Saturday, 5 October 2019

Alternate Best Supporting Actor 2001: Justin Theroux in Mulholland Drive

Justin Theroux did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Adam Kesher in Mulholland Drive.

Mulholland Drive is a masterful film seemingly about a Hollywood hopeful trying to solve a mystery surrounding a woman with amnesia she befriends.

Justin Theroux runs parallel to that story, as a director also living in Hollywood, though certainly not the dream. Theroux is an actor I haven't covered before, however mentions in the past haven't been particularly favorable. Theroux however is in the hands of David Lynch, who knows his way around finding the right actor for a given part, and Theroux seems onto the right part here. Although I should for a moment drift the eventual reality of the film, where we see Theroux in the traditional role of a Hollywood director. He's fine, he's confident with an expected undercurrent of smugness. That's all there really is to him, in that nightmare, or truth, but it is the dream that is more fun, or more remarkable as Theroux is concerned. Although Theroux must meet the requisite need to be within the moment of Lynch's world. Although Laura Elena Harring and Naomi Watts in particular do more of the heavy lifting in this regard, Theroux does do his part in offering sort of the reality in the surreal. This in two pivotal moments, one meeting the very mysterious and seemingly otherworldly "the cowboy" and spotting Watts's Betty as he tests actresses out for the central role in his film. Theroux's work in each is effectively straight forward in granting the very real anxiety and fear to the strange man, and the needed awe to the greatness that seems to be Betty. As always with Lynch, this grounding is essential to the effectiveness of these moments and Theroux more than delivers in these scenes.

The main crux though of his work involves Theroux obviously breaking reality himself a bit for predicting, or perhaps inspiring the existence of J.J. Abrams, who at the time this film was mostly unknown having not yet adopting his existence as Adam Kesher. Perhaps call me illogical myself for presenting this theory, however it is the truth, and I think Abrams himself is trying to tell us all that with his consistent mention of his "mystery box" storytelling ways. What film also features a mystery box, well Mulholland Drive of course, coincidence, I'll let you, and any local municipal psychiatric workers decide that. I believe my theory though holds true within Theroux's portrayal of the director that is Adam within the "dream", where he's not exactly having the best of days. This is obviously reflective of J.J. Abrams own lauded career of doing often hollow recreations of other better films, in that we see Adam experiencing of well weathered scenes though as a person, though also a bit more twisted than usual. We have the director having his dreams of control of his project rejected by coffee snob gangsters, not unlike a visionary director who in fact simply lives within the whims of a preconceived vision of other true visionaries and corporate overloads. Theroux's performance though works in capturing this weak willed disobedience in the moment with his flustered delivery of his objections. This is even as he physically wrecks the car of the men, via stealing a technique from Jack Nicholson, Theroux's way of running away from his vandalism isn't of some passionate artist, but of a child trying to get away with his pettiness. Theroux's performance works as this hilarious, near parody, of this sort of false artistry. This is continued as he lives through another tired scene, given vibrant life through the Lynch madness, of the director coming home to find himself cuckolded by a mulleted dude bro. Again Theroux's performance works in how underwhelming he is in his attempted act of defiance as he tries to ruin his wife's jewelry. There's no confidence, no strength, just this pathetic and very comical manner of a very weak man. Theroux's performance working as proper overwhelmed fool, who in the end falls in line delivering the expected despite claims to the contrary.

67 comments:

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Have you seen any Louis Theroux documentaries.

And any other rating changes.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Eh, he was fine. I like the guy who played the hitman more.

Calvin Law said...

Yeah, agreed with Robert. Good but not a highlight of the film in my opinion.

Also in relation to the previous post comments I hope there’s a chance for Luke Wilson to be bumped up to a 4.5.

Anonymous said...

Louis: thoughts on this SNL video featuring Ryan Gosling? https://youtu.be/jVhlJNJopOQ

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Matt Dillon as an actor? Have to wonder if he’ll one day get reviewed for a film you like lol

Bryan L. said...

Luke: Anyone from the cast of Inland Empire you think could get reviewed?

I’m glad Theroux received a closer look, and it’s pretty impressive that Lynch can make (almost) anyone work.

Matt Mustin said...

4.5 sounds right to me. It's a very interesting performance.

Lucas Saavedra said...

Great to see Theroux get reviewed. Have you seen him in HBO's The Leftovers?

Calvin Law said...

Louis: your thoughts on the eviction from the forbidden city, and the farewell to Mr Johnston scenes from The Last Emperor?

Calvin Law said...

Giving it more thought The Lighthouse is probably my #2 of the year after Parasite (which is only staying all the more with me) and Dafoe is my #1 so far.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Has The Force Awakens soured on you as much as you alluded to in the review?

Mitchell Murray said...

He'd probably be a 4 for myself. A good performance, and from an actor I actually don't mind much of the time. That's said, Theroux's is obviously not the actor who makes or breaks the film, but it is an interesting turn all the same.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Anonymous: That's one of my favourite SNL sketches, Gosling is a hoot in it xD

Bryan L. said...

I just realized that de Niro and Pacino both have small roles as showbiz people in two of the year's most talked-about films lol. And their main attraction is almost here...

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Have not. Harring and Watts have stayed the same.

Anonymous:

Pretty funny, typically digital shorts are where SNL has managed to be funny for some time, both for the fixation on such a specific thing, though made additionally funny at the choice for such a high budget film, and for Gosling's performance of such conviction.

Bryan:

Matt Dillon is someone I'd say is typically a reliable performer, even if his beginnings suggested maybe a more "actory" career. He's been consistent though working within his certain presence as an actor, very much defined I think by his graveling voice leaning him towards certain types of roles typically. He's been good in most of these roles set for him, though I wouldn't typically describe him as the most dynamic performer, one typically does very much see Matt Dillon first in his roles, but he definitely has an emotional range to take him further than other actors similar in type.

Lucas:

No.

Calvin:

Eviction from the city is a great scene, right from the outset as we see the family very much out of reality at first in their tennis match isolated away from the hostile take over that slowly encroaches on them. Just a brilliantly staged sequences by Bertolucci in having the force slowly pull into Puyi's space, and technically destroying the world he's come to exist by. Before eventually leaving as this "triumphant" emperor in dress and entourage, however being nothing more than a prisoner. Also love the small moment of Puyi seeing the people on the outside finally, technically his people, finally.

Goodbye to Johnston, reminds me of two things. One is how baffling is that O'Toole wasn't recognized for the film given its great success otherwise, but also how scenes like this are essential for such an epic. An epic of really often depressing outcomes, making their purposefully awkward handshake and genuine, and heartwarming moment even as Puyi is within a crisis.

Glad to see hear that Parasite is your #1, only getting better in my mind the more I think about it.

Tahmeed:

Not exactly, as my trolling there was directed at his general approach as a filmmaker. I'd probably say The Force Awakens is his best film, though even with those same flaws, while also very much existing as working with the template that had been set to him by Lucas. His recreations or riffs there though are quite frankly masterful when compared to say what he did with the "death behind glass" scene in Star Trek Into Darkness.

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Funny you mentioned his voice, because I was wondering the other day if he would’ve been a better choice for Black Mask too instead of McGregor. Thoughts?

Also, who would be your choice for Reginald Johnston in a 2010s version of the film? Branagh could be a good shout I think.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: I hope you're reviewing Holm next.

Calvin Law said...

Bryan: I would pick Jared Harris personally but Branagh would be a good choice too.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: Bong has that effect in general I think.

Also I will be seeing Joker soon enough, just waiting for my schedule to free up.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your ratings and thoughts on the cast of The Official Story (1985).

Louis Morgan said...

Saw Spider-man: Far From Home, which I did not go out of my way to see. A big whole ehhhhh from me, and honestly Marvel films in general will need to show me something different for me to remotely care for any future films. Everything felt tired to me, even if though just about everyone who made it obviously care, it couldn't make me care as it just hit the same beats again, and without really any innovation there. Slight side note, I'm really hating the "revisionist" thinking on the Raimi Spider-Men, which had so much more heart and directorial flair than what truly feel like "product" films, as technically competent as it might be.

Holland - 3.5
Zendaya - 3
Favreau - 3
Smoove - 2.5
Batalon - 2
Starr - 3
Gyllenhaal - 3

Also saw Toy Story 4, which thankfully wasn't the garbage fire that was Finding Dory, but didn't *quite* convince me that it needed to exist. I honestly kind of hated the first half hour, and the majority of the plot I think could've and would've been more appropriate to one of those Toy Story shorts. The one element that sets it apart, really only sets itself apart if one feel Bo Peep got a raw deal from Toy Story 3, well luckily I am one of those people. This is as everything involving Bo Peep really worked for me, particularly the ending. Around that wasn't much of a film for me, but it was enough to put it over say an Incredibles 2.

Hanks - 4
Allen - 3
Potts - 4
Key and Peele - 3
Hendricks - 3.5
Reeves - 3.5

Have to think about Hale, as I hated Forky quite honestly, but I don't think it was his fault, in fact he might've made me hate him a little less at least.

Bryan:

Well given I have no idea what McGregor is doing based on that trailer, probably, although I also am not sure what they're doing with this Black Mask either.

Branagh or Harris I think would both work well.

Luke:

Aleandro - (Her performance very much is the film. This is portraying essentially this descent towards reality while having the striking and almost unbearable attachment represented in her adopted child. Her work is extraordinary in creating such a vivid portrayal of slowly losing this naivety that expands towards this painful experience of coming to understand all the atrocities committed around. This while also having this obvious attachment to her child that doesn't go away, where Aleandro makes the horror all the more palatable by presenting it as this weighing dread as it become more and more evident that her child is in a way ill gotten gains. It is a incredible portrayal of this slow exploration towards a horrible understanding of what her existence really means, until her breakdown in many different ways in her final confrontation that is just brilliantly performed.)

Alterio - (He's fine but his performance is very much overshadowed. This is as his portrayal is technically of this attempted assured contentment that doesn't truly break until the final confrontation, where he is good in portraying the rather violent reaction to be called upon his own questionable existence. His performance isn't the one you take away from the film however.)

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your rating for Aleandro and where would rank her for Lead Actress 1985.

Your top 3 is:
Page
Cher
Goldberg.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

I should note I watched the film when I had revisited 85, forgotten that I hadn't mentioned it other than ranking Alterio though. Anyway, Aleandro's a 5 and would be my #2.

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the casts for both films? A bit surprised Gyllenhaals only a 3, although I’m guessing that’s tied in with your tiredness for the same beats being hit.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the casts of Spider-Man (Completely agree with your opinion on it) and Toy Story 4.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Have you finished Band Of Brothers.

Louis Morgan said...

Bryan:

Holland - (I mean he does a good job again. I'm also glad he toned down a little bit of the manic he had in Homecoming. Nonetheless he still just really had to hit the same beats once again, without anything particularly interesting for him to do in terms of anything new with the character.)

Zendaya - (Far less tiresome here, and at least hits the genuine emotional moments well enough, even if overly expected. Still decent enough.)

Favreau - (Really just for his reactions later on, that are well performed to be sure.)

Smoove - (Typical shtick from him though not used to his best I feel.)

Batalon - (Tired of his shtick)

Starr - (Still enjoy his shtick here, which I also like because he is so different from his Silicon Valley work.)

Gyllenhaal - (What kind of lowers him for me is his yelling scenes, which didn't quite work for me. Maybe it was because I was rather checked out, but I don't know it wasn't Gyllenhaal doing his best to me. Maybe it's partially because they just went "oh he's unbalanced" and called it a day for motivation which was out of Gyllenhall's hands I suppose. I liked him doing the fake hero routine, though I think they should've had him play a known Marvel hero, then reveal he's Mysterio, you know to make an actual twist. Then again, I really thought the twist was so weakly realized as written. Nonetheless I thought he was fine here, but that's it.)

Hanks - (His most emotional work I'd say out of any of the series, in terms of what his own vocals bring. Thought he delivered on point, at every point in creating a bit more weight in terms of both sort of Woody's insistence on being a "guardian" then later pondering on his own choices regarding his place in the world.)

Allen - (Thought Buzz got a little short shrift himself, particularly in the early scenes where he almost became a parody version I felt. Still Allen performs the part well once again.)

Potts - (The most essential performance given that she needs to bring a lot of life to a character, who didn't exactly have the most emphasis in the first two films. Potts makes you forget all that rather quickly through just how much she delivers this in work. One thing being sort of the energy as sort of the "action Bo" that didn't feel over the top, but also in just again hitting those emotional moments so effectively.)

Key & Peele - (Funny as to be expected.)

Hendricks - (Her character and motivation felt like a tv episode of the week material by how recycled it was. Having said that I have to give credit to Henricks's performance though that managed to balance both creepy with some emotional nuance that made up for less than stellar material as Stinky Pete version 3.)

Reeves - (Just hilarious work from him doing almost Reeves returning to his 90's version of himself in a way, delivering his lines much more as Johnny Utah than John Wick, which is a welcome return in this form.)

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

I have.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on each episode, the show overall and cast ranking.

Louis Morgan said...

Well overall I thought it was a downright brilliant miniseries and in many ways it is what I wish the rest of Saving Private Ryan was. This is as it managed to capture that same intensity but the emotion was allowed to exist in a far more natural and potent way. This while all being based pretty closely on reality. Managing to create such a compelling series of narrative by granting the focus on a different soldier, a different rank, a different battle, and different life in a way. Just incredible in creating the sense of the war, while also giving a real insight into the ongoing life of these very different soldiers. Each episode really being a terrific singular World War II film in their own, just about.)

Also I got kind of a kick out of the sort of "Where's Waldo" for the later famous actors in bit parts, like Pegg, Fassbender, McAvoy and Hardy (who I won't be ranking given how small their parts are.).

Currahee - (The bootcamp episode, of a different sort and a different perspective. Effective in creating the sense of the men and their character through sort of dealing with a singular jerk in their vindictive CO. Probably the most low key episode in a way but terrific in its table setting.)

Day of Days - (Forceful mainly action related episode, and incredible in that sense. This creating the sheer brutality of it particularly in the drop sequence. Then so effective in creating the sense of confusion as each group of men attempt to find their bearings to actual begin an attack.)

Carentan - (Kind of part 2 of Day of Days, and again brings you through this more direct assault, with also a greater sense of the wear that begins on the men through the story of Blithe. Great action once again in creating such a visceral sense, while also combining such a powerful approach in terms of granting the intensity of the moment, while also showing this advancement towards victory.)

Replacements - (Interesting as you get one part of A Bridge Too Far essentially, and great, as sort of the "successful" part of the mission unfolds in part, along with this introduction of the titular sort. This creating two fascinating dynamics between sort of the men already there becoming the hardened vets along with the blunt truth of the naive men walking into their deaths for what is almost a failure.)

Crossroads - (Amazing sort of some more narrowly focused episode on the exploits of Winters, even if Lewis always does feel as lead, this one in particular though powerfully shows his perspective through a singular action. This action given such a striking atypical existence in a way, as there are casual humanity moments within an attack, that slowly leave a haunting mark, namely his killing of the "staring at another human" German soldier.)

Bastogne - (The first half of the Battleground episode, and fantastic as well in managing to create such a compelling story within essentially the waiting for the battle, and dealing with the brunt of just the enemies artillery fire. An often haunting episode as well, by showing just sort of the taking of loss as this reality.)

The Breaking Point - (Part 2 of Battleground, as we see the wear of it on the men, and really the raw total of it all. This in the vivid detail as they finally seem to achieve "victory" in the endless winter of the battle, but also in that absolutely amazing church scene that shows everything they lose. An outstanding episode.)

Louis Morgan said...

The Last Patrol - (Where the episode succeeds without a doubt is sort of creating the beginning of the last three, which is not focused on in most war films, which is sort of awaiting the aftermath after the enemy is *almost* defeated. This one works as the exploration of this through the smaller, yet in a way sloppier, mission where the emotions more naturally reflect this state of existence.)

Why We Fight - (Just a masterful piece of work, right until that unforgettable ending of the case closing. Just so powerful, and heartbreaking portrayal of the perspective of liberators, where playing the savior is hardly a rewarding state given the horrors that they witness within it. Additionally just such a tour de force of nuanced performance in Ron Livingston who carries it in such unusual yet such an impactful way.)

Points - (Exceptional episode that deserves particularly credit given that they make really just waiting around for the war to end so compelling. A part of this is that they do not lose sight of any perspective. This is as we see each men dealing it in their own ways, with the idea of continuing such a foreign and strange thing, and sort of this attempted return to a different existence.)

Cast Ranking:

1. Ron Livingston
2. Damian Lewis
3. Donnie Wahlberg
4. Eion Bailey
5. Marc Warren
6. Shane Taylor
7. Rick Gomez
8. Scott Grimes
9. Dexter Fletcher
10. Neal McDonough
11. James Madio
12. Kirk Acevedo
13. Matthew Settle
14. Rene L. Moreno
15. Colin Hanks
16. Ross McCall
17. Douglas Spain
18. Rick Warden
19. Frank John Hughes
20. Richard Speight
21. Michael Cudlitz
22. Dale Dye
23. David Schwimmer

Really thought everyone was good, aside from Schwimmer who was a sore thumb though not aggressively bad.

Emi Grant said...

Louis: Thanks for saying that about Raimi's films, I detest that as well.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your Director and cast for a 80’s version of Joker?

Bryan L. said...

Anonymous: Damn, you beat me to it :)

Anonymous said...

Louis: Thoughts on the production design, costume design and cinematography of Brazil.

Anonymous said...

Louis: I'm curious, if you had to join a military branch, which one would it be? Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines or Coast Guard?

Calvin Law said...

Could I have your thoughts on Livingstone and Lewis, Louis?

Razor said...

Louis: Also your thoughts for the rest of the Top Ten cast members for BoB.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thoughts on the rest of the cast and more detailed thoughts on the concentration camp scene from Why We Fight.

Luke Higham said...

Bryan: I haven't seen Inland Empire since 2014 and I was mostly focused on Laura Dern who was the most praised element of it but out of the male cast members, maybe Theroux, Stanton or even Irons.

Luke Higham said...

And Brendan Gleeson is playing Donald Trump.

Bryan L. said...

Luke: That’s actually pretty good casting, in regards to Gleeson. Jeff Daniels doesn’t look like Comey all that much, although I get why he got the part.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Even though you felt Pattinson was fantastic in The Lighthouse, do you think you might appreciate his work even more on a 2nd viewing.

Matt Mustin said...

Luke: Good casting, but I really don't want to see that.

Calvin Law said...

Luke: potentially, though I do think I’ll still ‘prefer’ Dafoe.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: I don't expect you to change your view on that. I haven't seen the film yet but your opinion on the film as a whole has made my anticipation go up another notch. It's nuclear at this point.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Joker directed by, I mean come on, Martin Scorsese:

Arthur Fleck: Robert De Niro
Sophie: Diahnne Abbott
Murray Franklin: Jerry Lewis
Penny Fleck: Lee Grant
Thomas Wayne: Robert Loggia
Randall: Peter Boyle
Garrity and Burke: Philip Baker Hall & Fred Ward
Carl: Frankie Faison (Side note, special metnion to Brian Tyree Henry for doing just about everything he could in such a throwaway role)

Anonymous:

Brazil's production design is an all time great example quite honestly as it manages to merge a few things together. This being the slight futurism, a steakpunk regression, dystopian decay, but also bureaucratic excess. This realized both in grand sets, fantastic matte paintings, but also such detailed interiors. These each with their own moods, whether it be the Chaplin esque comedy of Sam's offices, the grotesque decadence of the formal affairs, and of course the overt horror of the final torture chamber. Just fantastic work in every aspect, in creating such a vivid world.

Brazil's costume design isn't quite on that level, but it is effective in its own way. Much of it is straight forward suits, however it works as bureaucrats still dress the same in the future. The sort of futuristic bits though are the best, including the odd wear for the engineers, against Harry Tuttle's more direct wear, though still futuristic however in a less goofy way. Also notable though is that particularly creepy baby mask on Jack. There is also the fantasy wear that is effectively over the top, as the wear of dreams indeed.

Roger Pratt's cinematography I wouldn't say is a standout element in the film, that is beyond what Gilliam is already doing in terms of the visual direction. His work obviously doesn't get in the way, however I don't think it necessarily amplifies that too much. I mean everything works, but there are moments of perhaps a greater potential distinction. This just as the fantasy scenes in terms of lighting aren't that much different reality. It definitely carries Gilliam's vision across, however comparing to say Deakins's work in 1984, you can see where there would've been potential for more.

Anonymous:

Uhhh...Coast Guard.

Calvin:

Livingston - (Livingston's performance is one of those sort of "time bomb" performances in a way. Although this isn't to say he's not making an impact the rest of the series. He is quite powerfully as the friend to Lewis in two ways. One being this sort of dry, darkly so, humor as a guy with a different dour sort of observation on it all, that offers this other perspective. Livingston does that believably yet wonderfully through this naturalistic melancholy that comes with it. Livingston's work though obviously is always towards something else, and even when Nixon is more jovial you get the sense that there's a real sadness within him. What is amazing is we don't suddenly get these huge breakdowns, yet the outbursts we eventually do get seem so natural within the type of man that Livingston has presented that it is all the more powerful. This initially with his moment of learning of his divorce, that is still slightly comical in away, yet heartbreaking all the same as Livingston in a way shows his manner only serves to hide just how broken up the man is by it all. This becomes this searing intensity, but in such a true idiosyncrasy as he becomes sort of the perspective character in the 9th episode. Livingston carries such a subtle power in just his eyes as he looks upon each of the horrors and those moments of looking upon the German civilians. It is outstanding work, and he was robbed of an Emmy nomination, and this is from someone who did think Firth and Tucci were both very good in Conspiracy.)

Louis Morgan said...

Lewis - (Lewis's performance is an interesting challenge, that he is in many ways just the right man for a job as he does so well with specific internalized emotion. This as he's very good as the sort of commander of men, in conveying this persistent confidence, yet not overconfidence, and bravery, yet never foolishness. He never has a true breakdown moment, yet is great in conveying moments of quiet disdain to foolishness, or the sheer emotional conviction to those moments of concern for his troops. Lewis projects so well just the state of a true leader who is ever there as a symbol to his men, while also being wholly human. He's fantastic though in particular in the hidden weight that weighs upon Winters soul. He never even comes close to breakdown, yet Lewis grants within just his eyes really those moments of being haunted by both the losses of his men but also the lives he had to take to achieve victory.)

Razor:

Wahlberg - (Actually looking at it I think he has the same dynamic with his brother that Casey Affleck has with Ben Affleck. In that while he has less of a natural screen presence, based his one scene wonder from the Sixth Sense and this, he has a greater emotional range. Wahlberg's performance works strikingly most within his narrative episode, this with his textured narration that conveys a great deal of emotion particularly in bringing home the unforgettable church sequence. His performance though is outstanding though in portraying the severity of the wear of single battle both in terms of the man's spirit and physicality. This too conveying a certain persistence in concern of the men and conviction to battle, but with the right overt quality in showing what Bastogne does to him.)

Bailey - (His performance then is in a way the next step in terms of creating the sense of the wear of the war. This with Bailey still portraying the right sense of stability of the soldier, yet even this wears away as the horrors of it all become more evident. His scenes of more overtly lashing out at it all, particularly trying to make sense of the camp, have this real power to them as he doesn't overplay them. He rather makes them particularly earnest representation of a man who cannot fathom the sense of it, and is drained by the sheer idea of it all.)

Louis Morgan said...

Warren -(His performance is captivating in sort of accentuating the trauma, though in this real middle ground of intertwined into him both overtly yet internally. This in slowly creating the slow thousand yard stare of the man, as the battle fatigue wears to the point of an extreme. An extreme that Warren realizes in this particularly powerful way in that it is in a way passive hysteria.)

Fletcher - (His performance stands out rather impressively in his "command" sequence, even though he's consistently good as part of the men, sort of, the rest of the time. His work though is terrific in creating the sense of the difficultly of command and emotional, though still restrained, ferocity as he attempts to control the situation as it becomes to overwhelm the senses of the men.)

McDonough - (McDonough pretty much gives you what one will expect from him, whether or not it works depends on if the role is suited to him. The role here is definitely suited to him and he's very effective as the dependent man for much of the series. He's remarkable though in showing the slowly crumpling wear that breaks the man down, not through noise, but just through losing his emotional sense until he is but a husk.)

Taylor - (Heartbreaking work in just detailing really the moments of the more intense loss represented in the battle, that is holding and in a way waiting for death to strike. Taylor's work strikingly bears this idea within it as he is able to convey the man on the edge of the break, that even seems to go beyond it, yet must remain in his state in order to be able to do what he needs to save others.)

Gomez, Grimes, Madio, Acevedo, Moreno - (These very much fill out the group of men, and offer consistently strong work. This as creating the sense of the men in a real honest way that goes beyond the expected WWII stereotypes of the men. Although there are touches, as some were realities quite simply, each ground and humanizes the men, while also doing the same so powerfully for the conflict.)

McCall, Spain, Warden, Hughes, Speight, Cudlitz - (All do fine work as well, though I feel they stand out less, even as their objective is to be part of the group like the aforementioned men.)

Hanks - (Fine work actually though more limited in a way as just sort of granting the right combination of naivety with an attempted assurance trying to be a leader, while not exactly having the bona fides to support the support of the soldiers looking towards him.)

Dye - (Fine work just as really just the sensible authority figure above Winters, although purposefully limited.)

Schwimmer - (Hard not to just see Schwimmer here as the cruel egotistical yet foolish CO. His work just always comes off as a little phony, even beyond the character being suppose to be more than a little phony himself. He stands out, which is part of the point, but not quite the point as he stands out for me as Schwimmer just seeming out of place.)

Bryan L. said...

Louis: You could’ve also put “Do I have to say...” like when you gave your 70s cast for Midnight Special haha

And I agree on Tyree Henry as well.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: If you don't mind, could I have your thoughts on this short?
https://youtu.be/gres_g2s1pg

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your top 5 Damian Lewis performances.

Anonymous said...

Is it just me or are things getting crazier other there?

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Anonymous: Crazier in terms of what?

Álex Marqués said...

New season of Succession is terrific. Matthew Macfadyen is the MVP so far, but the entire cast is very good (and Holly Hunter is a great addition).

Emi Grant said...

Tahmeed: I think he's referring to Joker.

Louis Morgan said...

Tahmeed:

Well that opening 2 minutes is not a bad rival to a Pixar "heart rip out" sequence alone. The same goes for the E.T. ending that is a whole lot sadder E.T. Around that is an enjoyable enough comical riff on really the government part of E.T.

Luke:

1. Keane
2. Wolf Hall
3. Our Kind of Traitor
4. Band of Brothers
5. The Escapist

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Your thoughts on “And Maggie Makes Three”? I think it’s a great example of how The Simpsons mixed heart with comedy back in its prime.

Also, your ratings and thoughts on the...uhh...two cameos in Hobbs & Shaw?

Luke Higham said...

Louis: How close is Lewis to a five for Keane because I had thought he was a five equivalent for Wolf Hall (You did say at the time, he was your favourite Henry VIII, over Laughton who is a five)

Calvin Law said...

Saw Joker. Ehhhhhhhh - not my thing and more I think about it there’s things that bug me. Phoenix is great, but honestly he’s just around 4th in my overall lead right now.

Anonymous said...

Louis: I know that one improved element can't save a whole film, but apparently Jack Hildyard was the original cinematographer for Cleopatra, and Freddie Young, Milton Krasner and Robert Surtees. Would have you preferred them over Shamroy?

Omar Franini said...

Louis: your rating and thoughts on Rachel Blake in Lantana and Cecilia Cheung in Failan?

Calvin: I’m glad you liked The Lighthouse, i preferred Pattinson over Dafoe, but loved both performances. I have Dafoe in leading too, but a supporting campaign wouldn’t be an enormous category fraud, and i agree with what you posted in the previous review. Your top 10 of the year so far?

Calvin Law said...

Omar: what’s your top 10?

Calvin Law said...

Omar: both were great. Honestly I’d be tempted to give a tie but Dafoe gave some of the most astonishing monologues I’ve seen all year long.

My top 10 would be,

1. Parasite (5)
2. The Lighthouse (4.5)
3. Avengers: Endgame
4. The Farewell
5. The Personal History of David Copperfield
6. Us
7. Rocketman (4)
8. Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
9. Pain and Glory
10. Wild Rose
HM: Ready or Not (3.5)

Louis Morgan said...

Bryan:

Well just simply agreed upon when it comes to Maggie Makes Three. Wonderfully touching ending without overdoing but indeed showing the natural heart that could be found in classic Simpsons. Of course it is also just a hilarious episode. Whether it be Homer's method of quitting the power plant, his method of trying to increase business for the Bowling alley or his inability and ability to hear the news, there just one hilarious moment after another. A great episode.

RR - 2(I thought he actually was pretty grating here to be honest. Just too far, even for the film that's tone allowed broadness to be sure.)

KH - 3(Prefer him considerably less as an actor typically however i think his work still felt more aligned with the film, and ended up being funnier.)

Luke:

TV performances as usual do not operate on the same scale. Though he is close to a 5 for Keane.

Anonymous:

I mean yes, but nothing would've made it a good film.

Omar:

Blake - 3.5(She's good as the desired woman in creating the certain naturalistic allure. Her best scenes though are the moments where she is trying not to know the man, and she brings the right sort of struggle between what she is feelings and what she is expressing.)

Cheung - 3.5(I would say this is more one of presence than performance. She is definitely haunting without a doubt, and luminous. I don't think the role has enough for her to go beyond that but she definitely leaves an impression.)

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