characters a bit too chill about Hoult's behavior? I mean, yes, we the audience see more than they probably did, but i would have liked if at least somebody pointed out how remarkably happy he seemed with everything going on. That only happened after Fiennes directly adressed him to give him his "big chance" so to speak, and i already found him a bit too obviously happy in parts before that.

Maybe i'm overthinking it, but i found that a little odd

Louis Morgan said...

Tim:

Taylor-Joy certainly noticed, and I think everyone else was kind of too wrapped up in their current predicament to notice. Besides there wasn't really a reason for them to notice, since if they did it is not as though he was interacting with the rest of the guests other than Taylor-Joy, and to be suspicious of him wouldn't have made a difference in terms of their plight, since it is not as though anyone, other than Taylor-Joy, was looking towards him for any help or confiding in him in anyway.

Oliver Menard said...

Louis: Your prediction for Avatar 2 at the box office and it's award chances?

Louis Morgan said...

Oliver:

I think it is going to do well, but not as well as the original, if at a very basic level the 3 hour runtime might be more of a turn off for some.

I'm kind of torn on its overall awards prospects, because it will do well in the techs regardless, as visual effects and sound seem safe to predict at the very least. I do think picture is in play, I'm not sure about Cameron, because there is less of a "new" to it than the original had going for it (theoretically). I'm probably going to lean less than more, particularly when there is the promise of more down the pike so that leaves a chance for the Academy to reward it later on.

Tony Kim said...

Louis - could I get your thoughts on Lisa the Skeptic, Miracle on Evergreen Terrace, and King of the Hill (the Simpsons episode)?

Also, was there a particular Simpsons episode that made you stop watching, or was it more of a gradual loss of interest over time?

Louis Morgan said...

8000's:

It sounds more like tests than what would've been the final performance, although it probably doesn't help that he's working with the goofiest material from the animated series. I say this because each part it's a bit different some sillier some more intense, although it sounds like Hamill might've listened to this and done essentially a refined version as it is a similar take even if not exactly the same. Although I think it is fair to say the "his take was too scary" is bunk, but from this, honestly it sounds like he would've given a very similar performance to Hamill. Obviously we all are comfortable with, and love, Hamill's take, so this isn't really fair comparison, particularly as again it doesn't like probably what would've been Curry's final takes, however it does seem like the right man got the part.

Tony:

Lisa the Skeptic - (The twist is pretty hilarious, though I wouldn't say its commentary is too deep, though I also wouldn't say it is trying to be deep rather despite the subject matter it is more gag related than you might think particularly with Homer's exploitation of it. Its main crux of Lisa and Marge though does work and shows that it still had heart at this time, and also kept Lisa from being purely just the finger wagger.)

Miracle on Evergreen Terrace - (I've never liked this one because I think it is far too mean spirited for a Christmas episode, something even South Park would avoid most of the time in their episodes, having said that the Jeopardy gag is perfection.)

King of the Hill - (Eh it is one I can watch easily enough, but it's not that good. The whole development is very sloppy with random shifts throughout. What makes it fine for me, is the gags are amusing enough throughout though I wouldn't say there are any classics...hmm maybe Brendan Fraser's delivery of "This just in power sauce is amazing".)

Not really a single episode but rather just the weaknesses of season 13, less gags were funny, the structure of episodes became all the weaker and the heart was almost entirely removed. I did come back to try one here and there since then, and have always gone back to my original decision of not watching.

Anonymous said...

Louis: What of the “indie” Oscar contenders this year do you feel have good shots at making Picture, Lead Actor and Director?

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Well

Picture:

Most to least likely but could happen:

Tar
Women Talking
EEAO (though I do think there's a scenario where it juvenile humor and general weirdness limits its success to a degree)
Living (Think Philomena)

Director:

Tar
Women Talking
EEAO

Actor:

The Whale (His snub with Spirits is interesting, though they will snub like this from time to time. It does seem like it could just be Fraser for the film, which will help Farrell greatly)
Living (I would think it would be funny if Nighy comes in as an assumed "also ran" and wins the whole thing)

Aftersun or The Inspection. With The Son only seemingly losing momentum at the moment, and if Cruise is a pipedream, I could see a passion push for Mescal or Pope happening a la Demián Bichir.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Did you see The Whale or Aftersun? If so did you give your thoughts on those somewhere?

Louis Morgan said...

I have not.

Matt Mustin said...

Louis: "King of the Hill" has one of my favourite one-off dialogue jokes with the exchange between the Sherpas: "I foresaw your death last night." "Stop saying that."

8000S said...

Louis: For that biopic of Robert La Follette with either Lynch or Branagh, I'm assuming that you'd pick either as director?

Also, it's interesting. I've seen La Follette being described as a real-life Mr. Smith Goes to Washington by a big fan of his on YouTube. Think a biopic of La Follette with the tone of said film would work?

Calvin Law said...

Louis: thoughts on this VFX breakdown for Decision to Leave? https://thefilmstage.com/watch-a-visual-effects-breakdown-for-park-chan-wooks-decision-to-leave/

Tim said...

I just watched the 30s verson if Hunchback of Notre Dame. I have not read the original novel, but i think i have a general idea of the changes made. As such, i did enjoy this film but i think i prefer the 96 version just a little bit, which has its own set of problems for certain, but overall seems a bit more streamlined and focused. This version here though is especially impressive on a visual level, particularly the set design and the INSANELY well done Make-Up job.


O'Hara - 4.5
Laughton - 5
O'Brien - 4
Hardwicke - 5
Mitchell - 3.5
Davenport - 3


Seriously though, how absolutely amazing was Thomas Mitchell's career?!

Michael McCarthy said...

Tim: I’m convinced Thomas Mitchell was in every film produced in 1939. Also that Ward Bond was in every film between 1939 and 1946.

Bryan L. said...

Louis: I fully see what you mean regarding Péscal and Pope, but it’s also worth mentioning that both of them are very new on the scene (even more than Austin Butler), and Bichir had been a working character actor for many years before 2011. Maybe Ricardo Darin/Daniel Giménez Cacho/someone else gets that push instead?

Again, not trying to go against your point, but it seems that the Academy only nominates young actors if the film they’re in is a solid contender (Hedges, Chalamet, the Judas duo).

Bryan L. said...

(Then again, everyone below Pope on the GoldDerby chart is at 1/100 odds, and Darins not even on it. Admittedly, one of the first names that came to my head).

Robert MacFarlane said...

Mescal could very well be a Ryan Gosling situation. I currently have him in slot 5.

Aidan Pittman said...

Having seen Aftersun yesterday I don't think they'll go for Mescal, who is great but his performance is a very subtle one and not at all showy which they typically don't go for, especially for a smaller film like this and from an actor who isn't a big name. Given what the actors branch pulled last year, I'm guessing that they'll just throw Jackman in the 5th slot.

Louis Morgan said...

8000's:

Yes ESPECIALLY if directed by Lynch, using himself with Branagh at different ages, as Straight Story and Elephant Man proved his capability with doing earnest so beautifully.

Calvin:

I mean when I see these kinds of breakdowns it shows that CGI absolutely can be used for good rather than evil as I didn't suspect a single one of these, brilliant seamless work.

Bryan:

Bichir might've had credits but he wasn't really well known even as a character actor, far from say a Richard Jenkins.

I would watch out for Cacho just because of the academy's love for Iñárritu but I wouldn't count on it. As again, same with Darin, non-English language speaking actors rarely can break it unless established in the west in some way.

Aidan:

It is true never expect anything from the acting branch, and you'll never be disappointed, however Jackman's film is tanking far more than even Being the Ricardos which was mixed-positive where The Son is almost entirely negative. His ground just seems *too* thin at this point, and doesn't have the boost of playing a real person. I don't know who the fifth will be but Jackman seems too much of a flimsy contender at this point. I mean rare is it even that a negatively reviewed film can even make it into lead actor.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: absolutely spotless isn't it, had no idea that cliff wasn't a cliff.

And on that note I'm sticking with Park Hae-il as the surprise 5th spot. I think Mescal has a better shot than your usual 'new' actor, though, as Robert said it's giving Gosling vibes.

Anonymous said...

Mescal’s performance is very Gosling-like - very minimalist and naturalistic and Gosling has been nominated for Lead Actor for types of naturalistic performances in similarly acclaimed films to Aftersun, Half Nelson is what I’m thinking of though La La Land is also an internalised type of performance too and he very nearly got in for First Man. Even if Mescal doesn’t get in, I do think he’ll fill in a younger slot of naturalistic performer that others amongst his contemporaries are seemingly ignoring which is refreshing.

With that being said, Louis: Do you feel the 20s-30s aged generation of male actors are as a whole talented? And if so what areas are they lacking in, and who receives too much or too little praise from this contemporary era of actors?

Michael McCarthy said...

RIP Al Strobel

Luke Higham said...

I believe Babylon's going to be very divisive for Academy voters but if Robbie gets a major push, it could help Calva sneak in there but only just.

Matt Mustin said...

I have this strange feeling that Babylon will be shut out.

Tim said...

Omy god, you guys, Last Christmas is soooooooo bad!

So irredeemably forced, unbelievable and horrendously put together. Most of the main characters are annoying, the comedy is awkward, every resolution to every plotline is a joke and the ill-fitted attempts at depth or serious moments are utterly laughable.

And i enjoyed every second of it. It's so awkward and so terrible that you cannot physically have any reaction but just to laugh at it. I had way more fun with this than can be explained in words. I am seriously contemplating turning this into an annual hate watch tradition for me, just like i do with Love Actually.

I need to go watch The Holiday now, else i lose my faith in an entire genre ...

8000S said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the Layla montage in Goodfellas.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

I mean "as a whole" is difficult to consider as there's plenty of terrible actors out there.

On the other end there are plenty who have given great performances at this point, Paul Dano, Nicholas Hoult, Adam Driver, Daniel Kaluuya, LaKeith Stanfield, Andrew Garfield, Steven Yeun and Robert Pattinson to name but a few. There are plenty with unique presences and most are deserving of the general praise they get. Are a few hyped more due to teenage fanbases...probably, but I wouldn't count that as really part of the general consensus.

Matt:

I think that will be difficult just because costumes and production design seem likely even if the reviews end up being mostly negative.





















RIP Al Strobel, the man whose performance was too good to be a one off.

8000S said...

Louis: Oh, also thoughts on the scene from The Irishman where Frank goes to buy chili dogs. Another scene from Scorsese that makes me hungry.

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Your cast & director for an 1980s and 1990s Do Revenge.

Marcus said...

Louis: Could I have your thoughts on this three minute scene/song from Phineas and Ferb?
https://youtu.be/OyA3QmUL_x4

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Ratings and thoughts on the cast of The Eternal Daughter.

Mitchell Murray said...

Marcus: It's been a long while since I've heard someone reference "Phineas and Ferb" - which is a shame, honestly, for such a unique and long lasting show.

As for that clip, it's a finely performed and fitting song indeed, though I do have a soft spot for "not so bad a dad".

Mitchell Murray said...

Also, fun little easter egg...

The voice actress for Isabella, Alyson Stoner, also voiced Opal from "Legend of Korra".

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

One of the few positive examples of executive meddling I can think of is Phineas and Ferb being required to have one song per episode. That show was a very rare bright spot in a mediocre late 2000's cartoon line up.

Mitchell Murray said...

Also, side note here...I revisited the "Arkham Asylum" game recently. Beyond being properly lauded for it's lore, combat and general atmosphere, the dynamic between Conroy and Hamill is on full display, and very rewarding/bittersweet to experience again.

With the Joker, Hamill really mastered the ability to switch from hilarious to menacing, and then back again. And with Conroy...well, what else can I say other than he shows a complete understanding of the role; Grim, steadfast, deservedly cocky, but all with an underlying sorrow and rage verging on insanity. Simply a great vocal performance from a career defined by them.

"I'm sorry Jim"

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your top 10 Keri Russell acting moments so far?

Tim said...

R.I.P. Kirstie Alley

Matt Mustin said...

Anonymous: Wait til he watches The Americans so he can properly answer that.

Anonymous said...

Louis: What award touted films for this year are you yet to watch and will watch soon? If you’ve watched any lately, please do you have any particular thoughts on them?

Shaggy Rogers said...

About the Mickey 17 teaser I was surprised with the release date, I believed it would come out between August and November. I was also surprised by the name change which was Mickey7. I got more excited.

Marcus said...

Anonymous: Louis logs his most recent watches on Letterboxd, you can find the link highlighted in red on the right.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Are you close to finishing The Night Manager.

Luke Higham said...

And ratings and thoughts on Brown and Hall in Honk For Jesus. Save Your Soul.

Matt Mustin said...

Rewatched A History of Violence and I have to say that I found a whole new appreciation for it, as I suspected I would. I picked up on a lot more subtleties this time around, particularly in Mortensen's performance, and I'll freely admit that the first time I saw it I just simply wasn't mature enough to appreciate it.

Mortensen-5
Bello-4
Harris-5(Maybe his best performance?)
Hurt-4.5
Holmes-2
MacNeill-3
McHattie-4(Always good.)
Schmid-1

Mitchell Murray said...

Matt: Yah, I might have had the same impression about "A History of Violence" when I first watched it IE "it's good, but what makes it great?" Looking back on the film, though, I do find it to be a very effective and well acted piece. Oddly enough, one of my old professors helped me confirm this viewpoint. They talked about the "hypocrisy" of Cronenberg to make such a strong condemnation of violence, given his background with grotesque body horror.

I guess my response to that would be...maybe that was his point? Maybe two decades after "The Fly", Cronenberg wanted to try something different and explore his well known taste for gore in a more grounded, harsher light? Beyond that, I'd say Cronenberg's aptitude for body horror helps make the film as disturbing as it is. He doesn't shy away from just how brutal his characters behave, and the full trauma of their actions are shown in all their ugliness.

Honestly, the movie's whole theme can be heard through one of Hurt's lines...

"when you dream, are you still Joey?"

Tom, for all his attempts to start fresh, and despite all the lies to himself/others, never escaped the monster he was. His true nature could only stay hidden for so long, and it left him a broken shell of his former and current self.

Mitchell Murray said...

Also, yeah...Harris is fantastic, and I never thought the phrase "don't forget your shoes" could be simultaneously so funny and chilling.

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Tim: I have to say, what a real difference the right script can do for someone. In Jamaica in, Maureen O'Hara is honestly a non entity, yet in HoND, she's easily one of the film's biggest assets.

Louis Morgan said...

8000's:

I mean just Scorsese brilliance at its finest, and a highlight in his collaboration with Schoonmaker and Ballhaus, as it literally is purging so many characters at once with such brilliant efficiency that is both brutally and beautifully done in equal measure. The rhythm of the song being so precise and perfect with every image, which each tell their own story through almost entirely the visual of unlocking the kind of "mystery" of each discovered death. Only to segue so elegantly right to the joy of Jimmy, the orchestrator of the deaths, living his greatest triumph, that is represented by Tommy, who with the music seems to be riding to future, where in fact it is his end with one more death. The music fading away just before that blunt snap that really puts an end to all the "glory" of Jimmy's triumph.

The detail of Scorsese as just a simple moment of picking up hotdogs, but it is the exact way that Scorsese indulges, if but for a second, to really make the cooking of the beer dogs as enticing as possible.

Bryan:

Do Revenge 1980's directed by Martha Coolidge:

Drea: Michelle Pfeiffer
Eleanor: Linda Fiorentino
Max: Kevin Bacon

Do Revenge 1990's directed by Amy Heckerling:

Drea: Sandra Bullock
Eleanor: Marisa Tomei
Max: Robert Downey Jr.

Marcus:

Although too short verse wise, and aside of "ninja of love" you could convince me this was lost Chicago love ballad.

Luke:

Swinton - 4.5(I almost wish another had taken this role only because we've seen this before from Swinton so is maybe too expected at this point. Having said that this is a good performance in that she convincingly creates the two characters that are similar as mother and daughter but certainly different. She suggests the more doddering manner of the mother but also the more anxiety ridden daughter. She's best together where she has convincing chemistry with herself in conveying their past history and developing that relationship effectively. Although the amount of scenes where she is silently staring are too many overall, every moment she can do more she does make the most of.)

Brown - 3.5(He's entertaining in just playing up the completely shameless manner of his character at every point, and does find some variation in the different levels of shamelessness. Showing how the man is shameless when at his biggest, but even at a personal level he always plays with it the same delusion although quieter. I would say there are limitations though because the character doesn't exactly go anywhere, still he is convincing and effectively plays with the satire even if I wish there had been more variation given to him.)

Hall - 4.5(A performance that does actually find variations even when the film doesn't. She plays well within the more overt moments with Brown, but in every scene Hall layers in everything her character is going through below the immediate surface. She creates a real sense of her conflict and trying to come to terms with her husband's flaws in every subsequent embarrassment. Her reactions are never simple, but rather convey a very long history where she really has been too much yet Hall makes you convinced why she stays with the man nonetheless. Hall's work is nuanced finding depth in really every little bit she has and really suggests a greater film than the one she is in.)

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: When you do rewatch Your Name, I'd suggest watching it in the original Japanese- makes a difference for all the songs, and the performances are uniformly better in my opinion.

8000S said...

Louis: Thoughts on the kiss in the rain scene in The Quiet Man.

Ytrewq Wertyq said...

Louis: Your 1990s and 2000s casts and directors for Bones and All?

8000S said...

Louis: Also, for that 60's Public Enemies with Frankenheimer as director, maybe either Howe or Hall for DP?

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Gavin Spokes, Nanna Blondell, Wil Johnson, Sian Brooke and Jefferson Hall in HOTD.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thoughts on The Night Manager cast and where would it rank in the careers of Hiddleston, Laurie, Colman and Debicki.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Louis: You ever watch anything from the Goes Wrong franchise? I recommend Peter Pan Goes Wrong, fitting for Christmas. As a bonus, it’s from 2016.

Shaggy Rogers said...

Hey guys
Tell us which performances already mentioned in Louis's overalls can improve in the review and can earn 5:
Tony Leung - In the Mood Love
Toshiro Mifune - The Bad Sleep Well
Tatsuya Nakadai - Kill!
James Cagney - Public Enemy
Ewan McGregor - The Ghost Writer
Jim Carrey - The Truman Show
Kyle MacLachlan - Blue Velvet
Al Pacino - The Godfather Part 3

8000S said...

Shaggy: I'm not seeing Pacino getting a 5. I do see Cagney and Mifune being upgraded.

Shaggy Rogers said...

8000S: I don't think it gets a 5 either. Even though it's not on the same level as parts 1 and 2, the third movie has improved over time, so "never say never" and let's wait and see.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Shaggy: Don't see Leung getting upgraded further as Louis already rewatched the film, but I'd love it if it happens sometime in the future.

Ytrewq Wertyq said...

Shaggy: I don't think Carrey will go up that much, since Louis mentioned how that performance is well executed, but it lacks a factor that would make it qualify for a good in-depth analysis. He's going to get a filler review, if anything.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Definitely think my 1986 requests (Alan Ruck and River Phoenix) will be 5’s.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Where would The Night Manager rank in Tom Hollander's career.

Anonymous said...

There's a good fight between Cagney, Lorre and Robinson.

Others that I believe will be 5 are Fields (The Bank Dick), Stewart (The Naked Spur) and Bowie (The Prestige)

Matt Mustin said...

Luke: I'm currently watching it as well and I think Hollander is one of the worst parts of it.

Unknown said...

No chance Fields gets a five. Zero.

Louis Morgan said...

Tahmeed:

Twas my intention. 

8000's:

Love the scene, and sometimes great direction is staying with the actors. As it is all conveyed between O'Hara and Wayne, as you see them bridging between separation and as true pair. They separate at first, with Mary Kate folding into herself before Sean embraces her, she embracing him, then truly becoming one as they kiss. 

8000's:

Hall ideally for that kind of crime photo aesthetic he did in In Cold Blood. 

Anonymous:


Spokes - (A performance that worked in basically unlocking an innocent man who tries to honestly serve his king to the point of seeming like a true outlier. Spokes properly play his part without complication just a man trying to speak his words as best he can and trying to counsel his king best they can even as he is limited by it. Spokes also though does bring a nice bit of emotion later on in creating this certain sense of failure as he looks upon the fighting children, and is moving in his final moments suggesting a good man quite unlike his second son.)

Blondell - (In a very short amount of time I will give her credit in creating seeming importance by creating convincing chemistry with Smith, as not true love, but a strong understanding of one another. Then she is genuinely powerful in her final moments in creating this mixed sense of extremely intense pain but also conviction in the final moments.)

Johnson - (I wouldn't mind a bit more of him as I liked the basic uncompromising energy he brought within the performance. Showing a man who wears his ambition and opinion on his sleeve much to his own fault. Johnson makes the most of his final scene in particular by presenting such satisfaction in the man as he calls it as he sees it, not wearing a hint of fear, just the man being his purest self.)

Brooke - (Again notable that she manages to create an impression so briefly that you get the real sense of love between her husband and daughter in their few scenes together. Brooke creates a sense of a woman who has accepted her setup role while doing so in a way that still conveys a sense of inner strength. In turn, she in part made her final scene as horrifying as it was, by in part having established a fleshed-out individual that we care about, but also by viscerally conveying every moment of the horror of it.)

Hall - (I think he was entirely fine if not overly distinctive particularly as he stands among the ranks of Lannister performers within Thrones. He isn't quite yet the Lord of Lords though and was decent in showing the smug privilege if perhaps his character has a bit less to back it up than say Tywin eventually would.)
Robert:

I have not, but I'll certainly consider the recommendation.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Hiddleston  - (It is a rock solid leading man style turn and is convincing as basically giving his audition for more of a Bondlike character. Hiddleston brings the right kind of quiet charisma here, playing to a likability in crafting the empathetic streak while still maintaining an overall stoic quality to his performance. He is particularly good in his scenes of quiet reaction where he has such good moments in terms of increasing the tension by subtly indicating his fear, or his moment of quiet anger or heartbreak by reacting to what is going on around him. He gives a strong heroic turn here bringing the right confidence in the part, but also always consistently establishing the heart of it. Probably Hiddleston best fully lead turn at the very least.)

Debicki - (Mistreated wife 1.0? Her first tryout in the part she is currently typecast, currently ongoing I guess given she is now playing Diana. She is good at it though at the very least, and I'd put this second behind Widows of this performance ilk for her. She manages to do everything she can after all with it. Certainly bringing a seductive sultry quality however playing that in the right way in showing it to be a bit of stressed madness of a woman who knows she's stuck in a bad position. She plays this well against having the moments where we are intimate and she shows just the blunt fear of it all quite potently. It is a moving performance as typical for her and she makes for a powerful damsel in distress even if that is essentially what she is in the scheme of things.)

Jupe  - (Not a big role but a nice naturalistic turn that showed he had from near the start.)

Colman - (In her grand scheme probably lower tier great tier for her. In that, she offers such a unique presence for this type of story that really does enliven every one of her scenes with this alternative energy. She's great though in conveying the certain sense of dogged conviction of a proper professional spy even with the manner of the sort of milquetoast housewife. Colman doesn't make it a disconnect but rather uses it to create a new pathway into exposition scenes that become more dynamic by the value of her presence. Additionally, though all the key moments, particularly the moment in which she notes why she wants to get Roper so badly, are just amazing acting with how much weight she carries into every word, how much emotion she is holding in, and the heart wrenching sense of reality she grants to the painful memory she is holding in.)

Louis Morgan said...

Laurie - (For much of the series I felt he had a bit of a thankless role despite the prominence of his character in the scheme, being the typical "other man" in so many ways. Even within the confines of that though I did like Laurie's balance between this friendly low-key charm about Roper with just the right touches of the undercurrent of menace. The last episode though is where he finally can do more than that, and there is where I thought it made all the rest of his work wholly proper because he so delivers in the end. Laurie brings out all the stops to show the rest of his work to be a bit of an act revealing such cutting intensity to his performance, and a real menace. While being as successful in showing Roper lose his position, particularly his final moment I thought was outstanding in showing the man wholly losing his control that so defined the rest of the work. Making such a great impact, by being so different from the rest of the work, yet feeling natural to the character. Probably the best dramatic turn that I've seen from him.)

Hollander - (Very low. Honestly thought he was more arch here than in Pirates, where that was in tone with that film at least, where he is very much out of place here in what is supposed to have a more realistic tone. I think he takes a great role and wastes it. This needed a performance that actually needed to garner that Claude Rains in Notorious or Will Patton in No Way Out, twisted kind of sympathy. Where while the character is evil you can strangely care about his particular betrayal. Hollander though plays up the evil so much that he turns the character into just this dull fiend that really doesn't have anywhere to go. When he loses it, the emotion feels off because he makes Corky so overtly nefarious that you don't get a proper sense of the man being genuinely hurt by being mistreated by his friend. This could've been something special but I thought this was a major miscalculation.)

Louis Morgan said...

Ytrewq:

Bones and All 1990's directed by Neil Jordan:

Maren Yearly: Jennifer Jason Leigh
Lee: Linus Roache
Sully: Stephen Rea
Frank: John Heard
Jake: Michael Parks
Brad: Stephen McHattie
Janelle: Candy Clark
Barbara: Kim Hunter

Bones and All 1990's directed by Park Chan-wook:

Maren Yearly: Bae Doona
Lee: Lee Byung-hun
Sully: Choi Min-sik
Frank: Roe-ha Kim
Jake: Byun Hee-Bong
Brad: Kim Byeong-Ok
Janelle: Kim Hae-sook
Barbara: Youn Yuh-jung

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Lee Byung-hun as a bisexual cannibal with dyed hair would definitely be a sight to see.

On another note, hope Chalamet is a definite for a review.

Tony Kim said...

Louis: Regarding the Sight and Sound lists, out of the many notable omissions, were there any that particularly surprised you?

Also, other than Dielman, are there any films on either list you haven't seen, or had never even heard of prior to the list?

Louis Morgan said...

Tony:

The only theoretical surprises were a few of those missing from the previous list, The Godfather Part II (which even then I can see some saying "I covered it by including the first one") and Lawrence of Arabia (which should be on any list that is going for directorial achievement and it is very weird that David Lean doesn't have one film to represent him.)

Not surprised by Chinatown's removal for obvious reasons.

I hadn't heard of Daisies, Meshes in the Afternoon, Tropical Malady and Touki Bouki before then.

In addition to those I haven't seen Tokyo Story, Man With a Movie Camera, The Rules of the Game, Cleo from 5 to 7, Close-Up, Playtime, Shoah, Killer of Sheep, News From Home, Satantango, Daughters of the Dust, The Gleaners and I, Celine and Julie Go Boating, Histoires du Cinema (not in a rush), Madame de..., A Man Escaped, Black Girl.

Anonymous said...

Louos: Your top 5 Terry Crews and Andre Braugher acting moments.

Anonymous said...

Louis, thoughts on the NBR winners.

Perfectionist_ad said...

Related to NBR, I was checking out previous NBR winners on Wikipedia, I was today years old when I found that George Clooney has won freaking 3 lol. Most for best actor.

Perfectionist_ad said...

Also I wanted to say one another thing. Colin Farrell should be winning the Oscar this year. It's not just about having THE single best performance of the year(Even though The Banshees EASILY makes a case for that as well) but the fact that he was an absolute workhorse this year as well. His equally brilliant performance in After Yang as well and he was giving his 110% in The Batman too. "The best actor of 2022" would fit him better than anyone else. It's one of the reasons Hopkins is my win for 1993.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Crews:

I like Crews in general, but I'm not sure I have specified moments.

Braugher:

1. Verbal attack by Trip - Glory
2. Tent introduction - Glory
3. Final Battle - Glory
4. "My wife was murdered by a man in a Yellow Sweater" Brooklyn 99(Have seen a random episode here and there)
5. Volunteering - Glory

Anonymous:

Prediction wise:

Top Gun Maverick is doing what it needs to be doing in becoming a force from the start. Good get for Aftersun, though might not be enough for Mescal to make a play but a decent start. Avatar potentially begins the run as a high tier contender, in turn I think Wakanda Forever is seeming less and less likely. Banshees, EEAO, The Fabelmans, and Women Talking all supporting their presumed status. Glass Onion apparently doing as well as Knives Out, though maybe it will get the same in the end. RRR continues to prove its contention which it needs. Good gets for Till and The Woman King which I think will need continued momentum to stay afloat.

Notable miss for Tar (Even missing the independent list), though usually something misses here that still is a best picture nominee, perhaps the trend of misses though for The Whale, Babylon and Elvis.

The acting winners for NBR particularly often don't mean much, however still not a bad thing for Yeoh, Gleeson and Monae to get on the winning board in general. More notable for Farrell just because most don't get both NY and NBR, so the love is real for him. That's what he needs and he's doing everything he needs to in order to get over the hump of being an unorthodox winner in terms of role.

Quality Wise (disregarding lead and supporting actor):

I have to say this year is looking up for me, as the worst of it for me is the Glass Onion (and even that I'm not going to begrudge any love for it). I wouldn't call any of those that I've seen are bad, with many being quite inspired. Also great choices in Yeoh and Monae, and LOVE those screenplay wins.

Anonymous said...

Louis: What films have you yet to see for this year awards season?

Robert MacFarlane said...

Louis: I just recently saw the 2005 King Kong for the first time, so I have to ask: Any chance Black could go up? Because I thought he was great.

Tim said...

Robert: while i do love that movie more than i should and really enjoy Black in many parts of it (especially near the end), there is a big problem in the first half.

Why would ANYBODY trust that guy? Seriously, he just seems kind of naturally conniving. The characters around him, especially Hanks, are supposed to be dissappointed late in the story by him being a douchebag, which i never believed, i can't see how they didn't see that beforehand

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Those that haven't gotten a release or a wide release yet.

Robert:

Well I have always liked Black in it (#40 is among the good performance for me that year), but I also haven't seen it in some time, so not impossible.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I get what Tim is saying, but I consider more of a writing problem. I was impressed with how much he internalized. Brought some conflict to the sleaze. By far my favorite thing about the film.

Calvin Law said...

I'm starting to think Maverick could be BP win competitive. It's probably getting editing, sound and cinematography, and I do think it has the passion to get the big one. What holds me back is that it will probably need at least one above the line nod.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Given how quickly Jackman's stock is falling at the moment, I am starting to buy Cruise as a possibility, particularly since all the other seeming #5's are basically academy unknowns. I do ponder how Kosinski is going to do, since technical achievements often = best director, yet I rarely see him being predicted, but really why not?

Calvin Law said...

For what it's worth, if it gets an above the line nom, I would take Kosinski over Cruise. If people love Maverick, then Kosinski is frankly the biggest reason why; everything I hear that people love about it is his work.

I think he might get DGA and after that get into the convo a bit more.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Same. And yes, logically if you love Maverick you love his work.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your thoughts on this Succession scene in terms of the performances?

https://youtu.be/lXKVp4h_M1U

Ytrewq Wertyq said...

Louis: Your 5 best Matthew Broderick moments?

Shaggy Rogers said...

Ytrewq: I haven't seen many of his movies but I say my #1 is his last scene from Ferris Bueller's Day Off which says:
"Yeah. I had said it and I say it again. Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it." And gives a smile.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: If you're seeing it today, may I have your ratings and thoughts on the cast of Del Toro's Pinocchio.

Calvin Law said...

Loved the beginning and finale of Pinocchio, very mixed on the midsection. Overall, quite liked it.

P.S. Anyone with MUBI, Decision to Leave is streaming from today onwards.

Matthew Montada said...

Calvin: ratings for the cast of Del Toro’s Pinocchio?

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Argentina through to the semis, Brazil out in the quarters. Love to see it.

Louis Morgan said...

Emancipation isn't bad but it also isn't good either. It is just kind of eh, I think the overall concept could've made a great film, but Antoine Fuqua wasn't the one to deliver it.

Smith - 4
Foster - 3

Robert MacFarlane said...

>Foster gets a 3.

Oh my God, the king is dead!

Michael McCarthy said...

I just saw The Whale.

No one should be wearing a fat suit for any reason, and I don’t think I’m going to change my mind on that any time soon. Having said that, yes, Brendan Fraser is as great as people are saying. Hong Chau is also outstanding and pretty easily my Supporting Actress win now.

Matthew Montada said...

Michael: ratings for the cast of The Whale?

Calvin Law said...

Matthew:

Mann - 3.5
Bradley - 4.5
McGregor - 4
Waltz - 3.5
Swinton - 3.5/4
Perlman - 3
Wolfhard - 2.5
Blanchett - *perfection*
Gorman - 3

Louis Morgan said...

Tahmeed:

Strong is great in portraying a man completely exuding desperation at his lowest, hostile to all and just filled with insecurities just about at his worst. Conversely when Shiv is less confident she actually tends to be less horrible as a person and Snook is great in showing the insecurity connect with actually a greater degree of sympathy. Culkin then is terrible (in a great way) as Roman is confident, portraying such smarmy bluster playing the part basically as his dad's demonic puppet, presenting Roman at his worst when believing he's doing exactly when Logan wants. Have to say I love what Alan Ruck does in the scene, showing maybe Connor's role often as the older brother just trying to calm down his more ambitious siblings in a genuine way, even if his attempt is callously disregarded.

Ytrewq:

1. Getting caught in the act - Election
2. "Come on, 54th" - Glory
3. Willing to accept Blame - Ferris Bueller's Day Off
4. Seeing Tracy in the end - Election
5. Trying to talk to Tripp - Glory

Tim said...

Calvin: your thoughts on David Bradley?

Michael McCarthy said...

Fraser: 5
Sink: 3
Chau: 5
Simpkins: 3.5/4
Sidharan: 3.5
Morton: 4

Louis Morgan said...

Basically share Calvin's thoughts on Pinocchio, though I'd add I wish the songs were a little better. Same ratings for the cast, I doubt anyone can top Bradley's work when it comes to vocal performances this year.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: I kind of agree on the songs. I do like the main recurring motif, but some of the musical numbers left something to be desired. Though I must admit, Waltz's singing is better than I expected.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I’ll go further; The musical numbers were uniformly terrible. Bogs the film down.

Anonymous said...

Louis, thoughts on the casts of Emancipation and Pinocchio.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Are you to watch Aftersun or The Whale anytime soon?

Ytrewq Wertyq said...

I saw Pinocchio and I thought it was very good all around. I didn't hate the musical numbers or anything, but none of them really contributed to the story aside from "Ciao, Papa".

Mann-3
Bradley-4
McGregor-3.5
Waltz-3.5
Swinton-3
Perlman-3.5
Wolfhard-3
Blanchett-3.5 (aside from her major scene, it seems that Frank Welker has some competition now)
Gorman-3
Nelson-3
Kenny-3
Turturro-2.5 (fine, but has not much to do)