Monday, 27 May 2019

Alternate Best Supporting Actor 2013: Colm Meaney in Alan Patridge: Alpha Papa

Colm Meaney did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Pat Farrell in Alan Patridge: Alpha Papa.

Having no exposure whatsoever to the evidently long running character of Alan Patridge, an inept English broadcaster, other than this film, I can only say I enjoyed this feature film featuring the character, though I'd imagine enjoying the particular comedic stylings of Steve Coogan as Patridge is essential for this. 

Anyway this film follows Alan Patridge as he throws under the bus a fellow "dinosaur" DJ in order keep his own job at a radio station. That man being Colm Meaney's Pat Farrell, an irascible Irish DJ. The "DJ" is kind of the distinction for a Colm Meaney's character who is just about always cast as an irascible sort, usually Irish, though not always. In this way Meaney is very much a classical character actor in if you need that irritable sort, call Meaney. There's a good reason for this however, as Meaney is quite good at playing these non too pleasant sorts, which makes him of course ideal for this film. Meaney playing the fired DJ who goes a bit nuts, and takes the station hostage, where it seems only Alan can negotiate a peace with Farrell. Meaney as aforementioned is ideal for this part as the crass DJ, as he brings that so naturally within his typical presence. This role isn't a stretch for Meaney, but it doesn't need to be because it works within his wheelhouse so well. Meaney makes for an enjoyable force for Alan to go "against", as he stands as less of an obstacle and more of a tool of Alan to try to use for his own gain. Meaney is this constant for most of the hostages, in this state of quiet hate that Meaney delivers in this appropriately calm way. This creating the right humorous inclination in his threats as he wears a "I'm going to kill you" eyes, even while maintaining a less intense demeanor. 

That is somewhat in contrast however to his interactions with Alan, as for much of the running time Pat is not aware that Alan in fact was key to getting him fired in order to save his own skin. Meaney though is enjoyable in playing much of these moments with this quiet affable quality as he "hangs" out with Alan even as they are in an ongoing hostage situation. Meaney's performance in these moments works in wonderful contrast as he plays them as though nothing serious is going on, even as he talks to Alan about how he fashioned a special way to kill one of his co-workers with a shot gun. There is a bit more though than having a demeanor ill-fitting to this situation in these moments though as Meaney manages to find a bit more as the film, briefly, looks at Pat's situation beyond his firing. This in moments of pondering on his late wife and how that loss probably compelled this current endeavor. Meaney manages a quiet sorrow in his delivery of these moments as he reflects a depression within the man as he speaks to Alan, this in-between moments of broadcasting from the hostage situation or further berating his less "loyal" co-workers. That is the dynamic of the performance and Meaney does well in both sides. This in part facilitating Coogan's more juvenile efforts by being an effectively hostile straight man of sorts, and bringing just a bit of genuine pathos to the proceedings. This being most evident when Alan sings "You were Always on My Mind" as a sign of repentance to Pat, after the latter discovers the former betrayal. A silly situation most certainly, however Meaney's reaction captures a honest sense of the man's loss as decides against murdering the man. This is a fine performance from Colm Meaney, very much in his wheel house to be sure, but a good example of why that house is his.

65 comments:

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your ratings and thoughts on Coogan and the rest of the cast?

Calvin Law said...

Love this film. It’s technically very different in tone to the television series but I loved it anyway.

Lucas Saavedra said...

Great

Anonymous said...

Louis: thoughts on Robert Aramayo, Ben Crompton, Gemma Whelan and Michael McElhatton on Game of Thrones.

Matt Mustin said...

Louis: I take it you'd consider yourself a fan of Steve Coogan, then? I mean, obviously you loved him in Stan & Ollie but other than that?

Bryan said...

Louis: Your thoughts on tbe screenplay for Jackie?

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Have you seen any 2019 releases lately.

Anonymous said...

Louis: and Ian McElhinney.

Mitchell Murray said...

Haven't seen this film, but I've usually liked Meaney in the small roles I do know him from.

Louis: Out of sheer curiosity, given there generally strong repertoires, what would be your 5 least favourite performances of Joaquin Phoenix, and your 10 favourite performances of Sigourney Weaver? From what I've watched of both actors, mine would probably be something like this:

Phoenix:

1) Irrational Man
2) The Village
3) Signs
4) Gladiator
5) Walk the Line

(Honestly, this does say something about the man's consistency, as I don't think any of those five performances are all that terrible.)

Weaver:

1) Aliens
2) Gorillas in the Mist
3) Alien
4) Alien 3
5) Prayers for Bobby
6) Working Girl
7) Galaxy Quest
8) Ghostbusters
9) The Ice Storm
10) The Cabin in the Woods (Weak one, I know, but I plan to rectify this.)

Bryan said...

Louis: Also, speaking of Phoenix, do you think he could've given a better performance in Gladiator? If not, who would you have cast?

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the production design of A Bug's Life, Finding Nemo and The Incredibles. I've asked you lots of times your thoughts on the set design of several films, so why not animated movies?

Anonymous said...

Louis, Have you watched anymore Deadwood.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Tom Hanks as an actor?

Bryan said...

Tahmeed: You can find his thoughts on Hanks in Paul Scofields' review for King Lear

Emi Grant said...

So, I caught up with Us and also watched Booksmart. Us I really liked and I believe it shows a major grown on the strength of Peele's direction. I'll be on the minority of this blog who preferred the humor on Get Out, though. Plus, I wasn't a fan of the ending revelation.

As for Booksmart, I'm not quite sure I'm getting the appeal and love it's receiving. The screenplay doesn't feel natural at times and many stylistic choices are too much for the film's own good. That said, there's one performance that I think easily elevates the film.

Us:

Nyong'o - 5
Duke - 3.5
Moss - 3.5
Wright - 3.5
Alex -3

Booksmart:

Feldstein - 3.5
Dever - 4 (could go up)

Robert MacFarlane said...

I saw Booksmart as well. I had some misgivings at first, but I liked it more and more as it went along. The last third or so is wonderful. LOVED Dever.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Rose Leslie's performance in Game of Thrones? I've looked for them, and I couldn't find them.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Fosse/Verdon and the cast.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the South Park season 19 episode "Tweek x Craig"? I realized the other day that that was probably one of my favourite episodes of the later seasons.

Matt Mustin said...

Louis: Thoughts on the Simpsons episode "Beyond Blunderdome", if you've seen it?

Louis Morgan said...

Tahmeed:

Coogan - 4(I mean more than anything it is just Coogan goofing off, however I will admit my enjoyment of doing his perpetual foolishness with his rather cheeky approach to a fool. This with a palatable ego thrown in for good measure that he actually makes work by always showing the idiot within it all. I'll give him the most credit for his scenes with Meaney where his broader work is the best utilized, and he too manages to find at least a hint of pathos in portraying Alan's small degree of repentance for his past actions.)

Thought everyone else was fine, but didn't leave too much of an impression.

Leslie - (I mean if the casting director was looking for the right foil for Harington, more than succeeded one has to say when a match up ended in a real marriage. It's easy enough to see that as what really makes Leslie's work so wonderful is her outstanding chemistry with Harington. This in provided the contrast between her overt sultriness against his more than cold demeanor. The sort of interactions that come between the two just are so splendid in how natural and genuine they feel in creating the sense of how each open up towards each other. This is where her work succeeds so wonderfully as where we see some warmth from the cold Snow, we get some moving vulnerability that is powerfully portrayed by Leslie. This most often in just reactionary moments, especially in her final fatal hesitation.)

It's an actually funny episode, which is always good for a comedy show, that manages to carry its narrative through, which is also a good thing for late South Park. I especially love the taking the "breakup" too seriously moment, that is easily the highlight of the episode. An episode that otherwise perhaps depends a little too much on "fan art", but not too much.

Anonymous:

Aramayo - (I have to say I found his first scene to be rather underwhelming even with his delivery of "No, now it ends" being fascinatingly memorable for whatever reason. I felt though he lacked the needed gravitas to really convincingly be a young Sean Bean in that moment. His performance seemed just a touch thin though not directly bad. I will give him credit for delivering in his scene with Lyanna as he managed to create an honest sorrow and sense of understanding that created that loss despite not a lot of time being spent with the dying character.)

Crompton - (His performance is without a doubt one of my favorite "brief" but long lasting performances. In that he is hilarious in every bit her has bringing such a wonderful sardonic delivery fitting for a man who really has found his way through a terrible world by scoffing at every bit of it. In there though I loved the nuance he brought later on. This while retaining the general cynicism of the character but with a internalized sense of the losses suffered along with the sense of foreboding regarding the white walkers. I have to say in turn I hated his end brought upon the dumbest strategy ever, along with Samm being a burden to all by being in the battle at all)

Louis Morgan said...

Whelan - (Although I think she occasionally touch over did the moments of being a real "woman's man" among her troops, although that was kind of the point, overall she gives a fine performance. This most often in her moments with Allen where she grants a sense of the tough love in a intensity within her, but with an honesty in her eyes that support a greater vulnerability to her brother. In the end it's a shame they really didn't have too much to do with her, but her performance remained effective even in her moment of just kind of being in meetings.)

McElhatton - (One of my favorite performances in terms of making a character seem perhaps more important than he was maybe suppose to be, and I have to say I wish the twist had been Roose dispatching the mad dog Ramsay instead. Any who though McElhatton's magnificent from his absorbing voice that represents this distinct command but also a hollowness of spirit. This with this sort of precision of character that is similar to Dance as Tywin but not exactly the same. This in creating a more innate sadism within that soullessness of the man, that we see in his reactions during the red wedding in particular. His eye glance to Catelyn is particularly magnificent in its sheer sinister quality, along with his hateful final message to Robb, that is particularly incisive through how quietly cruel the delivery is.)

Matt:

I suppose so, in that I've enjoyed him in everything I've seen him in.

The redone Mr. Smith ending is everything, as is the instant switch by Gibson on Homer's one bad review and of course Homer's "Dog is the villain idea". The rest of the episode I think is fine.. but does have a bit of sloppiness that indicated a decline in the show. It's still a good episode due to those highlight moments.

Bryan:

I will always give credit for a biopic trying to find new ground and taking on the grief of Jackie, with highlights of her career as First Lady, is certainly an approach with much potential. The scattered structure being evident in the screenplay itself that is constantly shifting these phases even without editing, and I actually think this is where the screenplay over does it a touch. In that I find the reporter scenes have incredible potency in itself, partially realized in the screenplay, but a little to scattered for its own good. I think there was potential to simplify it just a bit, and it may have been all the better for it. In that by doing this it occasionally hits the same idea in short succession, while perhaps being too afraid of allowing a scene to breath, as the potential is there to begin with. I mean I might have loved just a screenplay surrounding the interview, or perhaps intertwine that with the day of the assassination, or directly with whatever topic they are discussing. It kind does that a bit but doesn't stay true to it wholly. I say this all, without considering it a bad screenplay however, as I think there is a great deal worthwhile though I think a streamline of the story lines and an expansion of certain scenes could've only benefited the overall film.

Honestly I'm probably too hard on him there, as even though his work is derivative of the earlier mad emperor performances he still goes for it. Now I don't love what he does, but I get why others do there. And given the variety of his work he could easily grant a completely different Commodus if he so chose, as it is very difficult to miscast him given his range.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

McElhinney - (Ah such a waste, and his premature death might have been in many ways a turning point to pointless ends/rushing that ended up being the downfall of the series. Before his death, every death brought more story lines, this one just seemed to make room for Tyrion, which was an absolute waste. This is with McElhinney delivering a magnificent turn that accentuates the noble note beautifully. This is as he does not underline anything false in his work creating an earnest, yet intelligent, portrayal of a man a divine honor. This creating a force within the quietude, and making his moments of action especially powerful, namely his quitting scene. Hopefully he won't just get killed by some random nameless thugs in the books, if they're ever published.)

Mitchell:

1. Irrational Man
2. Gladiator
3. Parenthood
4. Hotel Rwanda
5. Walk the Line

Again testament to his talent that the first one is the only one I'd hand wave outright.

Weaver:

1. Alien 3
2. Aliens
3. Gorillas in the Mist
4. Alien
5. Ghostbusters
6. Galaxy Quest
7. The Ice Storm
8. A Monster Calls
9. The Year of Living Dangerously
10. Working Girl

Anonymous:

Interesting question to ask, and this is one where I understand why such films rarely are considered in the category, however it is a shame there is no way to reward them. This is that I do believe it is a very different challenge to design something that can exist in reality, and then to set decorate it, rather than "merely" draw it.

Any who.

A Bug's Life - (Much friendlier characters than another bug related film of that year, with the more cartoony take. I won't say this is overly memorable in this regard however nor is the overall design of the world, that has a little bit of fun in making the micro world, but largely it is just a forest.)

Finding Nemo - (Now this is far more more impressive in this regard with some truly memorable designs that tweak the existing sea life to just the right degree of cartoony to be both unique, while maintaining a certain realistic beauty. The same goes in the background designs that grant a realistic majesty of the inner ocean, especially withe variety of plant life and the like. Gorgeous work that grants a needed detail, when a much worse film could've just had a plain ole blue sea. This one is majestic.)

Incredibles - (Some fantastic work in conception in taking the art deco work all the way, this in designs of the characters with that streamlined super hero look, but the same goes for the cities/the villains labor. It is very much in Batman TAS vein, which is quiet frankly a good thing, though far brighter and friendly. I don't love it as much as that work if I am to be honest, but it makes its own)

Luke:

No, and I have to admit I'm not really feeling the summer's wide releases other than Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.

I thoroughly enjoyed Fosse/Verdon. It isn't quite amazing work by any means but I really liked it. There are definitely areas one can feel it could've mined more (All that Jazz in particular), however I still found its exploration of the two and their relationship quite captivating. That along with its memorable recreations, which thankfully avoided any Ryan Murphy style camp for the sake of camp (which thankfully the show wasn't show run by Ryan Murphy). It instead lacks any of those near trainwreck, or sometimes trainwreck qualities, offering what feels a far more honest take on the famous pair than some other similar FX dramas.

Mitchell Murray said...

Louis: Personally, I don't entirely get the inspired praise for Weaver's "Alien 3" performance. Of the first three movies, I felt the on screen characterization of Ripley was by far the weakest/most inconsistent in the third. To her credit, however, it's still a strong turn by Weaver; She does effectively show how beaten down Ripley is at that point, and offers a firm, authentic portrayal of her eventual circumstances. Her work never quite finds the same heights as the first two movies, in my opinion, but a lot of that can still be attributed to the story and direction.

Again, despite some missed opportunities in the written characterization, I do think Weaver delivers a compelling portrayal, though not my favourite of her's obviously.

Matt Mustin said...

I watched Shoplifters. That one snuck up on me.

Bryan said...

Louis: Your thoughts on "How Deep is Your Love" from the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack?


And lastly, how do you think Jake Gyllenhaal would fare in James Deans' film roles? I'd actually be curious to see his take on Jett Rink.

Bryan said...

And Cal Trask

Robert MacFarlane said...

Louis: Concerning Roose, I actually think Martin will end up killing him off like that whenever book 6 comes out. It’ll probably be a little more ceremonious than the show, but Ramsay is such a imbecilic barbarian in the books compared to Rheon’s version that I’m shocked he hasn’t done it already.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Rockwell and Williams in Fosse/Verdon.

Calvin Law said...

Saw Godzilla. Great special effects, action, and soundtrack is amazing. Problem is it’s stupid and it tries to have aspirations of higher intelligence in its thematic and screenplay goals and kinda fails pretty badly in that regard. Also the human element is lost even more so than the 2014 version.

Chandler - 3 (of the main players hurt the least by the screenplay on account that he’s pretty much just doing his usual stern authority figure with a heart thing. Solid work as usual on that front)

Farmiga - 2.5 (ugh what they do with her character is a sign of the filmmakers wanting to be clever but not quite finding the right way to do it. To her credit Farmiga gives the role the right amount of driven passion and obsession and makes some sense of where her character is going)

Brown - 2.5 (sorry to say this but while I love her work as Eleven, this is kind of her doing a lot of what she does in that role but in a far less complex and interesting fashion. The brunt of blame goes to that screenplay though as it fails to make the terribly uninspired family central dynamic work at all)

Whitford - 2.5 (ehhh I’ve seen the odd kooky scientist routine done better elsewhere. Not bad though and he’s mildly amusing)

Hawkins - 2.5 (kinda ridiculous they didn’t even try to expand her character’s role given the potential for the returnees, but made essentially just another exposition-er. She’s fine though.)

Dance - 3 (what on earth was the point of his character. Now to his credit Dance is worth watching onscreen no matter what, I’ve finished watching the first season of Thrones and his first appearance is quite something. He brings the right callous gravitas and I would have loved to have seen him be the protagonist to be quite frank, as there was potential.)

Middleditch - 2.5 (he does a solid enough job of delivering some pretty unpalatable exposition and his usual routine works for the character, but like so many others there just didn’t seem a point)

Hinds and Jackson - 3 (good standard army personnel work, sort of embracing the caricature and adding whatever weight they can to their scenes)

Strathairn - (good but just kinda there)

Zhang - 2.5 (just there pretty much, she’s fine though)

Watanabe - 3.5 (once again the MVP, and honestly still a bit wasted even in that capacity. Gotta give credit to the man knocking each and every one of his lines out with such gravitas, he really is a terrific actor isn’t he, and his big scene is honestly one of the few true emotional investments I felt in the film)

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Calvin: Your cast ranking for Game of Thrones season 1.

Luke Higham said...

Saw Godzilla yesterday as well. I pretty much agree with Calvin. Another disappointment after another great promotional campaign.

Calvin Law said...

1. Maisie Williams
2. Peter Dinklage
3. Mark Addy
4. Charles Dance
5. Sean Bean
6. Jason Momoa
7. Lena Headey
8. Conleth Hill
9. Michelle Fairley
10. Harry Lloyd

Pretty uniformly good performances though across the board.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your cast for a David Lean version of The English Patient. Honestly, if it had been made back in the early 50's, at least it could have been a masterpiece since this is Lean we're talking about.

Emi Grant said...

I've now watched Rocketman and it is indeed better than Bohemian Rhapsody. I thought it's interesting how the film knows they're going through some clichés, yet they do their best to inject them with some energy and creativity, which makes it easier to forgive its flaws.

Egerton: 4.5
Bell: 3.5
Madden: 2.5, I guess. Might go down.

Everyone else I wouldn't say is technically bad but limited or one dimensional.

Mitchell Murray said...

Calvin: As someone who recently watched "The Last Samurai" for the first time, I'm in agreement about Watanabe.

Also, what's everyone's opinion about this interview with Ben Kingsley?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z04A_sFuYMw

I must say, although Kingsley hasn't always been my favourite performer, his responses in this interview gave me a new level of respect for his style and presence...And I suppose having a great voice never hurts either.

Bryan said...

Anonymous: I asked Louis once for a Lean version of Titanic, and he mentioned that Lean had given up on romance after 1949, so it'd make more sense for the 40s.

Trevor Howard for Laszlo.

Michael McCarthy said...

I'm gonna be that guy and say I love The English Patient just the way it is. I keep going back and forth between Fiennes and Wrigt for my win for 1996.

Álex Marqués said...

Louis: how would you rank the cast of Deadwood from what you've seen so far?

Calvin Law said...

Trevor Howard and Celia Johnson for Laszlo and Katharine is like...a must.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your current top 5 TV rankings for 2019. Show, Actor, Actress, Supporting Actor and Supporting Actress.

Anonymous said...

Louis, Is the next review coming tonight or tomorrow.

Emi Grant said...

Louis: What are your thoughts on Kore-eda's upcoming "The Truth"?

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Rockwell & Williams - (I'll admit one can almost take Rockwell's work for granted because of how well cast he was. He just seemed like a great fit for Fosse...and he was. I'll also commend him for not trying to copy Fosse's voice, which I think would've been a mistake since his voice isn't overly distinct to the point it would be just a distraction. Rockwell instead very much embodies the man's character brilliantly, and not just because of his own hoofing skills either. His physical embodiment is pretty spectacular in terms of creating this sort of method of Fosse, where there's always a something a bit askew in a dynamic way, to just the way he'll stand within a moment Now Williams is extremely transformative, and more essential given that Verdon's voice for example was especially distinctive. I'll admit I did have some hesitation in this regard given a less than enthusiastic response to her Oscar nominated turn as an actress. I'm overjoyed to say though that I loved her work here, and it is probably my favorite performance of hers. She brings to life Verdon not only in voice, but in every way she conveys herself, even the way she scrunches her face is of Verdon not Williams. Most importantly though she manages to embody this in a way that feels lived in, and to the point you forget about the performance with Williams just becoming Verdon. Now both are terrific also in aging the characters throughout the different moments in each, though Williams is more overt in this, though for good reason, and excel in making the time differences distinct. Now Rockwell is fantastic as realizing Fosse as a man essentially driven through desperation at every point. He brings this charisma and ego, which he always underlies with a certain pathos suggesting a man believing himself to be a false success at every point. The sort of fantastical scenes, where Rockwell himself performs Lenny monologues, are the highlights of this where Rockwell is quite outstanding in fashioning the desperate emotional mess that defines the man. Williams avoids any blandness, by being the more stable of the two, by comparison, by creating this charisma of Verdon, with really this sense of exhilaration within the idea of performance. Her only desperation being torn or undercut in this sense, where Williams portrays less a desperation, and more an angry ferocity to disprove any notions that question her ability. I also have to give Williams all the credit for absolutely knocking out every recreated musical number given to her, which she carries both directly in some instances that are truly just recreations, but also granting another layer in her fantasy scenes of Pippin and Chicago. I especially love the intensity she offers in the latter that puts some cinematic comparisons to shame. Of course what makes them both great though is how they are together. This in both the positive moments of both better and worse. This in the moment of overt romance and creative collaboration where the pair are electric together, and Rockwell and Williams create the right sense of the invigoration they bring out in each other. They are equally remarkable though in creating the convincing extreme shifts throughout. This in the two making so much in a moment of direct verbal sparing or in just a simple reaction as the strips down the other. They create the right sense of the two being able to finish their sentences both as an idea of true love, and true hatred that could only come from such understanding. Both are terrific separately, but the greatness of Rockwell and Williams here comes quite rightly in the collaboration.)

Louis Morgan said...

This could be slightly different on Monday:

Series:

1. Chernobyl
2. Barry
3. Fosse/Verdon
4. True Detective
5. Cobra Kai

Actor:

1. Bill Hader - Barry
2. Sam Rockwell - Fosse/Verdon
3. William Zabka - Cobra Kai
4. Mahershala Ali - True Detective
5. Benedict Cumberbatch - Brexit

Actress:

1. Michelle Williams - Fosse/Verdon
2. Sarah Goldberg - Barry
3. Emilia Clarke - Game of Thrones (Category stretch to be sure)

Eh that's all I got.

Supporting Actor:

1. Stephen Dorff - True Detective
2. Jared Harris - Chernobyl
3. Stephen Root - Barry
4. Anthony Carrigan - Barry
5. Fares Fares - Chernobyl

Supporting Actress:

1. Jessie Buckley - Chernobyl
2. Emily Watson - Chernobyl
3. Aya Cash - Fosse/Verdon
4. Carmen Ejogo - True Detective
5. Gwendoline Christie - Game of Thrones

Bryan:

Well Nightcrawler is proof that he can pull off a go for broke performance, but since then he's shown he isn't quite Joaquin Phoenix or DDL in terms of being able to consistently do that. So theoretically I think could've done all three at one time or another, well actually I don't think he has a "cool" enough presence for Rebel so to speak, but I could see him as Jett or Caleb.

How deep is your love is a very fine Bee Gees song to be sure, though I'll say the chorus is easily the best part of the song, with the rest occasionally a touch rambling, but never bad to be sure. A touch too repetitive and overlong, then again it is Disco which is to be expected, but a nice song even in that repetition.

Robert:

That's probably true.

Anonymous:

Well I'd say The English Patient is enough overtly tragic in its romance, even violently so to work in the later Lean era, though I'd say he probably would've wanted more sympathy and complexity to Firth's character and would've accentuated the world events around the romance far more.

so 60's:

Laszlo: Peter O'Toole
Hana: Leslie Caron
Katherine: Jean Simmons
Geoffrey: Edward Woodward
Caravaggio: Alec Guinness
Kip: Omar Sharif

Alex:

Ian McShane
Brad Dourif
Robin Weigert
Powers Boothe
Kim Dickens
William Sanderson
Dayton Callie
W. Earl Brown
John Hawkes
Leon Rippy
Jim Beaver
Keith Carradine (Wish they drew out his plot a bit longer honestly)
Molly Parker
Ricky Jay
Jeffrey Jones
Garret Dillahunt
Titus Welliver
Timothy Olyphant (though I didn't think he was bad so far, but suffers in direct contrast to McShane)
Paula Malcomson
Sean Bridgers

Louis Morgan said...

Emi Grant:

Sounds potentially fascinating, though a director working outside of their native language is always a trial by fire that even the greatest directors don't always pull through, hope Kore-eda can pull it off.

Bryan said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the screenplay for In the Loop? Since you've already covered the same for Ianuccis second film.

Matt Mustin said...

Louis: Thoughts on Chernobyl and the cast, or would you rather til the finale?

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Brexit: The Uncivil War and your rating and thoughts on Cumberbatch.

Luke Higham said...

Thoughts on Aya Cash in Fosse/Verdon and where would Rockwell's work rank in his career overall.

Anonymous said...

Rating and thoughts on Rory Kinnear in Brexit.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Lastly, your initial Nominee predictions for next year's Oscars and your reasons why.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: what are your thoughts on Miltos Yerolemou in Game of Thrones? Brief work I know but honestly he was probably one of the many highlights from Season 1 for me.

Louis Morgan said...

Bryan:

In the Loop's screenplay is an impressive feat given it is essentially of a cluster of information thrown at you, both in terms of the characters and the situation. We are just dropped in there, especially if you don't even have any knowledge of even the few carry over characters such as Malcolm Tucker, which I'll admit I lacked upon viewing the film. The film effortlessly succeeds in creating this understanding only through the technically more intimate conversations of the players behind the scenes. This being this immense cluster built upon situation but also ego and insecurity. It works as this mess of information by so carefully establishing every personal conflict and character so efficiently in its writing. Of course one would be amiss not to mention the hilarious biting dialogue, amplified by improvisation, however apparent even within the page of course.

Matt:

Best to wait.

Luke:

The film itself I thought was fine, if a bit better than the American equivalents made by Jay Roache. I liked the film as it dug into both sides strategies and really motivations effectively, even though I do think there is a certain limit within the television form. In that it seemed like there was further material to definitely mine within the story, however I still liked what we did have from it.

Cumberbatch - 4.5(A strong performance from him to be sure, if very much in his wheel house as another insufferable anti-social genius of his field. Cumberbatch though manages to excel with another riff on this work though by presenting as the man as perhaps even more introverted than Dr. Strange or Turing in terms of the portrayal of the "process" of the man. Here he creates an effective, if purposefully detached, drive of a man who knows exactly what he's doing and why he's doing it, even if it is a bit harder for other to understand or deal with. It's terrific work that carries the film along with Kinnear, who just missed by S.Actor lineup.)

Cash - (A somewhat brief turn however she makes the most of her limited screentime in bringing so much warmth, but with a sort of earthy quality to it as the supportive best friend. She has a wonderful honest chemistry with Williams and the two are immensely sweet and heartfelt in their scenes together. Her biggest impact is her final scenes though where she is wholly heartbreaking in portraying this sort of courteousness of a woman who almost doesn't want to burden others with her own death.)

Probably just above Galaxy Quest.

Louis Morgan said...


Anonymous:

Kinnear - 4.5(I really hope he gets some sort of proper international breakout as he's consistently terrific. Any who, here he provides a great contrast to Cumberbatch that is equally driven though in far different way. He provides the same honesty in his presentation of the man's personalities and aims, however his is with a directness and openness in attitude. Kinnear creates the right outward sense of the man's own convictions, along with such a powerful portrayal of the man's reactions as the tide turn against him. He shows the right anguish that presents a real passion that goes far beyond a political power play. Special mention must be made of his exceptional portrayal of trying to manage a party meeting with a daughter's play date, where he so effortlessly conveys two very different frustrations at the same time.)

Calvin:

It's a wonderful performance to be sure as he brings this considerable charisma of sort of a properly fun teacher. I actually like that he plays it almost as a kindergarten teacher giving a lesson, even though he's teaching how to fight and kill as the lesson, as effectively shows the man sort of conveying his skills/philosophy to a little girl. He balances this well with conveying a more nuanced mature side in just his glance to Ned in the first practice and a darker side later when he truly shows the first sword of Bravos.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Well here really goes nothing...(as the known Cannes and Sundance contenders are pretty tricky to predict).

Picture:

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
Motherless Brooklyn
The Irishman
The Report
A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood
1917
The Farewell
Harriet
The Pope

Shots in the dark for the most part. Tarantino's has the praise to get in, but I still enough of nay saying/controversy to keep him from winning. Hopefully Motherless Brooklyn will be the passion project that pays off for Norton. Although the de aging still grants trepidation since the 00's the academy loves more populist Scorsese, so the Irishman seems like a good bet. The Report and the Farewell are actually somewhat known quantities, one hitting the
"timely" button, and another potentially hitting that other type of Indie sweet spot (which could do what Crazy Rich Asians could not, seeming more substantive than that film was.) Maybe A Beautiful Day will get extra love for the snub of "Won't You Be My Neighbor", and Heller's last film being a semi-contender. This could be her advancement to full contender. 1917, academy loves a good war film, maybe this will be that. Harriet, academy loves a god historical piece, maybe this will be that (though Lemmons's very inconsistent track record grants trepidation). The Pope probably won't be all that good, but the Academy LOVES McCarten's tissue thin scripts, so look forward to the love most likely.

Note: The Lighthouse can make it but will need a huge critics push. I'll wait to see that. Also left off Little Women and US, as I could Peele and Gerwig getting the treatment Chazelle and Jenkins got last year.

Director:

Quentin Tarantino
Marielle Heller
Martin Scorsese
Kasi Lemmons
Sam Mendes

Mix of academy vets and newcomers. I think Tarantino has a better chance of winning here than picture, though I don't quite foresee that either. I'll guess that even if Motherless Brooklyn is amazing, Norton will get the Cooper/Affleck treatment.

Actor:

Jonathan Pryce - The Pope (Winner)
Leonardo DiCaprio - Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
Taron Egerton - Rocketman
Robert De Niro - The Irishman
Edward Norton - Motherless Brooklyn

Could McCarten write four of the best actor winning roles of the decade? Probably, given he's already done three of them, I could see him do the same with never nominated vet Pryce who's playing a figure beloved by many. This will be a test for DiCaprio to see if he'll become a Hanks (who the academy seems to outright refuse to nominate hence why I'm not predicting him). I think he could make it however I could see him deferring to Brad Pitt for the spot in terms of campaigning (without going to supporting himself), but we'll see how that shakes out. Egerton got the praise, Malek winning this year I think probably prevents him from doing so, but I could see him getting nominated, though this early of a release hurts him. I mean if De Niro truly returns to form? It will be hard for the academy to resist, however what Pacino does will be a big question there (both in terms of potential film stealing/category placement). Place to reward Norton if it all pans out rather than director.

Actress:

Cynthia Erivo - Harriet (Winner)
Awkwafina - The Farewell
Alfre Woodward - Clemency
Natalie Portman - Lucy in the Sky
Anne Hathaway - The Last Thing He Wanted

Erivo has the role, and really the breakout narrative after last year. If the film's good I could see her go the distance. Awkwafina has a great "check out my range" position a la McCarthy last year. Woodward seems prime for a welcome back nomination. The Academy likes go for broke Portman, so if the film pans out, whether or not I hate her performance, she could make it in again (Note: Vox Lux guaranteed itself to not be a contender in multiple ways). Hathaway in a political thriller, sure, why not...

Louis Morgan said...

Supporting Actor:

Willem Dafoe - Motherless Brooklyn (Winner)
Brad Pitt - Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
Al Pacino - The Irishman
Matthew Rhys - A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood
Anthony Hopkins - The Pope

The Lighthouse has already panned out apparently, so if Motherless Brooklyn and The Last Thing He Wanted also do, Dafoe will have a colossal year. After being nominated twice in a row, the love for him is there, he just one more right role. Pitt, Pacino, Hopkins and Rhys are dependent on placement, and could all very well be co-leads. However that never stopped placements before. Pitt and Rhys, if this is their placement, could especially benefit from Hanks and DiCaprio who have been very good as of late, in terms of their co-stars getting in.

Supporting Actress:

Annette Bening - The Report(Winner)
Margot Robbie - Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
Gugu Mbatha-Raw - Motherless Brooklyn
Janell Monae - Harriet
Susan Leechi Watson - A Beautiful Day in The Neighborhood

Sounds like this could be Bening's win, given the role, and the general praise for the film. Robbie could suffer most from any controversy, however I could still see her getting in. Shot in the dark for Mbatha-Raw. Same for Monae, but maybe a makeup for being snubbed for Spencer in Hidden Figures. Maybe a supportive wife for Watson, really just throwing out names at this point.

Calvin Law said...

As a huge fan of the novel, Dafoe probably won’t be nominated for that role. It’s a fairly important character but it definitely seems like The Lighthouse would be the bigger player in that regard.

Matt Mustin said...

Since we're talking about potential Oscar nominations (don't know why, but whatever) I saw the trailer for Ford v. Ferrari and Bale and Letts both look very promising, especially Bale.

Matt Mustin said...

Not too sold on Damon, but we'll see.

Calvin Law said...

Matt: just saw that. Actually looks amazing and I agree completely on Bale, and visually I really like the style it’s going for.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

I'd agree, if the academy embraces a black and white horror film, I mean they *could*, but that critical push needs to be there for the film, Eggers, Pattinson and Dafoe.

Bryan said...

Louis: What about Mckellen for The Good Liar and Saoirse Ronan for Little Women?

And yeah, I think Pryce and Hopkins both get in as well, thanks to that "screenwriter."

Calvin Law said...

At this point I think Egerton will be a much more deserving nominee than Malek was, but also agree that early release date plus Bohemian Rhapsody stealing the thunder rids it of much of its chances at getting in.

Louis Morgan said...

Bryan:

The Good Liar sounds like it could be too lightweight, and McKellen got almost no attention for Mr. Holmes (despite immensely deserving it). This has a better release date though, so maybe.

Mary Queen of Scots showed that they're very willing to pass on Ronan (all awards bodies down the line for that matter), so if they are passing on Gerwig, I'll say they'll do the same to her. Then again maybe Gerwig turns out to be more like a David O. Russell or Adam Mckay (hopefully not in film quality but rather embracing someone for two films in a row) than Chazelle or Jenkins (Man the fact that they're the latter two rather than McKay and Russell, really makes me kind of hate the voting bloc.)