Thursday, 7 March 2019

Alternate Best Actor 2013: Domhnall Gleeson in About Time

Domhnall Gleeson did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Tim Lake in About Time.

About Time follows a young man's romantic adventures through life after he discovers the men in his family have the ability to travel through time.

I won't hesitate to state that I found this film to be easily the best film associated with writer/director Richard Curtis on any front. Mind you I feel that Love Actually, is a crime against humanity, but I did find this film to be mostly delightful, if just teetering on causing one to overdose on sugar occasionally. A man who must be given a great deal of credit for this is Domhnall Gleeson. Much like Paddy Considine, Domhnall Gleeson is another actor who've I've taken a long time to get to on here with an actual review, though I feel my affection for him as a performer is fairly evident. The younger Gleeson, fitting to his lineage, has shown a notable range in genre and tone. This is as much as Gleeson can handle the ennui of duplicitous android, and their creators, he is as apt for the far lighter tone of a work here. This is as his character of Tim is just an average "below average" chap just going about his life. This is not a stretch as Richard Curtis lead characters goes, though this idea is typically deigned to Hugh Grant, who while I don't dislike those performances, was always perhaps a bit too confident to be genuinely awkward. Well with the younger Gleeson this quality you might say feels a bit more earned.

Domhnall Gleeson in fact seems perfect for this role as his natural presence is one of being a little naturally awkward while also being charming. This is ideal for Tim whose life is changed through time travel primarily as a form of dealing with life's little awkward moments, and getting a chance to make them work just a bit better. Well, Gleeson therefore needs to do two things quite often in this performance. This is to be awkward first as we see Tim go about his first tries, whether that be failing to go in for a kiss at new years, failing take a romantic chance or two, and of course fumbling his way around his first sexual encounter with his love. Gleeson is wonderful at doing just the right touches of stilted speech, and inability to place himself physically in the right position, to be just the right sort of completely out of place in the moment. This of course is against his scenes of going back to "fix" things for himself, by now taking the chance, saying the right thing, or making the right move. Gleeson makes this method actually particularly endearing because while he carries a sense of confidence in his manner he does wholly lose that awkwardness that he makes a natural part of Tim.

These ole switcheroo's may be the sort of gimmick the film has to pull you in, however the film is more in general about just Tim living his life with his strange group of friends, his father (Bill Nighy) and his eventual love in Mary (Rachel McAdams). Well in each segment of these various vignettes, pieced together by the little time travel moves, we always have Gleeson as the rock center. Now that might sound like a criticism against the film, but it honestly isn't as it works in this largely breezy approach to the matter. It is of course helped by Gleeson's work though which just sort of maneuvers around the film with the effortless of someone living a life, even if technically a most unusual way. This actually is all helped by Gleeson's overarching approach which is to never overplay a single facet of the character. This is as the comedic moments are just as natural in his work as are the romantic ones. Gleeson keeps a light but never weak touch with the material. Gleeson rather finds just the right approach for any given scene, and in this sense very much makes the film by creating such a strong anchor.

Take the more hapless moments of the time travel, which are the most humorous of the film, Gleeson brings just a low key hilarity in his little reactions in a given moment. This is whether it be of enjoyable frustration and confusion when he has to take excessive effort to set things right, such as getting all the lines to some forgetful actors for a playwright acquaintance, or his knowing reactions when not so quietly figuring out his situation in front of others. I especially love the way Gleeson delivers his lines so directly in the sequence where he attempts to find a way to woo Mary again, after time travel shenanigans have technically caused more problems than they solved. Gleeson though is as good in the quiet romantic moments with McAdams where the two do develop just an absolutely splendid chemistry honestly based upon a mutual awkwardness essentially. Gleeson though just makes the moments work by playing every moment so honestly and quite affectionately, that makes it quite the sweet if certainly unassuming romance. The film of course has some slight detours towards the dramatic, initially through Tim's sister who has a less than pleasant experience in life. This isn't given too much depth but I'll credit Gleeson with making them work quite well, through his earnest work that grants the weight of his inability to help. Gleeson's terrific in this low key way though in that he avoids any melodrama yet grants enough gravity to not make it feel slight. The highlight though of the film, that in way combines all these elements, are his scenes with his equally time travel able father. He and Nighy are great together. Gleeson excels in his early befuddled elements, but where they really the most of the material in their moments of a mutual empathy that comes from two fellow time travelers. This eventually builds towards something more when his father is going to die and Tim can't do anything about it, accept use the time he has with him. Again what actually keeps this from a tonal problem is how light both actors keep these moments. Gleeson still grants the right earnest pathos within his eyes reflecting the loss, however he keeps that subtle, emphasizing instead the joy in their shared moments that captures the thematic spirit of the film beautifully. That is of course the entire performance of Domhnall Gleeson's here. It is not some earth shattering work but rather pitch perfect by being so charmingly average.

65 comments:

Bryan L. said...

Ratings and thoughts on the rest of cast?

Matt Mustin said...

I'm actually really not that crazy about Domhnall Gleeson in general, and I've certainly never found him charming, so I don't know how I'd react to this.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I have, uh, issues with this film and how it handles consent in regrads to time travel. It left a bad taste in my mouth in what was otherwise a very charming film. Gleeson is definitely a great dorky lead for this sort of film, and Nighy was even better. I assume the latter is getting reviewed.

Bryan L. said...

Matt: If you've never found him charming, then this is the exact film that will rectify that for you.

Emi Grant said...

Louis: Which are some directors you'd like to see Gleeson work with?

Charles H said...

Never been too impressed with Gleeson either. Although he's great here.

Matt Cofrancesco said...

Has Louis given his thoughts on Claude Laydu in Diary of a Country Priest or the movie itself?

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

I won't hesitate to say that this is easily my favourite film of 2013, and Gleeson deserves a great deal of credit for it. He's the epitome of awkward charm here, and his chemistry with McAdams is outstanding.

That said, Nighy is even better, and I hope he gets reviewed..

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the wedding scene?

Luke Higham said...

Matt C.: He's reviewing Laydu at a later date.

As someone who's been very mixed on Richard Curtis's work, (Nothing could top Blackadder and Nighy & Rickman were the only performers I got any enjoyment from in Love Actually) I was pleasantly surprised by About Time and I thought Gleeson and especially Nighy were great.

Luke Higham said...

Did anyone see Leaving Neverland.

RatedRStar said...

I have always liked Gleeson, he is a charming actor, he needs to get a proper leading role he clearly is a talented actor.

I heard an interview on Radio 2 about Leaving Neverland, not sure I could watch it, I will watch the Fyre documentary though, seems funny as lol haha.

Bryan L. said...

RatedRStar: You should definitely check out the Netflix Fyre doc, and you will have a couple of laughs haha

Calvin Law said...

So glad Gleeson got a good grade and that Louis quite liked the film.

Saw Captain Marvel. Pretty decent MCU origin flick, don’t believe the cesspool of weirdly angry haters who probably haven’t seen the film. It’s nothing amazing but it’s quite a bit of fun.

Larson: 3.5
Jackson: 3.5
Mendelsohn: 3.5/4
Pace: 2
Hounsou: 2.5
Lynch: 3
Bening: 2.5
Law: 2.5

Bryan L. said...

I second Calvin's thoughts on Captain Marvel.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: I'm seeing it in less than an hour however I feel as if I'm going to have the same opinion as both you and Bryan. Nothing too special yet decent. And I'm glad Marvel are using Mendelsohn well since I was really worried after underwhelming in his last Disney film Rogue One.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Thoughts on the cinematography of The Passion of Joan d'Arc and The Docks of New York.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Luke: Not gonna lie, I'm pretty hesitant to watch Leaving Neverland. Michael Jackson's music will always have a special place in my heart, and I'll admit that I might have let my own bias towards his songs cloud my judgment on the actions he's been accused of.

Luke Higham said...

Tahmeed: Fair enough.

Anyway, I saw Captain Marvel, I pretty much concur. I thought Mendelsohn was very, very good. :)

Larson - 3.5
Jackson - 3.5
Mendelsohn - 4
Pace - N/R
Hounsou - N/R
Lynch - 3
Bening - 2.5
Law - 2.5

Robert MacFarlane said...

I really liked Captain Marvel myself. In fact, I think you guys are underrating Larson and Jackson.

Luke Higham said...

Robert: I'm thinking about upgrading Jackson though I might need a second watch for Larson but she was pretty good thankfully.

Louis: If you're seeing Captain Marvel tonight or tomorrow, could I have your thoughts on it as well as ratings & thoughts on the cast.

Charles H said...

Luke: I saw Leaving Neverland when it premiered. It's a one sided documentary for sure where we only hear from the supposed victims and nobody from Michael's side of things. I've been looking around and most of the public seem to think the same. It's impossible to love Leaving Neverland because of the subject matter, but overall i think it fails to listen to everyone's voices which deserve to be heard.

Robert MacFarlane said...

My two cents on Leaving Neverland: I’m not watching it because it has been plainly obvious since the 90’s that Jackson fucking did it and I don’t need to feel miserable all over again being reminded he got away with it. I just hope his lagacy actually burns this time instead of the gross canonization of it when he died.

Matt Mustin said...

Louis: What are your thoughts on Jim Carrey's performance here? https://youtu.be/_UpZZGeOP2Q

Robert MacFarlane said...

Has anyone seen this? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2RB6POXBJas&t=461s

Anonymous said...

Is anyone looking forward to Shazam!.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: I am. :)

Anonymous said...

Louis, I see you've put Attenborough at #1 for Brighton Rock, your reason for this.

Luke Higham said...

I wish they were tied. :(

Louis: Where would Attenborough and Bogart rank in your Lead Actor 40s top 10.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: I have a bit of good news, A copy of The Scarecrow Of Romney Marsh (1963) was uploaded on Youtube sometime last year, so you'll be able to review McGoohan's performance. :)

1963 Lead
Gunnar Bjornstrand - Winter Light
Burt Lancaster - The Leopard
Robert Shaw/Donald Pleasence - The Caretaker
Marcello Mastroianni - The Organizer
Maurice Ronet - The Fire Within
Michael Redgrave/Laurence Olivier - Uncle Vanya
Steve McQueen - Love With The Proper Stranger
Patrick McGoohan - The Scarecrow Of Romney Marsh

Luke Higham said...

And if you're able to do 2 double reviews and 8 singles like what you did with the Reilly reviews for 2018 then I also recommend Oliver Reed in Paranoiac and Donald Pleasence in Dr. Crippen.

Calvin Law said...

Saw Fighting with My Family. I actually quite liked it (though I’m not a wrestling fan to begin with), a few cliches here and there but overall as far as sports biopics go I’d go on the positive scale for it.

Pugh - 4.5
Lowden - 4
Frost and Headey - 3.5
Vaughn - 3.5
Johnson - 3

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Your thoughts on Pugh and Lowden.

GM said...

Yeah for a Attenborough. Time to say imdb changed Act of Violence's release date to 1949.

Calvin Law said...

Luke:

Pugh - to say she gives another strong turn would be almost redundant at this point, but to reiterate she does. She effectively captures a figure who I knew little about before going into the film and gives a particularly charming and dynamic portrayal of a driven athlete, and the whole family/success conflict and self identity struggles were particularly well done. I’ll also give her credit in selling some pretty broad comedic lines while maintaining it within character.

Lowden - impressive work from him too, as he doesn’t shy away from the character’s lugheaded nature yet makes him pretty endearing too in a non-cutesy fashion. Then he’s honestly pretty great in showing the effects of failure and defeat on his character as he makes this depiction so vividly realized and rather moving.

Calvin Law said...

Also, a 1960s cast for About Time, directed by Guy Green
Tim: Albert Finney
Mary: Katharine Ross
James: Trevor Howard

Louis Morgan said...

Bryan:

Love and Mercy's screenplay is one of its strengths in offering something unique within the musical biopic form, in particular. This offering instead two distinct periods in his life rather than a run of a mill fame story line, allowing the film to get in depth in terms of the pivotal times in Brian Wilson's life. It actually spends the time then to develop moments you'll find in other musical biopics, here but here written with a lot more honesty. Take later state of mental decay, it's just not a quick moment, but rather you see the full brunt of the affect Landy's "treatment" has on him. Or take the often done scene of the making of music, a scene I had particular affection for, and is careful to look between this and Bohemian Rhapsody. In Rhapsody it is such surface details treated almost like divine statement, this against where we see essentially the hard work, and discussion as Brian tries to refine the sounds for his songs. It offers though overarching the two times, where it naturally shows the results of the past, to the present, but has a particular honesty in that it does not portray the simple fixes of so many biopics. Even in the chance of the solved by love idea, of the older Brian story, it does not treat so blithely foregoing obvious sentiment for scenes that create a far more genuine feeling path.

McAdams - 3.5(McAdams does awkwardness quite well honestly, and though I think she borders on being a little too comfortable with the note, in that she probably could have brought a touch more variation now and again. McAdams though nonetheless is still a delight within that note.)

Hollander - 3.5(His best man speech was probably the single funniest moment for me in the film, though either way he adds some much needed cynicism to the film that he delivers with all the vicious brunt you'd like him too.)

Robbie - 3(I'll give her credit in that she isn't a complete nothing here, in a role that frankly is meant to be. Robbie at least finds a little something in the bits she does have.)

Wilson - 2.5(Her performance I think falls a little too far into caricature most of the time unfortunately leaving too much of the heavy lifting to Gleeson in their scenes together.)

Hughes & McGuire - 2(Their performances were giving me Love Actually flashbacks.)

Quite enjoyed the cameos by Withnail and Uncle Monty.

Lindsay Duncan is wasted.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

You know I will say I detest the sort of sniffy attitude many have taken to the Raimi Spider-Man films, as a revisionist attitude, which I'll take any day over the Amazing films, or even Homecoming. 3's dance sequence I don't exactly disagree about...almost. The problem is the film is fighting with tones, as it is hard to defend the second dance scene when it ends with the supposedly serious minded moment of him hitting Mary Jane within the same exact scene. That said they are kind of amazing in microcosm, and I'll take a million dance sequences over the lifelessness of anything from Amazing Spider-Man 2.

The Aunt May scene is a great example of the sort of heart that I was so sorely missing from Spider-man Homecoming. This is quite frankly one of the best "why be the hero" speeches from any super hero film, as sort of Aunt May's own "great Power" speech, which finds a genuine emotion, and perhaps Maguire's best acting in the series in his reaction. (Although I'll admit I'm more and more looking fondly upon his take on Peter Parker in particular as time goes on). The same goes for the second scene, which is very low key, frankly human moment, that is just lovely honestly.

Emi Grant:

Martin McDonagh (Yes he was in Six Shooter, but in a non-role. I'd love to see him actually play his father's son in something.)
Edgar Wright
Taika Waititi

Tahmeed:

By far the best bit of directing I've seen from Richard Curtis, who is typically a dialogue man, but he manages to do some rather wonderful visual storytelling in showing how it is all such a splendid affair even as everything seems to go wrong.

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the direction for the same film?

Bryan L. said...

Louis: And since someone previously asked for thoughts on The Social Network trailer, may I have the same for the trailer to The Thin Red Line?

www.youtube.com/watch?v=mKl5_OxKBn8

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

The Passion of Joan D'Arc's cinematography is one of the most powerful accentuation of emotion you'll see in any film. This is through every shot that is potently constructed in this sense of the closeups that have such rich detail of expression, through its distinct, evocative lighting. Every shot is a simple composition, though notable in its choice of exact framing, yet this is the magic of the cinematography, as every single shot, pierces in this simplicity, as the focus is on those faces, especially that of the haunting Falconetti.

The Docks of New York is absolutely gorgeous film with its marvelously expressionistic lighting throughout the film. This granting such a sense of atmosphere for the titular docks, in the contrast between the warming glow of the people, the romance, against the shadows of the harsh world. This is further emphasized through the incredibly dynamic composition of shots, that essentially fits so much into every frame, in this notable vibrancy, of every position of the characters, or capture of the environment or people. It is remarkable as every shot, feels that of a painting.

Matt:

Well one certainly wouldn't ever knock of any points for a lack of trying, especially in his self-skeletonization, in his creation of the character for the sketch. A repeated note then of this sort strangely intense, yet sort of repressed quality of a "proper" fire inspector. It's quite something to say the least, and a bit of mad physical humor that only he honestly would be fully capable of.

Anonymous:

I re-watched both films, preferred Attenborough ever so slightly.

Luke:

1. James Stewart - It's A Wonderful Life
2. Ray Milland - The Lost Weekend
3. Richard Attenborough - Brighton Rock
4. Humphrey Bogart - The Treasure of Sierra Madre
5. Laurence Olivier - Rebecca
6. Humphrey Bogart - The Maltese Falcon
7. Toshiro Mifune - Stray Dog
8. Pierre Fresnay - Monsieur Vincent
9. Toshiro Mifune - The Quiet Duel
10. Joseph Cotten - Shadow of a Doubt

Calvin Law said...

So glad to see Milland so high up your list. Although personally I’d rank Drunken Angel as my personal favourite of Mifune’s 1940s works.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Does anyone else think McAdams is kind of a low-key chameleon?

Matt Mustin said...

Robert: She's amazing.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I feel bad I didn’t praise her more for Spotlight back in 2015, because after three viewings, she became my Supporting Actress win and I didn’t think twice about. It’s such a great example of someone filling in the blanks and adding layers to character that might not have been much on paper.

Bryan L. said...

Robert: I think she's shown quite a bit of range, however, I've never thought she's been truly great in anything, if I'm being honest.

I consider Spotlight and Game Night her career-bests so far.

Anonymous said...

Louis: I do not know if they ever asked you that, but what's your TOP 10 directors of 2018?

Anonymous said...

Louis: your top 20 James spader acting moments

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Could you put Heflin and Ryan in Act Of Violence over to 1949.

Anonymous said...

Luke: With the lineups you've been posting lately, what are your rating predictions for 1963 and 1999 Lead.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous:
1963
Björnstrand - 5
Lancaster - 5
Shaw - 5
Pleasence - 4.5/5
Mastroianni - 5 (I think this maybe his best performance)
Ronet - 4.5/5
Redgrave - 4.5/5
Olivier - 5
McQueen - 4.5
McGoohan - 4.5/5

Pleasence - 4.5
Reed - 4/4.5

1999
Broadbent (Topsy-Turvy) - 5
Cage (Bringing Out The Dead) - 5
Cruise (Eyes Wide Shut) - 4/4.5
Lavant (Beau Travail) - 4.5/5
Winstone (The War Game) - 4.5/5 (More confident for him to get a five in Nil By Mouth)

Bonus:
Wong (The Mission) - 4/4.5 (Could be Supporting)
Fiennes (Sunshine) - 4.5

Mitchell Murray said...

Robert: As someone who just reviewed McAdams, actually, I'll say she's a fine actress. She's never been amazing, per say, for myself, but she's certainly provided a number of good turns IE "Spotlight", "Game Night" and the like.

Mitchell Murray said...

Also, what would be your full ballot for 2015 supporting actress, Robert?

Razor said...

Louis: Any 2019 viewings? And your rating for Rachel McAdams in Mean Girls?

RatedRStar said...

2019 is looking like a very exciting year for film, there is pretty much something for everyone genre wise.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Mitchell:

1. McAdams
2. Ferguson
3. Banks
4. Cotillard
5. Vikander

Louis Morgan said...

Bryan:

It's interesting to look at Love & Mercy's direction, as on its own its fine work, but you wouldn't say it is anything excessively remarkable on its own. The acting, and the screenplay are the highlights of the film. The thing though is Bill Pohland's mostly straight forward, not to a fault, direction is right for the story, and consider it compared to say if Oren Moverman if he had directed his own screenplay. Moverman's become his own worst enemy as a director trying so hard to create a distinct voice that he ends up gargling the good things he has to say. Pohland's direction though doesn't get in the way of the strengths of the screenplay, giving enough life to the dialogue scenes, and being more than adequate in a few of the moments that require a bit more overt inspiration such as the audio hallucinations, or the more creative musical sequences. I wouldn't say there is anything extraordinary there, but it is consistent work across the board.

Anonymous:

1. The Coens - The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
2. Damien Chazelle - First Man
3. Yorgos Lanthimos - The Favourite
4. Pawel Pawlikowski - Cold War
5. Panos Cosmatos - Mandy
6. Lee Chang-dong - Burning
7. Marielle Heller - Can You Ever Forgive Me?
8. Christopher McQuarrie - Mission Impossible: Fallout
9. Orson Welles - The Other Side of the Wind
10. Debra Granik - Leave No Trace

Anonymous:

Spader:

I'll keep to ten since I honestly haven't seen the majority of his work.

1. Graham's Interview with Anne - Sex, Lies and Videotape
2. "I HATE STEP NINE!" - Seinfeld
3. Lincoln suddenly appears - Lincoln
4. Bip bopping and skatin - Seinfeld
5. Almost being shot - Lincoln
6. Explaining himself - Sex, Lies and Videotape
7. Shoes back where it belong - The Homesman
8. Going on a run - Lincoln
9. Interview with Cynthia - Sex, Lies and Videotape
10. Manipulations - Less than Zero

Luke:

Oh I'll get to it eventually, as well as putting Badlands in 74, which is a whole lot more complicated.

Razor:

Serenity, I was lost but now am found.

4, haven't seen it since 2004 however.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thoughts on Serenity and ratings & thoughts on the cast.

Anonymous said...

Louis, are you watching Captain Marvel soon.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Serenity has been described as similar to Collateral Beauty and The Book of Henry. Now that is true in that it seems like the film was written by an Alien offering its passionate take on hu-mans. The thing is, Steven Knight, though clearly not infallible, is genuinely talented unlike Colin Trevorrow, or Allan Loeb. Knight wishes to offer an original film in his Out of the Past meets Identity meets The Purple Rose of Cairo meets Pleasantville meets The Wizard meets Jumanji meets Bass Pro Shops: The Strike. I mean I've never seen this film before and it is fascinating. Fascinating to watch. Is it good in a traditional sense, where characters make sense, actions are logical, the plot is sensible, people aren't video characters? No, however it clearly isn't intended to be that, as it is not like Knight is accidentally making this thing. Does that make it good though? Also no. It's an extraordinary train wreck though, where there is such high ambition that both trains are going at super sonic speed and in their collision they transform into a supernova. To quote Richard Attenborough from Dr. Dolittle "I've never seen anything like it". Is that a good thing, no, but it's also far too mesmerizing in its willful insanity to place in the same trash heap as the films mentioned in my opening sentence.

McConaughey - (Okay, I don't know what exactly to qualify this work as exactly. Only because he gives such conviction to the performance and the material, that he is essential in making the film's madness as captivating as it often is. This is indeed like primo emotional McConaughey to the extreme, and how much he gives himself to the role is something to watch in itself. He throws himself into the narrative just as the narrative throws all of us into its spiraling lunacy. Take a scene where McConaughey randomly strips, jumps down into water naked, and then swims with his son through some virtual nirvana. McConaughey sells every moment of this, to the utmost, and I can't help but give some sort of accommodation for that. Not sure what type, but I'm not going to mock him for such devotion to the page.)

Hathaway - (Well as a femme fatale she isn't exactly the most believable. I have to say though, she too certainly gives a lot of conviction to tell her husband that "he needs to get that Tuna", after a brutal beating. I mean such a thing cannot be simply ignored. I would say though even within this madness she is even a bit miscast as such.)

Clarke - (In all honesty this performance should be terrible and many performances of the like are terrible. Again though there is something I can help but hold some affection for Clarke trying so hard to portray the emotional and physical pain of a man so desperately wanting to catch a fish while also being jealous of his potentially unfaithful wife and reeling from physical pain of almost being killed. I think I can legitimately say no actor has ever quite had to portray such an exact combination of emotion and Clarke doesn't exactly fail, even if it remains as insane as it sounds.)

Lane & Hounsou - (Definitely have the least challenging roles, which is saying something, as they in a certain way almost get to act in what seem like somewhat normal circumstances occasionally. They're both fine in these moments, but I mean that's not what I'm here for.)

Strong - (I have to say without equivocation I really enjoyed his performance since he completely gives his performance as though he is playing an extremely limited NPC. Well that's exactly what he's playing and Strong's performance reflects that kind of brilliantly in a certain kind of way.)

Anonymous:

I'll see it eventually. I have to admit I didn't run out because of just how forgettably adequate Ant-Man and The Wasp was, and that's what this looked like from the trailers. Sounds like it might be a bit more than that. So I'll see it sooner than later.

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Your choice for cinematographer and The Chemist for your 80s version of Mandy?

Louis Morgan said...

Bryan:

Frederick Elmes, Josef Summer

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Lastly, do you think the following cast could've worked for an alternate UK version of Drive (set in London)? Keep Refn as director

The Driver- Tom Hardy
Irene- Carey Mulligan (still)
Blanche- Rosamund Pike
Standard- Dominic Cooper
Shannon- Peter Capaldi alt. Richard E. Grant
Nino- Robbie Coltrane
Bernie- Jim Broadbent

Anonymous said...

Louis: Thoughts on the use of color in Drive and Baby Driver.

Louis Morgan said...

Bryan:

I could see all of those.