Saturday, 2 May 2020

Alternate Best Actor 1983: Results

5. Oleg Yankovsky in Nostalgia - Although Yankovsky gives a fine performance with what it is that he has, his character is overshadowed by the approach surrounding his character. He is lost within the margins though he is fine within those margins.

Best Scene: The scene where he speaks.
4. Keith Gordon in Christine - Gordon gives an effective portrayal of a unique type of obsession that builds confidence yet slowly destroys himself.

Best Scene: Describing Christine.
3. Om Puri in Ardh Satya - Puri delivers an effective contrasting portrayal of the brutal cop he is in his professional life and the sensitive romantic he is in his personal.

Best Scene: Describing his past.
2. David Bowie in Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence - David Bowie delivers a great performance as only he could. This in granting an honest depiction of a defiant soldier, but also this enigmatic quality that is essential to the focal point relationship in the film.

Best Scene: The kiss.
1. Gerard Depardieu in Danton - Good predictions Luke, Tahmeed, Anonymous, Calvin GM and Omar. Depardieu delivers an outstanding performance in his portrayal of a charismatic and approachable leader, and in the end a passionate martyr for his beliefs.

Best Scene: Being brought to trial. 
Updated Overall

Next: 1983 Supporting

59 comments:

Louis Morgan said...

Note: It is not a tie, I intend to re-watch the Dead Zone and Tender Mercies, then I'll decide.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Ratings and thoughts on the rest of the Lead performances.

Your Female Lead and Supporting Top Tens with ratings and other 4+ honourable mentions.

Your 1983 wins.

Luke Higham said...

Jonathan Pryce/Jason Robards - Something Wicked This Way Comes
David Bowie - The Hunger
Takeshi Kitano - Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence
Michael Palin - The Meaning Of Life
Max Von Sydow - Strange Brew or Christopher Lee - The Return Of Captain Invincible

Bonus: Ian McDiarmid - Return Of The Jedi (Please don't put him in the lineup unless there's no other probable 4.5+ past the first 4 I mentioned) and Ed Harris - Under Fire

Luke Higham said...

Louis: My request is Gerard Depardieu in The Return Of Martin Guerre.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Nostalghia, Ratings and thoughts on the cast and Tarkovsky's Direction.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

*opens overall*
*sees winner*

Alright Louis, keep your secrets.

Anonymous said...

Louis, your Top 5 for Director.

And my request is Max Von Sydow in Flight Of The Eagle.

Luke Higham said...

Man, 1982 Lead is gonna be a foreign language fest. :)

RatedRStar said...

Louis: Interestingly Ian McKellen as you mentioned was nominated for the Bafta for Supporting Actor in the Dresser, he lost to the original Dresser himself..Tom Courtenay lol =D.

RatedRStar said...

Louis: Since you have seen Gorky Park which I thought was a good enough thriller, what did you reckon to the Globe nomination for Joanna Pacula and the Bafta nomination for Michael Elphick? I personally thought those nominations were a bit over the top although I thought Elphick was fine given his limited role, as for Pacula I thought she was a bit meh if I'm honest.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Is Mark Hamill a 3.5 or 4 for Return of the Jedi, and could he go up on a rewatch?

Luke Higham said...

Tahmeed: I think he's a 3.5 at the moment but I hope for an upgrade as I do think it's his best work from the OT.

Anonymous said...

Luke, in your opinion, what’s the best video game of all-time?

Luke Higham said...

Of what I've played. My personal favourite is probably Red Dead Redemption 1.

Anonymous said...

Louis, do you prefer IMDB or Letterboxd.

Anonymous said...

Luke, oops, I should’ve worded that a bit differently. Who do you think will take Best Actor from Louis’ choices?

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: I'm still sticking with Courtenay.

Luke Higham said...

And Letterboxd all day long.

Bryan L. said...

Luke: Do you have a Letterboxd account?

Luke Higham said...

Bryan: No, again, If I'm giving thoughts on anything it'll be on here.

I much prefer Letterboxd as there's more opinions from the Cinephiles than the Casual movie fan.

Plus, it's more helpful to find Hidden Gems on there.

Luke Higham said...

And no review bombing either.

Bryan L. said...

Luke: Agreed.

If anyone else here has a Letterboxd account, feel free to add me @bryanl1994 I’ll definitely follow back!

Shaggy Rogers said...

If Louis takes a vote to get the public to decide the winner, then my vote goes to Robert Duvall. Because Walken and Courtenay already won during Louis' revisions; while Duvall still has a victory by Apocalypse Now but I believe he can lose the first position.

So my vote goes to Duvall.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: Betrayal is one of my all-time favourite plays (I dunno if I’ve mentioned it before here but Pinter is my lifeline) and I throughly enjoyed your little homage to it.

I’ll have to think a bit more about my request, but glad to see such a predicament at the top Louis.

Luke Higham said...

Shaggy: Duvall won't lose 79.

Calvin Law said...

Also reading through your revised thoughts on The Dresser and I’m agreeing with ya on all counts.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: would you say on reflection that Courtenay’s work in The Dresser is your favourite leading work of his? It certainly seems that way from your re-evaluated review. And your ratings for Hopkins and McKellen? I’d go for a 4 and 3.5 respectively.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Hopkins - 4.5, McKellen - 3

Shaggy Rogers said...

Luke: Never know

GM said...

Takeshi Kitano, Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence
David Bowie, The Hunger
Jonathan Pryce, Something Wicked This Way Comes
Jason Robards, Something Wicked This Way Comes
Ian McDiarmid, Return Of The Jedi

Mandy Patinkin, Daniel
Erland Josephson, Nostalghia
Warren Oates, Blue Thunder
Daniel Stern, Blue Thunder
Jean Reno, The Last Battle
Rutger Hauer, Eureka
John Hurt, The Osterman Weekend

Calvin Law said...

No way Duvall is losing 1979 lol. Also gonna be very interested to see how 1983 supporting pans out, though McGavin is 100% retaining his top spot.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Bates - 4.5(His performance is in snippets in a certain sense given that we only see parts of his character, given that everyone else is examining him while his character is at a distance. Bates though is terrific in realizing each phase of the man. This in the one scene as the "real" man in a man that exemplifies the burdened man of age just suffering from his state. Then the immediate horror of a shell shock that Bates delivers with a real raw intensity. The main segment though is as the regressed man. There Bates is fantastic in portraying the youthful energy in the man and there is something endearing in this initially, though eventually haunting. This in Bates portraying so well a youthful sense of affection in his scenes with Glenda Jackson, as he doesn't love her with maturity but rather a innocence of a near child. It is wonderful work from Bates.)

Krabbe - 4.5(I mean perhaps slightly overshadowed by the mad imagery on display as offered by Verhoeven. Krabbe's performance though is an interesting one in the slow dissection of a sort of intellectual type. This in a work that is often reactionary in a certain sense, though he establishes well early on a seeming confidence of a man with much philosophy to offer. Krabbe's performance creating though then the immediate insanity of the man as he faces down the images in his head, some quite horrifying. These that he amplifies quite powerfully through his performance, and eventually leads towards a more overt breakdown that is quite artfully performed.)

Hackman - 4(The film is a complete mess, although somewhat fascinating at times in just how all over the place it is. Hackman being good anyways is no surprise and does his best to at least create something cohesive in his own work. This is to the point that when he exits far too early, any fascination with the film, even in its messiness, goes out the window. Hackman though is terrific in portraying this sort of omnipotence of the man in the way he glories in his gold, but also the desperation of it though. This in Hackman depicting the intensity of a man with nothing but concern for others greed for it. It is a compelling work even as the film flops.)

Villalpando - 4(I have to say if it wasn't for the film's nihilistic ending, which was perhaps just a little too nihilistic, I might've loved the film, but that gives you whiplash, given how much you go through with the characters to see it shattered to nothing so quickly is a little too cruel. Villalpando gives an endearing turn in bringing an earnest charm to the part and just a strict sincerity into every phase of the journey. He offers a man who isn't special, but just a normal guy trying to survive while making a living with his sister. His performance delivers on that, and at the end at least is quite effective in delivering on the haunting heartbreak of the final scenes of the film.)

Smith - 4(I will admit, not a favorite actor of mine in general, however he is good here in realizing Carroll Ballard's vision, which as usual is best when it stays away from plot and worse when it moves towards it. Smith though gives an effective turn in just being so effectively normal as this slightly goofy scientist making observation. This by adding quite a bit with his narration in just making you really feel you are part of his inmate little journey. He even doesn't fall apart when the film loses itself a bit in the climax, playing well the sort of stricken madness from becoming so connected to the wildlife surrounding him. It is a strong unusual anchor to his film, that unfortunately skirts greatness just a bit.)

Louis Morgan said...

Trintignant - 4(I will first say that it is so fitting in a way that this was Truffaut's last film, as the massive Hitchcock fan he was, it is very similar to Family Plot as a final film. This being just an enjoyable thriller no more, but definitely no less. Ardant steals the show, but Trintignant is good in portraying a particularly unlikely hero. Trintignant finding a certain effective underlying humor in his performance in portraying his character still as sort of the boss to Ardant, while at the same time still hiding as a fugitive the entire time.)

Ganz - 4(A different performance from him that largely relies on just his general charisma in a film with a particularly relaxed tone/pacing. Ganx does well with this however, in giving a charismatic turn.)

Leder - 4(Not to be crude, but I think critics would herald a film about a man slowly going the bathroom as genius, if I filmed it artfully enough. I'll admit that's how I felt about this film about watching a serial killer slowly murder his victims. In that while it is well shot, I found no reason or purpose in the experience, and just found it grotesque honestly. Leder though delivers on portraying a demented turn, that oddly enough is a companion to Charles Martin Smith's work from this year, as his narration makes up a great deal of it. Leder though delivers on the mania required, though again hardly made me care for the film any more.)

Lucia - 3.5(I have to say I quite enjoyed the film altogether, that was a lot of fun in realizing Carmen in a unique way. Lucia's performance is part of just a tapestry of this wonderful rendition, he serves it well though as the lustful director that becomes a jealous jilted lover however, and delivers well on the spirit of the part/production quite effectively.)

Keaton - 3.5(Keaton doing some Keatoning, the film honestly exists within his performance and him just adding some of those Keaton moments to the film. He sharpens every single bit just a bit more but virtue of Keaton offering his unique energy to it.)

Hurt - 3.5(His accent eventually just seems like an afterthought from him. Having said that though Hurt gives an interesting performance given he brings his brand of intensity to what is a potboiler style leading turn. This makes definitely for some unexpected emotional moments thanks to Hurt's atypical approach. The most notable of these being his interrogation as he figures out the mystery, or even his reaction to the death of one of his friends in the investigation. Hurt offers something quite raw in there, even in maintaining still the expected soviet soldier manner.)

Louis Morgan said...

Pryce - 3(A rather weird film in it feels just like a long pondering diatribe. This is until Rosemary Harris briefly shows up to switch things up just a bit, but not enough to really make a difference. Pryce is fine he just is part of that pondering in literally standing there so often thinking of something. He does his duty, but the material doesn't serve him well.)

Hauer - 3(One could easily place him supporting, in fact if the film was better he would be in supporting, but it goes on too long without Hackman, that he technically sorta becomes the focus for whatever reason. Hauer's role is hard to even figure out as the film doesn't seem to know what it is even, or even when the heck happens in that so called murder scene. Hauer delivers on a charisma and intensity, of course, but who his character is remains a mystery, a little too much of one. Again though, hardly his fault.)

Martin - 3(Typical Martin, enjoyable enough.)

Dangerfield - 3(Typical Dangerfield, enjoyable enough)

Arkin - 2.5(This performance almost defies a rating in a way, as I quite enjoyed the way Arkin seemed to be dying inside throughout the film, while a certain co-star was loving every minute of it. In a way it works. Also note this film may be 1984, hard to say for sure, but you know what, a film of its quality, surpasses the need for silly release dates, it is of a greater form of existence that we should really all aspire to.)

Hutton - 2.5(Daniel as a film is deeply unsatisfying, too much so, as it refuses to declare innocence or determine guilt, or even the idea of not knowing. Instead it becomes about the importance of protesting I guess. Really though unlike so many of his unsuccessful films, I'd say Lumet's direction is on point the script just is lacking. Hutton unfortunately has a terribly unlikable character to work with, this in his random berating of Elle Barkin hardly endears you to his personal quest. This quest we only see beats of, which makes Hutton's work unfortunately terribly repetitive, even if we do see that early intensity of his on display. Although that is sadly without enough purpose.)

Chui - 2.5(A bit more goofy than stoic I'd say, although does basically serve its purpose, but less than other leads of this ilk often do.)

Actress:

1. Fanny Ardant - Confidentially Your
2. Glenda Jackson - The Return of the Soldier
3. Jane Alexander - Testament - 5
4. Meryl Streep - Silkwood
5. Phyllis Logan - Another Time, Another Place
6. Anne Bancroft - To Be Or Not To Be
7. Julie Walters - Educating Rita
8. Sumiko Sakamoto - The Ballad of Narayama
9. Zaide Silvia Gutierrez - El Norte
10. Ann-Margret - The Return of the Soldier

And:

Patricia Hodge - Betrayal
Kathleen Turn - The Man With Two Brains

Supporting Actress:

1. Melinda Dillon - A Christmas Story
2. Cher - Silkwood
3. Tess Harper - Tender Mercies
4. Jamie Lee Curtis - Trading Places
5. Rosemary Harris - The Ploughman's Lunch
6. Mary Kay Place - The Big Chill
7. Alfre Woodard - Cross Creek
8. Rebecca De Mornay - Risky Business
9. Lupe Ontiveros - El Norte
10. Veronica Cartwright - The Right Stuff

RatedRStar:

A strange poetic justice I suppose regarding Bafta then.

Pacula I thought was okayish at times, but largely forgettable or underwhelming. Elphick's nomination is ridiculous, he's not bad but a complete afterthought. I have no idea how they chose to nominate him over Lee Marvin or Brian Dennehy (though I'm not sure what the point of his character was)...or even Ian Bannen, Ian McDiarmid or Richard Griffiths for that matter.

Calvin:

Well it is definitely up there, regarding Courtenay.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your lowest 4.5 on the Actress ranking and thoughts on Ardant, Jackson, Alexander, Logan, Walters, Sakomoto, Gutierrez, Ann-Margret, Turner, Harris, Ontiveros and rating and thoughts on Julie Christie in Return Of The Soldier.

Luke Higham said...

And what are your ratings now for MacLaine and Winger in Terms Of Endearment.

Calvin Law said...

Not gonna lie, not going to watch Angst just by a cursory look at the synopsis.

Anonymous said...

Louis, thoughts on Nostalgia with your rating and thoughts on Josephson and what did you think of Tarkovsky's direction.

Your top 5 for 83 score.

Calvin Law said...

And I’m so glad you loved Alexander (I think this is the first time you’ve ever liked her?). I haven’t seen Ardant or Jackson yet but she’s an easy win for mr from the year.

Lucas Saavedra said...

Takeshi Kitano - Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence
Michael Palin - The Meaning Of Life
Ian McDiarmid - Return Of The Jedi
Christopher Lee - The Return Of Captain Invincible
Jonathan Pryce/Jason Robards - Something Wicked This Way Comes

GM said...

My request: Ivan Dixon in Nothing But a Man

Bryan L. said...

Hey, 7 wins for The Right Stuff!

Luke Higham said...

Jonathan Pryce/Jason Robards - Something Wicked This Way Comes
David Bowie - The Hunger
Takeshi Kitano - Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence
Michael Palin - The Meaning Of Life
Christopher Lee - The Return Of Captain Invincible

Bonus: Ian McDiarmid - Return Of The Jedi and Ed Harris - Under Fire

Michael Patison said...

Louis: Can I get ratings on your female top 10s for 83? And has your opinion changed on MacLaine and Winger?

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Lastly, your thoughts on the production design and costume design of Return Of The Jedi.

Bryan L. said...

Luke: You can find the production design thoughts on the second page of the 2016 Alternate Supporting results page.

Anonymous said...

Louis: You must review Michael Palin. 'Every Sperm is Sacred' is one of his career highlights.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Thoughts on Muller's work in Barfly?

Anonymous said...

Also your thoughts on the movie "Testament" itself. Definitely a movie that has not been seen by a lot, which I liked.

Mitchell Murray said...

Anonymous: I mean, I'd watch it just to complete 1983 as a best actress year. To date I've seen Walters, McClaine and Winger, though i'd need to re-watch "Terms of Endearment" to solidify my view of the latter two.

Calvin Law said...

Testament grew a lot on me on rewatch. It's not a perfect film but I think the restraint it has with its storytelling is quite admirable, and there are some great moments, mostly involving Alexander of course.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Watched Children of Men for the first time. Absolutely loved it, and it's easily my Picture and Director win for 2006.

Bryan L. said...

For 2006, I’m going to do the ole’ Picture-Director split and go with CuarĂ³n & The Lives of Others.

Anonymous said...

Louis, Your thoughts on Alan Menken as a composer and songwriter. Your thoughts on Howard Ashman, Elton John, Tim Rice and Stephen Schwartz as songwriters.

Mitchell Murray said...

Tahmeed: Glad to see that movie win over another fan.

I just happened to watch "The Rock" all the way through for the first time. It is indeed the "good Michael Bay film", and Harris is absolutely the MVP.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

MacLaine should be under Streep, I must've somehow deleted her when transferring part of my old list.

Ardant - (This isn't a performance of bearing one's soul like Alexander, but rather is an example of greatness in levity. This in giving one of the best leading turns, as sort of the dogged heroine Hitchcock type, perhaps my singular favorite in that type actually as she is just a delight every second she is onscreen. This bringing so much energy to every facet of the investigation, and making no scene exactly the same by interacting with them as she does. I love how she portrays it as a character very much aware of that she is playing the part of the investigator, and captures such a great comic energy through that. There are so many little wonderful moments in her performance throughout the film, by granting this sort of swerve in the genre, and making her just so much fun to watch. She does go further though in portraying the character's interactions with Trintignant, this in portraying the low key crush, but also suspicion. This that slowly wavers away though still with these fantastic moments of depicting her certain low-self esteem towards her former boss, and creating slowly though a bit of flirting. The two end up being wonderful together, and this is just an effortlessly captivating star turn by Ardant that I adored every second of.)

Jackson - (Although nearly supporting in a sense I found her performance amazing here that overrode any such concerns. This as she delivers initially the timid quality of stranger who offers a bit of concern for an old friend but no more. She though then segues this so brilliantly in her scenes together. This in portraying the old fascination with the man, different though in depicting in it her own age, and reflecting instead a powerful nostalgia. She's amazing though in her silent way of conveying the understanding that what she sees is that of basically a time capsule of an experience and not the man he was. She's marvelous in her moment of creating the complexity of the compromise, this in the sense of the loss it, but also the understanding that her old experience was that. Alternatively from that I also love just her one moment with Frank Finlay, in portraying a quiet and so powerfully earnest appreciation for her husband's concerns through near silence.)

Alexander - (Certainly her best performance here in excelling largely in just giving an honest depiction of this kind of horror. This in finding a balance though not to become overwrought. This in earning those moments where she does almost collapse, balancing them where the dread is more suggested than excessively implied. This in just wonderfully realized moments with her work throughout in her quietly somber interactions in the slightly happy times with her children, and the raw distress of the losses that come one by one. It is a powerful work, one amplified all the more through her narration which offers a sort eulogistic tone towards the piece in general, and grants emotion well the distance still of someone recording a history. Her performance is great and I would say nearly single handed elevates the film.)

Louis Morgan said...

Logan - (Although the film takes a curiously long time to get where it is going, to the point when it finally gets there it does seem in rather a rush. Logan though delivers nonetheless an honest portrayal of the sort of repression of the spirit combined with a real sense of affection from what is quite new in front of. In a story that is in some ways a dime store romance novel, she definitely elevates it beyond that by continually offering very much the human condition of it all that goes beyond the potentially artificial setup.)

Gutierrez - (Like her co-star she just delivers a moving portrayal of determination more than anything. This in playing so naturally as just a normal persona attempting to make their ways through it, She's particularly remarkable in the rats scene portraying the visceral fear as well as that dogged determination to overcome. It is a moving portrayal even if again what they do to her character does seem a touch too cruel.)

Ann-Margret - (I will admit I didn't recognize her in this, in part because she fashions herself well to the period, but she actually completely rejects any traditional Ann-Margret qualities to really just feel as natural as Jackson or Christie as the English spinster. Her performance though I think is remarkable in it as an example of how to do a largely thankless part. This as the character's motivation is only to see what is done, is done right. She portrays well this sense of quiet empathy rather well, and again is notable by just how much restraint she delivers here in general.)

Turner - (Doing the sexpot routine she kind was known for early on but for laughs. She is enjoyable most definitely in doing a similar turn to her Body Heat performance, but just turning up to ridiculous levels. Also credit must go to her final scene of offering a completely opposite presence, and doing so effectively.)

Harris - (The only character that seems to do more than just sort of be there with the occasional comment. This as Harris delivers a real passion of the radical though deferred slightly, however still granting it this intensity and even allure. This making what happens with her role quite effective as this natural reaction, though it is a shame her performance is cut short a bit too quickly.)

Ontiveros - (A good strictly supporting turn so to speak. In that she brings the sort of warmth along with the sense of knowledge of the character rather. Speaking with an authoritative but also supportive presence.)

Louis Morgan said...

Christie - 3(Makes the least impression out of the cast. She's fine in showing at least the sort of direct desire to have what she wants in a light that is selfish to be sure, but also with enough humanity to be at least understandable.)

Return of the Jedi's costume design is a natural progression per the Star Wars legacy, with famously iconic designs, particularly that of the Imperial Guard, everything in Jabba's palace and of course Luke's proper Jedi garb. Additionally though you may or may not like the Ewoks, you definitely believe them as these creatures, and not just little muppets basically, with the costume design being a major factor in that.

Anonymous:

Nostalgia I'll say I understand why it might not be for all as it is rather impenetrable at times. What made the film a success for me is that I just found the whole thing effortlessly compelling due to Tarkovsky's POV directing, that grants you sense of both a sense of place and mind. His direction here being particularly notable in that in both the idea of examination of a place or thought, or even an idea granted such vividness, that is quite remarkable. I have to note special commendation for the candle scene which I knew about going in, yet its runtime didn't phase me for a moment as I was so invested. That is truly brilliant directing as Tarkovsky made me care about the technical insane task, and just following through with it.

Louis Morgan said...

Hold on Josephson for the moment.

Score:

1. The Right Stuff
2. Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence
3. Videodrome
4. Return of the Jedi
5. The Dead Zone

Calvin:

I thought she was also fine in Kramer vs. Kramer.

Lowest 4.5 is Sakamoto.

Anonymous:

Well it would be difficult to classify Barfly as one of Muller's major works, though his approach certain serves the material well here. This as Muller grants the lighting of a seedy bar and just general desperate locations. Muller as is often the case does manage to find a certain beauty in the "ugly", as you are granted that sense of location, however never does it make the film itself look truly ugly. Finding a notable balance even if not one of his greatest works.

Anonymous:

I have some reservations regarding the "tv movie" qualities of the film, and really the way no one really seems to be sick at any point, makes their onscreen deaths seem slightly detached. Not that it needed to go full Chernobyl but I think When the Wind Blows, gave a more effective depiction of radiation sickness. In this it is shown as a given however you don't see it anywhere. Still it manages to be haunting film though just in showing the slow process of the destruction of what is left, and again amplified by Alexander's striking work. Although I think sort of the attempt at symbolism is probably pretty week, it works in the strictest emotional sense.