Tuesday, 21 May 2019

Alternate Best Supporting Actor 2013: Lily Franky in Like Father, Like Son

Lily Franky did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Yūdai Saiki in Like Father, Like Son.

Lily Franky plays the role that is many ways the antithesis of the film's lead character Ryōta (Masaharu Fukuyama). Ryōta being a rich work driven businessman who never seems to find time for his son. This is opposed to Yūdai Saiki who is a working class guy who runs an electronic shop with three kids of his own, but he finds plenty of time to share with them. Although the "outgoing" Yūdai may seem less challenging than pulling off the very reserved Ryōta, Franky's role also presents its own challenge. This is in the wrong hands there could've been the potential to simplify this difference into a potential caricature. The essential element thought to Franky's work then is this naturalism, as there is not a hint of performance in this performance. This idea even can sometimes wrongly be used as an excuse for being boring or simplifying in some other way, however that isn't the idea of Franky's performance that introduces us so vividly to Saiki and his family. This is from the outset of his appearance when he and his wife, show up to meet Ryōta and his wife to discuss what's to be done with the revelation that their sons were switched at birth. Franky's work delivers so much information just within his somewhat shy and awkward demeanor, ill-fitted to these sort of meetings, though with this earnestness within his delivery as he notes the difficultly to properly address the situation. I especially love his wholly genuine reaction of deferring to his wife's notion that even if they were giving up a pet it would not be a simple prospect to switch something you love.

Franky in that more reserved moment even reveals the more open, but also more emotionally honest nature of Yūdai. He's not someone who wears his emotions constantly on his sleeve, but rather Franky reveals someone with just a healthy sense of it. As we explore the family more though we are granted a greater sense of the man though. This is as we see him interact with his children where Franky is simply wonderful. Franky brings such a genuine warmth in the energetic interactions of Yūdai with his three children. There is not a false hint in Franky's work that exudes just a man who loves his family, and adores every moment he gets to spend with them. This isn't something he forces, but rather finds so much texture in the quiet moments of sincere affection, along with those little moments of humorous interactions fitting to an open loving father. In the moments of pure family interaction Franky reveals a man completely in his element, by just essentially giving himself to each and every moment, by always having a second to spare for his kids. Franky is this constant reminder of this different approach to parenting, as his performance creates with such an ease the powerful sense of a father far more in touch with his son than Ryōta ever has been. Franky again never simplifies the role within that, but also in terms of creating the sense of the man Yūdai is. When we see him interacting with Ryōta, Franky's manner changes to exude the strangeness of the situation, but also the separation of class and spirit. It isn't a cold separation but rather Franky's reaction are so effective in offering the sense of near anxiety on how to broach such a different man.

There is a fantastic moment where Yūdai tries to present his side, and I love the meek delivery of Franky's that brings such an honesty as he tries to impart his own wisdom, as gently as possible. His eyes in the moment evoke such a real concern towards the man's business focused mind, though while conveying this sensitivity towards the situation and their separation of class. Although even with this Franky brings that wholly good nature of the man this earned constant as part of his outgoing personality, to the point of trying to make the unique relationship work even with that distance. The only time this breaks is when Ryōta coldly suggests he takes all of the Saiki's children due to their better living conditions, based solely on their wealth. Franky's reaction of sheer disbelief with an undercurrent of horror makes Yūdai's violent reaction of hitting the man natural even to such a cheerful man. Franky in the moment shows so well the horror of such an idea and is only supported by that sense of overwhelming love for his children. Franky throughout the film adds so much to the film by providing this contrast to the central character. He does so by providing this other side of the coin but in doing so providing as honest of portrait of man. He never becomes a caricature of the "fun dad" in the same way Fukuyama never becomes one of the "cold dad". Their performances rather creates that contrast while still being fully embodying these men beyond that circumstance. Although he obviously has a more limited perspective than Fukuyama, Franky's work also finds such a quiet poignancy in presenting Yūdai with an essential reality of a man living through this unlikely struggle, just a different kind of struggle due to the nature of the man.

74 comments:

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Your choice for showrunner for that 90s version of Barry? I think Robert Altman could've made something of the material if he had dabbled in television back then.

And your 70s cast and showrunner for Barry as well? With The New Hollywood and the Vietnam War as backdrops.

Emi Grant said...

Hell, just the particular way in which Franky hits Fukuyama speaks volumes of his character. I'm looking forward to uncovering more of his work.

Louis: If the film was to be remade, who would you choose for the American cast and who would be your pick for director?

Bryan L. said...

Apparently, Anthony McCarten is going to write a narrative adaptation of Three Identical Strangers.


Ugghhhh...

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your cast for a 2010s A Bittersweet Life, with American actors? I'm assuming Gosling is your choice for Lee's role.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Do you have anything to add thoughts wise on Alfie Allen, Liam Cunningham, Conleth Hill, Rory McCann, Sophie Turner, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau and Lena Headey from seasons 5-8.

Calvin Law said...

Parasite getting great reviews too.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Happy that all of my most anticipated films from Cannes are doing pretty well.

I think it's a really strong possibility that Dafoe/Pattison and Dicaprio & other OUATIH cast members will be reviewed this year.

Anonymous said...

Louis, with King Of The Monsters soon to release, do you consider Bryan Cranston's character in the first film, an example of wasted potential.

Anonymous said...

Louis: So I've read that Curtiz originally wanted Davis to play Mildred Pierce, but when she declined, he then thought of Stanwyck. Rosalind Russell, Myrna Loy and the De Havilland sisters were also considered apparently.

Emi Grant said...

Bryan L: Why, though?

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the latest castings for Nolan's next film, Tenet.

Luke Higham said...

Aladdin
Massoud - 3
Scott - 4 (Completely stole the film for me)
Smith - 3
Kenzari - 1.5 (What on earth were they thinking)
Negahban - 3

Was a decent remake but my god, that Jafar miscasting really dragged it down at times.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your thoughts on this scene from Season 2 of Game of Thrones? I think it's one of Coster-Waldau's finest moments.
https://youtu.be/DpD47mmlei4

Calvin Law said...

Saw Rocketman. I have fairly substantial problems with the framing device and some of the writing regarding Elton’s family, but thought the overall approach to his stardom and pitfalls was pretty great and all the music sequences bar one awful one, are fantastic.

Egerton - 4.5
Bell - 4
Madden - 3
Howard - 2

Bryan L. said...

Emi: Because McCarten cannot be stopped unfortunately...

Bryan L. said...

Calvin: Is it better than Bohemian Rhapsody? If so, by how much?

Luke: The more important question is whether those OUATIH reviews will include "received/did not receive an Oscar nomination for playing..."

Mitchell Murray said...

Bryan: Well with the exception of "Pulp Fiction", every time the academy has recognized a Tarantino film, they've only nominated one performance. And even then, most of those where flamboyant supporting turns ala Christoph Waltz's two wins. As for the OUATIH ensemble, if they do decide to change things up, then DiCaprio would probably be the prime contender.

If not, well... maybe Margot Robbie, or Brad Pitt if they category fraud him, but those two are really the less likely outcomes.

Calvin Law said...

Bryan: vastly better. The formulaic biopic approach is still there in the screenplay somewhat but I thought Fletcher did very well to add some unique life and flair to it. Not every choice worked but when they did they paid off marvellously. It also handles some of the darker tones MUCH better than BR did.

Bryan L. said...

Calvin: I'm quite glad to hear that. Probably should've just let Fletcher direct BR from the beginning. And gotten a different writer. Anyways, I'm a bit surprised they're releasing this in May instead of awards season.


Mitchell: I predict that Pitt and Robbie get in. I'm actually not too sure if Dicaprio will though, since they might think "Eh we finally gave him one; that's enough".

Emi Grant said...

I'm actually going on a limb here, and saying Pitt and DiCaprio will be the first double nominees on Lead Actor since Amadeus.

Matt Mustin said...

I'm thinking they're gonna push Pitt in Supporting. I don't know how accurate that placement is, but I think DiCaprio's top billed, so they'll probably put him lead, Pitt Supporting, or they might go ensemble and say everyone's supporting.

Anonymous said...

Louis: your top 10 bill hader , stephen root and henry winkler acting moments

Bryan L. said...

Anonymous: Here's mine for Hader. From Barry, unless noted otherwise

1. Shakespeare
2. Monologue to Cousineau
3. FUCHES!
4. He's not a child molester- The Skeleton Twins
5. Final scene with Detective Moss
6. How he shot Chris
7. What marriage?- The Skeleton Twins
8. WHAT?!
9. "Welcome to the goody room!"- Tropic Thunder
10. Lip syncing- The Skeleton Twins

Honorable mention to all his Stefon appearances

Bryan L. said...

*By #2, I mean his monologue in the pilot.

Michael McCarthy said...

While we're on the subject, who was everyone's MVP per episode from season 2 of Barry?

For me:

1. Anthony Carrigan
2. Bill Hader
3. Bill Hader
4. Sarah Goldberg
5. Stephen Root
6. Bill Hader
7. Stephen Root
8. Henry Winkler

Bryan L. said...

Michael: I'll cheat on a couple of them if you don't mind

1. Anthony Corrigan
2. Bill Hader
3. Sarah Goldberg
4. Bill Hader and Sarah Goldberg
5. Stephen Root (His reactions here are the funniest)
6. Bill Hader
7. Stephen Root (Although I love Corrigans' confession on the bus)
8. Bill Hader and Henry Winkler

Michael McCarthy said...

Bryan: I understand cheating on episode 4, since Hader, Root, and Winkler all gave some of their best work of the season in that one. I went with Goldberg because I her portrayal of being emotionally manipulated by an ex was so powerfully authentic that I haven't been able to get it out of my head.

Bryan L. said...

Michael: I agree, although Haders' reactions to almost going through with killing Sallys' ex are great. Everyone really stepped it up, and I have a feeling that Harry Winkler will get a lot of focus in Season 3.

Bryan L. said...

*Henry

Anonymous said...

Louis: apparently Mark Strong was offered the role of Stannis, how do you think he would’ve fared?

Anonymous said...

Louis, your thoughts on the reception for The Lighthouse, A Hidden Life and Parasite.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on this:
youtube.com/watch?v=sQyDpTypfZ0

Luke Higham said...

Michael McCarthy: What are your ratings and thoughts on Phoenix, Meaney and Siddiqui.

Bryan L. said...

Luke: Your Top Ten Anthony Hopkins performances?

RatedRStar said...

I am fairly confident that at least 2 of three from OUATIH will get nominated.

Luke Higham said...

1. Westworld
2. Shadowlands
3. The Silence Of The Lambs
4. The Lion In Winter
5. The Elephant Man
6. Magic
7. Titus
8. A Bridge Too Far
9. The Mask Of Zorro
10. The Remains Of The Day
Thought he was also good in Legends Of The Fall, The World's Fastest Indian, Hannibal and The Bounty. Haven't seen his portrayal of Pierre Bezukhov yet or his work in The Dresser (2015) and King Lear (2018)

Bryan L. said...

RatedRStar: Same here.

Luke: Thanks. Damn, he's that good in Westworld? Guess I've gotta check that show out now, since I've been putting it off for too long.

Also, your ratings for him in Nixon and Hitchcock? And what rating do you reckon he'll get in The Pope?

Luke Higham said...

Bryan:
Hitchcock - 3
Nixon - 3.5 (Haven't seen it in ages so a rewatch is needed)

Hard to tell, don't know how big the role is, I'd say a 4.

Omar Franini said...

Louis: your cast ranking for the second season of Barry? And your thoughts on the fifth episode?

I’m in Cannes those days since i’ve received the 3 days accreditation; I’ll be seeing A Hidden Life and The Lighthouse tomorrow and Parasite on Saturday.

Calvin Law said...

Omar: sounds heavenly. Enjoy!

Anonymous said...

Louis Morgan: Your top ten A Song of Ice and Fire characters?

Robert MacFarlane said...

Louis: You think it would have been better if Jaime died at Winterfell instead of his other fate?

Louis Morgan said...

Bryan:

Theoretically sure, though of course there was that "crater" back then between tv/movies then so even Carrey going back to the form would've been a pipe dream, though I tried to keep to that idea otherwise.

Barry: Michael McKean
Fuches: Tom Ewell
Sally: Lesley Ann Warren
Gene Cousineau: Ralph Bellamy
Goran: Joss Ackland
NoHo Hank: John Lithgow
Detective Moss: Eartha Kitt

Emi Grant:

Wealthy Couple: Edward Norton/Elizabeth Banks
Working Couple: Bob Odenkirk/Linda Cardellini

Directed by Lenny Abrahamson

Note: (Gosling will be perfect for the Ryota equivalent in ten years)

Tahmeed:

The equivalents:

Kim: Yeah Gosling
Mr. Kang: W. Earl Brown
Hee-soo: Margaret Qualley
Baek: Ben Barnes
Mun Suk: Stephen Dorff
Gun Dealer: Tom Sizemore

Luke:

Alfie Allen - (Although he started to be given repetitive material at times, he managed to bring Theon's arc back around beautifully hitting every beat, even the trips, into one cohesive character. And, as much as I have so many problems with the final season, Theon's final moments was not one of them, with Allen's reaction to "You're a good man" being the highlight as he managed to convey all that he lost and gained in that moment.)

Cunningham - (I've mentioned before his highlight moment before with his confrontation with Melisandre being one of the best acted moments of the series, but it's a testament to his talent that he remained such a notable presence even while so often just playing a pitch man for Jon Snow. Cunningham though never lost it even within sometimes more limited character movement, and made the most out of every chance.)

McCann - (Nothing really to add as his "reformed" Hound was beautifully performed with that bluntly more than cynical wit so well delivered with that palatable emotional depth within his role. MAN, I have to say they really could've done so much more between Arya and him if they had spared the time in the last two season. Still McCann was consistently a highlight every chance he had.)

Turner - (Although I really thought they kept her two much at a distance in the final two seasons, her work in both 5 and 6 was consistently excellent in again delivering her arc. This was bringing the real meat within the emotions of the character whether it be the moments of abject horror and despair, but also that convincing portrayal of the growth in confidence. This note the writers overplayed mind you, ridding Sansa a bit of her humanity at time needlessly, Turner though was terrific though even when the writing was not.)

Coster-Waldau - (I mean if I thought other characters were inconsistent their treatment of Jaime as a rubber band was quite the extraordinary nonsense. Coster-Waldau though deserves all the credit though for making it work, to the point I think he kind of made the ending even worse, since I feel he played it as though Jaime was lying when playing the kingslayer persona, whereas the showrunners were like "yep that's Jaime". Any who though Coster-Waldau stayed true to the reformed presence that he so powerfully realized in so many great moments of finding the emotional depth within the unforgivable vile fiend we all thought he was, which I guess he was "SCREW THAT ENDING".)

Headey - (SCREW THAT ENDING. Oh excuse me I forgot about Headey's performance which gave quite the wonderful depiction of first humanizing Cersei as we see her lose all her power, and fall into one foolish decision after another. This in granting the right sorrow and heartbreak in her losses both politically with the high sparrow then emotionally with her children. This though then was effectively turned as she played the soullessness take hold with each loss to becoming surely the queen of sorrows. Of course, nope, she never lost it, uhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh)

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Yes.

Anonymous:

I mean any of those also considered choices would've worked, though the part played well into Crawford's strengths.

Luke:

Posey, cool, Caine, Of course, Branagh (His new Caine? I'm fine with that), Taylor-Johnson? Uhhhh....Nolan...usually...gets his casting right so I'm not too concerned.

Tahmeed:

Great scene in setting up the rather rocky start to Jaime and Brienne's relationship with his asides as he stays as the man playing into being dishonorable, though I love Coster-Waldau's quiet allusions to Jaime's confessions within the lines as he hints at a bit of emotions as he remarks on the conflicts of a Knight's duties.

Anonymous:

Hader:

1. WHY DID YOU SAY THAT
2. The Real flashback
3. Shakespeare
4. His "monologue"
5. Sally's Monologue
6. Going to kill Fuches
7. Trying to make Chris Leave
8. Confrontation at the Lake
9. Confessing to Fuches
10. A Not so intimidating Blake

Stephen Root:

1. Fake Private Eye With Gene
2. "comforting" Barry
3. Tracking the feral Girl
4. Talking a man to suicide
5. Making peace between the gangs
6. "Taylor has to die"
7. "Pan Shot" - The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
8. In the basement - Office Space
9. Reaction to the torture prep
10. Meeting with LBJ - All the Way

He was always great at voicing Bill in King of the Hill, though harder to single down.

Winkler:

1. Loaded Beretta - Barry
2. Date - Barry
3. Police interrogation - Barry
4. Desolate grave - An American Christmas Carol
5. Offering his services - Barry
6. It's very long - Arrested Development
7. Audition - Barry
8. The Ending - An American Christmas Carol
9. Are you nuts? - Arrested Development
10. Tearing down Sally - Barry

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

I think he would've been good without a doubt, Strong knows how to bring humanity to cold intensity, but given that Stephen Dillane is Stannis in real life, I prefer how it went down.

Anonymous:

Whell I don't typically read reviews until after I've seen a film, but just from the general sound of things...

The Lighthouse (The "ink" on Pattinson & Dafoe is more than enough, but I also am looking forward to Eggers's vision, given he already made his knack for atmosphere quite evident in the VVitch.)

A Hidden Life - (Well sounds like Malick's returned to at least some form, not sure to what degree, but I will actually bother to check this one out)

Parasite - (Well I'd be in for a semi divisive Bong film, an almost universally lauded one? No need for even a trailer or a still, just let me see it!)

Luke:

A truly great scene from season 5 (which is very inconsistent), that is pretty close to the books, with such a short but powerful performance moment from Vaughan with "I dreamed I was old" that is absolutely heartbreaking.

Omar:

Episode 5 is the television achievement of the year so far, with Hader proving himself as quite the director here as well. This in creating such a uniquely captivating sequences from the opening brawl to the chaos of the climax. This within between it all just some incredible physical comedy from all involved, but wound with such a genuinely compelling narrative sequence through the conflict of Barry/Ronny, Barry/Lilly, Fuches/Barry, Barry/Fuches/Lilly, Barry/Ronny again, then topping off with Ronny/Loach. Brilliantly conceived and impeccably staged.

1. Bill Hader
2. Stephen Root
3. Anthony Carrigan
4. Sarah Goldberg
5. Henry Winkler
(All great)
5. John Pirruccello
6. Andrew Leeds
7. Daniel Bernhardt
8. Michael Irby
9. Acting class actors (Who aren't bad at all)

Anonymous:

If we're only talking the books:

1. Davos Seaworth
2. Jaime Lannister
3. Stannis Baratheon
4. Arya Stark
5. Sansa Stark
6. Brienne of Tarth
7. Tyrion Lannister
8. Tywin Lannister
9. The Hound
10. Theon Greyjoy

Robert:

Given what we got, yes, as it would've been far more fitting to what Jaime became. It also would've spared us that garbage "Never cared about the people's of King's Landing" WHAAAAATTT, it's funny your most vulnerable moment in the bath seemed to suggest otherwise.

Calvin Law said...

I always forget about Winkler as Barry Zuckercorn. What are your thoughts on his work there Louis? He’s hilarious.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Rating and thoughts on Winkler in An American Christmas Carol.

Matt Mustin said...

Watched The Ballad of Buster Scruggs again. Bill Heck is a 5 for me now, each time I've watched it I've appreciated his performance more and more, and that entire segment actually.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: What would be your ideal cast and director for a biopic detailing the career of The Beatles?

Calvin Law said...

John Wick 3: I actually think I preferred Part 2 (what about you Louis?) This one just had...nothing going on. The action was good but even that wasn’t great. Only thing I preferred in this were the villains but even they weren’t great or anything. Gosh I miss those Russians in the first film.

Reeves: 3
McShane: 3 (HATE what they did with his characterisation)
Reddick: 3 (MVP)
Everyone else is a collective 2.5, although I thought Jerome Flynn’s cameo was actually pretty bad.

Can’t believe this but I vastly preferred Aladdin. It doesn’t really do anything to reinvent the wheel and the villain is pathetic but I enjoyed it.

Massoud - 3.5
Scott - 4
Smith - 3.5 (playing himself but honestly I liked that)
Kenzari - 1
Negahban - 3
Tudyk - wasted

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Your thoughts on the Aladdin cast.

I'm upgrading Massoud and Smith & downgrading Kenzari.

I saw Rocketman yesterday, it was quite good and Egerton was great.

What was that one musical sequence that you described as awful.

In regards to John's family, that John Lewis advert last christmas doesn't have the same effect that it once did. And I really didn't like BDH's portrayal of his mother.

Anonymous said...

Louis: I don't know if you were ever aware of this, but for Beast Wars, there was supposed to be an episode where Rattrap salvages a computer bank from the Axalon where he finds the core consciousness of the deceased Dinobot and gets the idea that he can bring the old Dinobot back by downloading it into Dinobot II's systems. There were rumors that it was never produced because it was too dark.

Anonymous said...

Louis: And here's another fun fact about Beast Wars. When it got a Japanese dub, the voice director decided to miscast some of the actors and had them ad-lib most of the time. When I mean by miscast, I'm talking about actors like Optimus Primal's VA, who is known for playing over-the-top villains in anime. His voice would have been more suited for Megatron.

Calvin Law said...

Massoud - (makes Aladdin a suitably endearing rogue with some nice comic touches. I wouldn’t say that the character is a particularly interesting one as written, as was the case with the original but he certainly gives a charming turn here.)

Scott - (just lovely and I did like the added touches the writing gave her character. Excellent chemistry with Massoud, handled her little arc nicely, and nails her big numbers even if I wasn’t a fan of all of them necessarily)

Smith - (I mean I got what I came for, Smith doing Smith and honestly I thought it worked for the role. The CGI was still pretty uncanny but I thought he was charming in all the right ways and loved his chemistry with Pedrad who I’d give a 3 to)

Kenzari - (not even a hilariously bad villain just very, very, very bland. Nothing much to say really since he made Jafar into such a non-entity which is quite something to begin with)

Negahban - (has the right gravitas, doesn’t get much to do but liked what he did)

And the musical sequence I was referring to was I Want Love. Not terrible to be honest thinking about it...but more just pretty below the standard of most of the other numbers. My favourites were ‘Your Song’ and ‘Goodbye Yellow Brick Road’.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Really just consistently knock out hilarious work, where he just came in with that perfect earnestness of his though in service to extreme incompetence and questionable morals. His performance very much was a subversion of doing the sleazy lawyer, though with that Winkler "purity" that made for something supremely entertaining.

Full agreement in regards to Wick 3, which I like less the more I think about it. Wick 2 also annoyed me with its focus so much on the world building, but it at least bothered to tell some semblance of its own self-contained story unlike 3.

Luke:

Winkler - 4.5(Although he looks like a human turtle in his less than stellar makeup I have to give it to Winkler for actually delivering his own convincing take on Ebenezer Scrooge, though here Americanized. Winkler though acquits himself actually quite well in not only wearing the age past the questionable makeup, while also playing twice against expectation. The first being doing a purely dramatic role the second playing a mean character given his always affable presence. Winkler though makes for a proper curmudgeon and like any proper Scrooge delivers the right bitterness and cynicism within the cruelty. His performance though actually carries the always potent arc of the Scrooge type well hitting both emotional moments of reaction that lead to reformation, but also showing the hardening of a young man losing himself.)

Tahmeed:

I mean if you're talking the early years you'd have to go with largely unknowns, but for the sake of making this more fun:

Directed by Martin Scorsese (Who must be able to make a non-documentary musical biopic at some point):

John Lennon: Nicholas Hoult
Paul McCartney: George McKay
George Harrison: Harry Styles
Ringo Starr: Will Poulter
George Martin: Linus Roache
Brian Epstein: Alfie Allen
Cynthia Lennon: Tamzin Merchant
Jane Asher: Karen Gillen
Linda McCartney: Riley Keough
Maureen Cox: Mia Goth
Pattie Boyd: Holliday Grainger
Yoko Ono: Chiaki Kuriyama
Billy Preston: Daveed Diggs

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Yes I was, and it makes sense given it has both a setup in the Rampage episode, it makes the final results of the clone less convenient.

Bryan L. said...

Luke: Your rating for Egerton?

Bryan L. said...

I'll thrown in a music biopic of my own

Nirvana biopic, directed by Anton Corbijn

Kurt- Evan Peters
Dave- Michael Angarano
Krist- Ezra Miller
Courtney Love- Margot Robbie (Although it might be too obvious)
Danny Goldberg- Jason Segel
Butch Vig- Martin Starr

BRAZINTERMA said...

Louis.
The movie You Were Never Really Here is from the year 2017, right? Yes or no, tell me one thing: where is Joaquin Phoenix's performance in Overall Ranking?

Emi Grant said...

Brazinterma: I think he'll add him after he reviews him (he's pretty much guaranteed to) when doing the Bonus Rounds for 2017. It might be quite a while before that happens, though.

Luke Higham said...

Bryan: 4.5

Luke Higham said...

Parasite wins the Palme D'or.

Calvin Law said...

So happy for Bong.

Matt Mustin said...

Louis: Thoughts on this? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fINh4SsOyBw

Bryan L. said...

Luke: Ratings for everyone else?

Luke Higham said...

Bell - 3.5
Madden - 3
BDH - 2

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the screenplays of The Damned United and Pride of the Yankees.

Emi Grant said...

Hopefully Parasite becomes South Korea's first Best Foreign Language Film Nominee, and maybe even winner.

Bryan L. said...

Louis: If Miller had made Fury Road back in the day with Gibson, who would be your choices for the rest of the cast and decade of release? (Keeping Keays-Byrne of course)

Also, your thoughts on last years "90 Years" montage during the Oscars?

Bryan L. said...

Matt: Any updated ratings for the cast of Buster Scruggs?

Matt Mustin said...

Bryan L: Pretty much everyone, thinking back to my original ratings, they're not at all accurate, except for Waits (who is my win once again, and yes I've seen Burning) and Nelson.

Heck-5
Kazan-4.5
Hines-4.5
O'Neill-4.5
Melling-4.5
Watson-3.5
Neeson-3.5
Root-3.5
Rubinek-4

Matt Mustin said...

Louis: If a movie gets a DVD or online release and than gets a theatrical release a year or so later, which year do you consider it for?

Louis Morgan said...

Matt:

I'll admit I don't always love a lot individual Python sketches, most often due to the pacing which stretch the jokes out a bit longer than they have the fuel for, despite being funny in conception. This is an enjoyable example of one sketch though solely found in the use of language and is impressive in kind of forcing one to care about a lot of what is typically said that you don't pay attention to. It also is paced quite well.

I go by whenever the first time the general public can see it legally with relative ease. So if it was released officially on either of those formats first I go by that release

Bryan:

Well 90's:

Furiosa: Rene Russo
Splendid: Connie Nielsen
Capable: Dina Meyer
Toast: Talisa Soto
The Dag: Kylie Minogue
Slit: David Wenham
Nux: Ben Mendelsohn

Many times a lot montages don't make a great deal of sense, however this made sense in its use, and was quite artfully made in that respect. This in particularly effective in creating the speech through clips.

Anonymous:

Pride of the Yankees is an extremely straight forward screenplay and very much representative of the biopics of the era. We get a bit of childhood, a bit of romance, a bit of their accomplishment, and their end, whatever that might be. For an example of this it does the first three things just fine. It isn't extraordinary as such, certainly not in any sort of depth, but it does its job with all three. This in finding at least a bit conflict, however limited in there in places, and some extra bits in there, like playing a prank on Babe Ruth for example. Its end though does have a bit more though through taking his real life retirement speech almost verbatim for the closure, which is quite an end, even if directly lifted. I'll give the screenplay credit though it knows not to try to top that, because it couldn't.

The Damned United is an interesting atypical biopic fashioned by Peter Morgan, whose made his career out of bringing fascinating real life stories to screen. His work is typically pointed by strong plotting, and natural, and not showy, dialogue, unlike another playwright screenwriter who likes to tackle true to life stories. Although Morgan has a similar approach to that unnamed screenwriter, in his ability to absorb one into minutia. That is make you care about the finer details, accurate or not, of a given subject. This is evident here in terms of football, as brings you into the world with a rapid fire energy. Overarching though there is something distinctly fascinating in the screenplay here as it grants you the typical story of a sports movie, that is a bit of background then following a season, however this one is about failure rather than success. This being failure of the team and failure of the coach, who stops at nothing to try to prove his point. This creates a most unique, and compelling variation in the genre just as it also succeeds in bringing you essentially into the world of competitive football.

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