Wednesday, 22 April 2020

Alternate Best Actor 1983: Om Puri in Ardh Satya

Om Puri did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Sub inspector Anant Velankar in Ardh Satya.

Ardh Satya follows a man as he is pulled between a romance with young peaceful woman, and his career put upon him as police officer, by his violent father.

Om Puri portraying the officer Velankar who we are introduced to in largely humane circumstances of a man just attending a social gathering. This is where we see him initially meet up with the lovely young woman Jyotsna (Smita Patil). Puri is charming in a low key way in just expressing the bit of happiness that stems from the two interacting. Puri bringing an earnest modesty and an appropriate shyness in the interaction, suggesting a woman he really likes, and setting up this point importantly in his character. This is before we see him though first acting as a cop, just interacting with the other police officers. This initially isn't too concerning as Puri just portrays a slight disarming boast about potentially meeting someone worthwhile to the others, and we see a man just going about hid duties which seem perfunctory for the moment. This though is interrupted however with flashback s towards Velankar's past where his father launched into verbal and physical assaults against Velankar's mother. This leaving Puri portrays sort of this a difficult state. This as Velankar only ever watched the behavior, something that clearly effected him negatively to see the mistreatment yet while reaming the dutiful son. These moments establish essentially what will be the contrasting influences for Velankar throughout the film, as he goes deeper into the relationship with Jyotsna, but also deeper into the life of the police officer with all that it entails.

The film then show the progress of each, and really the disagreement between these two sides of the man. In this reminded me strongly of Puri's later BAFTA nominated performance in East of East, where there were also two extremes within his character. This though is one more of a progression of each, and where that conflict comes in. This as we see his work as a police officer, where we initially just see the determination of a man doing his job. Puri brings an intensity to be sure, but at first it appears more of the requirements for the man of such a position. This with a stiff spine and stern look, but not beyond that. This still though is in contrast with Jyotsna that continue to have this growing tenderness between them, with both actors sharing a sweet chemistry with one another. The moments as the officer though we see the frustrations within Puri's work as Velankar's efforts are not particularly successful and he pushed towards more violent actions required within his city. This as we see him attempting to take down a legitimate criminal, posturing as the strong man doing the right thing, however this failing entirely. This too changes his relationship with Jyotsna, though largely from her concerns for his actions. This as Puri himself portrays initially this attempted distance and detachment from the other man. This as though it is just a job, portraying just a man attempting to be loving towards her, even with those concerns growing.

This as the man's violent actions only continue to worsen as he beats down protestors and becomes altogether more vicious. Puri's performance of this, as was his work in East is East, is quite frankly startling in just how real he makes the violence. This showing just it as something that is plainly ugly, and befitting a man who is basically doing the will of the very worst he saw in his own father. Puri giving a startling depiction of a horrible misery that inflicts the man, and we see what appears to be all the hate he learned from his father as he delivers it onto what essentially become his victims. Puri is remarkable though as he naturally shows us what appeared to be just a likable man initially as this horrible person. He still shows the man who tries to separate himself from it with Jyotsna, but when he goes far too far with his violence, it finally forces him to face facts. This scene is a downright amazing scene for Puri. This as we see the man finally reflect upon his actions, and upon his past regarding his mother. Puri is heartbreaking by showing the man finally facing his violent side is in a moment of such vulnerability. This showing it in his connection with this woman he clearly loves, but with a certain terrible resignation within looking at where he has gone due to his personal flaws. Puri conjures up the whole sense of the failures of his father, and regrets of childhood with such striking nuance. He shows the man desperation in the moment beautifully, even if so painfully. This showing a man finally seeing both sides of himself. This continues though as he confronts the true criminal again, and again Puri shows a slightly different combination of the sides of the man. This as we see this viciousness though with this sort emotional determination, as while his act isn't good, Puri now portrays it as personal, rather than just detaced cruelty of a state.  Puri's performance shows us the good man theoretically who could just be in this relationship, charming and even endearing at times. He makes the terrible path of the man though wholly tangible in that gradual descent, that while it eventually leads to that powerful moment of reflection, also realizes how man detaching himself from his actions can lead to near atrocities.

99 comments:

Luke Higham said...

1. Depardieu
2. Bowie
3. Puri
4. Gordon
5. Yankovsky

Louis: Ratings and thoughts on the rest of the cast.

Luke Higham said...

Michael McCarthy: Your ratings for Depardieu, Pszoniak, Bowie, Conti, Gordon and Yankovsky.

Michael Patison said...

I'll redo:
1. David Bowie
2. Gerard Depardieu
3. Om Puri
4. Keith Gordon
5. Oleg Yankovsky

Anonymous said...

Luke, why don't you don't watch all the films in a lineup for once? Just to mix it up.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: I'm busy with other things in my life right now. And I have seen all but Puri. Saw Nostalghia the other day and my gut feeling was right.

Anonymous said...

Luke, fair enough.

Luke Higham said...

I'll also say that I'm generally indecisive with my predictions and I'll do anything I can to win even at the last minute before the 2nd review is up.

Calvin Law said...

I’ll stick with my predictions as they are I think. Excellent performance. What did you make of the film overall Louis? I thought it was quite excellent In terms of handling the topic matter and moved along quite well, and putting an ‘honest cop’ as protagonist was a nice interesting touch.

Calvin Law said...

I’ll try to get to Depardieu as soon as possible I think.

Bryan L. said...

1. Bowie
2. Puri
3. Depardieu
4. Gordon
5. Yankovsky

Lucas Saavedra said...

1. Bowie
2. Puri
3. Depardieu
4. Yankovsky
5. Gordon

Mitchell Murray said...

1) Bowie
2) Depardieu
3) Puri
4) Yankovsky
5) Gordon

Anonymous said...

Louis: I recall you mentioning that set realism was a trait that was usually found in Lumets' films, although it didn't exactly define him per se, and that it may have been a main reason as to why The Wiz didn't work. Now that you've seen the film, would you confirm that to be true?

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Patil - 3.5(The film is very much Puri's show, however I think she really delivers well in bringing the straight heart to her performance. This is even though her role is largely reactionary, she handles that well by emphasizing so well the strong sense of empathy in every moment with Puri, and brings depth within the idea of sort of questioning Puri's character's stance.)

Puri - 3(I mean quite effective in being just horrible every second he is onscreen. He is as ugly as the other Puri in that regard in showing the sheer vicious misery of his hate. I do like his final scene though in bringing just a hint of nuance as he thinks about his son with less than anger for at least a moment.)

Amrapurkar - 3.5(Quite effective in delivering just utter sleaze in his few scenes. This in bringing just such despicable smug assurance that everything will be going perfectly for him. He finds the right risible quality in every second he is onscreen, and just does well to set the presence as this worst kind of criminal.)

Calvin:

I thought it was quite good, I did think it could've been tightened a little bit, in just there are a few repetitive moments in terms of the character's degradation, however I thought the exploration nonetheless was very artfully done.

Anonymous:

Yes, that and broad comedy doesn't suit that style either. The Wiz needed really fantasy and broad comedy to work in anyway, both aren't Lumet's strong suit, so in turn it is one of his worst films.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Has anyone heard about this “Demme cut” of Swing Shift? From the people who’ve seen it, they claim it’s an infinitely better film and Hawn gives a much better performance in that cut. It’s also very difficult to come by.

Louis Morgan said...

Robert:

Had not, although that would make sense as the theatrical cut does feel like it had been oddly repurposed to be a generic rom-com.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Louis: The story goes that Hawn thought she was being upstaged and her performance was too “small”, so she demanded “bigger” scenes and had it rewritten. By all accounts from those who’ve seen it, a case of serious self-sabotage.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

So glad you liked him, even if I was hoping for a 5 (which is the rating this review suggests).

1. Depardieu
2. Bowie
3. Puri
4. Gordon
5. Yankovsky
2.

Calvin Law said...

Tahmeed: it reads to me like a pretty strong 4.5 to be honest. I find that the step between a 4.5 and 5 for Louis I can usually start to gauge around the midway mark which is always a fun experience.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Could Puri go up slightly for East is East?

Calvin Law said...

Which makes it obvious always when either the wrong rating was put up accidentally or otherwise (i.e. Cagney in Dirty Faces, Bale in Hostiles).

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Calvin: If I recall correctly, Donat was originally Louis's pick for the 38 lineup. Cagney was upgraded soon afterwards.

But giving the review a second read, I'll have to agree with you.

Louis Morgan said...

Robert:

That's unfortunate, hopefully it can get a proper release, as looking it up now, that is some mighty high praise from those who have apparently seen it.

Tahmeed:

Sure.

Calvin Law said...

Can anyone think of other examples like that Robert mentioned where a huge editing job came about as a result of an actor's involvement? The only one off the top of my head is Edward Norton for American History X which apparently did help salvage a mess, although it did begin his infamous string of egotism with films he was involved in.

Calvin Law said...

Actually, looking at its apparently Kaye's original cut was much shorter. I can't really see how that would have benefited the film either.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

I heard Norton rewrote a large part of American History X in order to give himself more screen time. Given that he's an easy win for me in 98 Lead, I'd say it paid off.

Matt Mustin said...

Tahmeed: I don't think he rewrote it, I think he just re-edited it.

Calvin Law said...

Yeah filming was done by that point and I don’t think they did reshoots. On one hand I do feel bad that Kaye’s original vision was compromised but apparently he was not easy to work with either.

Omar Franini said...

1. Depardieu
2. Bowie
3. Puri
4. Gordon
5. Yankovsky

Anonymous said...

1. Depardieu
2. Bowie
3. Puri
4. Gordon
5. Yankovsky

Luke Higham said...

Calvin and Tahmeed: What would be your most satisfying upgrade. You should know my answer by now. I'd also include Astin, Bettany (M&C) and Neeson (Schindler's List).

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar: Are you looking forward to Depardieu's review because it appears to me you gave up hope on Louis really liking a performance from him awhile back.

RatedRStar said...

Luke: Well I came around to disliking his work in Cyrano after I eventually saw Ferrer, I have heard good things about Depardieu in the 80s giving more naturalistic turns as opposed to over the top ones like in Green Card.

RatedRStar said...

In fact the best thing about Green Card was the good joke from the first episode of Spaced lol.

Luke Higham said...

If Louis really likes/loves Depardieu, I'm gonna request him for The Return Of Martin Guerre or Jean De Florette (Heard really great things about it and I'd suggest reviewing all 3 leads).

Calvin Law said...

Luke: Honestly Day-Lewis is one of them for me. But other ones: -

Stephen Rea for The Crying Game
Johnny Depp for Pirates of the Caribbean
Carey Mulligan for Inside Llewyn Davis
Amy Adams for Arrival
Richard Dreyfuss for Jaws

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: I Forgot about Russell Crowe in Master And Commander.

Calvin Law said...

Crowe is another great one, but I guess was more of one I expected to happen anyway.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Ratings and thoughts on Aurore Clement in The Meetings Of Anna, the cast of Convoy (With thoughts on the film), Sylvester Stallone in FIST, Jackie Chan in Drunken Master, the cast of I Wanna Hold Your Hand and if you've seen it only recently, Isabelle Huppert in Violette Noziere.

Bryan L. said...

Luke: I’m not a big fan of Sean Penn, but I really do like him in Milk, so I was glad about that upgrade. Johnny Depp in the first Pirates would be another, since he practically IS the film.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your 2010s choices for these Laurence Olivier roles?

Heathcliff
Fitzwilliam Darcy
George Hurstwood
General John Burgoyne
Crassus
Dr. Astrov
Andrew Wyke
Ezra Lieberman

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

I haven't just seen this films, I had just forgotten to list them when I had updated supporting.

Clement - 3.5(The film isn't really about the acting, though I'd argue it is unfortunately not about much more than boredom, and I won't grant it, the it's just not for me. This as I evidently love when Tarkovsky does it, preview had great for affection for Nostalgia as well, so I won't let it off that easy. Clement's performance is fine, but the idea is more of a person in slow motion than an existing person in a way, and nothing exists in the way you'd think it should. This is the style be sure, and Clement does her best within it, but it doesn't go beyond a certain point.)

Convoy is close to terrible, as a less enjoyable Smokey and the Bandit, though with slight delusions of grandeur.

Kristofferson - 3(He's fine, but not great in doing a too cool for school routine. There's less to it then when he did it as Billy the Kid. Here doing it with the same type of swagger but without any real depth to it.)

Borgnine - 3.5(The best part of the film as he tries his best, and doesn't wholly fail in making the film's tone in work in some way. In that he is just big enough to be comedic, but manages to find a little nuance there that is rather surprising but appreciated later on. This is in portraying the man's recognition that the whole thing might've gone on for too long)

McGraw - 2(Quite bland as per usual, and odd line readings all over the place. She is more than anything just kind of forgettable though.)

Cassel - 3(He's fine in doing basically an attempted but not quite smooth politician routine.)

Stallone - 3.5(Although the film doesn't quite work it is an interesting stretch of sorts for Stallone. In portraying sort of a smarter though just as dogged Rocky type. He manages though to bring that sort of tough intensity you'd expect from him, but plays within it towards an intelligence in the sort of that rather than the more thick headed Rocky.)

Chan - 3(An enjoyable bit of goofy Chan action as a film, and a fine goofy example of Chan, doing his idiot who knows kung fu routine. He's fine in the role and hits the breezy tone well. You can see the sense of how Chan managed to differentiate himself from the other martial arts stars, through that goofiness within the action, that is as much slapstick as it is action)

I will first recommend I Want to Hold Your Hand, to more than just those who'd like to be a Zemeckis completest, as it is really a rather charming a debut and well worth watching. This as just a silly look into Beatlemania with light touches of coming of age things, but mostly in a comic context. Also most notable for getting to see the original "Hey, you get your damn hands off her", which apparently Zemeckis was referencing himself with that one.

Allen, Newman, Saldana, Sperber - 3.5(All are enjoyable in portraying their own sort of comic riffs related to relationship/beatle mania in each. Each performance is a lot of fun in itself with Allen, doing meekness showing strength eventually well, Newman doing a particular form of the protestor type to great effect, Saldana being effectively the most human in the devotion to seeing the Beatles, and then Sperber being a hoot in extreme mania.)

McClure, Di Cicco, Deezen - 3.5/3.5/3(Enjoyed seeing both of the lesser known McFly siblings in this and McClur is enjoyable in doing his own hapless take on George McFly. Di Cicco is fun as sort doing an attempted to smooth, but in the right foolish sort of way. Then Deezen is fine doing his extreme nerd thing he did also in Grease.)

Luke Higham said...

I'm glad Tarkovsky is now 2 for 2 and could possibly have a perfect record once you've seen the rest. Andrei Rublev and Stalker are the two films that I'm deeply excited to get your opinion on.

Anonymous said...

Louis, If you loved Nostalgia then it's a near guarantee you'll love the rest of his work.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Heathcliff - Alfie Allen
Fitzwilliam Darcy - Benedict Cumberbatch
George Hurstwood - Liev Schreiber
General John Burgoyne - Steve Coogan
Crassus - Viggo Mortensen
Dr. Astrov - Gary Oldman
Andrew Wyke - Jeremy Irons (England) - Kevin Kline (America)
Ezra Lieberman - Michael Byrne

Michael McCarthy said...

Luke:

Depardieu: 5
Pszoniak: 4.5 (verging on 5)
Bowie & Conti: 4.5
Gordon: 4.5
Yankovsky: 3.5

I’m not exactly set on the ratings for Bowie and Gordon.

Luke Higham said...

Michael: Your rating for Erland Josephson and could I have your thoughts on Depardieu & Pszoniak.

Calvin Law said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Luke Higham said...

Calvin: I re-watched Danton for the first time in about 5 years and I don't think I gave Depardieu enough credit. I personally love Brandauer's take on the character 6 years later but Depardieu's incredible in his scenes with Pszoniak and his trial speech scene.

Luke Higham said...

I'm switching Depardieu's rating to a 5 and I still have Bowie at a 5 as well.

Luke Higham said...

And I really wish Pszoniak was fluent in French, because he'd be an easy 5 otherwise.

Anonymous said...

Luke, having seen The Snowman, what would be your thoughts on Fassbenders’ performance there, as well as rating? Also, would you consider the final result to be one of the greatest film disappointments of all-time?

Calvin Law said...

I was equally impressed with Depardieu and Pszoniak.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: A 2, It's a dull performance from him that just so happens to be the nadir of his whole career thus far. Much of the problem stems from the film itself which is undoubtedly the most disappointing film I've seen since the blog began.

Anonymous said...

Luke, thanks. Apparently, Nolan intends to release Tenet on its original date if theaters are open then. Your thoughts on this.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: Well, from where I am, I wouldn't get my hopes up. Real issue for the film would be the box-office gross if 50% capacity is implemented at that time whilst restrictions are eased.

Mitchell Murray said...

Man....Fassbender really hasn't had the best luck since "Steve Jobs", has he?

Fingers crossed for "Next Goal Wins".

Mitchell Murray said...

And to be clear, I meant that in regards to the quality of his films, not so much his performances. I mean, "Alien Covenant" was just an underwhelming dud overall, but he was at least interesting in a dual role.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Luke: To name a few of my favorite upgrades-

Al Pacino in Scarecrow
Russell Crowe and Paul Bettany in Master and Commander
Jesse Eisenberg in The Social Network
Lee Byung-Hun in I Saw the Devil
Paul Bettany in A Knight's Tale
Pat Morita in The Karate Kid (really hope Louis upgrades him further)

Mitchell Murray said...

Wait a minute...Morita was lower than a 4 at one point?

Luke Higham said...

Mitchell: He was a 3 initially.

Mitchell Murray said...

Well...I'm glad he was upgraded it that case, as I wouldn't hesitate to give him a 4 myself.

Honestly, I think its quite amazing how the likes of Morita, Burgess Merideth and Alec Guinness came to define the "old mentor" role we see in films today...especially since all of those characters were rather against type for the three men mentioned above.

Matt Mustin said...

I watched The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, which I LOVED. Of all the movies that have ever made me cry, I was not at all expecting this to be one of them. The climactic scene is already probably my favourite thing Anderson has ever done, and possibly Murray for that matter.

Tim said...

I watched Magnolia for the first time yesterday. Loved it. It is my second favorite movie of 99 now, just shortly behind American Beauty. Even though, as it is usual with that kind of movie, you always like some stories more and some less, and i think that the frog rain is not bad, but a bit too much and the movie would have worked equally for me without it.


Blackman: 3.5
Cruise: 5 (my winner of the nominees now)
Dillon: 3
Hall: 4.5 (close to 5)
Hoffman: 4
Macy: 4
Walters: 5
Robards: 3.5
Reilly: 5
Moore: 2.5 (i have only watched the german dubbed Version though and have not watched any Clips in english yet so i do not know what she is like in the original Version)

Luke Higham said...

Louis: On your nominations page, Robert Shaw in Force 10 From Navarone, Dustin Hoffman in Straight Time and Donald Sutherland in Invasion Of The Body Snatchers are stll listed.

John Smith said...

1. Bowie 
2. Puri
3. Depardieu
4. Gordon 
5. Yankovsky

Anonymous said...

Louis: Thoughts on the production design of both Judge Dredd films?

Calvin Law said...

So having just rewatched Mr Lawrence, Bowie and Conti are now 5 and 4.5’s but I’m actually even more looking forward to potentially getting Sakomoto and Kitano reviews (in particular the latter who really surprised me by how much he impacted me this time around).

Mitchell Murray said...

I just saw "The Goodbye Girl" for the first time, and I thought it was okay. There are definitely narrative issues with the film, mainly because of some questionable scenes between Elliott and Paula. It's also rather dated in a lot of ways, as I doubt some of it's scenarios and lines would pass in a modern romantic comedy. Still, the film does have its moments.

Dreyfuss - 3.5 (I must concur with Louis in that he's very annoying in his first couple scenes. Afterwards, however, the performance is more or less what you'd expect from 70's era Dreyfuss - energetic, witty, and for the most part, effective.)
Mason - 4
Cummings - 3

Calvin Law said...

Mitchell: Dreyfus is a strong 4.5 for me.

Calvin Law said...

And this goes against a nitpick of mine in general but I will change up my ranking a bit once more:

1. Depardieu
2. Bowie
3. Puri
4. Gordon
5. Yankovsky

Nothing against Bowie, just think Louis might take to Depardieu a bit more.

Mitchell Murray said...

Calvin: Well just for the record, I do like Dreyfuss in general (LOVE him in "Jaws"). And for most of his "Goodbye Girl" performance he's quite good; It's mainly in those opening scenes that, in my opinion, he went overboard.

Calvin Law said...

That’s definitely where I’d diverge with you and Louis, I think he’s absolutely perfect in those scenes.

Mitchell Murray said...

I should also mention that he's the only best actor nominee of '77 that I've seen, so I don't know how the performance will age in that regard.

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Your cast for a Coen brothers version of Parasite?

RatedRStar said...

I did like Dreyfuss a bit when he was in the phone box at the start and he is arguing with the operator "I'M TRYING TO WORK IT OUT OPERATOR" lol.

I do have a lot of affection though for his Oscar win itself and Stallones line "The new heavyweight champ, RICHARD DREYFUSS" and the massive scream from the audience lol.

RatedRStar said...

The Goodbye Girl I do quite like though actually, I haven't seen it in ages though.

Mitchell Murray said...

I watched the movie as part of a film classics TV line up, hosted by Ben Mankiewicz. According to him, Dreyfus actually predicted his own win on the grounds that Travolta was too new, Allen would win for picture/director, Burton was a few years to late and, quote, "they were never going to give it to Marcello".

If that's true, then its certainly aligns with the personality Dreyfuss has become known for over the years.

RatedRStar said...

Dreyfuss was right to think that, I there were other reasons to Dreyfuss winning as well, he had The Goodbye Girl and Close Encounters in the same year, he won both the Globe and the Bafta as well, Burton was really the only person to potentially challenge him but Equus was not a box office contender like Close Encounters or a Best Picture nominee like Girl was.

Emi Grant said...

1. Bowie
2. Depardieu
3. Puri
4. Gordon
5. Yankovsky

Michael McCarthy said...

So I watched The Hunger last night and kinda dug it, Bowie should get a supporting review after this lineup. Anyone else seen it?

Luke Higham said...

Michael: Not yet, what did you think of Erland Josephson in Nostalgia.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Well Judge Dredd, isn't quite the cinematic abomination some make it out to be, it's more just bad in a general sort of way, though does show sort of the need for direction, as I'm sure the production designers are probably talented...enough people. The film's production design isn't even terrible, it just is generic sci-fi, Blade Runner derivative, that was the most common look for the time. It doesn't stand out in anyway, either as good or bad for that matter. It looks like 90's sci-fi, which is a bit underwhelming but not altogether awful.

Dredd's production design is considerably better, unsurprisingly. This far more reinforcing the idea of a dystopian future, and that is very much reliant on the production design, particular in the slum tower. Every little bit of the nasty Megacity one, or the interior, gives a bit of the idea of the character, that is a very effective combination with futuristic developments broken down through urban rot. Dredd gives you an instant and tangible sense of the type of future you're in, where is Judge Dredd, is just kind of a generic future.

Bryan:

Using previous collaborators only:

Poor Father: John Goodman
Poor Mother; Frances McDormand
Poor Son: Alden Ehrenreich
Poor Daughter: Hailee Steinfeld
Rich Father: Oscar Isaac
Rich Mother: Carey Mulligan
Husband: Tim Blake Nelson
Wife: Elizabeth Marvel

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the direction for the 2012 Dredd?

Anonymous said...

Louis: If Laird Cregar hadn't passed away in 1944, what roles after could you have seen him being a good fit for?

Also, your present film roles for him and Joel McCrea?

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: What are your thoughts on Andre Braugher as an actor?

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Dredd's direction, though its "authorship" is under some dispute, is terrific no matter who directed it. This in firstly in its craft of the world building. This taking a distinct, and vivid creation of its post-apocalyptic landscape for Dredd to be involved with. It goes further though in its stylistic touches that are simply fantastic, whether it be psychic elements, that it manages to make not only not-goofy, but actual grant a real edge to the, or the use of the "slow-mo" that is brilliantly used throughout the film. Then it is just a great action picture. This being in breaking down each sequence in its own set of proper set pieces, as honestly all the great action films do, leaving though within it enough quiet time, to make the action hit all the harder, and grant the film the pace needed. That action itself which finds so many creative routes within those stylistic choices, but also just different ways for us to basically see all the different creative ways to do gun battles, as opposed to the hand to hand combat of the raid.

Anonymous:

Oscar Wilde
Bruno Antony
Big Daddy
Nero
Charles W. Kingsfield Jr.
Ed Concannon

Present:

Howard Stambler
Beria
Gunther Bachmann

Joel McCrea:

Holland March
Max Davis (Game Night)
Patrick Denham (The Wolf of Wall Street)

Tahmeed:

Well he is one where my exposure to his work is somewhat limited with Glory, then a few brief parts, and the episodes of the first season of Brooklyn Nine-Nine that I saw (which I didn't dislike, in fact rather enjoyed his parts, however am still absurdly picky when it comes to TV.) Anyways, from those I've seen him as a rather easily affable actor, with an ease sort of in his performances that frankly create that affability. This in his work that kind of have a clever reverse intensity, with the best scenes of Glory being between him and Washington for a reason, as they do share the screen rather well, with Washington delivering that externalized intensity, while Braugher managing that internalized work rather remarkably. Also though managing to use it in comedy quite well too, though carrying that same innately affable presence.

Calvin Law said...

Cregar would be amazing as Beria. Maybe Elisha Cook Jr as Kruschev then? Assuming this is a version in the 1950s had Cregar not unforunately passed on.

Michael McCarthy said...

Like: I think Josephson fared a bit better than Yankovsky, he was at least able to bring some quirky eccentricity to the role. Nostalgia is more notable for its direction and technical elements than for its acting in my opinion though. Louis, if you find you don’t have much to write about Yankovsky and would like a substitute I highly recommend Jeroen KrabbĂ© in The Fourth Man. I’ve just watched the film and he’s fantastic.

Also Calvin I know you said this a while ago but I 150% agree with you that Kitano needs a review for Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence, he was actually the MVP for me.

Calvin Law said...

Michael: Same for me, I actually think a lot of the most emotional moments of the film rest upon his shoulders. I think he will be for Louis too. Interesting to note he was primarily a comedian before that role, given I'd only ever seen him in Battle Royale.

I just saw Nostalgia too and I liked it definitely, and even though I wouldn't have chosen Yankovsky for a review (although I'd give him a 3.5 or 4) I'm not entirely opposed to it (although if there's some hidden gem like Krabbe, then by all means).

Luke Higham said...

Michael: I'm so pleased you took to Krabbe because he would've been in my 5 for the lineup if I was forced to choose between him, Hackman and Bates.

Luke Higham said...

Also, knowing that Louis has watched Nostalgia, I doubt he'll review Yankovsky as he would've been up by now.

Luke Higham said...

My new supporting lineup
David Bowie (The Hunger)
Jonathan Pryce/Jason Robards (Something Wicked Ths Way Comes)
Ryuichi Sakamoto/Takeshi Kitano (Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence)
Michael Palin (Monty Python's The Meaning Of Life)
Max Von Sydow (Strange Brew)

Bonus: Ian McDiarmid (Return Of The Jedi) and Ed Harris (Under Fire)

Anonymous said...

Luke, I really like that Supporting lineup. What rating would you give McDiarmid in ROTJ.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: I'd give him a 4.5. His subsequent appearances have made me appreciate his work here all the more.

Anonymous said...

Luke, your thoughts on McDiarmid in RoTJ. Also, are you still baffled by what they did with him in TRoS?

Calvin Law said...

Louis: thoughts on Tak Fujimoto’s cinematography? Always forget how Badlands was his feature film debut.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: With the screen time he has, I think he's really great in his depiction of a manipulative, diabolical evil which made him undoubtedly the primary antagonist of the whole saga. My favourite line delivery of his is probably 'So be it, Jedi'.

And yes, I detest what they did with him, which near diminished the impact of ROTJ's ending.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Tak Fujimoto's cinematography certainly is one of the strongest debuts of any, even if the authorship on that one is slightly vague. I would also say Terrence Malick appears to be a filmmaker who brings out the best out of his cinematographers, at least until recently. Although I wouldn't put his work with the likes of a Delbonnel, Deakins, Storaro, Lubezki, who you can almost argue as sort of auteur cinematographers, in that their voice is evident to some degree no matter how talented or talentless their director is. Fujimoto's work though carries that professionalism though where his work is competent at the very least, even if you can see how it thrives with certain filmmakers more than others.