Saturday, 3 October 2020

Alternate Best Actor 1944: Laird Cregar in The Lodger

Laird Cregar did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Mr. Slade the titular character in The Lodger.

The Lodger is one of the many adaptations of the Jack the Ripper inspired story of a mysterious man taking residence in the upstairs of a London home.
 
Laird Cregar is one of the great "could've been actors" having only a six year run in films before his untimely death at the age of 31. One must note though then the remarkable thing it is to discover the man, and to see what he was able to accomplish within that tragically brief tenure. Cregar naturally was cast within the classic "heavies" however again notable how Cragar in that time was able to create different types of characters within that role. Whether it was the sniveling weasel henchmen in This Gun For Hire, a particularly affable devil in Heaven Can Wait, or of his creepy yet tragic inspector in I Wake Up Screaming. Cregar found a different approach and even a different tone for each. We find that again here, where honestly one might be able to quickly presume that Cregar is in fact playing Jack the Ripper as the Lodger known as Slade, a nearby street name to his hopeful residence. Cregar's performance then is what must create the intrigue far beyond the "is he?" the defines the story. He's obviously him, so really it comes down to how intriguing he is in revealing the strange state of the man. This from his opening scene where the man investigates the upper floor of the residence. Cregar's higher pitched voice granting both a elegance and an off-beat peculiar quality to the man. His eyes filled with something that isn't so easily described as he looks upon the quarters, and his almost lustful way of speaking that the home will provide the "intense heat" for his "medical experiments". 

Where the part would be later played by Jack Palance with a steely calm, there is something far more dynamic within Cregar's performance that seeks to grant a certain odd sympathy for Slade even as he also reveals the nature of the man. This in his first scene as the man remarks the place shall be a refuge for him after be spoken to of the Jack the ripper murders. Cregar's monetary gaze up into though shows the man's need for some kind of solace within his mind, befitting a man technically being constantly hunted. Cregar's performance creating an intrigue within itself through his manner as he tips towards the stylized yet never goes too far in granting an nearly intangible quality about the man. This again remarkable as Cregar suggests a man almost another plane of thought that alludes towards what is that Slade is doing when he is not "lodging". Cregar's performance, which the cinematographer particularly seems to love in the way his face essentially glows here, is captivating within itself in creating Slade not as a, is he, isn't he, question but rather an examination of what a man who does such would be. We are granted to explore more of this as Slade's introduced to the idea of his landlady's niece Kitty (Merle Oberon) is a showgirl. First explaining his distinct fascination with showgirls. This as Cregar is impeccably creepy in speaking the fear nearly in the man's voice as he explains the way he oddly seems to think he's oppressed by them in some way. This though at the same when distinctly speaking of one Cregar's glare is of a precise transfixing thought. 

His first meeting with her is a brilliant scene for Cregar this is as he's both creepy but in a strange way an almost romantic quality he brings. This when explaining river in the night to her. This as Cregar speaks the words with a poet's grace but just with an intensity that is more than that. There is something pressing with the man, a madness that he so eloquently realizes as a state that makes Slade's psychopathy on that different state of mind. Again though Cregar is chilling with a nearly ethereal quality in creating the deranged state so uniquely. Cregar's performance in a way know that the material has been tried many times before in a way, as though his performance in some way subvert the material, he glides through in a way to grace each note with some marvelous eccentricity. This just in the way he watches others, including an inspector, discuss the case. Cregar's look craft the man suspicious of well...the suspicions, but there's more. His little glares grant a critical quality in the man almost annoyed at the others attempting to pigeonhole himself as some kind of particular maniac. Although I wouldn't quite say Cregar makes the character of Slade fun, there is something quiet entertaining in his portrayal that is playful in a way without being dismissive of the material. This most often in playing the "monster" of the lodger, just in his particular gait, and especially his way of looking upon the others with the manner of a predator minding his prey. That so often with the look of dead eyes of Slade. This though still with the complication in his work of showing Slade is in some way conflicted between disgust and lust in his crimes. This in his interactions with Kitty where Cregar is so many things at once. That looking as both in love with her and with a hate. This speaking though with some critical venom and some hope of seduction. Cregar's always elegant delivery making the most of the hypocrisy of Slade. Cregar apparently attempted to grant the part a "romantic veneer" and successful he is in this. This in making his performance fascinating kind of a mad man. This in even his final scene with Oberon where he reveals his murderous intent that Cregar plays both as a horror scene and a love scene. This in going back and forth between the seduction and the kill as this terrible sort of dance. Although the film is just fine otherwise, if only just fine, Cregar achieves greatness here by both fulfilling and subverting expectations of the part of Slade. A part that was played before and would be played again, but Cregar makes it his own. This as a magnetic hypocrite that exists in his own realm that clashes violently when he attempts to confront reality.

123 comments:

Anonymous said...

Louis, I'm incredibly pleased that you loved Cregar here.

RatedRStar said...

His final film I think has to be a guaranteed review/watch I think, plus it completes the 5 for 1945 lol.

Louis: His final heavy breathing expression when he is cornered before he jumps out the window as the police edge closer, OMG it has to be one of the creepiest scenes of that era when the camera closes in on his face.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Rating and thoughts on Oberon.

Emi Grant said...

I've always found Jack The Ripper as an immensely interesting case despite every rarely going out of my way to seek out more about him. Might check out this film to remedy that, though.

Mitchell Murray said...

Emi: I think the greatest point of intrigue concerning the Ripper is that, like the Zodiac and Butcher of Hillsbury Run, the killer was never identified. We don't have a complete profile of the perpetrator, which allows for an uncommonly large amount of creative license. Beyond that, the Victorian era is a rather fascinating time period, and a writer/film maker can do a lot with 1890's London.

Louis: Who would you cast as Napoleon and Illya in the 80s, 90s and 00s versions of "The Man from Uncle"? I must say, the best thing "The Gentleman" did for me was boost my appreciation for that film.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Aside from playing Javert in a Les Miserables adaptation, I've read that empresario Billy Rose wanted Cregar to star as Henry VIII for a Broadway production.

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

I've got four new performances to call favorites (4.5s or 5s):

Bela Lugosi in Dracula (4.5)
Giulietta Massina and Anthony Quinn in La Strada (5 and 4.5 respectively)
Deborah Kerr in Tea and Sympathy (5)

Louis Morgan said...

Having watched the new Boys in the Band, not sure why it exists largely because, other than the more modern aesthetic of the cinematography, it doesn't make any major choices that differentiates itself from the original film right down to maintaining its Broadway performers in the adaptation. So I guess its a revival film, but unlike plays where there is an obvious purpose to even an unambitious revival, one can simply watch the original film. The only reason I can wager is for the performances, but even then most skew extremely close towards their 70 counterparts in terms of approach.

RatedRStar:

Another great moment for Cregar.

Luke:

Oberon - 3(She's perfectly fine here, completely overshadowed by Cregar, however effective in balancing in her work a sense of interest with the man as much as she portrays the growing fear towards him as well. Not substantial, largely due to the limits of the role but good.)

Anonymous:

Sounds like ideal casting at the very least.

Mitchell Murray said...

Louis: Who would you cast as Napoleon and Illya in the 80s, 90s and 00s versions of "The Man from Uncle"?

Aidan Pittman said...

Just watched Dracula (92). Absolutely nuts. Liked it a good deal though, mainly because of the visuals and Coppola's direction.

Oldman - 4
Ryder - 3
Reeves - 1.5
Hopkins - 3.5

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Aidan: Funny how we both watched a Dracula movie for the first time.

Louis Morgan said...

Matt:

80's:

Napoleon: Kurt Russell
Illya: Arnold Schwarzenegger

90's:

Napoleon: Robert Downey Jr.
Illya: Russell Crowe

00's:

Napoleon: Matthew McConaughey
Illya: Karl Urban

Mitchell Murray said...

Louis: I am not Matt.

Louis Morgan said...

Mitchell:

You're not? I could've sworn Matt and Mitchell are the same name.

Mitchell Murray said...

Louis: For what its worth, you'd be surprised how many people have called me Michael by mistake...

I jest, of course. There's no harm done.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: thoughts and ratings for the cast to The Boys in the Band? I agree with you except I thought the performances in this version were largely better.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Funny, I just watched the original Dracula for the first time! It was... kind of boring. I actually liked Frye more than Lugosi.

Emi Grant said...

Louis: I mean, both Matt and Mitchell are Canadian too. You might be onto something.

Matt Mustin said...

I've never seen us in the same room together.

Calvin Law said...

The Prestige (2006)

Aidan Pittman said...

Seems like this was a Dracula kind of night.

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

So it was, haha

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

I don't think I disagree on the whole, but rather noted that most interpretations of the parts are pretty similar. I do prefer Nelson and Frey to their counterparts however. Also thinking on it more I prefer a lot of Friedkin's touches, for example staying on the actors for the phone calls (rather than the unneeded cutaways) and of course Harold's entrance.

Parsons - 2.5(Perhaps I should Kenneth Nelson a bit more credit, or perhaps there's just something about Parsons as a performer I don't like, but definitely preferred the original performance here even with the greater theatrical bent. This as I just didn't feel any of the true desperation or vulnerability of the character here even in his big emotional moments. Rather I felt Parsons played almost the whole thing on just kind of a generally catty note which I think undersells the intentions of the self-loathing character. He's not terrible in my mind, but I felt it's a pretty thin performance on the whole.)

Quinto - 3(Okay I think Quinto and everyone involved in the production loved Frey's original performance, which makes sense as it was the best in the original film. Having said that, Quinto does practically an imitation on every level of what Frey did in the original but in general I think he hits a lot of generally lighter note that doesn't serve the part as well as Frey's truly venomous turn. I do think he's general more than fine in the imitation but again I honestly would've rather seen an entirely new take rather than a Frey-lite.)

Bomer - 3(An upgrade of a really slight role to begin with. This just as I felt Bomer managed to bring a bit more of a naturalistic presence that aided the character's purpose really of being largely just there for support in the strictest sense.)

Rannelles & Watkins - 3/3.5(Though I think Rannelles potentially could've adjusted his work a little more at times, still I think both deliver in their roles. Watkins particularly in creating the sense of the discomfort in the man in basically an in-between. This as he's best though in his big moment in portraying sort of a genuine moment of connection and happiness. This being helped by the two having I think far stronger chemistry than the original duo.)

Carver - 2.5(I mean he's practically a clone of Robert La Tourneaux in almost every regard. A limited role no matter what, but I think there are seeds for perhaps a little more. Carver I think is fine, but doesn't really make any more of an impact.)

Washington - 3(Pretty good in his big moment though otherwise just fine otherwise.)

de Jesus - 4(The major upgrade in this version, and I can see why he was the one recognized for the revival. This as he brings the needed flamboyance of the part but offers way more nuance to the character to make him more than just an over the top caricature. This in the bring down moments he brings a real honesty in creating the sense of his flamboyance as a defense mechanism to a certain degree. This in particularly making the absolute most of his phone call scene in offering so much vulnerability in the moment along with granting a real sense of the man beneath all the personal "decoration". Striking work that I felt really stole the film in this version.)

Hutchison - 2.5(Honestly I'm not sure what one can really do with Alan as a character, as he largely exists as a McGuffin for Michael more than anything. This to the point that whatever his character is going through is just there to test Michael than really explore his own character in any way. Hutchison is fine enough in this difficult grey area, but still generally just an almost random enigma.)

Mitchell Murray said...

Matt: Well, the jig is up. Good thing this happened before I had to lose a finger.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Your ratings for Canada Lee in Cry, The Beloved Country (1951), Judy Davis in Impromtu (1991) and Reed & Eggar in The Brood. I'm rather surprised you didn't mention Lee for 51 or during 52 where it had its US/UK release. Would you consider recommending it for a viewing.

Louis Morgan said...

Also watched Eternal Beauty which is occasionally intriguing in its attempt to create a perspective of schizophrenia and aided by an expectedly committed performance from Sally Hawkins, however it doesn't quite succeed fully in the former element as it just kind of rambles and wanders aimlessly that sadly doesn't amount to much.

Side Note: The poster is extremely misleading.

Hawkins - 4.5
Thewlis - 3.5
Piper - 3
Wilton - 3
Lowe - 3

Tim said...

your Top 1ß0 best winners for Sound Editing?

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thoughts on Hawkins and Thewlis.

Tim said...

oops, that is supposed to mean Top 10

Louis Morgan said...

Tim:

Sound Editing winners (including special awards):

1. Jurassic Park
2. Star Wars
3. Terminator 2: Judgment Day
4. Mad Max: Fury Road
5. The Right Stuff
6. Raiders of the Lost Ark
7. The Matrix
8. The Dark Knight
9. Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
10. Bram Stoker's Dracula

Although there are a couple other "curious" winners the only flat out bad winner is Bohemian Rhapsody.

Luke:

Hawkins - (A bit of her "greatest" hits style performance largely because of the film's wandering approach, however as much as it doesn't achieve her best work it still shows her great ability to truly throw herself into a role like this. This in portraying the state with such a strict reality within her character that never lets off. Her allowing both the needed sympathy for the state, while also crafting the intensity of that state both in her physical manner and her moments of more caustic reaction. Although I think the film lets her down to a degree by being as aimless, and not in a successful Mike Leigh way which this film seems to kind of want to be...I think. Hawkins though is still terrific with all that she has making for a compelling portrayal of the broken state of mind even if the film only lets her explore so much.)

Thewlis - (Again the Mike Leigh connection does seem strong with two of his leads sharing the screen here, and in a way you could almost argue Thewlis could be playing a later in life Johnny to some extent. This as we get a similar rambling scene, though rambling no longer with the intensity of youth. Thewlis is effectively deranged here though he doesn't go over the top finding the right tone between granting a comic tone towards his mention of his "band" while also seeming more than a bit off. He also strikes up a genuinely charming chemistry with Hawkins in the scenes that have the most promise in the film. Sadly this is short lived and Thewlis's performance is cut short. A shame as their truly off-beat interactions are the best moments in the film thanks largely due to the performers.)

Aidan Pittman said...

Louis: What are your Top 10 Oscar wins for Cinematography and Score?

Matt Mustin said...

Loved tonight's Fargo, but that's enough with the farts, I think.

Matt Mustin said...

Jessie Buckley was MVP once again, despite barely being in it, but I also loved Ben Whishaw and Timothy Olyphant.

Michael McCarthy said...

Matt: I think I’d go with Turman for MVP actually, he gave a subtle facial expression early on in the episode that REALLY made me fascinated for where his performance is going to go later on. Whishaw would be a close second, Buckley an even closer third, and Olyphant seems very promising.

Matt Mustin said...

Michael: Yeah, Turman was great too.

Matt Mustin said...

Olyphant had my favourite line of the episode though.

Anonymous said...

Louis: In the early 60's, Jerry Wald wanted to produce an adaptation of Robert F. Kennedy's non-fiction book The Enemy Within which was about crime and corruption within labour unions, particularly with the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, which Kennedy considered one of the most powerful institutions in America. Not sure whom Wald wanted to direct the film,but Budd Schulberg wrote a draft, with either Bradford Dillman or Paul Newman as Kennedy, and Robert Mitchum and Spencer Tracy in supporting roles.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Do you reckon you'll watch Enola Holmes any time soon?

Anonymous said...

Louis, not naming names but do you plan on posting a Supporting review for 1944.

Luke Higham said...

I give up, Dune's been delayed to next autumn.

Louis Morgan said...

Regarding Fargo, really liked the episode, probably lean towards Whishaw as MVP, with Turman and of course Buckley very close as runner-ups. Really liked Olyphant as well though.

Luke Higham said...

If they're still going ahead with a non-physical Oscars ceremony next year then many of those techs need to be Special Achievement awards.

RatedRStar said...

I knew Dune would get pushed back I pretty much called it like a day ago. At least 2021 will be a good year for films lol.

Tim said...

regaring Dune:


*every curse word in existence*

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar: In my mind, I knew it was inevitable yet I still held out hope. Next year's going to be an absolute bloodbath.

Tim said...

Louis: your rating and thoughts on Tom Cruise and Tim Robbins in War of The Worlds? I am just watching it for the first time in ever, and ... what exactly were the instructions Robbins was given? I usually would not consider him such an overactor

RatedRStar said...

So I guess Tenet wins visual effects.

Luke Higham said...

I'm sure Nolan will be counting his lucky stars on that, no matter how much I've come to dislike it.

RatedRStar said...

I reckon Wonder Woman 1984 might be pushed back as well.

Louis Morgan said...

Also one more Fargo note, although Rock I think is still fine in the sort of "in the moment" scenes, it seems to me the part demanded far stronger unspoken presence than he has. I'll say Calvin's earlier suggestion of Dave Chapelle could've been perfect, particularly given who the character's son probably is.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I’m calling it now, the Academy will end up canceling this year’s awards and declare 2020 film eligible for next year’s awards as a “blanket year”.

Also, Louis: Rating and thoughts on whoever the hell played Cruise’s awful son in War of the Worlds?

Matt Mustin said...

Louis: Completely agree about Rock, he projects nothing in the silences.

Luke Higham said...

If The Oscars are cancelled then can we please have the 2nd Backlog in its place.

Louis Morgan said...

Robert:

Well I was about to go "that's so and so" but then realized I didn't even bother ranking whoever that forgettable yet also terrible actor was. This as I do struggle to think of his face in any way. I'll say to his, well I won't say to his credit, the part is terrible as written from the cliched "I hate dad" lines and the absolutely ridiculous ending involving him. Having said all that he is terrible. This in selling every one of those bad lines in an equally cliched way. He only gets worse though with the "I wanna fight" lines that come off as just petulant more than anything.

Luke:

If cancelled I will proceed with a 2020 lineup, once I've seen everything I can or what is at least worth seeing, since I will still personally recognize 2020 no matter how minimal the slate is. If that means reviewing a performance before it is Oscar nominated, so be it. That will be an exception I am willing to make for this year.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thanks for that. I couldn't really bear waiting another year for Laurie's review in particular.

Matt Mustin said...

Robert and Louis: It's Justin Chatwin, I think.

Anonymous said...

You did review Fitzgerald twice for the same performance so I can accept that.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Matt: Oh shit, he was live-action white Goku! Genuine lol

Anonymous said...

Luke, what are your Supporting suggestions for 94.

Luke Higham said...

Maximilian Schell - Little Odessa
Daniel Auteuil and Jean-Hugues Anglade - La Reine Margot (I think Virna Lisi is winning Supporting Actress)
Jean-Louis Trintignant - Three Colours: Red
Tommy Lee Jones - Natural Born Killers
Michael Keaton and Robert Duvall - The Paper or Anthony Hopkins - Legends Of The Fall

Robert MacFarlane said...

Anonymous: Going something Matt Zoller-Seitz once said, Bokeem Woodbine in Jason’s Lyric sounds like a good possibility.

Michael McCarthy said...

Also for ‘94 Supporting: Delroy Lindo in Crooklyn. Really strong work.

Luke Higham said...

I think most will agree that 94 has to be the next year if the 90s are indeed next.

Aidan Pittman said...

R.I.P. Clark Middleton

Michael McCarthy said...

R.I.P. Clark Middleton

Louis Morgan said...

Aidan:

Re-posting due to forgetting The Thin Red Line didn't win.

Cinematography:

1. Blade Runner 2049
2. There Will Be Blood
3. Days of Heaven
4. Lawrence of Arabia
5. Barry Lyndon
6. The Third Man
7. Apocalypse Now
8. Road to Perdition
9. Black Narcissus
10. Birdman

Score:

Some combination of these:

Ben-Hur
Chariots of Fire
Jaws
The Last Emperor
Lawrence of Arabia
LOTR: The Fellowship of the Ring
LOTR: The Return of the King
Schindler's List
Star Wars
The Right Stuff

HM: The Social Network, La La Land, Beauty and the Beast, The Omen, The Devil and Daniel Webster, Spellbound and The Godfather Part II

Anonymous:

I mean at the time it would've been essential on director as it could've been an easy puff piece, or something that digs deeper even with Schulberg's script likely doing some of that.

Anonymous:

Yeah fairly soon.

Anonymous:

Unlikely, but we'll see.

Tim:

Cruise - 3.5(Largely fine Cruise control as he certainly can sell an intense scene and knows how to play into action effectively. I would say though he might've been more than a little miscast honestly though as it seems Spielberg really wants a more average man represented by his character, which isn't quite fitting to Cruise. I think almost like Tom Hanks here could've been a lot more interesting in the idea of a real struggle with the family. With Cruise, he's good, but you always feel he's the "hero" in ways limiting really what the character can do within the film.)

Robbins - 2(I mean he's just pretty ridiculous here in every regard I suppose, although honestly it was a bit of a downturn for him in general after his Oscar win, almost like that was an excuse to typically go big for no particular reason. I think it also falls though into the flaws of Spielberg with the material as he's trepidation about some of the material in parts, almost lightening things up by having Robbins be so ridiculous in some way. Either way Robbins's performance just isn't at all convincing and makes the character just some caricature of a survivalist rather than something truly interesting in any way.)

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Paddy Considine has just been cast as the lead for HBO's next Thrones project. Your thoughts on this.

Anonymous said...

Luke, If the Oscars do get cancelled then will Lead Actor have a 5 or 10 lineup.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: A 10 lineup will happen if there's more than five 5s. I feel very confident about Jackman, Lindo, Rylance, Oldman and Hopkins. Must also take into account that One Night In Miami and Trial Of The Chicago 7 may have Leads within their ensembles. And by the way, I saw the first images for News Of The World and I'm a little more excited for it now.

Matt Mustin said...

Luke: Paddy Considine with a prominent role is nothing but good.

Bryan L. said...

Luke: Your rating and thoughts on Paddy Considine in a Dead Man’s Shoes

Luke Higham said...

Bryan: 5, A downright incredible performance and for me his career peak. Richard is one of the great anti-heroes and chilling to the bone especially with two of his earlier scenes when he refers to one of the bullies as a C*** and his iconic scene with Gary Stretch. When it comes to 2004, I downright love Ganz in Downfall but honestly now, I can't deny Paddy the win.

Bryan L. said...

Luke: *Dead Man’s Shoes

And thanks :)

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the production design for Road to Perdition, and your rating and thoughts on Stanley Tucci in that film? The recent discussion about it compelled to revisit the film (though I had been meaning to) and......alright, it actually grew on me more this time.

Bryan L. said...

*compelled me. (Man, I’m off today.)

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

I mean...sure. Thrones has lost so much momentum I ponder if they can get one of those prequels actually off the ground at this point. Considine's a great lead to have theoretically though.

Bryan:

Glad it improved somewhat for you at least.

The production design is immaculate and something you can argue is essential in allowing Conrad Hall to achieve the heights he hits. This as every locale is beautifully realized whether it is the gorgeous interiors or so many of those countryside shots where somehow differentiate every outdoor setting. Again aided though by just how wonderfully lived in yet artfully stylized the production design is, this being definitely a 20's style gangster fair, but the best looking 20's gangster fair you'll find.

Tucci - 3.5(I quite like his far more accurate portrayal Frankie Nitti (compared to the nearly reptilian Billy Drago in The Untouchables) and honestly wish we could've ALSO gotten a more meat and potatoes depiction of the era. This as Tucci's terrific in his few scenes, that are also pared down largely to set up that more operatic conflict between Sullivan and the Rooneys, but still gives an effective sense of this sort of businessman mobster. This as he brings the sort of courtesy for such a man, but with enough of an underlying edge suggesting the reality of the man.)

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Oh, I might’ve sounded a bit negative there. I was already positive on it, but now I reeealllly get it. Strong 4.5 or soft 5 now, depending on how I feel on any given day lol.

Bryan L. said...

*Watches “I’m glad it’s you...” scene again*

Aaahhhhhh...alright fine.

*Gives it 5/5*

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Could I have your thoughts and interpretation of the ending/final stare in The Graduate? While I was fairly underwhelmed by the film outside of the three central performances the first time I watched it, that ending is undoubtedly terrific.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thoughts on the News Of The World trailer.

Luke Higham said...

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=F8auVKAgyHI&t=1s

Louis Morgan said...

Tahmeed:

The ending is brilliant, if accidentally created but of course purposefully implemented. Most of the ending being in line with a more traditional rom-com, both pre- and post-, what makes it different is those last few seconds. My interpretation is that it is a few seconds of a strict reality on the fantasy of fighting for "true love", we get the moment of reflection, and second thoughts, that maybe it wasn't such a great idea for either after all. I'm not nearly as big on the film overall as most, but that ending is a brilliant subversion.

Luke:

Speaking of Road to Perdition, definitely some familiar territory in the western genre, but looks like it could be some good familiar territory, along with a potentially promising performance from Hanks.

Tim said...

Tahmeed: how about this for an interpretation?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IDoM4EuW18s

Tim said...

R. I. P. Eddie Van Halen

Luke Higham said...

I guess we're getting Knox next then moving onto 94.

Luke Higham said...

And RIP Eddie Van Halen

Matt Mustin said...

RIP Eddie Van Halen indeed.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Or perhaps ole' Louis is a little busy at the moment.

Emi Grant said...

R.I.P. Eddie Van Halen, that one actively pissed me off

RatedRStar said...

RIP Eddie Van Halen

RatedRStar said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
RatedRStar said...

Luke: I am quite interested still in seeing Powell and Nikolai reviewed mainly because of their films especially in the case of Powell playing Philip Marlowe and seeing how he compares to others.

I am really excited about Alexander Knox though since he seems like a hidden gem from the clips I saw, he seems like a very underrated performer.

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar: I agree on Powell. Though I do expect Louis to like Ivan The Terrible, Michael having Cherkasov in 5th doesn't fill me with a whole lot of confidence in his review if there is one.

And Mank is reportedly coming out on December 4th. If the Oscars do get cancelled, they better not announce it until the very end of the year, last thing I need is to see the one remaining film that I'm utterly excited for get delayed.

RatedRStar said...

I think Wonder Woman is the only film that is likely to get pushed back now since all the other films coming out seem to be coming out purely to compete for Oscars as apposed to making it big at the box office with a big budget.

Luke Higham said...

The Academy are now allowing drive-ins.

RatedRStar said...

Oh good so definitely not cancelled, good enoughhh for me =D.

Anonymous said...

Luke, I'm happy to hear that. Hopefully this would mean I could get Louis' rewrite of Hopkin's Remains Of The Day review before The Father.

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar and Louis: Do you think some of the techs should go the Special Achievement route or would you stick with 3 to 5 nominees.

Luke Higham said...

Solely for this year.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

I think you can still do a lineup particularly if it's reduced down to 3 potentially.

VFX is probably going to be the hardest, and even then say the nominees are:

Tenet
Color out of Space
Sonic the Hedgehog

It's not a great lineup but it isn't a terrible one either.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thoughts on the Mank teaser.

Luke Higham said...

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=4Xwmo4mc_dQ

Anonymous said...

Netflix posted 2 trailers. Oldman, Dance and Seyfried all look really promising.

Matt Mustin said...

Well, Mank is our Best Cinematography winner, then.

Emi Grant said...

I'm already putting all of my money on Fincher finally taking Director

RatedRStar said...

Luke: I still want at least 3, I feel a lineup for everything will still happen, maybe foreign language films might provide some depth, like when Border got a Makeup nomination.

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the apartment shootout scene vs. Harlen in Road to Perdition? (Where Michael Jr. is the one that drives away)

And of course, thoughts on “I’m glad it’s you......”?

Anonymous said...

Luke, your top five Colin Firth performances

Luke Higham said...

1. The Railway Man
2. The Mercy
3. A Single Man
4. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy
5. Conspiracy

Anonymous said...

Luke, how many fives do you think Louis will give for 2020.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: Somewhere between 10 and 14 I think. Funny how this year will be much weaker than say 2001 yet it'll still have more fives on the acting side of things.

Shaggy Rogers said...

Louis and guys
Do you consider Alex Garland's Ex Machina as a 2014 film? If yes, where in the rankings would Oscar Isaac and Alicia Vinkander be?

Aidan Pittman said...

Mank looks awesome. That's all I have to say.

Luke Higham said...

Shaggy: It's 2015 for me. I'm not counting that screening at BFI Southbank since it was part of a festival programme.

Anonymous said...

I would consider it because in a supporting actor in 2014 there were few people with 5 in the lineup.
So I would put Isaac at # 4 (above Shia LaBeouf). Vinkander wins as a supporting actress, much better than Lindsay Duncan. Ex Machina would also win for best original screenplay.

Anonymous said...

Shaggy: I would consider it because in a supporting actor in 2014 there were few people with 5 in the lineup.
So I would put Isaac at # 4 (above Shia LaBeouf). Vinkander wins as a supporting actress, much better than Lindsay Duncan. Ex Machina would also win for best original screenplay.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your top 5 Emily Watson performances.

Anonymous said...

Luke, what would be YOUR top five for Emily Watson?

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous:
1. Breaking The Waves
2. The Proposition
3. Chernobyl
4. Appropriate Adult (One that I really need to re-watch)
5. Punch-Drunk Love

Have yet to see Hilary and Jackie.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Love the throwback style, aesthetic, and cinematography (where I'm glad Fincher finally has stopped his extreme dim approach) from this snippet, and the cast looks quite promising, particularly Oldman, naturally.

Bryan:

Love both scenes though one is one of all time favorite scenes, and why I have not hesitation to name Mendes my director win that year.

The first though is just a terrifically taut action sequence, with just a real dynamic edge in every moment that perhaps calls back to its graphic novel roots in the right way.

The latter is the scene I do adore most, as it is just flawlessly executed in my mind, this though again why I think it supports my samurai claim in just how evocative the weather is in the moment, and like a Yojimboesque take down it isn't about fight but rather the precision in the moment. That as it is just so gorgeously realized by Conrad Hall, perfectly supplemented by the score, but with just the perfect instance of direct sound in the only exchange of the scene. Love how Mendes orchestrates every elements, particularly as he keeps it in Newman's perspective almost the entire time, as you see the moment of acceptance in his portrayal before he speaks it so powerfully, against Hanks's simple yet powerful reaction of man not doing something he likes, rather something he has to do.

Luke:

1. Breaking the Wave
2. The Proposition
3. Chernobyl
4. Punch-Drunk Love
5. Angela's Ashes

Anonymous said...

Louis: Having mentioned Sonic, thoughts on the zones of the first Sonic game, since you've played it and the rest of the Genesis games?

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Do you think Carey Mulligan might contend for a nomination. Promising Young Woman is now scheduled for Dec 25th.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Uhh, that might fall into my non-film song category.

Luke:

I mean coming out this year definitely helps her a great deal, as long as the Academy doesn't postpone further.