Friday, 9 October 2020

Alternate Best Actor 1944: Dick Powell in Murder, My Sweet

Dick Powell did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Phillip Marlowe in Murder, My Sweet. 

Murder, My Sweet is a rather effective adaptation of private detective Phillip Marlowe naturally trying to uncover some criminal plot. 

The character of Philip Marlowe is one of the original hard-boiled P.I.'s from novels that were well suited for the 40's period of the film noirs. The first time the character received an adaptation, where he remained named as Philip Marlowe, was this film featuring a less well known Dick Powell, at least compared to Humphrey Bogart who played the part a couple years later or Robert Mitchum who eventually would be cast in the role despite being far too old for the part. I'll admit going into the film, as much as tried not to, a preconceived notion about an early often forgotten performer of a famous role itched at my mind. Perhaps a side of effect of seeing the pre-Bogart Sam Spade Ricardo Cortez's thoroughly underwhelming performance. I'll say those notions thankfully were unearned when finally seeing the film. Although that isn't to say that Powell is a precursor to Bogart or Mitchum's work, in fact I'd say his performance is closer to Elliott Gould's downright brilliant portrayal of the anachronistic Marlowe in The Long Goodbye. Although he's naturally not as off-beat as that performance, Powell's work really isn't to craft a glamorous, even in a downtrodden sort of way PI, but rather someone who probably would more likely be one. Powell's performance not trying to make Marlowe's the end all be all PI, but rather just a PI whose going try to solve things best he can no matter how many hits to the head it takes. 

Powell's performance emphasizes kind of a "why not" approach to Marlowe's as in many ways it is all a game, in turn a day in the life to the PI. This as he brings a nice sort of blithe manner particularly in his narration. A narration that he offers an edge of a comical quality as he almost seems bemused by his own existence. Powell's actually rather wonderful here in his delivery of so many of the hard-boiled lines that he makes sing through the right degree of showing Marlowe deriding those around him while also still being within the moment. Powell's portrayal being quite compelling in the way he brings you into really a tangible sense of Marlowe's world right down to the way he explains his being knocked out as going "head first into a black pool". Powell's work manages to give a strong sense of the man's personality as someone who knows what he's doing, but also kind of knows how much of a joke all of it is in his series of bad luck. Powell in some way playing more so into a later type of protagonist in that he doesn't present Marlowe as having a perfect cool, but rather what makes him so remarkable is how he's flying by the seat of his pants to a degree. Powell making for that professional, but also the professional who is a man after all, with more than a few parts of imperfections. 

Powell quite honestly is fun to watch here in just finding ways to enliven the proceedings to make the mystery both easier to follow and more digestible. One of my favorite moments, that seems like Gould might have ran with, is this brief moment where Marlowe going to a not particularly interesting meeting with some potential leads does a little skip dance on his way. It's just an exceptional moment that so well conveys the spirit of his performance and in turn how his Marlowe works. This as Powell lets the viewer in on the mystery very much so every step of the way. I particularly love how he handles even the romantic moments that we the femme fatale (Claire Trevor) and the less step-daughter fatal (Ann Shirley). In Powell's work both he shows that even when obviously knowing the fatale's game Powell shows Marlowe's almost not minding the fringe benefits he can get from it. This against the step-daughter where Powell finds a sweetness within suspicion. Again as someone who always seems to find his way around a situation no matter how odd or potentially fatal. Unfortunately my only complaint comes into the sequence where Marlowe's is drugged and has to escape from an asylum of sorts. This just as Powell goes a bit too broad in portraying the off his rocker Marlowe. Although it is fitting that this would be one part where he isn't in control even in his off-beat way, but even then it just more feels it is the one part Powell doesn't seem fully comfortable with in his portrayal. This is unfortunate essentially because I actually really enjoy the rest of his performance here. This as though obviously his take would be original, being the first after all, his take and approach is absolutely worthwhile and worth mentioning right along with his successors in the role. 

70 comments:

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Glad that you liked him.

Louis: Your ratings and thoughts on the rest of the cast?

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Also, on an unrelated note, do you think David Harbour would be a good choice for John C Reilly's role in a 2010s version of Magnolia?

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Throughout Max Von Sydow's career, are there any roles you wish he played and your reasons why. Bishop Vergerus will be one of them once you've seen Fanny And Alexander even though Jan Malmsjo was brilliant.

Louis Morgan said...

Tahmeed:

Trevor - 4(She of course can plays roles like this in her sleep, yet of course in turn she does not disappoint in that regard. That again finding the right combination of sort of a detached weaponized seductive quality mixed in with a vicious incisive quality within her eyes.)

Shirley - 3.5(Effectively sweet by being everything Trevor's not. Simple in a certain regard however effective in that regard.)

Kruger - 3.5(Wished there was a bit more of him, as like Saboteur, Kruger is a terrific sort of elegant slime ball.)

Mazurki - 3.5(Not Anthony Quinn is quite good here in just being a proper brute, but I do like that there is a bit of nuance at times in showing the slow, very slow, gradual realizations of his character.)

Might not be my first choice but I could see it.

Luke:

Again, von Sydow isn't someone I see a lot of missed opportunities in being such a consistently relevant actor for basically his entire career by taking on international roles while also still working in his home country. Although a major one is Prometheus as Wayland, more so for the film's benefit than his, but von Sydow in that role would've been a considerable upgrade over Mr. Burns.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Have you seen any other 2020 releases. And could you get around to Shirley with Elisabeth Moss and Michael Stuhlbarg sometime soon. Moss may be stronger there than she was in The Invisible Man.

Anonymous said...

Louis, not spoiling a possible upgrade once the ranking is updated, have you re-watched Henry V with Olivier. I saw it for the first time today and Olivier's performance of the St. Crispin's Day speech really is something special. It made me appreciate him even more as a performer and made me think if only we got to see his Macbeth.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Not at the moment.

Anonymous:

I have re-watched the film.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: your thoughts on the ending to Fire Walk With Me? I was just discussing it with a friend and have to say the more I think about it, the more I consider it to be perfectly in alignment with The Return.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

The whole film is quite unique in that unlike most films, it earned a revaluation from new material that gave it a greater purpose. This as the film is brilliant as a bridge between Twin Peaks and the Return, however I can see just how unsatisfying it would've been for someone hoping for answers back in the early 90's. The ending is perhaps most emblematic of this as Cooper and Laura stuck in the Red Room, absolutely haunting in seeing them there, with the chance of escape in The Return, but perhaps a just a little too cruel when it appeared to be final fate of Cooper.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: it's haunting but I don't know kind of beautifully so in a way. Like peaceful. Although again, I agree the revaluation from new material probably contributes to that.

Anonymous said...

Guys, any early predictions for Louis' 2020 wins.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous:

Picture: 1. Mank (This feels like a no-brainer to me) 2. Nomadland 3. Minari

Director: 1. Fincher 2. Zhao 3. Kaufman/Chung

Actress: 1. McDormand 2. Buckley 3. Kirby 4. Davis 5. Mulligan 6. Clark (Saint Maud)

Actor: 1. Hopkins 2. Oldman 3. Jackman 4. Lindo 5. Cohen 6. Yeun 7. Rylance 8. Ben-Adir/Odom 10. MacKay

Supporting Actress: 1. Seyfried 2. Colman 3. Young Yuh-Jung 4. Zengel 5. E. Davis

Supporting Actor: 1. Dance 2. Hoult 3. Rylance 4. Boseman 5. Abdul-Mateen II 6. Hodge 7. Laurie 8. Diggs 9. Redmayne 10. Groff

Original Screenplay: Mank
Adapted Screenplay: The Father/The Personal History Of David Copperfield

Bryan L. said...

Anonymous:

Picture - Mank
Director - David Fincher
Actor - Anthony Hopkins
Actress - Vanessa Kirby
Supporting Actress - Olivia Colman
Supporting Actor - Charles Dance
Original Screenplay - Mank
Adapted Screenplay - The Trial of The Chicago 7 (or Copperfield)
Cinematography - Mank
Original Score - Mank
Visual Effects - Colour Out of Space*
Makeup & Hairstyling - Mank
Production Design - Mank

*Semi-shot in the dark for that one

Luke Higham said...

And Mank or Chicago 7 for Ensemble.

Luke Higham said...

Looking at the Acting Categories, I don't think we'll have it as bad as we thought it could've been.

Aidan Pittman said...

Anonymous:

Picture: Mank
Director: Fincher
Actor: Hopkins
Actress: Buckley
Supporting Actor: Dance
Supporting Actress: Colman
Ensemble: The Trial of the Chicago 7
Original Screenplay: Mank
Adapted Screenplay: Nomadland or The Father
Film Editing: Mank
Cinematography: Mank
Score: Mank
Production Design: Mank
Costume Design: Mank
Makeup & Hairstyling: Possessor
Visual Effects: Color Out of Space
Sound Mixing: News of the World
Sound Editing: Color Out of Space

Matt Mustin said...

Aidan: Hamilton for Film Editing.

Matt Mustin said...

Liked tonight's Fargo well-enough, other than the horrible looking CGI flames at the beginning.Whishaw's probably my MVP. Also, Rock is still very underwhelming, but wow, put him in a scene with Andrew Bird and he looks like Lawrence Olivier.

Matt Mustin said...

Jason Schwartzman continues to be awful,he seems to be giving the same kind of performance he gave in Scott Pilgrim.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: your thoughts on the direction of Hard Boiled?

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Are you intrigued by the upcoming film adaptation of Dear Evan Hansen? I've gotten into the soundtrack lately, and I'm really looking forward to it.

Mitchell Murray said...

In continuing my game of Anime "catch up", I just watched the first season of "Bleach" now, and I thought it was fairly good. I actually wasn't familiar with the show's supernatural elements, so for me, the lore behind both the Hollows and Soul Reapers was interesting to learn about. I also felt many of the characters were decent, the comedic moments to be entertaining, and the cliffhanger ending to be relatively sound. All that being said, however, I still wasn't as enraptured with the show as much as my other recent viewings; It did not have the consistent energy and flash of "Jojo", nor did it give me the "gotta know what happens next" feeling like "The Last Airbender"...

If I'm being honest, rather than fully anticipating the second season, I'm now more intrigued about the shows I REALLY want to check out - namely "Mob Psycho 100" and, believe it or not, "Yu Yu Hakusho".

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Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Mitchell: You have GOT to check out the original FMA 2003, and also Brotherhood after that. Also, since you really enjoyed Jojo, I'd recommend "Assassination Classroom" as well. All three are in my personal all-time favorite list.

Mitchell Murray said...

Tahmeed: I have Alchemist on the Netflix watchlist, and I've been meaning to watch it for some time. My main hesitation, though, is that similar to shows like "One Piece" or "Fairy Tail", it is a very long first season (50+ episodes). As someone who likes to watch one series at a time, that's a rather intimidating episode count to digest...

I mean, part of why I enjoyed "One Punch Man" so much is because it was only 12 episodes, and so it was something I could wrap up quite quickly. Being four times that length, "Alchemist" sort of gives me the same feeling as the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy, wherein I could watch them all in one go, but I will take a lot out of me.

Tim said...

i watched Straw Dogs for the first time yesterday. Very suspensful and intriguing first half, frustratingly momentum- and focusless as well as undeservingly long second half with way too many dutch angles.


Hoffman: 4
George: 4.5
Henney: 3.5
Warner: 2.5

Calvin Law said...

This episode of Fargo felt a bit off. I’m not sure what it was, might have been the writing or some of the performances. I’m still not sure about Esposito but I think I can see where they’re going with him and Schwartzman even if I’m not a fan of either performance. Agreed with Matt on Bird who was awful, Rock is still decent but can definitely see how many others would do better in the role.

Honestly still dig a lot of the cast and individual scenes but I’m dubious as to the overall direction of the plot.

Calvin Law said...

Also it can’t be a coincidence that Gaetano Bruno as Constant Calamita is a dead ringer for Gabriel Byrne right?

Louis Morgan said...

Regarding Fargo I entirely enjoyed the episode, I think when it comes to plot you honestly have to wait until the end of a season to really properly criticize unless it is overtly terrible. I'll say I think Fargo has set a standard at this point that is so far above most tv serieses that the mise en scène is almost enough for me. The episode had more, as Whishaw (MVP again) is most intriguing and quite enjoyed the literal good cop/bad cop dynamic of Olyphant and Huston. Speaking of Whishaw though I think he's more than essential than he should be as he had to carry that scene with Schwartzman (an against type that sadly didn't work out) and helped Rock out a great deal (though again Rock is still fine).

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Hardboiled direction very much is the film as Woo basically sets up the film in a series of extravagant action scenes, with just enough talking in-between to give the film an appropriate bit of substance. In turn what he does is just seek to make them as spectacular as possible, finding this immaculate balance between over the top extreme and...well hardboiled. Making action that is a shootout of a whole different kind. Woo's work very much works by embracing the extreme though in a way most films were too timid to do so, and in turn making digestible by being so over the top in such slick and strangely artistic fashion.

Tahmeed:

As I've mentioned before I usually don't listen to musical albums unless I've seen them, so while I'm not exactly excited for it, based on having no real knowledge of it, I'm not, not interested.

Anonymous said...

Does anyone think Jacob Tremblay will still be Louis' 2015 Lead winner or is there going to be a change.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: I think it's 50/50. A change could happen because as far as I know, Tremblay's the only winner from the 2010s not in Louis' Lead Actor Top 25 so I hope to see a performance make that 25. Looking at the rest of the fives from that year, he had equal affection for many of them whereas Tremblay was perhaps the only one that had that little bit extra to hand him the win that year.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: If you've seen it, your thoughts on South Park's 'Pandemic Special'?

Shaggy Rogers said...

Hey guys!
Tell us your ranks of 1944 nominees in each category:

Song (I'm only going to name 5 because 11 nominees were overkill)
1. "Swinging on a Star" - Going My Way
2. "The Trolley Song" - Meet Me in St. Louis
3. "Rio de Janeiro" - Brazil
4. "Long Ago and Far Away" - Cover Girl
5. "Now I Know" - Up in Arms

Score - Musical (only 5 films)
1. Meet Me in St. Louis
2. Irish Eyes Are Smiling
3. Song of the Open Road
4. Up in Arms
5. Brazil

Score - Drama/Comedy (only 5 films)
1. Double Indemnity
2. None but the Lonely Heart
3. Voice in the Wind
4. Since You Went Away
5. The Woman of the Town

Sound (only 5 films)
1. Double Indemnity
2. Wilson
3. Voice in the Wind
4. Casanova Brown
5. Cover Girl

Editing
1. Going My Way
2. Janie
3. None but the Lonely Heart
4. Wilson
5. Since You Went Away

Special Effects (only 5 films)
1. Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo
2. Days of Glory
3. The Story of Dr. Wassell
4. The Adventures of Mark Twain
5. Secret Command

Art Direction - B&W (only 5 films)
1. Gaslight
2. Laura
3. Since You Went Away
4. The Adventures of Mark Twain
5. Address Unknown

Art Direction - COLOR (only 5 films)
1. Cover Girl
2. Lady in the Dark
3. Wilson
4. Kismet
5. The Princess and the Pirate

Cinematography - B&W (only 5 films)
1. Laura
2. Double Indemnity
3. Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo
4. Gaslight
5. The Uninvited

Cinematography (COLOR)
1. Meet Me in St. Louis
2. Cover Girl
3. Lady in the Dark
4. Wilson
5. Home in Indiana
6. Kismet

Motion Picture Story
1. Lifeboat
2. None Shall Escape
3. Going My Way
4. A Guy Named Joe
5. The Sullivans

Original Screenplay
1. The Miracle of Morgan's Creek
2. Hail the Conquering Hero
3. Wing and a Prayer, The Story of Carrier X
4. Two Girls and a Sailor
5. Wilson

Screenplay
1. Double Indemnity
2. Laura
3. Gaslight
4. Meet Me in St. Louis
5. Going My Way

Supporting Actress
1. Jennifer Jones
2. Ethel Barrymore
3. Agnes Moorehead
4. Aline MacMahon
5. Angela Lansbury

Supporting Actor
1. Barry Fitzgerald
2. Clifton Webb
3. Hume Cronyn
4. Claude Rains
5. Monty Woolley

Lead Actress
1. Barbara Stanwyck
2. Ingrid Bergman
3. Bette Davis
4. Claudette Colbert
5. Greer Garson

Lead Actor
1. Charles Boyer
2. Alexander Knox
3. Barry Fitzgerald
4. Bing Crosby
5. Cary Grant

Director
1. Otto Preminger
2. Billy Wilder
3. Alfred Hitchcock
4. Leo McCarey
5. Henry King

Picture
1. Double Indemnity
2. Gaslight
3. Going My Way
4. Since You Went Away
5. Wilson

And what are your ranks?

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the screenplay, production design & cinematography for Night and The City? The latter reminded me of The Third Man, though in a great way.

Also, your 70s cast & director for that film?

Mitchell Murray said...

What's everyone's thoughts on Gal Gadot being cast as Cleopatra? Personally, I think it's an interesting choice, and perhaps the role will show a different side to Gadot's range that we haven't seen before.

Also, in light of some strange internet backlash, allow me to clarify something right now: Cleopatra was part of the Ptolemy dynasty on her father's side - which can be traced back to Alexander the Great - and was possibly Persian on her mother's side. As such, she was almost certainly of Greek or partial Greek heritage, and based on numerous historical depictions, one can reasonably infer she had a similar complexion to Gadot's.

Matt Mustin said...

Mitchell: I don't have any thoughts on her casting. My opinion though is we don't need any more movies about Cleopatra.

Emi Grant said...

I agree with Matt

Mitchell Murray said...

Matt and Emi: Even without having seen all of the 1963 film....I would say fair enough.

Michael Patison said...

Mitchell: I don't care that they're making another Cleopatra movie. On the casting, my point is basically the same as yours. Cleopatra was of Greek descent, so an Israeli portraying a Middle Easterner/North African isn't so much a valid response. The more valid response is that Gadot has neither enough blood disease nor enough extra fingers or toes to be a member of the incestuous Ancient Egyptian royalty, no matter the dynasty.

Michael McCarthy said...

I finally was able to watch episode 4 of Fargo. Salvatore Esposito should win an award for convincing me he was actually intimidated by Jason Schwartzman.

Mitchell Murray said...

Michael: At least partially Greek, anyways. The difficult thing about tracing Cleopatra's family is we know a great deal about the Ptolemies, but are still speculating about who her mother exactly was. At the risk of speaking in broad terms, even me referencing her complexion earlier is a bit of a stretch, since there are many ethnic groups around the Mediterranean/Middle East with olive skin. Since most of Cleopatra's historical renderings show her to have that complexion, though, I don't think Gadot's casting would be TOO off the mark - especially because, for all we know, Cleopatra's mom could've been from that area of the Middle East. Then again, its also possible she was entirely Greek....we just don't know for sure yet.

Matt Mustin said...

Michael: Sure, but I don't know, he kinda just feels like a less interesting Jon Polito to me.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Could I have your thoughts on this performance of 'Yorktown' by the original Hamilton cast during the 2016 Tonys?

https://youtu.be/b5VqyCQV1Tg

Tim said...

R.I.P Conchata Ferrell

I am so gonna watch Edward Scissorhands again tonight

Álex Marqués said...

I've seen the Hillbilly Elegy trailer and it looks like one of the trailers from the opening of Tropic Thunder

Bryan L. said...

At this point, it’d be easier to mention the possible awards contenders that AREN’T being released by Netflix.

Tim said...

Louis: your overall thoughts on the movie Closer (2004)?

Luke Higham said...

OMG! Joaquin Phoenix is playing Napoleon Bonaparte in an epic directed by Ridley Scott.

Louis: Any thoughts on this.

Luke Higham said...

Please cast Fassbender as Wellington.

Mitchell Murray said...

Luke: I love Phoenix, and I like several of Scott's films, but......why.......?

This is almost as puzzling as when they choose Tom Hardy for Al Capone.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Alex: No kidding. I haven't seen Film Twitter this united in mocking a trailer since Cats.

Luke Higham said...

Robert: I had to see that trailer and jeez, Close is terrible and incredibly desperate at this point.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Luke: Adams looks even worse. I'm thinking this might be a future episode of This Had Oscar Buzz.

Anonymous said...

When was the last time Close had a really good performance, it's been decades.

Luke Higham said...

Robert: Equally terrible in my view but fair enough.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: Can't say anything about her TV work but probably 101 Dalmatians (1996).

Bryan L. said...

BREAKING: “Hillbilly Elegy goes home as the big winner at the 93rd Academy Awards. Glenn Close & Amy Adams win their first Oscars.”

Luke Higham said...

Bryan, please don't go there, giving me a bad visual.

Tim said...

Bryan: *twitching eye

Mitchell Murray said...

Me: Watches trailer to "Hillbilly Elegy"...........proceeds to fret over the careers of everyone involved.

Luke Higham said...

Mitchell: I'm only concerned for Adams, couldn't care less about Howard and Close at this point in their careers.

Michael McCarthy said...

Louis, how do you think Dana Ashbrook would have been in Jared Leto’s role in Panic Room? I started imagining him in the role about 10 minutes into Leto’s performance and couldn’t get the idea out of my head.

Mitchell Murray said...

Luke: I mean, Howard is one of those directors where as inconsistent as he may be, I can't really bring myself to be too critical of him. That also goes for Adams and Close because when there good, they can be quite memorable.

Michael: Honestly, while I'd actually say "Panic Room" is one of Leto's better performances, he was fairly overshadowed by Whitaker and Yoakam. As such, I could imagine several actors playing that role (Timothy Olyphant, Walton Goggins, etc..)

Luke Higham said...

Mitchell: I'm not doubting the talents they have but it's been an awful long time since I've really liked one of Close's performances and I didn't say anything negative about Adams. Cared about instead of concerned is probably the better term for it.

Luke Higham said...

And with Howard, I've enjoyed some of his movies though they all had potential to be greater.

Mitchell Murray said...

Luke: I didn't intend to criticize your response, mind you. I guess I was just remembering the quality work Howard/Close/Adams have all done and trying to remain optimistic.....which, now that I say that out loud, seems like a rather fruitless task given the trailer.

Seriously...did the writer even watch the "Terminator" franchise? There was never a "neutral" terminator!

Bryan L. said...

Mitchell:

1. They most likely need a name so they could hypothetically get this project a large or decent-sized budget.
2. Profile-wise, Phoenix is on fire right now (Oscar win, Joker grossing $1B)
3. The Duellists
4. Phoenixs’ and Ridleys last historical venture was a success (more so on Crowe though)
5. Quills
6. Napoleon Bonaparte himself was a VERY ambitious man, which seems like a character that Phoenix could really sink his teeth into. Imagine him (Phoenix) growing mad with power as he seeks to own Europe.

Mitchell Murray said...

Bryan: Now that you break it down like that, I can certainly see why Phoenix was chosen. That said, I'm still having a hard time picturing him in the part, and he certainly wouldn't have been my first choice personally.

Louis Morgan said...

That Hillbilly Elegy trailer looked exactly as I thought it would, I mean THAT name directed by Ron Howard, what could've gone right? Having said that I fears Close could gain traction for this just by the sheer amount of ACTING going on from her in that trailer.

Bryan:

Night and the City's screenplay is terrific in crafting the leading character who is sympathetic though deeply flawed and developing a unique downfall for the time. The script manages to balance this well, apparently properly toning down the source material a bit by not making Harry too morally onerous, in allowing us to understand Harry and where he's coming from even allowing us to see the thrill of his success even with all the flaws. As great as Harry's journey is realized, what is so brilliant about the work is how detailed it crafts the world and every character. This in even bothering to develop the heavy like Lom's Kristo, shows the sort of detail that allows a film to go to the next level as Night and the City does. It let's us know everyone's motivations, and a sense of underworld from the ground up, not at a distance.

The production design has some fantastic gritty lived in detail, much more unique for the time, in no specific area just looks like anything remotely filmesque. There is rather a sense of the people who live in each place, and the type of people who live or work there. There's such a sense of detail that in turn creates a real sense of the people and their world.

Night and the City is brilliantly shot by Mutz Greenbaum. This as almost every shot has such a vivid detail, where you can almost smell the smoke of each location and have sense of it. There as he finds such a elegant balance through such dynamic composition and framing, along with lighting, but doing it within granting such a lurid quality to it all. It's beautiful but dirty in the best of ways, indeed much like The Third Man. One touch I love, where there is such a focus on the contrast of black and whites, is Greenbaum only truly loses that in the ending, where Harry's spent all options, and offers a particularly remarkable edge to the ending as Day literally finally comes as well.

Night and the City 1970's directed by Roman Polanski:

Harry: Jack Nicholson
Mary: Ann-Margret
Helen: Diana Rigg
Adam: Christopher Plummer
Phil: Peter Ustinov
Kristo: Raul Julia

Luke:

Well I'm intrigued, though Napoleon is such an undertaking hard to say more at the moment.

Tahmeed:

I would say rather notable, as what I would say is rougher, by virtue of just the technical, but remarkable in the particularly intense emotional performance of almost all there.

Tim:

Well as someone who isn't crazy about "Virginia Woolf" you're not going to catch me praising its inferior spiritual sequel. Although I'll admit the material itself I don't find the most fascinating to begin with, I find it suffers from Mike Nichols's overly glossy direction, made only worse by his glossier cast (other than Owen that is). This as it suffers from really a lack of rawness to a film all about the raw nature sexuality and relationships. This in Nichols directing the whole thing with an overly mainstream sensibility(a common flaw in his later career), and the A-list cast who seem ill-suited to the material, again other than Owen who seems to get it.

Michael:

I think that could've been perfect.