Monday, 29 July 2019

Alternate Best Actor 1963: Burt Lancaster in The Leopard

Burt Lancaster did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Don Fabrizio Corbera, Prince of Salina in The Leopard.

The Leopard is a rather effective film following aristocrat attempting to uphold his family's position within Sicily during a time of upheaval.

Burt Lancaster joins of one of many of the American or international leads taking on the center role of an Italian film...often in Italian. Well having both watched the film in Italian and all of Lancaster's scenes in English, with his own vocal performance, that's is just something to note more than anything else. What the film though does offer a rather a different role for Lancaster, who was perhaps one of the more covertly versatile actors of his period. This as Lancaster inhabits this role from the first scene of the film as we see his Prince taking in a prayer service with his family, before receiving somewhat troubling news of the ongoing revolution around them. Even with his own voice Lancaster embodies this role beautifully in a rather unique way among his own work. This is as Lancaster is almost always a commanding presence. That is just part of his nature as a performer, but what is striking here is how he manages to deliver that in a wholly different way as the prince. His whole physical manner here is remarkable in the way he creates such a powerful presence. This with a perfectly dignified walk, fitting to a royalty that was bred to be as such, but everything he does here Lancaster does so with that regal quality. What is most essential in this, and in a way more notable, is that Lancaster does so with such a genuine ease and grace. Lancaster makes for a most convincing Italian royal, through this brilliant adjustment toward his typical presence, that uses that power but in a new way.

The Leopard, along with director Luchino Visconti's previous film, Rocco and His Brothers, was undoubtedly a great influence on the far better known The Godfather, with all films being about the life of an Italian family. Where "Rocco" you can see perhaps the influence on the life of the family and sibling dynamics of the Corleone family, here though it is difficult not to see at least some influence on the patriarch of the Corleone'sm, Vito, in Lancaster's prince. This is evident within Lancaster's performance, who just visually isn't a far cry from Brando's appearance in that film, but the comparison stretches further than this. This is as we find the Prince who is essentially our hero in the film, though like Vito, a hero who seeks to maintain the way of life and prominence of his family, whom the viewer may or may not agree with. The method of the man is perhaps what sells the sympathies, which is so impeccably realized by Lancaster's portrayal. This as the prince is a man of this quiet power. Again realized in Lancaster's work, where that ease in manner just carries the immediate strength of the man, but as does his voice that carries this careful precision. This as Lancaster finds something essential in his portrayal which is a careful intelligence that the prince uses to ensure his family survives within the upheaval around him.

Lancaster delivers on the expected confidence within the character which he exudes in every encounter. This even when speaking of the most potentially troublesome developments Lancaster's eyes conveys the right degree of calculation as though the prince is immediately deciding on what his next move needs to be. The essential facet though, that I would say is most similar to Vito, and helps to design that sympathy for the man is this unquestioned concern for his family. This is as Lancaster delivers this understated, yet palatable warmth within the role. This particularly well shown as he wishes his nephew, Tancredi (Alain Delon), good fortune in actually joining the rebel army even donating something to it. Lancaster keeps a reserved expression, but is magnificent in delivery such an overpowering still, sense of affection for the young man. In that moment too, Lancaster finds just the right degree of wistful optimism in the encouragement. This is as Lancaster is able to express in the moment, care for his family but also an enjoyment of the the idea of the idealism of joining in the fight. Lancaster holds back enough though as he still keeps the prince within his station as a prince, who theoretically should support the old guard, but carries this natural sense of the appreciation for those potentially trying to create a better world.

That revolution is technically successful however it is worked for the royals to maintain position through a constitutional monarchy, which the prince endorses. This in a series of a few of the public scenes of the prince as he works his will to ensure the survival of his family, by dealing with some corrupt men, or at least all too eager to find power. Lancaster is outstanding in carrying the technically manipulative charisma within the prince. There is a particularly great scene where the prince goes to vote in a fixed election that will maintain his family's prominence essentially through the creation of allies. Lancaster's fantastic in the scene as he's able to carefully play the scene so we see the prince's manipulation even as he's technically had compromised to meet his goal. Lancaster delivers this perfect twinkle in his eye as he charms the local corrupt Don, through his voting, while also carefully ensuring no disfavor comes to his family's priest who likely would not vote the expected way. Lancaster's magnificent because in every moment we see him as the man in command of the situation even as the prince plays into the fix. This with his bright smile that appeases the crowd, but still with the quick incisive eyes of the man who knows he is working his will.

In private though we find a different man, where Lancaster too excels in creating the very real sense of the man. This particularly in the private discussions with his priest. Lancaster again delivers two things so well in this the first again being that genuine warmth. This even extends to discussing his own reasons for adultery, which Lancaster manages to speak without excessive hypocrisy, underlined perhaps as he speaks every moment regarding his family with that with only this honest concern. This that he underlines more with a strict passion as he discusses his reasons for his own political maneuvers. He calmly explains the needs for his family's survival with a striking devotion and even a humble sincerity regarding the path. Lancaster is captivating but also creates the essential concern for his position. This is particularly essential again, as Lancaster makes one care for the royal family maintaining their status, just as Vito Corleone did so for his criminal enterprise. Lancaster embodies a the true sense of the leader as he advocates for his position, not through grand statements but through precise action and compromise. This even to the point he rejects potential real power as a senator, which again Lancaster is outstanding by managing to convey in the moment of rejection again this repressed enthusiasm showing that while the prince's heart would be in it, his sense forces him against it.

The film ends as he sees the success of those who are the most opportunistic, and perhaps not the most principled, succeed including his nephew Tancredi, who switches from the revolutionary to the royal army without a second thought. This technically culminating in an alliance as Tancredi marries the daughter of the opportunistic Don, Angelica (Claudia Cardinale), to their mutual benefit. Lancaster, as great as he is in the rest of the film, is downright extraordinary in the final sequence celebrating essentially the new alliance and really the new world. This sequence doesn't even require one to watch the film with Lancaster's voice, as he carries such a poignancy just within his face throughout the sequences. This as the prince goes off to passively look upon the extravagance of those around him and the somewhat questionable fruits of his labor. The sense of melancholia is particularly moving as there is almost the sense of second guessing all that he has played for, in the quietly, yet so strikingly distraught expression as he looks upon seemingly nothing of value around him. The one respite in this being in seeing the young couple of Angelica and Tancredi, which despite the opportunistic pairing do genuinely love each other. The expression of this is best scene in the moment where the prince dances with Angelica. This in the brief moment Lancaster evokes the spark of the prince so beautifully as he looks upon her with the eyes of appreciation for some future, or at least something worthwhile within it. This is but a respite though as after this moment, the prince resigns himself as basically a fading past. Lancaster's amazing again as delivers that understated yet so resonate in his portrayal of this despair, of a man accepting yet still haunted by essentially being an extinct breed. This is an incredible performance by Burt Lancaster, that is unlike any other performance of his I've seen, in delivering this rather effortless yet always compelling depiction of a man both strict in his conviction for his family though with the intelligence to know when to compromise for that conviction.

52 comments:

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Ratings and thoughts on the rest of the cast.

Thoughts on the Art Direction, Costume Design, Cinematography and Score.

Bryan L. said...

Luke: Your Top Ten James Mason performances? With ratings.

Calvin Law said...

Incidentally do you think Lancaster could’ve been a great Vito Corleone?

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

I think Lancaster might actually take this one, this sounds like his greatest performance.

Luke Higham said...

Tahmeed: Difficult to say. It looks like a 4-way battle at this point between Mifune, Lancaster, Shaw and Pleasence though we'll see how Björnstrand fares.

Luke Higham said...

Bryan:
5
1. Lolita
2. Bigger Than Life
3. 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea
4. Julius Caesar
5. The Verdict
6. A Star Is Born
7. Odd Man Out
8. North By Northwest
9. The Deadly Affair
4.5
10. The Shooting Party
Have yet to see Murder By Decree and only watched the first 20 minutes of The Fall Of The Roman Empire.

Anonymous said...

Luke: I'm curious if this film will get the Best Cinematography win over Hud.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: thoughts on The Lighthouse trailer?

Luke Higham said...

My most anticipated film for the rest of the year.

BRAZINTERMA said...

I think Lancaster won the 1963 Alternate Best Actor reanalysis. Now all that remains is whether he will occupy the Toshiro Mifune rating.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Thoughts on this Japanese dub of Transformers: The Movie?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-YMmm9DIISg

Emi Grant said...

The Lighthouse looks amazing. I'm beyond hyped at this point.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Not sure if you've been asked this before, but could I have your thoughts on the screenplay, direction and editing of Hot Fuzz?

Bryan L. said...

Luke: As always, thanks.

Bryan L. said...

I didn't care too much for The Witch...but The Lighthouse looks stunning.

Feels like it was shot in 1939, and I mean that in a positive way. Pattinson and Dafoe both look very promising. Count me in.

Also, Avengers: Endgame came out on Digital today.

Mitchell Murray said...

"The Lighthouse" does indeed look promising... stylistically, structurally and of course in regards to its two leads. It also helps that Dafoe is strangely owning that look and accent already.

Luke Higham said...

Bryan: I'm going to rewatch Infinity War and Endgame back to back pretty soon.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Regarding Akiva Goldsman, he's isn't the worst screenwriter of all time, he might not even be the worst Oscar winning screenwriter. I mean he is capable of writing at least a decent film, Cinderella Man is a fine film for example, and hey much of the terrible things in A Time to Kill are a burden from the novel, including the much derided final speech. In the instance of Cinderella Man, which should be noted is not a sole writer credit, though he had really a relatively easy pathway to follow of both the source of the story and just boxing movies in general, which it follows pretty closely. The places of a bit more creativity, are probably its worst points though, most notably making Max Baer, an unrepentant psychopath. It is also not as though the rest of the film is remarkable achievement, it is just a fine boxing film, which is naturally dramatic genre. Now aside from that though, which again wasn't a sole work, he's pretty terrible much of the time. Now it doesn't help that workman Ron Howard is probably the best director he's worked with, but he doesn't help matters. When looks at his mostly original works, you see just how terrible he can be. Most notably his two Batmans, which aren't based on any particular Batman story, and are just cheese filled messed at the screenplay level. Joel Schumacher doesn't help things, but few filmmakers could've made good films with his atrocious writing that can neither commit to an honest depiction of the characters or as a parody. Lost in Space is a horrible slog filled with half thought out ideas into another mess, that too randomly goes from ridiculously goofy, to self-serious. His ability to structure a film is even rather questionable, as both Batman's just kind of have a series of random scenes, until the climax happens. He doesn't make characters he makes caricatures, or even less than that with half of Lost in Space being just blank slates. He's not the worst screenwriter of all time, but he's not a very good one.

Tahmeed:

Oh forgot my Hamilton biopic.

Post-revolution period:

Alexander Hamilton film directed by Peter Weir (I don't care I will fantasize about him making another film).

Alexander Hamilton: Ethan Hawke
Elizabeth Hamilton: Kirsten Dunst
Aaron Burr: Joel Edgerton
George Washington: Viggo Mortensen
Thomas Jefferson: Edward Norton
Marquis de Lafayette: Romain Duris
James Madison: Ben Whishaw

Louis Morgan said...

Hot Fuzz's screenplay, without hyperbole, is masterful in that it is the greatest spoof script ever written. This in first achieving the first requirement of a good spoof in that it is an actual police procedural/actioneer. Hot Fuzz goes further though in developing a complex mystery worthy of a great mystery, which it hilariously subverts of course. The details to the false plot though are wholly convincing on their own. This happens multiple times as it exists within the genre successfully while making fun of it. For example, you have the villain in neon lights in Simon Skinner, which is the spoof. It also though has the genuinely surprise of the reveal of every other villain in the film, like a proper twist for the genre. This duality is downright brilliant throughout. This is also right in the character of Nicolas Angel, who both combats the notion of the comical protagonist, by instead being this straight laced cop, that is its own riff, on the too-cool for school action hero, by essential instead being the hall monitor of a policeman. It embraces the ridiculousness of the genre fully, by bringing every cliche in the book. This both technically straight, though hilarious, but also subverted at the same time. We get a great ridiculous car chase, and a car chase to track down a rogue speeder. The references to the other films directly, aren't "here's a reference, funny right?", no they realize them properly, as for example the Point Break gun shot into the air, is made hilarious not just because Danny does it, but because it is earned by creating the same type of circumstances as in Point Break. The screenplay essentially plays everything twice, that isn't even to forget the wordplay within the script that does very much the same. The dialogue being being a masterclass of comic rules, of the callback or the rules of three. This would already be enough, but it goes one step further in that in all of this it too gives us two central characters we genuinely care for. It develops Danny and Nick as characters who exist beyond the spoof, even as their arcs exist through embracing the ridiculousness of the genre. Quite simply one of the best comedy scripts ever written.

Louis Morgan said...

Of course as great as the script is, Edgar Wright's direction is what makes it all sing, as the best modern comedy director (something I'd honestly wish he'd embrace). This is as he doesn't direct his films like a basic comedy, he instead does a brilliant amalgamation, of comedic timing, genre expectation and his own style. Wright makes a legitimate action film, just as he does make a hilarious one. This is as Wright delivers the sort of peddle to metal intensity of a proper action film, riffing on it so brilliantly by copying then modifying techniques, sometimes of even sort of shoddy directors, towards comedic brilliance. This is as he does for example the Michael Bay 360, as purposefully over the top, and it is hilarious, where as such a technique is done without a sense of humor by Bay himself. Wright though delivering this towards essentially instead a comic timing, though I'll just jump to a next section which is perhaps the most important facet of realizing Wright's approach.

The editing of Wright's work has become perhaps his most prominent trademark, this with this sort of kinetic approach. An approach that is easier said than done, and is this cinematic shorthand in his work. Hot Fuzz is a highlight of this, as the approach is most benefiting to this action spoof, which does the over the top editing of a proper action film, but better than any film. This as he applies it to the most mundane act that makes it seem badass, which again is a brilliant use of both paying tribute and making fun of the genre. This approach though is realized with an essential, precision and timing, which I'll credit more to Wright than Chris Dickens, given the same type of editing became rather grating in his work for Danny Boyle in Slumdog Millionaire. Wright's direction though chooses carefully not to over do the flairs of the editing, rather just making it something that gives this marvelous exclamation marks of cinematic genius throughout the film. This of course with just proper traditional editing, as it knows when and how to let characters just speak to one another, just as it does in crafting a fantastic and hilarious action sequence. This where the editing both brings that intensity through cuts, but also create so many humorous beats through them as well.

Calvin:

The Lighthouse looks mesmerizing at this venture. I have no idea what's going on, but am so eager to find out. Eggers's gothic aesthetic I find especially fascinating, that from just the trailer seems to have a balance of a classic black and white horror, but with a modern riff.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke & Anonymous:

Will get you those thoughts soon.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Cardinale - 2.5(Luminous as ever but honestly kind of wasted in more ways than one.)

Delon - 3(Shame always to be denied his voice in both versions. He nonetheless still carries a dynamic presence that both offers a bit of youthful charisma and charm, but also a certain degree of sly dishonesty.)

Valli - 4(Wonderful in every single scene he is in. This in both his moments of creating such a real sense of exasperation at voicing his own discontent at some of the prince's moves as well as bringing this befuddlement to sort of the nature of the rich. This is best realized though in just so many of his reactionary moments where he often says so much in a scene. This whether his quiet internalized bemusement at the rich extravagance around him or a certain degree of distaste with some of the questionable morals he has to witness.)

Stoppa - 3.5(Quite effective in bringing such a sinfulness within his little grin. The perfect sort of grin of the hideous roach who carries such an affable method even while just being corrupt in every way imaginable. Stoppa's terrific by just being so shameless in portraying the character's intention in every moment.)

The art direction and costume design are both remarkable achievements. This with such a careful and elegant mix of creating a sense of excessive extravagance but never becoming downright ugly in this, looking at you Cleopatra. The Leopard rather uses its expense well in creating such beautiful design and costumes, that combine that perfect measure of style while granting sense of period.

The cinematography Giuseppe Rotunno, to deride Cleopatra a bit more, is amazing epic cinematography. This in simply utilizing the sheer width of frame not just for the sake of it, but with such richness within the composition of every shot. Which, yes a favorite saying of mine, but still true of this worthy to comparison of the grandiose actual paintings within the sets. This of course mastered by Visconti's direction with such eloquent use of colors, amplified however through the vibrant lighting. Lighting which carefully accentuates the emotion within a given scene, creating so much more within capturing the grand scale of the story.

The score is a mix of a few things by Nino Rota. This being that of the epic overture, which is perhaps more typical to epics of the periods yet an excellent example of such. This particularly in Rota's grand romanticism that is especially pointed. This mixed in with sort of "period" work effectively strewn within the score. I think though his less grandiose moments of the score are perhaps the most potent though, and technically more revolutionary. This where he limits the instrumentation a bit to focus upon a simpler, yet so poignant of melodies. A score that effectively both accentuates the grand scale but also the intimate emotions within the story.

Anonymous:

I mean the actual voice work of Prime is pretty good, Megatron's a little much at times, though not bad. I would say though the additions of the extra screams thrown in are more than a little excessive.

Matt Mustin said...

Saw Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. I'm kind of right in the middle on it. I didn't love it anywhere near as much as many did, nor did I see any of the depth that several others did, but I was thoroughly entertained and I loved spending time with these characters.

Brad Pitt's best performance in many, many years.

DiCaprio-5
Pitt-5
Robbie-3.5
Hirsch-2.5
Qualley-3.5
Olyphant-3.5
Butler-3
Fanning-3
Dern-3
Butters-4
Pacino-3
Lewis-3
Moh-4(hilarious)
Russell-3(the narration device is really awful, but he delivers it fine)
Hammond-3.5
Bell-2
Herriman-3(He's in it for like 30 seconds, but he nails those 30 seconds.)

Mitchell Murray said...

Louis: Might I ask why you'd cast Viggo Mortensen as George Washington? I mean Viggo is of course a brilliant actor, but for me he neither evokes the time period nor the stature/presence of the first president.

For the most perfectly casted Washington simply in a physical and dramatic sense, I'd nominate David Morse from "John Adams".

Bryan L. said...

Matt: Agreed regarding Pitt.

Mitchell: Mortensen has a lot of range, and he's played many different ethnicities over the years, though I'd like to hear Louis' reasons as well.

Louis Morgan said...

Mitchell:

Well Morse has already done that so I didn't want to copy and paste. Washington I find a particularly difficult figure to cast, however I definitely think Mortensen has the presence as evident by his most kingly moments as Aragorn, and is far more capable of evoking period than you are giving him credit for. I doubt one would've pegged him ever for Freud before A Dangerous Method, yet he effortlessly fit into that role.

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Your casting choices for Benedict Arnold, King George III, Crispus Attucks, Paul Revere, and Benjamin Franklin? I'm guessing you'd go with that cast as well during the actual war, although correct me if I'm wrong.

Mitchell Murray said...

Louis: I didn't want to under serve Mortensen, of course... With the exception of an Italian American from you know what, he has been fairly convincing as most any nationality. In fact, to list off a more random comparison, me and my dad both agreed he would've been better suited for Tom Cruise's part in "The Last Samurai".

As Washington I'd would be willing to give him a shot, though for me, there would still be the matter of his height... a superficial nit pick, I know, but a noticeable one nonetheless.

Louis Morgan said...

Bryan:

Well Hamilton was in his early twenties during the Revolution so alternate casting would be needed.

Benedict Arnold: Corey Stoll
Crispus Attucks: Lance Reddick
Paul Revere: Stephen Root
King George III: Roger Allam
Benjamin Franklin: Donald Sutherland (Pride and Prejudice for proof of visual concept)

Mitchell:

I mean four inches isn't too hard to fake.

Mitchell Murray said...

Hence why I said superficial.

Michael McCarthy said...

Louis: Are you planning on watching The Three Lives of Thomasina before the results for this year? I’ve heard very good things about Patrick McGoohan’s performance in that.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

I'm surprised Nikolaj Coster-Waldau submitted 'The Bells' as his submission for the Emmy. In fact, I find it rather odd the Television Academy in general ignored the only good episode of the final season, 'A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms.'

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Would you consider reviewing Nick Frost in Hot Fuzz for 2007 supporting, or have you settled on his rating.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Cries and Whispers was released in Sweden in 1973, but it was released in the US in December 1972. When you get to see it, will you put it in either the top 10 of 72 and 73?

Also, where would you rank Hud and The Leopard in the top 20 best shot films of the 60's?

Anonymous said...

Louis: Thoughts on the cinematography of Body and Soul and Pursued?

Calvin Law said...

Louis: can you give your thoughts on the cast of OUATIH now?

Calvin Law said...

Also that Irishman teaser...hm. I’ll reserve judgement.

Louis Morgan said...

Regarding the Irishman trailer, still not sold on the de-aging or De Niro (could be sleepwalking still, hopefully not), yet. Pacino and Pesci though look very promising, I'm glad that the latter seems to have a substantial role. At the very least it looks better than Hoffa, hopefully it will skew closer to Goodfellas than Casino, and honestly from this, it could either way.

Michael:

Yes.

Tahmeed:

Probably not, but maybe.

Anonymous:

Cries and Whispers is 72 for me.

Let me hold on that.

Anonymous:

Regarding Body and Soul, it's a 40's boxing film, it's Howe, of course it's going to look good. Body and Soul, might be a cut below Champion and especially The Set-Up, but that is saying very little. The lighting of the film is fantastic in creating those deep contrasts in emphasizing very much the noir, which as always looks magnificent in the boxing ring. It is beautiful really pristine of the era, with really essentially creating the vibrancy through greys.

Pursued has pretty fascinating work from Howe, as he essentially shoots a western like a noir. The result is a particularly dynamic and moody film, as he offers that same darkness and moral grey, as basically a shorthand for that framing, composition and lighting, that is particularly off-beat for a western. Effectively so in creating a wholly different appearance for one, where Howe doesn't show a hero gleaming in a light, but rather an anti-hero hiding in the shadows.

Calvin:

Sure, though I won't get spoilery for the sake of our European friends.

Robbie - (Luminous to be sure, but as I mentioned in my comment your review Tarantino is reverent to a fault. She just doesn't have anything other to do than just seem quietly charming and full of life. She's that to be sure, but there isn't much more than that.)

Louis Morgan said...

Hirsch - (Mostly just there, but thought his final reactions were quite effective.)

Qualley - (A step up from her somewhat overblown "flower child" portrayal from the Nice Guys. This time her performance feels far more assured and is quite effective in creating the sort of sweet allure combined with a slightly scary derangement. She balances it quite well as she sort of grants the sense of both what could bring one into the cult, while also what was so wrong with it.)

Olyphant - (More than anything I quite enjoyed his western lead acting, which felt very period appropriate. Liked too his scene with DiCaprio, as I like how he played it as though his character was genuinely interested in the conversation.)

Butters - 4(Just wonderful and actually pulls off something rather difficult. In that she kind of gives the precocious child performance, as intended for the character of the character she is playing, but with the right balance in not overplaying to becoming over the top. There's the right sincerity in the way she does it that makes her such a marvelous bit of warmth in the film, and I downright love her supportive interactions with DiCaprio.)

Butler - (Appropriately sleazy without going over board, that goes someplace else, where he's effective too in a different way.)

Fanning - (Her performance works best as a contrast to Qualley, as you see sort of someone deeper into the cult with the venomous nature of it becomes all the more evident. Fanning being effective in brimming with the sort of hateful discontent that defines who they really are.)

Dern - (Dern just pretty much always delivers, and you instantly get what's going on with Spahn in a matter of seconds. Something he pulls off with a degree of pathos and humor, not quite a memorable as his cameo in Django, but some fine work.)

Pacino - (Quite enjoyable in bringing just the right combination of sort of an accidental maliciousness with a more earnest appreciation in his scenes. Pacino plays it effectively as sort of this blunt reality that the character knows how to deal in the business, which he enjoys but also has no disillusions regarding how it works.)

Russell - (Shouldn't Pitt have been the narrator? Russell does his best to deliver that narration, but it just was a bad device. In his actual scenes though Russell bring his usual nice presence to make you "get" his character instantly, even if he is minimally used.)

Herriman - (Exceptionally creepy, making his mark as he should with an eerie ease. I especially loved even just the way he walked which was off-putting in a rather subtle way.)

Lewis - (Great casting, and I did like his little McQueen shrug, shame he's barely used.)

Moh - (I mean downright hilarious and I'd say his performance could've been used in any way. This is as he completely delivers on the charisma and manner of Lee. He just has him down and has that magnificent presence. This that I think he frankly could've either used for a more reverent portrayal, but is also effective in basically being more Cato from the Pink Panther, than Kato from The Green Hornet. I'll give him credit though as the embodiment was fantastic, and though it was for comedy, his timing was impeccable. I hope someone has the good sense to use him for Lee again sometime, as I would've loved to have seen more.)

Hammond - (Loved the unabashed enthusiasm he brought to every moment, as though directing this random western episode meant everything to him. Hammond brings such a delightful and endearing energy, that I love that he plays with absolute sincerity. I actually particularly enjoy his off-screen direction which he delivers with such real encouragement of a properly supportive director.)

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the Queen & Slim trailer.

Matt Mustin said...

Louis: Without spoiling too much about Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, did you, like me, also love the way they inserted a certain person into a certain movie?

Calvin Law said...

Kaluuya looks fantastic.

Bryan L. said...

Matt: I know exactly what you're referring to, and it does make me wonder how he'd actually do in that role.


Calvin: Agreed. He's become one of Hollywoods' most intriguing actors in that age group.

Mitchell Murray said...

Queen and Slim:

For all the direct comparisons with Bonnie and Clyde, when watching the trailer, I actually saw more parallels to "Thelma & Louise" myself. That's not to discredit the film right off the bat, though, despite the familiar territory it is treading, as it appears inspired enough. If I was to watch the movie for any main reason it would ultimately be for Kaluuya; Like Calvin said he is one of the more interesting performers of his generation. He was great in "Get Out", very effective in "Widows", and hopefully very strong in this movie.

The Irishman:

I mean, the potential is certainly there, both in the caliber of the crew and the meaty nature of the real life story. I would echo Louis' sentiments in his caution for De Niro's de-aging makeup, and the man's investment from what we've seen. Pacino and Pesci do look promising, however, and are hopefully delivering strong late career turns here.

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Your present film roles for Robert Ryan? And your cast and decade of release for a Kubrick version of Ex Machina?

Luke Higham said...

1963 Supporting suggestions
Rod Steiger - Hands Over The City
George Cole/Geoffrey Keen/Patrick Wymark - The Scarecrow Of Romney Marsh
Alan Bates - The Caretaker
Max Von Sydow - Winter Light
Anil Chatterjee - Mahanagar

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: What do you consider to be the 10 most charismatic male performances of all time? My #1 has to be Clark Gable in Gone with the Wind.

Emi Grant said...

Nicholson in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest would be up there for me.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thoughts on the 1917 trailer.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=MPKtM3fGJEU

Calvin Law said...

Tommen on the battlefields eh?

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Regarding Queen & Slim, tonally looks a bit odd, hopefully it all works in the final film. At the very least the performances do look solid.

1917 looks visually great, though the trailer was obviously very Dunkirk influenced, nonetheless loved the intensity of it. Looks like grand scale Mendes, which for me is a good thing.

Matt:

Wasn't my favorite moment, but I did enjoy it well enough.

Bryan:

Ex Machina 1980's directed by Stanley Kubrick:

Caleb: Tom Hulce
Nathan: Raul Julia
Ava: Lena Olin
Kyoko: Yoko Shimada

Tahmeed:

Yes, I think Lancaster could've made a good Vito.

Jack Nicholson - One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest
Toshiro Mifune - Yojimbo
Harrison Ford - Raiders of the Lost Ark
Clark Gable - Gone With the Wind
Humphrey Bogart - The Maltese Falcon
Cary Grant - North By Northwest
William Holden - Stalag 17
Paul Newman - The Sting
Russell Crowe - Master and Commander
Sidney Poitier - In the Heat of the Night

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