Friday, 23 November 2018

Alternate Best Actor 1987: Steve Martin in Roxanne

Steve Martin did not receive an Oscar nomination, despite being nominated for a Golden Globe, winning NSFC and LAFCA, for portraying C. D. "Charlie" Bales in Roxanne.

Roxanne is an enjoyable enough modern re-telling of Cyrano de Bergerac re envisioned about a long nosed firemen and tennis racket fencer searching for his titular love.

I have previously covered Cyranos in the form of the Oscar winning and Oscar nominated performances of Jose Ferrer and Gerard Depardieu respectively. The comedic performer Martin, who also wrote this film, one would assume would have a different intention overall for Cyrano which is less comedic and much more tragic than in its original form. Martin though actually doesn't fully subvert the idea of the character and in many ways embraces the traditional part even beyond the character's extended facial non conformity. This is right within the character's profession as a firemen that lends itself naturally to heroic sort, and Martin very much plays into the heroic nature of the character, though perhaps with a certain cheekiness. This from the outset where he helps the titular Roxanne (Daryl Hannah) get back into her house after being locked out...naked of course. Martin doesn't creep it up exactly though delivers a certain sly smile when telling the rest of the firemen there isn't anything too exciting about the job.

The way Martin portrays Charlie going about the job though is with this very straight forward confidant demeanor. The same is even true for when he battles some hecklers with his tennis racket, which while ridiculous as a concept Martin does present it with this strange sincerity in a way. This actually adds to the comedy since Martin plays it like an actual duel rather just a few guys goofing around. In an interesting way Martin clearly holds the role of Cyrano in great esteem since he never makes fun of the character or the idea of it. Although this is a comedy Martin doesn't ever insult the nature of the original story. This is within moments of strict earnestness within his performance such as a scene of helping kids on a roof. Martin delivers a natural warmth within that confidence of a man who wishes to do the right thing. The same is with the central romance with the titular woman where the long nosed Charlie, just as Cyrano finds himself in dangerous territory in the friend zone. Martin though in these early interactions delivers his lines without sarcasm presenting a man genuinely smitten, even if it is not returned to him.

Oddly enough the parts where he is least Cyrano are also the parts that are most traditionally Steve Martin as a comic performer. This being the famous moment of Cyrano taking down one of his nose heckler by delivery proper nose insults. This is reworked as Charlie rattles off insults based on different subjects, and Martin kind of falls upon his more traditional comedic presence. His timing is of course good, and he delivers the scene well in a comedic sense. I don't think it necessarily is entirely true to the rest of the presentation of the character. Martin isn't bad in this scene at all, in fact he rather funny, but his portrayal of Charlie's Bravado feels a touch standard. This is especially when compared to the rest of his performance that seeks to be much more the real Cyrano, even with that modern bent. This isn't to say I expected Martin to fully replicate what Ferrer did so well, I mean he did even bother to get the really bland main two co-stars, but rather his other scenes feel like a proper riff on that where that scene is more just Martin the comic. This perhaps falls more into the film not really being overly ambitious. It mostly just a loving tribute to the original, and that is Martin's performance. It seeks to lovingly allude to the Cyrano that came before as Charlie, with a bit more comedy, but not much more than that. It never quite reaches this greater grandiose styling it occasionally seems to try to achieve.  This even in the more earnest moments that slowly feel more traditional romantic comedy with Martin as the hapless romantic, though still with that undercurrent of the poet at times. It's a fun performance, even a delightful one at times. It however isn't even Martin's best performance from 1987 with his straight man turn in Planes, Trains and Automobiles leaving a greater impression.

100 comments:

Robert MacFarlane said...

Yeah, I agree he was better in Planes, Trains, and Automobiles. Granted, I adore Planes, Trains, and Automobiles to an irrational extent.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the production and costume design of The Sting.

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Are there any actors today that remind you of James Mason? Or that have the potential to be?

Michael McCarthy said...

Dang, I thought he was marvelous in the heckling scene and would probably give him a 4.5 just for that.

Charles H said...

Planes, Trains, and Automobiles was his better turn i think. I would've liked to have seen him upgraded for that.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Could I have your extended thoughts on Martin in Planes, Trains and Automobiles.

Anonymous said...

Louis: So Jim Carrey is playing Dr. Robotnik in a live-action Sonic the Hedgehog movie. Thoughts? While the film will likely fail, I think Carrey is a great fit.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Biggest missed opportunities of Christian Bale and Liam Neeson's careers. Same criteria as before.

Luke Higham said...

R.I.P. Nicolas Roeg

Matt Cofrancesco said...

Tahmeed:

Martin - 4.5(About half of it is technically Martin's sardonic shtick but this is one of the best examples of it. There is more here though as he does bring some genuine heart to the role here, and the parts I always find the most memorable in the film are technically the more dramatic scenes between him and Candy. They are great together)

Luke Higham said...

Louis: And the biggest missed opportunities of Russell Crowe's career.

RatedRStar said...

R.I.P. Nicolas Roeg

Emi Grant said...

Luke: I don't think it was that big of a missed opportunity (Especially since I loved Fassbender in that role), but Bale as Steve Jobs would have been interesting. Mostly because I would have loved seeing Bale reciting Sorkinese dialogue.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your thoughts on this scene from Game of Thrones? I personally think it's Michelle Fairley's best moment.

https://youtu.be/0k_HWCIT8nY

Anonymous said...

Luke: For Crowe, not playing Shakespeare in Shakespeare in Love. Would have been so much better than Fiennes. In fact, if he had played the role, then I would have liked the film, I would have found it watchable.

Bryan L. said...

Anonymous: I feel the same, although I still think that part should've gone to the other Fiennes brother :D

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Well I'd really might as well address both as they very much work in tandem, and have the exact same intention. That is this sort of careful stylishness. In that the work has touches of extravagance, period appropriate, however it never goes too far in either department. In each it reflects a certain glamor to be sure, but with an understanding of sort of the depression era mindfulness. In that on the edges of each fancy set is one that shows a certain rot just outside of it. This is perhaps less noticeable for the costumes, however it too finds the right combination between that period functionality, and well...just looking good.

Bryan:

Jeremy Irons is the modern James Mason even beyond playing Humbert Humbert. In terms of a younger crop though I don't think there is anyone who really springs to mind.

Tahmeed:

Well full disclosure I had planned to do a double review above but was planning on watching the film on Thanksgiving however not a single station played it making myself rather disgruntled over the whole idea. Martin's performance though is rather covertly powerful though I will admit. In that you do have his more sardonic presence as the overarching performance that works very well with the more comedic elements. Within that though he does bring some real genuine frustrations at time that effectively create that need to get home. The most powerful aspect of his performance though is the chemistry with Candy, even beyond their comedic dynamic of the straight man against the more overt character. Martin does more though in terms of portraying the slowly growing affection and even understanding between the two men, just as he delivers the anger towards him at times. The highlights of his performance though are in those moments, that make me love the film far beyond just an enjoyable comedy, where it relates to really the idea of companionship and family. Martin's best scene is the very end in the combination of the subway ride and his return to Del. Martin conveys so so much in the moment realization and is also very moving, even if Candy is the one that breaks your heart.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

That's fine, I guess as Carrey does try to "voice act" when he does so, even if I don't always love it.

Luke:

I don't really see Bale as someone who has had a lot of missed opportunities. He's been occasionally miscast, but he's had a good career. His profile has become a little quieter since Batman, but since then he's gotten two Oscar nominations, and is probably on his way to a third. So I'd say he's doing just fine, and I don't see any major misses along the way.

Neeson is an actor who really has simply "worked" throughout his career, and not really to the point of an overt detriment. It rather just suggests a specific work ethic where he finds work where he can get it. In turn I'd say he's gotten his opportunities when they've come up, and there isn't really any performances where he underwhelmed in an unexpected way. I would say in terms of his own career he probably did make a mistake in giving up Lincoln, however I do doubt he would've given a better performance than Day-Lewis did.

On Crowe, there are several parts he turned down that although he would've been good, I'm glad the person who played the part did so, in Hugh Jackman for Wolverine (I doubt we would've ever gotten Logan if Crowe played the part), and Aragorn (which thankfully raised Viggo Mortensen's profile towards more roles). The one major missed opportunity was Kingdom of Heaven, but he wanted to play the lead, Scott just wouldn't wait for him. That sadly is more of a missed opportunity for all of us given how much better he would've been in that role than who played it. Otherwise he's someone people put kind of the fallen star moniker on, due to his behavior. Although I'd say, other than being perhaps Oscar blacklisted, his career maintained pretty well with several notable high profile turns afterwards.













RIP Nicolas Roeg and Ricky Jay

RatedRStar said...

RIP Ricky Jay

Calvin Law said...

Louis: what are your thoughts to the soundtrack of Sorry to Bother You? Giving it a listen again and it's probably one of my favourites of the year.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the cinematography of Sabrina and Wait Until Dark.

Anonymous said...

Louis: what are your thoughts and ratings on stacy keach and bob odenkirk on nebraska

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your thoughts on this scene from Game of Thrones?
https://youtu.be/0k_HWCIT8nY

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Your rating and thoughts on Jaimz Woolvett in Unforgiven? I can't seem to find them and I've noticed that he is pretty low on the ranking for that year. Also, who would you have cast instead of him for that part?

RatedRStar said...

RIP Bernardo Bertolucci

Calvin Law said...

RIP Bertolucci.

Louis: your thoughts on this scene from The Night Of - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TLRb8SK_PHw

Luke Higham said...

RIP Bernardo Bertolucci

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Do you think Kingdom Of Heaven would've been released in full if Crowe played Balian or is it difficult to say.

And wouldn't Michael Collins be a missed opportunity for an even greater performance if Neil Jordan allowed Neeson to have a more complex portrayal. Rob Roy is very much an action hero performance so I've no complaints at all with that.

Calvin Law said...

What's everyone's top 5's for the acting categories now? I'll throw in Director and Score for now too.

Director
1. Damien Chazelle (First Man)
2. The Coen Brothers (Buster Scruggs)
3. Debra Granik (Leave No Trace)
4. Christopher McQuarrie (Mission Impossible Fallout)
5. Lee Chang-dong (Burning)

Actor
1. Ryan Gosling (First Man)
2. Ethan Hawke (First Reformed)
3. Ben Foster (Leave No Trace)
4. Bradley Cooper (A Star is Born)
5. Yoo Ah-in (Burning)

Actress
1. Thomasin McKenzie (Leave No Trace)
2. Toni Collette (Hereditary)
3. Lady Gaga (A Star is Born
4. Olivia Cooke (Thoroughbreds)
5. Anya Taylor-Joy (Thoroughbreds)

HM - Carey Mulligan, Wildlife

Supporting Actor
1. Steven Yeun (Burning)
2. Tom Waits (Buster Scruggs)
3. Lily Franky (Shoplifters)
4. Tim Blake Nelson (The Ballad of Buster Scruggs)
5. Daniel Kaluuya (Widows)

Supporting Actress
1. Elizabeth Debicki (Widows)
2. Claire Foy (First Man)
3. Jeon Jong-seo (Burning)
4. Cynthia Erivo (Bad Times at the El Royale)
5. Zazie Beetz (Deadpool 2)

Score
1. First Man
2. Buster Scruggs
3. Mandy
4. McQueen
5. BlacKkKlansman

Bryan L. said...

Luke: That's an interesting question, since Crowe was one of the biggest stars in Hollywood at the time. There's a chance he would've had a bigger say in the final outcome of the film, since he previously proved himself in a Ridley-Scott directed historical epic of course :)
Maybe the studio would've released the longer cut since they would've had greater faith given the talent involved.

Then again, Kingdom of Heaven would still have been a tougher sell, given all the factions involved in the film, and Gladiator was marketed as a revenge epic. But either way, the directors cut should've been the one released.

Btw, I apologize if I keep butting in on the questions you ask Louis. I just think your queries are interesting, that's all :)

Calvin: I'd need to think about that one for a bit, but I have a general idea so far.

Giuseppe Fadda said...

Lead Actor:

1. Alessandro Borghi, On My Skin
2. Bradley Cooper, A Star is Born
3. Marcello Fonte, Dogman
4. Toni Servillo, Loro
5. Victor Polster, Loro

Lead Actress:

1. Lady Gaga, A Star is Born
2. Emma Thompson, The Children Act
3. Kathryn Hahn, Private Life
4. Rachel McAdams, Disobedience
5. Toni Collette, Hereditary

Supporting Actor:

1. Alessandro Nivola, Disobedience
2. Jeff Bridges, Bad Times at the El Royale
3. Lewis Pullman, Bad Times at the El Royale
4. Arieh Worthalther, Girl
5. David Kaluuya, Widows

Supporting Actress:

1. Elena Sofia Ricci, Loro
2. Cynthia Erivo, Bad Times at the El Royale
3. Elizabeth Debicki, Widows
4. Kasia Smutniak, Loro
5. Mackenzie Davis, Tully

Director:

1. Orson Welles, The Other Side of the Wind
2. Paolo Sorrentino, Loro
3. Drew Goddard, Bad Times at the El Royale
4. Matteo Garrone, Dogman
5. Bradley Cooper, A Star is Born

Score:

1. First Man
2. Woman at War
Need to think about the rest.

Charles H said...

RIP Bernardo Bertolucci

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

A soundtrack befitting the film as there is a certain loopy quality in every song choice. All even as straight forward as they may seem all have something odd in the sort of techno compositions usually as part of it, that are always off in a peculiar way that just works for the film's surreal style.

Heartbreaking scene, brilliantly performed by Ahmed as he just embodies in that moment all that Naz lost through his experience, and poignantly attaches to that moment of happiness.

Anonymous:

Sabrina features some wonderful work from Charles Lang, as again Wilder was someone who purposefully avoided sort of "dramatic" shot, seeking a more straight forward approach. Lang work realizes this well in creating in the lighting a certain pristine black and white look that emphasizes the high society/glamorous elements of the film rather well, without going too far in terms of the accentuation. And as usual the camera loves Hepburn, and she is beautifully shot and framed here. There actually is a bit more to how certain shots compose Bogart that is rather effective in positioning his interactions/reactions with Hepburn, that is subtly done yet very effectively in creating the low key romance in the film.

Wait Until Dark actually is most pretty straight forward work, and not overly impressive most of the time. Not that there is anything wrong with it, it is functionally fine. This is except anything involving Alan Arkin where Lang gets rather creative in terms of playing with the lighting around his character that effectively casts shadows to make him all the more nefarious in his scenes. Then the other highlight is still with him, in the final confrontation where it very directly plays with the lighting that is effectively done, though given the potential of the idea I wouldn't praise any more than that. Solid work though.

Anonymous:

Keach - 4(A very good pseudo villain who manages to not overplay his role, which can be easy with Payne. I like his more subtle approach where he plays the sleaze as a more naturalistic part of his presence rather than trying to just add on top of his lines. Keach rather leaves it in his face to show sort of the nature of the man, while so falsely, yet "earnestly" making his case for his right to the cash.)

Odenkirk - 3.5(Again Odenkirk thankfully avoids becoming a caricature, as the more "loved" the brother. He rather just finds a right sort of assumed/historical type of chemistry with Forte. Although playing his slightly emotional moments with a more breezy attitude that effectively shows sort of the less of burden his character wears regarding their father.)

Louis Morgan said...

Tahmeed:

I agree with the assessment, and I think it is one of the great additions to the series over the books. I always found the way Catelyn was written in the books regarding Jon Snow was almost with this strange petulance that was ill-fitting to the character. The scene though adds far more depth to the idea, and Fairley is exceptional giving one of the best acted moments of the series. As she captures so powerfully her internalized anger over the son, and the sadness and guilt within her shame. And honestly, along with the underlining with the Stark theme, the final line gives me chills every time.

Bryan:

Woolvett - 2.5(I don't think he's terrible he just doesn't deliver in a part with a great deal of potential. He almost seems a little adrift, and far more so than I think the kid was suppose to be. This is especially noticeable when he is sharing the screen with Freeman and Eastwood at his absolute peak. He has decent moments like his scene of the assassination, and he's not bad in his scene after that. He isn't devastating though, and I think the kid could've been. In that scene though Eastwood's reactions, are far more powerful than what Woolvett is doing despite what he has in his possession. He doesn't take anything away from the film for me, but he just isn't up to that otherwise impeccable cast.)

Ethan Hawke would've been perfect.

Luke:

Hard to say.

Yes, I'd say so in regards to Michael Collins, although that would've been a massive restructuring. Neeson himself does need to be pushed in some way whether it be by the director, Spielberg/Scorsese, or through the material like The Grey.

Anonymous said...

Louis seen any 2018 releases recently?

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Nah, too busy watching 1987 classics like Independent Spirit Award best feature nominee "Tough Guys Don't Dance"...OH GOD! OH MAN! OH GOD! OH MAN! OH GOD! OH MAN! OH GOD! OH MAN! OH GOD! OH MAN! OH GOD! OH MAN! OH GOD! OH MAN! OH GOD! OH MAN! OH GOD! OH MAN! OH GOD! OH MAN! OH GOD! OH MAN! OH GOD! OH MAN!

Anonymous said...

Louis: Rating and thoughts on Joan Crawford, Van Heflin and Raymond Massey in Possessed.

Michael McCarthy said...

I got to see Boy Erased tonight, and damn was it powerful. The cast is great all around, it baffles me that Crowe in particular hasn't gotten more awards buzz.

Michael McCarthy said...

Lead Actor

1. Bradley Cooper
2. Ethan Hawke
3. Robert Redford
4. Ryan Gosling
5. Daveed Diggs

Lead Actress

1. Melissa McCarthy
2. Anya Taylor-Joy
3. Carey Mulligan
4. Charlize Theron
5. Toni Collette

Supporting Actor

1. Jeff Bridges
2. Steven Yeun
3. Russell Crowe
4. Tim Blake Nelson
5. Linus Roache

Supporting Actress:

1. Elizabeth Debicki
2. Jeon Jong-seo
3. Cynthia Erivo (Bad Times)
4. Andrea Riseborough
5. Claire Foy

Mitchell Murray said...

Michael: Thoughts on Crowe, Hedges and Kidman? Of those three I'm actually most curious about Hedges, as his performance looked quite promising from the trailer.

Anonymous said...

You guys: Gotham Awards thoughts?

Louis: Maybe a bit of a personal query, but have you ever studied or have an academic understanding of film and acting? Or does it just come naturally to you?

Plus did you give your thoughts on Leave no Trace?

Michael McCarthy said...

Mitchell:

Hedges-(First let me say that I can officially say that I prefer Hedges to his Lady Bird co-star Timothee Chalamet as an actor, I really wish it was the former and not the latter that everyone was going crazy over. I've mostly liked Hedges from what I've seen but this is the most mature work I've seen from him yet. HE internalizes the emotional journey of the character beautifully throughout the film and manages to bring so much complexity out of each of his relationships while doing so little. Whenever his character has any sort of breakdown or outburst, Hedges shows that this is the result of an ordinary kid being pushed to the absolute limit of what he can handle. It's just wonderfully honest work that is mostly quiet and subtle yet is absolutely essential to the power of the film.)

Crowe-(This is a fascinating balancing act by Crowe as he brings an enormous amount of warmth to the character of the preacher showing that despite some difficulties, he really does have a close and loving relationship with his son. When dealing with what to do about his son's sexuality, he brilliantly infuses hints of both personal pride and religious fanaticism into an attitude that overall is grounded in love and a desire to help his son. His moments towards the end of the film are absolutely incredible as you can feel the amount of conflict in this man's mind and heart as he speaks to his son and essentially does his best to reassess his whole ideology.)

Kidman-(She definitely has the simplest character arc of the main characters but she's still Nicole Kidman so she manages to bake quite a strong impact nevertheless. Like Crowe, she brings an immense warmth to her role, only without any reservations. She manages to find some nice depth to her character in regards to her characters regrets, which she handles quite adeptly.)

Emi Grant said...

Louis: Thoughts and rating on O'Neall? Also, thoughts on that particular scene

Michael: Thoughts on Edgerton's direction/performance?

Luke Higham said...

Michael: Louis may have to increase the Supporting lineup again if he agrees with you on Crowe.

Luke Higham said...

Updated Lead Actor Prediction
Cooper (Winner)
Bale
Mortensen
Malek
Hawke

Calvin Law said...

I'm sad that Gosling might miss out.

RatedRStar said...

Hawke probably has less chances left to be nominated in his life since he seems to be hot or cold nowadays, currently very hot, whereas Ryan Gosling is still quite young and is a common leading man, so I would rather Hawke be the one to get nominated, I think they were both great, I still think Gosling is more likely to get nominated though just because his film will still get plenty of nominations.

Hawke basically needs to be 2016s equivalent of Viggo Mortensen, get in everywhere and be comfortably in despite not appearing comfortable.

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar: It's a toss-up for that 5th spot between Hawke and Gosling. Dafoe could gain momentum later on with a few critics awards but it would be too late.

We'll see what happens with the big 4 critics awards. (I'm predicting Cooper to win the National Board Of Review and Hawke or Dafoe for the National Society of Film Critics)

Robert MacFarlane said...

*Really* hoping Mortensen’s impression of Jon Stewart doing an New York Italian impression falls through.

RatedRStar said...

Viggo Mortensen cannot give a bad performance I just do not see it lol its not possible lol

RatedRStar said...

He was even half decent in Psycho well compared to John Gavin anyway.

Robert MacFarlane said...

RatedRStar: You haven't evens seen the damn movie. I have, and let's just say that as an Italian American, I wasn't particularly thrilled with Viggo's performance.

Also, the movie and Viggo just won NBR. I'm going to go pour myself a drink.

Luke Higham said...

Well, I was half right on Cooper winning though I wouldn't put money on Viggo just yet.

Anonymous said...

Louis: One thing to note about March's role in Middle of the Night is that it was originally played by Edward G. Robinson on Broadway. He was apparently so good that audiences cried. He was nominated along with Paul Muni, Ben Gazzara, Boris Karloff and Michael Redgrave.

Bryan L. said...

Calvin: Same here, especially since the role of Neil Armstrong would seem like something right up their alley. I still hope he sneaks in though.

RatedRStar said...

Robert: I have seen it definitely lol

Emi Grant said...

I honestly can't see Gosling missing out. He's always seemed locked to me.

Bryan L. said...

Emi: I really hope he gets in. I'm just a bit skeptical since First Man is getting more a "pat on the back" response rather than a "LOVED IT!" reaction, and the film didn't exactly kill it at the box office. The film should be a lock for some of the techs though.

Mitchell Murray said...

Robert: You know, for what its worth, lets remember who won the NBR for best actor last year. These things are not set in stone by any means.

Calvin Law said...

Bryan: What I loved about what Gosling did with Armstrong is that he deliberately played him as just a low-key guy so sincerely. Not as in he was a dull person, or someone with hidden demons like The Driver or deliberately cold and incisive like K, but reserved to the point of holding everything in. How he made you really feel everything going on in his mind all the time and how he treid to handle everything with that same firm, cold diplomatic reserve making those big emotional moments so powerful. There's more to his performance I could praise but I'll have to have more of a think.

Bryan L. said...

Calvin: I agree very much, since I find it impressive that Gosling has found different approaches in most of his introverted roles (the exception being Only God Forgives, and I think he could've given a good performance with a better script for that film.)

Charles H said...

Emi: I agree. I can't see Gosling missing out either. He's such a fantastic modern day leading man he's certain to get an Oscar in the near future.

Mortensen and Cooper seem to be the frontrunners for best actor, take it or leave it.

Matt Mustin said...

Saw Widows. Liked it quite a bit, although it definitely has some problems.

Davis-4
Rodriguez-2.5
Debicki-5
Erivo-3.5
Kaluuya-4.5(Quick note on his screen time, I thought he was used exactly the right amount.)
Farrell-3.5
Henry-4
Duvall-3
Dillahunt-3
Neeson-3

Bryan L. said...

Matt: My ratings would be the same as yours, though Farrell is a bit on the fence between a 3.5 and a 4 for me.

Louis: Do you think Christopher Nolan would be a good fit to direct a 2010s version of Lawrence of Arabia? I feel like he has at least one of these types of historical epics in him. If not him, who would be your choice?

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your top ten Brendan Gleeson acting moments

Anonymous said...

Michael Fassbender.

Louis: Your thoughts on the screenplays of The Lost Weekend and Ace in the Hole.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Could Mark Hamill go up for Return of the Jedi?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous:

1. The Tower - In Bruges
2. "On Ragland Road" - In Bruges
3. In the Park With Ray - In Bruges
4. Walk to the beach - Calvary
5. How do gunshots feel - The Guard
6. Cahill and the inspector - The General
7. Inappropriate comments - The Guard
8. What side would he fight for? - In Bruges
9. Finding the dead birds - The General
10. Proper shootout - The Guard
11. The kid's death - Six Shooter
12. Meeting Harry for a drink - In Bruges
13. Rabbit - Six Shooter
14. Crucifixion interrogation - The General
15. Infection - 28 Days Later
16. Finding his dog - Calvary
17. Hearing about the alcoves - In Bruges
18. No credit for fourth place - the Guard
19. Bloody Shakespearean - Gangs of New York
20. Bar "fight" - Calvary

Luke Higham said...

Sylvester Stallone's done with Rocky Balboa.

Matt Mustin said...

Luke: Well, for now.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Crawford - 4(Crawford's performances, even her best ones, tend to be always on the edge of an extreme camp or melodrama. This isn't a criticism really, in fact very much gives herself this certain edge as a performer that grants a unique presence on film. Here that certainly comes to play as a woman very much on the edge. In this was Crawford occasionally does go perhaps too far, however overall she is effective in creating the intensity of the state. It is perhaps a little much at times, however overall she is effective particularly in her quieter scenes where she exudes the sort of deranged state even when seeming to be "normal" overall.)

Heflin - 3.5(Heflin, as per usual with a half way decent role, manages to find the right complication in the part that probably would've been bland in some hands. Heflin find the right low key sleaze though along with enough charisma to create enough of a believably quality to the fixation.)

Massey - 3(A more standard Massey turn as sort of a general respectable sort. He does it well enough here, but his work doesn't really stand out within the film.)

Anonymous:

Yes, and yes.

Luke:

It will probably already be ten, as I forgot about a few saves like Peter Bogdanovich, which I have no intention of giving up.

Louis Morgan said...

Emi:

O'Neil - 2Wiseaus(That scene is the highlight of his performance, in that his extremely melodramatic delivery, along with the extreme switch, the ridiculous voice over, the comical camera turns, and the whole idea of driving to a beach just to read a letter makes it a comic masterpiece of a moment. Of course people really should see the whole thing to just try to comprehend that such a film exists. O'Neill is always hilarious here, sometimes I honestly feel sorry for him as though he is frustrated by the very idea of the film as well. But often enough we get some downright hilarious reactions as the film becomes more and more ridiculous.)

I'm also surprised O'Neil missed out on the Indie Spirit Nom, since the equally Wiseau worthy performances of Wings Hauser and Debra Sandlund were recognized.

Bryan:

No, based on his focus on urgency, which isn't the whole of Lawrence's story. I'd say Denis Villeneuve's directorial style would be a better fit.

Anonymous:

The Lost Weekend's screenplay viewed from a modern perspective may seem filled with alcoholic tropes in its exploration of one man's descent into his own vice, however the difference is it created them. Billy Wilder/Charles Brackett's work takes the idea seriously in their adaption of the work, something that wasn't always the case previously, in trying to truly comprehend the man's demons. For the time, it doesn't hold back in terms of revealing the man's pains, and anguish of the perpetual drunk. What makes the film though is an avoidance of becoming too perilous. Wilder and Brackett's writing establishes a dark tone, in particular the sanatorium scene, however it is filled with a real poetry in terms of Birnam's self-examination. An examination that never seems indulgent on the part of the writers creating a believable exploration in the man's soul. Equally astute is the use of the love interest, which could have fallen into an easy melodrama in itself, or avoidance. It rather amplifies it through their specific use that offers just a bit of warmth to the story, but even that is not granted without some trepidation.

Ace in the Hole is a downright brilliant and searing exploration of the nature of journalism. This through the as established amoral journalist who is looking for a story. A co-authored Wilder screenplay once again does not pull its punches in granting the intense cynical edge of to the story. This in its depiction of corrupt town officials, blood thirsty spectators and journalists, or even that of the opportunist wife. One of the few places of humanity granted in the poor man in the center of the big top. I love how that aspect in particular is written as this center point of humanity. It is not over written, to make him some "greatest guy" rather makes it all the more tragic that it is some random, though honest, schlub. Around him though is the web of deceit which the screenplay has both fun in the build up, but within it a real despair of sorts in showing each figure trading their soul for some financial gain. The morality never feels moralizing creating this exceptionally powerful dissection of essentially "the human interest" story.

Tahmeed:

Probably not.

Louis Morgan said...

In regards to NBR....it begins.

I will say even as someone who didn't mind Green Book, it's bogus to me that it even got in over say First Man, into the top ten. But hey I am happy "Buster Scruggs" got some just deserts.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the "These things go down" and "Living in denial" scenes from Midnight Run.

Luke Higham said...

Updated Supporting Lineup
Tom Waits/Tim Blake Nelson - The Ballad Of Buster Scruggs
Jeff Bridges/Lewis Pullman - Bad Times At The El Royale
Lily Franky - Shoplifters
Steven Yeun - Burning
Russell Crowe - Boy Erased
Daniel Kaluuya - Widows
Linus Roache - Mandy
Peter Bogdanovich - The Other Side Of The Wind
Russell Hornsby - The Hate U Give
Alessandro Nivola - Disobedience

Louis: Are you able to give ratings and thoughts on Brolin and Hemsworth in Avengers: Infinity War.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: And ratings/thoughts on Hauser and Sandlund in Tough Guys Don't Dance.

Bryan L. said...

Luke: Honestly, I'd rather see a Brolin/Hemsworth review rather than one for Kaluuya. While I thought the latter was very good, I do think you could also sum up what he does in a paragraph, and I think he's most likely getting a 4.5 anyways. Won't mind either way though, but we'll see what happens.

BTW, do you think there's a chance Jordan gets nominated for Black Panther?

Bryan L. said...

Luke:: Although Brolin and Hemsworth are probably getting 4.5s as well, with an outside chance for a 5 for Brolin. I just get an extra kick out of reading performance reviews in superhero films, that's all haha.

Luke Higham said...

Bryan: I don't mind too much really (I've mentioned before that he would get a very strong 4.5), but Kaluuya does have his supporters on here.

Jordan, I currently have at #6 for potential nominees. A lot of pundits are predicting a Picture nomination so that could help.

Luke Higham said...

Bryan: Louis gave Hemsworth his MVP award on a re-watch, so I don't think that's happening.

Bryan L. said...

Luke: I think it's interesting to note that Fassbender, Farrell (The Beguiled) and Edgerton were already cleared from the saves at this time last year, whilst no one has been so far this year. It could mean that 5s may be at a premium this time around, in terms of Leading performances.

Luke Higham said...

Bryan: I do think it's a certainty we'll have more than 8.

I hope Fonte in Dogman will be a bonus review instead of part of the lineup or saved for the bonus round because it's hard to predict when an English subs copy will be made available. I remember requesting Rohrig in Son Of Saul for the alternate round but switched it to Mendelsohn in Mississippi Grind as there was no copy available and didn't come until the summer after.

Luke Higham said...

Ethan Hawke won NYFCC. :)

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis and everyone else: Your top ten favourite films from the 80s.
Mine would be, in no particular order:

Amadeus
Grave of the Fireflies
Paris, Texas
My Neighbour Totoro
Back to the Future
The Princess Bride
The Empire Strikes Back
Planes, Trains and Automobiles
The Breakfast Club
A Christmas Story

Bryan L. said...

Luke: Glad to hear that :)
Honestly, I didn't like First Reformed all that much but I thought Hawke was outstanding.

Tahmeed: Many, MANY more films I need to see from that decade, but for now

Paris, Texas
Platoon
Blue Velvet
Back to the Future
The Fly
E.T.
Amadeus
Full Metal Jacket
Ferris Bueller's Day Off
A Christmas Story

Calvin Law said...

1. The Elephant Man
2. Back to the Future
3. The Princess Bride
4. Blue Velvet
5. Die Hard
6. Cinema Paradiso
7. Amadeus
8. Henry V
9. The Last Emperor
10. A Fish Called Wanda

HM: Rain Man

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Can't believe I forgot about The Elephant Man. That should be there instead of A Christmas Story.

Calvin Law said...

Prediction for the Alternate Best Actor lineup:

Ryan Gosling - First Man (though I hope he gets in)
Willem Dafoe - At Eternity's Gate
John Huston - The Other Side of the Wind
Robert Redford - The Old Man and the Gun
Ben Foster - Leave No Trace/Galveston
Clint Eastwood - The Mule
Marcello Fonte - Dogman
Daveed Diggs - Blindspotting
John C. Reilly and Joaquin Phoenix/John C. Reilly and Steve Coogan - The Sisters Brothers/Stan and Ollie
Yoo Ah-in - Burning

Also in contention:

LaKeith Stanfield - Sorry to Bother You

Lucas Hedges - Boy Erased

Alex Wolff - Hereditary

John David Washington - BlackKkKklansman

Nicolas Cage - Mandy

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: If Fonte's review ends up on the back-burner then Stanfield or Hedges for that 10th spot.

Álex Marqués said...

I still have a looot to see, but:
Paris Texas
Do the Right Thing
The King Of Comedy
Drugstore Cowboy
The Thing
Something Wild
Blue Velvet
This is Spinal Tap
Broadcast News
Stop Making Sense

I've seen some of these more recently, and there are some movies I need to watch again. I could easily include Back to the Future in that list.

Luke Higham said...

I'll do a top 11.
Amadeus
Back To The Future
Blue Velvet
Come And See
The Elephant Man
Fanny And Alexander
Grave Of The Fireflies
Henry V
Indiana Jones And The Last Crusade
The Princess Bride
Who Framed Roger Rabbit

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: And the 2 Reilly double reviews are a good idea for one slot.

Emi Grant said...

Well, I'm really starting to believe that Ethan Hawke might just pull-off a Captain Fantastic now.

Luke Higham said...

Emi Grant: Let's wait until those SAG nominations come in first. If Hawke gets in ahead of Gosling then the lineup's set in stone.

Anonymous said...

My 10 80's movies.

Blue Velvet
Raging Bull
The Elephant Man
Amadeus
Ran
The Empire Strikes Back
Kagemusha
Blade Runner
The Thing
Raiders of the Lost Ark

Robert MacFarlane said...

The NYFCC choices were pretty great from the ones I saw. Really happy for Hawke, Hall, and Grant.

Calvin Law said...

Some retroactive castings for 1987 films today:

Planes, Trains and Automobiles directed by Tom McCarthy
Neal Page: Jason Bateman
Del Griffith: Danny McBride

The Last Emperor directed by Ang Lee
Puyi: Liu Ye
Wanrong: Gemma Chan
Reginald Johnston: Ben Mendelsohn
Detention Camp Governor: Tzi Ma

The Untouchables directed by Christopher Nolan
Eliot Ness: Tom Hardy
Jimmy Malone: Mark Rylance
George Stone: Emory Cohen
Oscar Wallace: Cory Michael Smith
Al Capone: Andy Serkis

Charles H said...

NYFCC choice were shockingly great. I LOVE seeing Hawke starting to become a contender.

For Jordan, i don't see him being nominated for BP, although i'm sure the academy will love the film i don't think it's Jordan's time yet.

Bryan L. said...

Calvin: I can see those, but I might opt for Kenneth Branagh as Reginald and maybe Liam Cunningham for Jimmy Malone. And Lord & Miller instead of McCarthy for director. I like the choice of McBride though.

Louis Morgan said...

In regards to NY, Actress got even thicker (though I think this could just be Rachel Weisz), Hawke could be that indie lone acting nom (though Schrader is doing well for himself so far too), Grant could be coming for that win (as BAFTA for example seems rather likely), and King could become a sweeper.

Roma love isn't at all surprising, and I could see this being potentially a Social Network though.

Anonymous:

These Things Go Down, is just hilarious in a scene that is kind of hard to describe why it is so funny beyond just Grodin's delivery of the phobic breakdown. The best thing is he is both believable in its way, while being so funny, with the probably improvised "It's too big" and "These Things go Down". The latter being a line I will just randomly sometimes, to get a laugh.

Living in Denial is just a great scene of impeccable chemistry between Grodin and De Niro(which is probably his most underrated turn). Great character realized brilliantly through wonderful interplay between the two. Grodin so carefully sardonic, yet earnest, against De Niro, intense yet earnest.

Luke:

Well let's set things in stone yet, plus we have to see what the academy does.

Sandlund - 2Wiseaus(Surprised she was nominated in lead, as she's not in it much, but she is quite awfully hilarious in doing this strange rather deranged portrayal of a southernish sexpot. The whole performance is so very odd and ridiculous it is occasionally fascinating in its bizarre nature.)

Hauser - 3Wiseaus(Hauser for much of it does seemingly a parody of the corrupt police captain type with just how over the top every glare and line delivery of his. He couldn't be more obvious as the villain, and just makes his insane lines all the more ridiculous. Hilariously so. Of course what takes him up a notch though is his final scene where he gets to do some extra bit of "acting" as a mostly paralyzed man that must be seen to be believed wholly.)

Tahmeed:

Amadeus
Back to the Future
Blue Velvet
Chariots of Fire
A Christmas Story
The Elephant Man
Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
The Last Emperor
The Princess Bride
Ran