Wednesday, 31 July 2013

Alternate Best Actor 2002: Robin Williams in One Hour Photo

Robin Williams did not receive an Oscar nomination, despite being nominated for a few critic awards, for portraying Seymour "Sy" Parrish in One Hour Photo.

One Hour Photo is an effective thriller about a worker at a one hour photo who becomes obsessed with the family of one of his customers who he sees as ideal.

Robin Williams has not been a preferred performer for me, and it is not that I don't think he has talent. He is funny comedian but his style of comedy rarely works within a character, and it can be especially distracting when he throws in a comedic bit in an otherwise straight performance and really breaks cahracter just to have a moment for Robin Williams the comedian. Robin Williams performance here is the first time, out of his performances that I have reviewed, where I can say that he doesn't once fall onto his abilities as comedian, and instead stays with his character for the entire film.

Williams is very much against his usually lively type portraying Sy the man who runs a photo booth in a large department store. Sy is a very lonely man who only seems to take solace in that he is good at his job as well as in the photos of a life he dreamed he had. Williams really reigns himself in as he portrays Sy as a very introverted, and at least at first quiet man. As the worker at the booth Williams puts on a smile to the customers as a good employee should but as well as man trying to be happier than he is. Within his eyes Williams suggests appropriately an anguish and deep seeded sadness in the man that is something almost always prevalent in some way.

Sy is a disturbed man although not disturbed in the way you might expect. He makes copies of the happy photos for himself, but technically speaking his intentions for this are not evil. He has no sinister plans for the father, the mother, or son all he really wants to be is part of their life and apparently would be happy just to be their friend. Williams does well not to try to make Sy any psychopath in this regard and his obsessions with the family are handled in just the right way. Williams most certainly is unnerving in his portrayal as Sy tries to get just the slightest connection with any of the family, but Williams is genuine in Sy's desires which although are off putting are understandable in that it is a lonely man looking for someone to love.

Williams is very good in his creation of Sy as a character because he allows sympathy for the man while at the same time building the unease by establishing that Sy definitely has problems that go even beyond his loneliness. In every attempt just to work his way into his good graces we see the genuine desire just for friendship in Williams's performance so we do feel for him. At the same time Williams though does bring across the unpleasantness of the situation in the way Sy both comes on too strongly each time as well as never seems to be able to connect with them. This dynamic that Williams creates makes every scene where Sy tries to befriend any of the family members particularly effective as they heartfelt while being off putting.

Sy's mental state quickly begins to deteriorate when he fired from his job for making all the copies of the photos, and to only further his distress he learns that his ideal family is less than perfect with the husband being an adulterer. Robin Williams is pent up for most of the film so when he unravels it might have been an easy time to overact, Williams though stays within the character of Sy and is very effective as Sy begins to come up with a very strange plan.Sy slowly begins to unravel to the point he finally seems to snap as he enacts his bizarre plan. Williams is very good because he is careful not to make Sy just an evil psychopath even though he is brandishing a knife. He's quite frightening to be sure because Williams still makes it the same old Sy who has finally let loose his rage.

Throughout the film it is apparent that something in Sy's past has brought him not only to his introverted state, but as well in his obsession with the family. Williams certainly gives subtle hints throughout, but it is more apparent in his last scene as Sy's explains why he did what he did. When Sy opens up this time about himself it is a powerful scene and Williams is heartbreaking as we see exactly what happened to Sy. Although it is not fully explained actually it is made obvious by Williams's flawless delivery of Sy's final speech on how exactly how father's should treat their sons. This is a very strong performance by Robin Williams that drives the film exceedingly well. I won't say Williams's turn even surprised me, as I always thought he had talent, instead this is just a great example of how good he can be when he reigns himself in.

Tuesday, 30 July 2013

Alternate Best Actor 2002: Ray Liotta in Narc

Ray Liotta did not receive an Oscar nomination, despite being nominated for an Independent Spirit Award and a sole critic award, for portraying Lieutenant Detective Henry Oak in Narc.

Narc although doesn't reinvent the genre it nevertheless it is a solid entry in the crime genre about two cops trying to solve the murder of an undercover narcotics officer.

Ray Liotta is not an actor who has not had the greatest variety of roles in his career. He more often than not is cast as a thuggish criminal or sometimes as a cop most often a corrupt or rather stupid one. Aside from a few exceptions these roles are generally are not all that complex. This role is one of those exceptions. I should just quickly address that I think this is a lead role even though his two nominations came in the supporting category. Although Jason Patric as the rookie Nick does has the most screen time Liotta's character overwhelms the film much in the same way Denzel Washington's in Training Day and it is his character who really drives the character the forward leaving Patric's character often as an observer.

I mention Denzel Washington's character Alonzo Harris in Training Day and there are some definite similarities to Henry Oak in this film in that they are both men who know their job very well and are paired with a less experienced cop who will come to question some of their methods. Henry Oak as portrayed by Liotta is a far more complex character though, and is not the villain of the film or at least not in a straight forward fashion. In fact when we first meet Oak we see him as a cop who probably is actually too devoted to his job of cleaning up the street, and making scum pay for the crimes they committed. Liotta's whole appearance is brilliantly crafted and from the moment we see him we know the type of cop Oak is.

Henry Oak is a guy who is probably been a cop for too long, and has seen too many terrible things in his time. In Liotta face we see the history of Oak which has been long an arduous. It is filled with exasperation but even more so an anger from experience. Liotta is excellent in his creation of the ticking time bomb that is Oak. He hates just about everything there is in his job, and he is barely able to hide this fact even in a calm situation. The smoldering rage is something always in him and Liotta brings this into his characterization as a constant. He plays it just right so we see what the job has done to him and how at any moment it seems that Oak could snap, but Liotta never lets this become a one note character.

Liotta importantly brings this intensity into Henry Oak who also is an honestly efficient police officer. As the officer Liotta is very effective in presenting him as competent. The way he handles every crime scene, or potential crime scene they come on Liotta plays a certain way in terms of his physical performance. Liotta maneuvers each of these scenes that reflects both the ability of Oak as a police officer but as well the volatile nature of the man. In every scene Liotta excused the command and intelligent in Oak as he checks out every scene, and interrogates any suspect. We can see a man who gets to the point quickly, but as well Liotta shows that Oak goes head first in taking chances with a possible death wish.

Liotta avoid being one note by having Oak function as a normal human being. Yes he is a man obsessed with what he does and that underlying obsession never fully goes away at any point yet Liotta does show variety in the man. There are scenes where he can enjoy a moment such as the death of a particularly stupid criminal, creating some camaraderie with his new partner or a warmer moment between Oak and the family of the slain police officer. Liotta although keeps Oak's unstable behavior as a constant never lets this override him as a character as a whole. He allows there to be an actual person with his performance. Yes he is a hard as nails cop which is his defining characteristic, but Liotta never lets this be his only characteristic.

What drives this man so hard is told to us in an early scene which is an incredible scene for Liotta. The scene depicts Oak telling a little about himself to Nick including that his wife has died from cancer and how that has changed his manner as an officer. Liotta is spellbinding as Oak reveals the truth in the man. It is a terrific scene because Liotta still has that spent tired face yet he shows us some tenderness in this man. Liotta delivery is pitch perfect as we see briefly a love and caring in the man that overwhelms his hate even while the hate still resides in him. It is a great scene for Liotta as he humanizes Oak in a powerful fashion giving insight in why Oak's brings such intensity with his job.

Oak is persistent in the search for the killer but slowly it seems he might want the case wrapped up for more than avenging his friend's death. Liotta is terrific in planting the seeds in simple moments where Oak acts just ever so slightly suspicious as maybe he seems even too quick to anger even for Oak. This all culminates when he and Nick finally come upon the men who seem to be responsible for the murder. Liotta finally lets the volcano erupt in this scene and it is brutal. The full extent of the rage in Oak comes out and he seems capable of almost anything. Liotta does not hold anything back showing Oak an emotional tsunami that will do anything to get the confessions from the men or he will kill them. It is an amazing scene for Liotta because he manages to bring an even greater intensity to the already tense Oak, and suggests the full extent of what ending this case means to Oak.

This leads to Oak's final scene when he forced to tell Nick exactly what happened the day the man killed and what Oak had to do with it. The scene builds up that Oak could be the villain, but Liotta did something very special in that he made me believe in his character enough that I could not believe that his character could be dirty at least not in the traditional sense. Liotta doing this only makes the final revelation all the more tragic as Oak's reveals why he was trying to bend the law. Liotta face is haunting as Oak relives the memory he tried so hard to forget.

We also see in flashback what this memory is and Liotta is very moving as Oak loses it again not in anger this time, but rather from sadness over the fate of his friend. It is a heartbreaking scene that Liotta gives the poignancy and power it deserves as we learn all that Oak did was not to protect himself, but to save another he cared so deeply for. This is outstanding work by Ray Liotta as he is able to give a truly sympathetic performance while being the hard edge cop who knows the street like the back of his hand. It is a testament that Liotta's talent as he gives such a detailed and complex character, and gives a soul to the type of character who are often left soulless.

Monday, 29 July 2013

Alternate Best Actor 2002: Tony Leung Chiu-Wai in Infernal Affairs

Tony Leung Chiu-Wai did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Chan Wing-yan in Infernal Affairs.

Infernal Affairs is the original excellent film about an undercover cop trying to take down a gangster from the inside and a corrupt police detective who feeds the gangster information. This was of course remade into the Oscar winning The Departed and I must say as remakes go The Departed does take the right approach. The Departed doesn't try to ape this film, but takes its own approach to the material having a very different style and including more exposition.

Tony Leung does not play the corrupt cop though and is instead the honest cop who pretends to be a gangster to infiltrate the mob/Triad boss. This part was played by Leonardo DiCaprio in The Departed, but the character is a bit different from the one in the remake. Where The Departed depicts DiCaprio's character freshly into the undercover game Chan Wing-yan has been in the life for ten years when we first meet up with him so Leung's performance is in turn rather different in approach. Leung himself is no stranger to playing undercover cops having played one in Hard Boiled, although Chan Wing-yan is a very different undercover cop than the one he played in that earlier film.

The underlying factor to much of his performance is expressing the exasperation in his character who has been undercover for far too long. Leung is extremely effective in bringing this out in his cahracter that suggests the experience of his character. Leung's doesn't portray the cop as ready to jump to every task and really make himself deep into the good graces of the crime boss, instead interestingly Leung plays him as a man who to some degree is rather bored with his job. This is of course a rather difficult approach to take as the character could seem boring himself, but Leung gives the right complexity to these feelings to allow us insight into a cop who has been pretending to be a criminal for his whole career.

Leung is very affecting in his role in that he shows that Chan isn't tired of the job in that it is not interesting or anything like that but rather tired of playing the bad guy all the time when he is in fact the good guy. Leung is careful in his portrayal in he is able to be the man fed up with being the bad guy well properly playing the part of the bad guy at the same time. Leung is quite excellent because he has a little bit of fun in his performance in giving off the vibe of the punk who is living loose and just is up for the next deal, but within this he is able to express his problems within this very same thing through a distinct lack of satisfaction during any point he is taking part in the crime boss's plan.

This being a performance by Tony Leung there is a great deal of charm in his performance. Leung measures it perfectly though never overplaying his hand yet still bringing in just the right amount to make it very easily to like Chan as well as really feel for his plight throughout the film. He has some very nice moments that lets us see Chan as more of a man than just in his current situation, and we see some of the ways he tries to alleviate his feelings. Leung is always great in these fairly simplistic moments like his romance of sorts with his therapist because he just brings these moments of just the slightest of joys in his often downbeat man in such a genuine fashion.

Something rather interesting about Leung's performance is he doesn't play it in a very heavy fashion, yet he never once feels even slightly inadequate in any scene. He is able to bring the anguish and the pain that he feels but he very much pulls this into his performance as Chan who really can't show that and has to keep up the facade of aloofness most of the time. Leung absolutely makes this work in a fashion that establishes always the way that Chan is playing a part the part of a man who really does not care about much of anything, but even behind the part that he is playing there is an emotional man who is coming very close to being fed up with his false life of crime he must continue to live.

Leung approach pays off extremely well for any scene where Chan is either allowed or forced to express his own feelings without any screen put above it. Each of these moments Leung makes a tremendous impact with and they have a great power especially due to the reluctance he shows otherwise. One of the most moving scenes in the film is Leung's heartbreaking reaction when one of Chan's few actual friends is killed. It is a very poignant scene, and a challenge as their scenes have been somewhat limited beforehand yet Leung absolutely brings the heart the scene needs. In his silent emotional response Leung expresses how the death devastates Chan not only because his only official connection dies, but also really his only friend.

Leung is brilliant as such a unique hero who must play the morally bankrupt yet is the most moral man in the entire proceedings. His performance works in so many ways. He also works as the man of two sides always trying to do one thing well doing the other in tandem. He also acts as the more traditional hero who we become invested in as he tries to do good. He makes the longing to do the right thing so very real and the moment where it appears he has won is especially satisfying with Leung portraying Chan finally getting to show his true colors. Leung's quiet dignified portrayal of this most moral man I found grew on me substantially throughout. He made it so the final moments of this film, where he is barely on screen, were even more moving than I expected them to be, and made it so the ending (which I thought might be unsatisfying in some way) to be truly profound.

Thursday, 25 July 2013

Alternate Best Actor 2002

And the Nominees Were Not:

Tony Leung Chiu-Wai in Infernal Affairs

Robin Williams in One Hour Photo

Ray Liotta in Narc

Ralph Fiennes in Spider

Edward Norton in 25th Hour

I apologize in advance if I left off any of your favorites, but this year was packed.

Alternate Best Supporting Actor 1943: Dana Andrews in The Ox-Bow Incident and Results

Dana Andrews did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Donald Martin in The Ox-Bow Incident.

Dana Andrews often played characters who were stern and very restrained in their emotions such as in films like Laura and Boomerang. This performance is in a way is as much against type as Joseph Cotten was in Shadow of a Doubt due to the emotional nature of the role. Dana Andrews plays the man who is the leader of a group of three men who are stumbled upon by the posse hoping to avenge the death of a local rancher. The men are accused of the murder, and they are helped by the fact that they have some of the man's cattle without a proper receipt for the purchase. These leaves Martin to try and convince the very angry men to believe that he and the other men had nothing whatsoever to do with the murder and are innocent.

Andrews has none of his usual demeanor in this performance instead giving a very emotionally charged performance as Martin. His first scene is incredible reflecting the complete confusion of the man as he founds himself surrounded and instantly accused of a very severe crime. Andrews is absolutely terrific bringing about the strain of the situation into his performance. Andrews is excellent in showing how hard it is for Martin to try to keep his thoughts together as he tries to juggle all of the question being asked at him as well as trying to keep things under control among his own men, and from the extremely hostile crowd who are ready to string him up without even the slightest explanation.

It is especially powerful to see the usually so confidant Andrews give such an emotionally violate performance. Andrews is especially raw an intense in nature, and in a time where so many performances could be dull it is amazing to see such an uncompromising depiction of feeling as Andrews gives. His pleas for understanding, sympathy, and for the sake of his family are heartbreaking. There is never a moment of false sentiment in his portrayal. His performance is only ever genuine. There is nothing showy about this but rather he plays the part in such a purely genuine fashion that he is utterly gut wrenching to hear his pleas that are only the pleas of an innocent man fighting for his life.

 Andrews's performance pretty much takes over the picture  with his presence as even when he is not saying anything his silent reactions to the posse's deliberations are just as powerful as when he is talking. When the posse vote on whether to kill them or to let them live Andrews's performance is that brings the power of the scene so strongly to life. His face is so haunting as he shows Martin trying so hard to keep it together as the men choose. He is so moving as he gives the glimpse of hope in his eyes when some choose to let them live, but his reaction to most of the choosing death is one of the saddest moments ever put in a fictional film as we see Martin see that he has no chance to live. 

The Ox-Bow Incident is about showing the horrors and wrongfulness that is the act of lynching along with the mob mentality that goes along with it. Andrews gives the portrait of the victim of this injustice with his delicate and poignant performance. Dana Andrew's performance stands for me as one of the most affecting performances ever through his wholly genuine depiction of a man pleading for mercy against a wall of seemingly deaf ears. Although I still did not cry watching this performance his work right along with Richard Jordan's performance in Gettysburg stands as two of the few performances that I can't help but choke up when watching and come very very close to losing my composure.
Other Performances:
Anthony Quinn in The Ox-Bow Incident- Although Dana Andrews does leave the strongest impression on the film a very young Anthony Quinn makes his mark in the film as one of the other men in the accused group of three men. Quinn plays Juan Martínez who seems like he is the least savory of the three men. Quinn is very good in creating his character form the get out from his expression when he first sees that they have been surrounded by the posse. It isn't of fear or surprise but rather like he was thinking that he would be caught for something eventually. His character has some secrets, and Quinn is very good in being an unpredictable element in the film as a bit is revealed about Juan throughout his brief screen time. Each of the men react to their potential lynching differently, and the three actors each portray their parts differently. Quinn is very effective in being the cynical one who doesn't accept his fate, and won't let his captors see any fears in his eyes. His role is a short one which doesn't get the majority focus as most is given to Andrews, but Quinn makes a strong impact with all that he has.
Erich von Stroheim in Five Graves to Cairo- Erich Von Stroheim plays Field Marshall Rommel, but that really is not important. He plays the main Nazi villain of the film, which was a common villain during the 40's, and often they would be one note or rather bland. Stroheim buck this trend though in giving a fairly intelligent performance as Rommel. He plays Rommel as the arch villain with a strong presence, and just the right amount of flamboyance. Rather just trying to be evil like most Nazi villains of the time Stroheim goes about making Rommel a worthy adversary, and an entertaining character. He tears into all his scenes with a certain refined style where he expresses the ability of Rommel, and just is a fun character to watch while still successfully being the villain he is suppose to be. A fairly limited role on the whole, but one that Stroheim plays with the appropriate gusto to make Rommel one of the best parts of this film.
Overall Rank:
  1. Dana Andrews in The Ox-Bow Incident
  2. Charles Coburn in The More the Merrier
  3. Anthony Quinn in The Ox-Bow Incident
  4. Erich von Stroheim in Five Graves to Cairo
  5. Harry Davenport in The Ox-Bow Incident
  6. Lee J. Cobb in The Song of Bernadette
  7. George Sanders in This Land is Mine
  8. Francis Ford in The Ox-Bow Incident
  9. Vincent Price in The Song of Bernadette 
  10. Takashi Shimura in Sanshiro Sugata
  11. Henry Travers in Shadow of a Doubt
  12. Laird Cregar in Heaven Can Wait 
  13. Hume Cronyn in Shadow of a Doubt
  14. Harry Morgan in The Ox-Bow Incident 
  15. Charles Coburn in Heaven Can Wait 
  16. Rex Ingram in Sahara 
  17. Frank Morgan in The Human Comedy 
  18. Anton Walbrook in The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp
  19. Akim Tamiroff in Five Graves to Cairo
  20. Leigh Whipper in The Ox-Bow Incident 
  21. Eugene Palette in Heaven Can Wait
  22. George Coulouris in Watch on the Rhine
  23. Walter Slezak in This Land is Mine 
  24. Richard Nugent in Sahara 
  25. Frank Conroy in The Ox-Bow Incident
  26. Dan Duryea in Sahara 
  27. Denjiro Okochi in Sanshiro Sugata
  28. Van Johnson in The Human Comedy
  29. George Coulouris in This Land is Mine
  30. Wallace Ford in Shadow of a Doubt
  31. Ray Collins in The Human Comedy
  32. Peter van Eyck in Fives Grave to Cairo
  33. William Eythe in The Ox-Bow Incident
  34. Paul Hurst in The Ox-Bow Incident
  35. Kent Smith in This Land is Mine
  36. Louis Mercier in Sahara
  37. Matt Briggs in The Ox-Bow Incident
  38. J. Carrol Naish in Sahara
  39. Charles Bickford in The Song of Bernadette
  40. Chris-Pin Martin in The Ox-Bow Incident
  41. Albert Bassermann in Madame Curie
  42. Marc Lawrence in The Ox-Bow Incident
  43. Henry Travers in Madame Curies
  44. Dick Rich in The Ox-Bow Incident
  45. Yukiki Todoroki in Sanshiro Sugata 
  46. Akim Tamiroff in For Whom the Bell Tolls
  47. Macdonald Carey in Shadow of a Doubt 
  48. William Eythe in The Song of Bernadette
  49. Kurt Kreuger in Sahara
  50. James Craig in The Human Comedy
  51. John Wengraf in Sahara
  52. Donald Buka in Watch on the Rhine
  53. Richard Gaines in The More the Merrier
  54. Nelson Eddy in Phantom of the Opera
  55. Edgar Barrier in Phantom of the Opera
  56. Eric Roberts in Watch on the Rhine
Next Year: 2002 Lead

Wednesday, 24 July 2013

Alternate Best Actor 1943: Results

5. Claude Rains in The Phantom of the Opera- Rains is held back by his film but he manages to be both rather sympathetic, and effectively evil in this film.

Best Scene: The Phantom's Face is revealed.
4. Henry Fonda in The Ox-Bow Incident- Fonda is overshadowed by other elements in his film, but he is consistently solid and exceptional in one scene.

Best Scene: Gil reads Donald Martin's letter.
3. Charles Laughton in This Land is Mine- Laughton gives a strong performance that makes the transition from cowardice to bravery believable.

Best Scene: Albert watches as his friend is executed.
2. Roger Livesey in The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp- Livesey's performance is one of the finest examples of portraying the progression of a character over time and through experiences.

Best Scene: Candy reunites with Theo.
1. Joseph Cotten in Shadow of a Doubt- Good Prediction Psifonian feel free to name a request. Cotten easily wins this year with his incredible charming and chilling performance as a man with dark secret he wants to hide.

Best Scene: Uncle Charlie tells young Charlie about the true nature of the world.
Overall Rank:
  1. Joseph Cotten in Shadow of A Doubt
  2. Roger Livesey in The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp
  3. Paul Lukas in Watch on the Rhine
  4. Charles Laughton in This Land is Mine
  5. Joel McCrea in The More the Merrier 
  6. Mickey Rooney in The Human Comedy
  7. Henry Fonda in The Ox-Bow Incident
  8. Claude Rains in Phantom of the Opera
  9. Humphrey Bogart in Sahara
  10. Franchot Tone in Five Graves to Cairo
  11. Don Ameche in Heaven Can Wait
  12. Susumu Fujita in Sanshiro Sugata
  13. Gary Cooper in For Whom The Bell Tolls
  14. Walter Pidgeon in in Madame Curie
Next Year: 1943 Supporting

Alternate Best Actor 1943: Henry Fonda in The Ox-Bow Incident

Henry Fonda did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Gil Carter in The Ox-Bow Incident.

The Ox-Bow Incident is a very powerful film about a reckless posse that catches three men with the intention of lynching as they believe they have killed a local rancher.

Henry Fonda plays one of the men in the posse although he is rather different from most of the men. His character Gil Carter, although originally from the rough dead end town, is now an outsider who only goes along with the posse so that he and his friend (Harry Morgan) are not accused of anything themselves. There isn't anything particularly special about Fonda's performance early on as he just is a fairly standard type of main character who occasionally gets a little agitated by the stupidity of some of the towns' folk around him. It is fairly limited, but to Fonda's credit he does play it exactly as he should.

As the film proceeds the film almost becomes an ensemble piece. Fonda is the lead of the film, but really just barely leading. Fonda though his consistently solid in his portray of Gil, and does well in portraying his character's fairly cynical outlook during the whole process of deliberation on whether or not to lynch the man. Fonda's expression of defeat conveys a lot of almost an acceptance of the terrible deeds of the others, but importantly there are the pivotal moments where Gil does speak up passionately against the wrongs committed by the posse. These are short moments for sure but Fonda gives them the strength they need through his almost trademark righteous passion.

His best scene in the film doesn't come in one of his louder passionate moments but instead a quiet scene as he reads the letter of one of the condemned men to the lynching party. Fonda delivery of this scene is fantastic as he brings the poignancy to the scene in an effortless fashion. It is a great moment as through his performance he brings out the beauty of the words that are filled not with moral outrage but rather a sadness and pity for the terrible deeds committed by the men. That scene makes this a memorable turn by Henry Fonda. Otherwise he mostly serves his character and the film just as he should even though he is mostly overshadowed. The true power of this film belongs to another performance which I will be getting to very soon.

Tuesday, 23 July 2013

Alternate Best Actor 1943: Joseph Cotten in Shadow of a Doubt

Joseph Cotten did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Charlie Oakley in Shadow of a Doubt.

Shadow of a Doubt is an excellent thriller about a man coming to his sister's home because he is suspected of being a serial killer.

Joseph Cotten was most often cast as a fairly unassuming fairly normal guy. In films like the Third Man, Citizen Kane, and A Duel in The Sun he even played the more level headed counterpart to someone who was bit more unscrupulous. Cotten usually was the guy you could trust, or at least the guy you knew wasn't really hiding any secrets. His role as Charlie is the complete antithesis and a classic case of an actor playing wholly against his established type. Charlie, or Uncle Charlie as he is most commonly referred to by his adoring Niece also named Charlie (Teresa Wright) is nothing like his earlier roles, and there most certainly is a dark secret that his character is hiding in this film.

Cotten in his opening scene slashes any thought of his earlier and later portrayals of easily understandable warm characters. We see him lying bathed in shadow, yet that is not the only shadow in the room. Cotten's makes Charlie a shadow himself. Charlie is basking in what he is both metaphorically in the shadow, but as well from what he has done as he is just about lying in the profits from his most recent murder as well. Charlie is a man basking in what he is, and Cotten's performance as Charlie almost entirely being himself reflects this. Cotten's plays the suspected psychopath not as a gleeful villain, but very effectively as an odd cynical philosopher. His line deliveries early have such an incisive soullessness which reflects the nature of Charlie.

Cotten in his first scene brilliantly sets up the nature of the character feeding into a dread, and that doubt when he changes a bit to go visit his family to escape the police inquiries. Cotten brings some of what is found in one of his more traditional performances as Charlie charms his entire family. Interestingly enough Cotten might be at his most charming as Charlie. It is very easy to see why everyone would be so quickly enamored with Charlie, as well as why they would be so easily accepting of his rather lacking explanations of what he has been up to. Cotten portrayal is particularly mesmerizing in how his whole body, and voice are welcoming yet in his eyes we can still see the man we met earlier.

Cotten's performance becomes a fascinating man of different shades as Charlie ingratiates himself back in his family but as well in their seemingly very pleasant town. Cotten is extremely effective with his dynamic that he creates in presenting the Charlie attempting to live while not being suspected of anything. Cotten is incredibly smooth in portrayal of the way Charlie may just seem like he is being nice to everyone in his usual way, but within that he suggests the mind of Charlie which is always watching for something that may find him. I think one of the most astonishing things he does is the way he becomes two men even when smiling, how he can switch so naturally from the outgoing man about town Charlie with his more open body language, to that dark brooding evil in his colder withdrawn in the true Charlie.

This is a rather interesting case of a villain in the film in that most of the time he actually plays the part of just the nice Uncle, and it is in between the lines where we finds the villainous nature most of the time. This might seem limiting in some way, but Cotten never allows this to be a limitation in his portrayal. Cotten creates such a menacing feeling in the moments where the real Charlie comes out, and he is outstanding the way he is able to jump out in a brief moment making Charlie the unpredictable element he should be. Although we ought to know the truth about Charlie due to his opening scene, Cotten's performance still allows the mystery of the man through the terrific way in which he plays with the right hints to the monster, but never overplays his hand.

The way Cotten plays the part so carefully makes it so whenever the real Charlie comes out it is absolutely spellbinding. One of his strongest moments comes in when we see a glimpse into the psychotic mindset of Charlie as he talks about how he feels about wealthy widows. Cotten is chilling in his portrayal of this insanity in Charlie. There is such hatred in him, and it isn't a direct loud hate but rather something seething through him in a most disturbing way. Even though we never see Charlie actually kill anyone in the film this scene as well as the few others where we get to know the thoughts in Charlie's head Cotten shows through his deranged philosophy exactly what drives Charlie to his horrible hollow pursuit.

A main focus of the film is the relationship between old Charlie and young Charlie. It is probably rather telling that Teresa Wright has much more chemistry with Joseph Cotten then she does with her technical love interest played by Macdonald Carey. Charlie and Charlie are more than just Uncle and Niece and the scenes between Cotten and Wright are what make the film. It is not necessarily incestuous so to speak but Cotten and Wright give the two Charlie's a definite connection. The arc of the story comes in really the connection that Cotten and Wright make together, and how it changes over the course of the film. 

Cotten and Wright are just about flawless together in the way at the beginning that could not be more loving to one another with the warmest of attention. They are the purest form of happiness without even a sense that there could be anything wrong. The two are so fascinating in their chemistry though as each slowly changes in attitude toward the other. Cotten moving slowly toward the darkness in Charlie revealing not only his sinister nature but the ugliness of the world, and Wright losing her uncontrollable affection, and constant optimisim. The greatness in their performances is that even as each becomes hostile to one another they keep that underlying connection between the two powerfully conveying the almost otherworldly nature of it.

One of the themes of the film is what lies beneath what is ideal on the surface, and Cotten's performance is the personification of the theme. His turn as the psychopath Charlie is a revelation for Cotten who is able to be the white paint as well as the rust. Cotten's performance is that of a visceral nature in the way he tears the image of the gentle smile and loving embrace mercilessly off to reveal the demonic creature that lives within. His performance works as the freighting portrait of the hidden psychotic and the destroyer of all that is rose tinted. Cotten allows us to experience right along with young Charlie that fall from enchantment to cynicism through his viscous uncompriming portrait of Uncle Charlie.

Monday, 22 July 2013

Alternate Best Actor 1943: Charles Laughton in This Land is Mine

Charles Laughton did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Albert Lory in This Land is Mine.

This Land is Mine is a fairly solid anti-Nazi film about about a school teacher in a Nazi occupied country who finds himself in between the ideas of collaboration and resistance.

Charles Laughton plays the school teacher Albert Lory who is a particularly pathetic character. He is always worried about everything who falls in line with all the commands of his whiny mother, and in the school itself is constantly ridiculed by his students. Laughton played a meek character before in Ruggles of Red Gap, but Albert Lory at the start of this film makes Ruggles look like Henry VIII. This is not a comedic meekness though as Ruggles was, and Laughton goes about giving a serious portrayal of a man like this. It is very interesting to see Laughton take on a very similar role this time for dramatic purpose whereas his earlier portrayal was largely for the laughs.

Laughton is rather hard to watch early on in this film not because he is bad but rather because he is too good in the role. Laughton unlike in Ruggles does not really change his manner to play Ruggles to that of a meek man. Rather what Laughton does is entirely in the attitude of Albert. Laughton emphasizes that Albert just goes along with his meekness and what comes from it. When his mother commands him Albert just maybe sulks a little but just does it. When his students drop water on his head he barely recognizes it and just goes along with it as something as his routine. When the Nazi occupation force comes in and forces him to censor their school books once again Laughton shows Albert just go along with it as pure routine.

When the routine is broken in anyway, such as an air raid, the meekness of Albert only comes out the stronger. Laughton doesn't shy away from making Albert downright pathetic as he basically goes about acting liking a young child in his mother's arm as he fears the planes dropping bombs from the outside. Laughton is very effective because he doesn't overplay it and he does not try to at all make this something funny as the situation very well could have become. Instead Laughton brings to life this character whose actions on the outside seem to have almost no value, he is afraid of any change of his small little world which consists of him just taking what others give to him.

There is quite the change in store for the character and Laughton has some strong subtle moments early on that plant the seeds for the change for his character. Although overwhelming in his characterization is the weakness of Albert Laughton does express a certain passionate conviction underneath this. It is the smallest part of the man that is hidden right along with his love for his co-worker Louise (Maureen O'Hara), but it is still there. Laughton brings this miniscule of personal strength into Albert as a character in just the right way as it does not all make him seem like a confidant capable human being early on, but it does give just the slightest hope that Albert could redeem his character.

Albert is forced to try and do this when the Nazis begin to round up hostages after a saboteur begins to try to disrupt the Nazis. Laughton is very good in the transition as the initial stages are frankly rather easy as Albert just has to go along with a fairly simple lie to protect someone well keeping his mouth shut. Laughton not only shows that inner strength peep through, but as well suggests a certain enjoyment in Albert as he finally stops doing everything that is expected of him for once. Albert is forced to change even more so though when he is also arrested and questioned over the matter of the saboteur, and later over accidentally being in the wrong place after a Nazi informant has committed suicide.

While being held though he sees a group of men executed one of them being the head master of his school. Laughton is very moving in the scene expressing the sadness in Albert but as well further change as he shows the resolve in Albert only grow from witnessing the horrible sight. Laughton brings Albert naturally to the point where he has his long speech about fighting against the evil of the Nazis. This is very much a speech in the same vein as many speeches from films before and during World War II which is to denounce the terrible nature of the Nazis well pushing the idea of resistance. Laughton handles it well because he gives a quiet very poignant power. He gets the message across firmly yet still within the character of Albert Lory who only has recently overcome his repressed nature.

Like Ruggles of Red Gap this is another example of Charles Laughton giving a strong performance that is not in his more common flamboyant fashion. Laughton also doesn't tread any water even though he once again plays a meek man who is able to change and find his internal strength. Albert Lory's transformation is the crux of the film and it very well could have been rather unbelievable, or at least one part of his performance could have been stronger than the other. Laughton absolutely succeeds from Albert when he is the loser that would collaborate just because it would be the easier thing to do and throughout his whole transition to the man who will stand proudly for what he believes in even if it might mean his own death.

Saturday, 20 July 2013

Alternate Best Actor 1943: Claude Rains in Phantom of the Opera

Claude Rains did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Erique Claudin the titular character of Phantom of the Opera.

This version of the classic story about mysterious man who hides in an opera house and tries to help a young upcoming singer is a particularly weak version. Almost every character is dull, the love triangle of the film (which doesn't consist the Phantom) is very poorly done.

I say almost every character is dull because there is just one character who is not played by the always competent Mr. Rains. This version of the phantom begins as a violinist at the Paris Opera house. He is a career performer who finds his talent fading when he begins to suffer a physical ailment in his hand. He is fired, and has no money because he has funded the musical training of the young singer Christine. Rains is really good in these early scenes at being just a sympathetic fellow. He is so unassuming but charming, and the scene where he plays his lullaby is beautiful as Rains reflects the love Claudin has for his art. He shows that he is a perfectly honest man who and his helping of Christine is entirely pure.

Rains makes us feel sorry for Claudin effectively, and honestly I think I would have preferred if this film followed the musician down an inspiring path. This is not the case as Rains returns to his Universal monster roots in this film after Claudin finds a man is trying to steal his music which results in him killing the man, and someone else scarring him with acid. This is all probably a bit too sudden for its own good making it so Rains has to turn up to 11 a little too fast. He does as well as he probably could in portraying the sudden insanity in Claudin because he set up how passionate Claudin was about the music. It still seems a bit too far, but Rains does not fail in this despite the extreme limitations put upon him by the story.

Once he becomes the Phantom we don't see all that much of Rains and not just because he is wearing a mask. The film is too busy spending time with the downright boring characters. When Rains does show up he manages to lighten up the picture a bit with the energetic evil he has in the role of Phantom, although even this is a bit limited since the film spends very little time with his villainous deeds. He gets to do more in the climax of the film when the Phantom kidnaps Christine. The film fails in that it did not create a pseudo romantic, or even mentor type relationship between the two beforehand, but Rains gives it the good old Thespis try to make up for the film's inadequacies.

In the climax Rains tries hard to bring some conviction to his part, and does have one very good scene when he plays the piano with Christie singing. Rains's expression of sheer glee is a pretty brilliant way of showing how Claudin's pure love for music has turned into the phantom's deranged perverse obsession. Anyway this far too short scene is interrupted by Christine removing his mask. Rains is rather moving once again seeing the defeated Phantom with nothing left, and makes him the tragic figure he should be. The film again quickly ends as there is a cave in and the Phantom appears to have died. Rains is lead, but very limited by the grasp of the film. Rains does give a solid performance through the little he has, and is easily the best part of the film even though that is not saying all that much.

Friday, 19 July 2013

Alternate Best Actor 1943: Roger Livesey in The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp

Roger Livesey did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Clive Candy in The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp.

Although I have read some mighty high praise including the words masterpiece used as well as the best film ever to come out of England for The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp I have to say I was a bit underwhelmed by the film. This is not to say I disliked it as it has plenty of good qualities. I found the film is far too long though, and that it fails to bridge its comedic parts with its serious moments into a cohesive whole leaving the film very tonally inconsistent.

The film itself about the military career of Clive Candy played by Livesey and how he goes from a young soldier to a very old general. There are some performances that cannot tread through the strange tone of the picture like Anton Walbrook as a German soldier who starts the picture as a bit of a caricature meant to be funny, but ends up being the most dramatic character in the film. Livesey though plays Clive Candy and is able to find consistency in his performance despite how inconsistent the film can be at times. Livesey is no doubt helped by the nature of his character which is that of the prim and proper British soldier, who is suppose to be rather consistent.

This is a story that takes place through many years, and although he stays consistent as the very British type he ages and does change in certain ways through the years. Livesey is especially able in this facet of his performance. His manner of just aging is actually quite brilliant as he goes from a youthful man ready for adventure to an old timer would is basically retired. If one has seen his performance in The Entertainer this is a particularly amazing transformation as he moves toward and becomes his older self right within this film. This actually is probably one of finest examples of how to an actor should age his character throughout the course of the film.

In all of his ages he is always within the code of the perfect British Soldier though in that he always stands upright, speaks with distinction, and gives a strong sense of both obedience to his cause and command in his own personal will. There are differences though found in the style of man he is. In the early parts of the film Livesey is quite dashing and daring as the youthful Candy. He expresses the youthful exuberance of the man who takes to his task with all the passion one would expect, but with a certain degree of humor and charm as well. He shows Candy as a man at the top of his game as a professional soldier.

We take a rather large jump as we meet Candy as an older man during World War I. Livesey's physical changes are precise and natural, but as well expresses a spiritual change. Although still very proper there just is not that same strength in his spirit there was before. Livesey though is effective in showing as well a change in outlook and personal style. Candy is no longer outgoing in quite the same way. It is quite remarkable to see Livesey change from the man who steps forward in the passion of a young man, to that of the the older soldier who hasn't been jaded but has settled in his ways where everything he does is much lower key.

In the last phase we meet a retired Candy who Livesey makes as that retired general type. It doesn't feel like cliche or stereotype as Livesey has shown us how Candy has come to this point. In these late scenes he is all together quieter, but with a strong dignified wisdom in him. Again physically Livesey reworks himself again, and pretty effectively suggests the manner one sees in a portrait or picture of a retired general. Livesey also reflects the experiences of Candy in his sometimes somber demeanor that conveys what the man has lost, but Livesey still has a passion in his portrayal. It is at its most restrained but as well at its most moving as Livesey shows really what his current cause means to him.

Roger Livesey performance is a impeccably calculated work that peels away exactly what makes up the life of the proper British soldier who can go from an open energetic young man, to a much slower elderly fellow. He finds the right consistency in style that allows him to traverse through the sometimes rather jarring tonal shifts found in the film. Livesey's portrayal of the film is easily its best facet as he gives a striking portrait of the career soldier. Although I may not have always found that the film entirely worked, Livesey's performance always does making Candy likable and allowing us into the mind of the type of character who usually keeps quite the distance from the audience.

Thursday, 18 July 2013

Alternate Best Actor 1943

And the Nominees Were Not:

Henry Fonda in The Ox-Bow Incident

Roger Livesey in The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp

Joseph Cotten in Shadow of a Doubt

Charles Laughton in This Land is Mine

Claude Rains in Phantom of the Opera

Wednesday, 17 July 2013

Alternate Best Supporting Actor 1994: Results

5. Bruce Willis in Pulp Fiction- Willis utilizes his usual on screen persona effectively in a role that suits it.

Best Scene: Butch saves Marcellus.
4. Bob Gunton in The Shawshank Redemption- Gunton gives a terrific performance portraying the evil Warden viciously yet never comprising the "proper" manner of his character.

Best Scene: Warden Norton threatens Andy in the hole.  
3. Gary Oldman in Leon: The Professional- Oldman is one flamboyant fireball here delivering a delicious performance as a corrupt DEA agent with almost no scruples.

Best Scene: Stansfield murders Mathilda's family. 
2. Raul Julia in Street Fighter- I give Julia the edge over Oldman as Julia seemed to give his performance all on his own accord since his film otherwise is pretty bad. Julia though is insanely entertaining in his brilliantly over the top turn as General M. Bison.

Best Scene: (This was a hard choice to make) The Bisonopolis Speech.
1. James Whitmore in The Shawshank Redemption- James Whitmore gives a very powerful and heartbreaking performance as a man whose been so institutionalized by prison that he fears the outside world.

Best Scene: Brooks's Letter
Overall Rank:
  1. Martin Landau in Ed Wood
  2. James Whitmore in The Shawshank Redemption
  3. Raul Julia in Street Fighter
  4. Gary Oldman in Leon: The Professional
  5. Bob Gunton in The Shawshank Redemption
  6. Christopher Walken in Pulp Fiction
  7. Harvey Keitel in Pulp Fiction
  8. Bruce Willis in Pulp Fiction
  9. Clancy Brown in The Shawshank Redemption 
  10. Jeremy Irons in The Lion King 
  11. Ian Holm in The Madness of King George
  12. Richard Attenborough in Miracle on 34th Street
  13. Gary Sinise in Forrest Gump
  14. Paul Scofield in Quiz Show
  15. Dennis Hopper in Speed
  16. Ving Rhames in Pulp Fiction
  17. Chazz Palminteri in Bullets Over Broadway
  18. David Paymer in Quiz Show
  19. Willem Dafoe in Clear and Present Danger
  20. Jim Broadbent in Bullets Over Broadway
  21. Bill Hunter in The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert
  22. James Garner in Maverick
  23. Tim Roth in Pulp Fiction
  24. Bill Murray in Ed Wood
  25. William Sadler in The Shawshank Redemption
  26. Jeffrey Jones in Ed Wood
  27. Kevin Spacey in Iron Will
  28. Paul Newman in The Hudsucker Proxy
  29. George Steele in Ed Wood
  30. James Earl Jones in The Lion King
  31. Danny Aiello in Leon: The Professional
  32. Mark Rolston in The Shawshank Redemption 
  33. Jack Palance in City Slickers II
  34. Jeff Daniels in Speed
  35. Jeffrey DeMunn in The Shawshank Redemption
  36. Charles Durning in The Hudsucker Proxy
  37. James Coburn in Maverick
  38. Eric Stoltz in Pulp Fiction
  39. Martin Scorsese in Quiz Show
  40. Rupert Graves in The Madness of King George
  41. Peter Greene in Pulp Fiction
  42. Mike Starr in Dumb and Dumber
  43. Joe Viterelli in Bullets Over Broadway
  44. Robert Englund in Wes Craven's New Nightmare
  45. Peter Riegert in The Mask
  46. Frank Whaley in Pulp Fiction
  47. Gill Bellows in The Shawshank Redemption
  48. Mike Starr in Ed Wood
  49. Bill Cobbs in The Hudsucker Proxy
  50. Duane Whitaker in Pulp Fiction
  51. Malcolm McDowell in Star Trek Generations
  52. Judge Reinhold in The Santa Clause
  53. Peter Green in The Mask
  54. Philip Seymour Hoffman in Nobody's Fool
  55. Jeroen Krabbé in Immortal Beloved
  56. Christopher McDonald in Quiz Show 
  57. Max Casella in Ed Wood
  58. Roshan Seth in Street Fighter
  59. Alfred Molina in Maverick 
  60. David Krumholtz in The Santa Clause 
  61. Brent Spiner in Star Trek Generations
  62. Bruce Willis in Nobody's Fool
  63. Bill Paxton in True Lies
  64. Joaquim de Almeida in Clear and Present Danger
  65. Tom Arnold in True Lies
  66. Wes Studi in Street Fighter
  67. Art Malik in True Lies
  68. Mykelti Williamson in Forrest Gump 
  69. John Mahoney in The Hudsucker Proxy
  70. Michael Ironside in The Next Karate Kid
  71. Tone Loc in Ace Ventura: Pet Detective
  72. Pat Morita in The Next Karate Kid
  73. Charles Rocket in Dumb and Dumber
  74. Hank Azaria in Quiz Show 
  75. Donald Moffat in Clear and Present Danger
  76. Jim True-Frost in The Hudsucker Proxy
  77. Dylan Walsh in Nobody's Fool
  78. Jaye Davidson in Stargate
  79. Eric Lloyd in The Santa Clause
  80. The Rest of the Cast of Street Fighter
  81. Quentin Tarantino in Pulp Fiction
  82. Michael Cavalieri in The Next Karate Kid
Next Year: 1943 lead

Alternate Best Supporting Actor 1994: Bruce Willis in Pulp Fiction

Bruce Willis did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Butch Coolidge in Pulp Fiction.

Bruce Willis is a popular and prolific actor who I have yet to cover. Willis as an actor is a bit of John Wayne type, his performances are often less about being a chameleon, and more about using his own screen presence when it comes to playing his roles. This is not a criticism of Bruce Willis or John Wayne for that matter as both are very good at being this type of actor. Quentin Tarantino possibly had that in mind when Bruce Willis played the part of Butch in Pulp Fiction. Butch stands as the "lead" of his story in the middle of the film about a boxer who decides to trick a mobster (Ving Rhames) by saying he will take a fall, but instead bets on himself before winning the fighter ripping off all those who were trying to profit from the fix.

Butch is probably one of the least talkative characters in the film, and unlike most of the characters who like their long speeches Butch though mostly reacts to someone else talking, and is much more a man of actions rather than words. Willis was the right choice in the role as he often plays a man of action and is able to portray such a role with a fair amount of ease. Willis being a competent action hero if very good in conveying the emotions of a character while the character is on the move. This works particularly well for Butch in the opening of his story as Willis tells a great deal about him just as Butch escapes the Boxing arena and takes a cab to escape. The film does not dwell on the emotions but Willis gets across the desperation and determination of Butch instantly.

 Butch honestly does not have the flamboyancy or the complexity of the characters of Jules (Samuel L. Jackson) and Vincent Vega (John Travolta). His role is very much different in that he is very much the more traditional lead. His most defining features are that he does things his own way as well as that he very much respects his watch that has been handed down in his family. There is not a great deal more to him than that, and that really is plenty for Willis to make him the compelling enough character for his story. The middle story actually has considerably more actions scenes than the other stories, and Willis traverses these well always being believable through any of the situations that Butch finds himself in.

Willis is continues to be effective throughout his story just a very much average hero going through the story and delivers in his scenes whether they need a strong presence, some emotional weight, or a little bit humor. Willis brings all of these qualities naturally to the part of Butch, and leads his story just as he should in his usual leading man way although in this case in a much smaller scale. I would say this is not the best performance by Willis in this style, nor would I say he is the most memorable part of this film. This is a fine example of Willis's strength as a performer though, and realizes the character of Butch properly.

My Nominations

For fun and for the record I have decided to list my nominations for every actor who receives at least nominations from me. I should clarify that I have decided to ignore the academy's rule and allow 10 nominations per year. The reason for this is I firmly believe that one can find ten worthwhile performances to recognize if you actually try unlike the academy who will have filler nominations with only five. I should note that these lists are subject to change.
Charlie Chaplin, 6 noms

Best Actor 1928: The Circus (#10 loses to Conrad Veidt)
Best Actor 1931: City Lights (#3 loses to Peter Lorre)
Best Actor 1936: Modern Times (#3 loses to Edward Arnold)
Best Actor 1940: The Great Dictator (#2 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Actor 1947: Monsieur Verdoux (#6 loses to Richard Attenborough)
Best Actor 1952: Limelight (#7 loses to Takashi Shimura)
Groucho Marx, 2 noms

Best Actor 1929: The Cocoanuts (#9 loses to Ronald Colman)
Best Actor 1933: Duck Soup (#6 loses to Charles Laughton)
Oliver Hardy, 7 noms

Best Actor: 1929: Big Buisness (#4 loses to Ronald Colman)
Best Actor 1930: Another Fine Mess (#3 loses to Lew Ayres)
Best Actor 1931: Chickens Come Home (#9 loses to Peter Lorre)
Best Actor 1932: Pack Up Your Troubles (#2 loses to Paul Muni)
Best Actor 1933: Sons of the Desert (#4 loses to Charles Laughton)
Best Actor 1934: Babes in Toyland  (#3 loses to Clark Gable)
Best Actor 1937: Way Out West (#5 loses to Robert Montgomery)

Stan Laurel, 7 noms

Best Actor 1929: Big Buisness (#5 loses to Ronald Colman)
Best Actor 1930: Another Fine Mess (#4 loses to Lew Ayres)
Best Actor 1931: Chickens Come Home (#10 loses to Peter Lorre)
Best Actor 1932: Pack Up Your Troubles (#3 loses to Paul Muni) 
Best Actor 1933: Sons of the Desert (#5 loses to Charles Laughton)
Best Actor 1934: Babes in Toyland (#4 loses to Clark Gable)
Best Actor 1937: Way Out West (#6 loses to Robert Montgomery)
James Finlayson, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1929: Big Business (#7 loses to Louis Wolheim)
Best Supporting Actor 1930: Another Fine Mess (#5 loses to Louis Wolheim)
Conrad Veidt, 3 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1928: The Man Who Laughs (WINS)
Best Actor 1939: The Spy in Black (#8 loses to Charles Laughton)
Best Actor 1940: Contraband (#5 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Emil Jannings, 2 noms

Best Actor 1928: The Last Command (#3 loses to Conrad Veidt)
Best Actor 1930: The Blue Angel (#5 loses to Lew Ayres)


Warner Baxter, 2 noms 

Best Actor 1928: In Old Arizona (#8 loses to Conrad Veidt)
Best Actor 1933: 42nd Street (#7 loses to Charles Laughton) 
Melvyn Douglas, 4 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1932: The Old Dark House (#8 loses to John Barrymore)
Best Supporting Actor 1933: Counsellor At Law (#7 loses to Robert Donat)
Best Supporting Actor 1963: Hud (# 2 loses to Tsutomu Yamazaki)
Best Actor 1970: I Never Sang for My Father (#6 loses to George C. Scott)
James Cagney, 8 noms, 2 wins

Best Actor 1931: Public Enemy (#4 loses to Peter Lorre)
Best Supporting Actor 1935: A Midsummer's Night Dream (WINS)
Best Actor 1938: Angels With Dirty Faces (WINS)
Best Actor 1939: The Roaring Twenties (#6 loses to Charles Laughton)
Best Actor 1941: The Strawberry Blonde (#5 loses to Humphrey Bogart)
Best Actor 1942: Yankee Doodle Dandy (#5 loses to Humphrey Bogart)
Best Actor 1949: White Heat (#5 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Actor 1961: One, Two, Three (#5 loses to Toshiro Mifune)

Pat O'Brien, 2 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1932: Hell's House (#6 loses to John Barrymore)
Best Supporting Actor 1938: Angels With Dirty Faces (WINS)
Eugene Pallette, 4 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1929: The Canary Murder Case (#5 loses to Louis Wolheim)
Best Supporting Actor 1929: The Greene Murder Case (#9 loses to Louis Wolheim)
Best Supporting Actor 1933: The Kennel Murder Case (#8 loses to Robert Donat)
Best Supporting Actor 1936: My Man Godfrey (#7 loses to Peter Lorre)

Louis Wolheim, 5 noms 2 wins

Best Actor 1928: The Racket (#4 loses to Conrad Veidt)
Best Supporting Actor 1929: Condemned (WINS)
Best Actor 1930: Danger Lights (#2 loses to Lew Ayres)
Best Supporting Actor 1930: All Quiet on The Western Front (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1930: Silver Horde (#2 loses to himself)
Lew Ayres, 2 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1930: All Quiet On The Western Front (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1938: Holiday (#8 loses to Pat O'Brien)
Charles Laughton, 8 noms 2 wins

Best Supporting Actor 1932: The Old Dark House (#2 loses to John Barrymore)
Best Actor 1933: The Private Life of Henry VIII (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1935: Les Miserables (#2 loses to James Cagney)
Best Actor 1935: Ruggles of Red Gap (#4 loses to Victor McLaglen)
Best Actor 1936: Rembrandt (#2 loses to Edward Arnold)
Best Actor 1939: The Hunchback of Notre Dame (WINS)
Best Actor 1943: This Land is Mine (#4 loses to Joseph Cotten)
Best Actor 1957: Witness for the Prosecution ( #5 loses to Alec Guinness)
Paul Muni, 4 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1929: The Valiant (#10 loses to Ronald Colman)
Best Actor 1932: I Am A Fugitive From A Chain Gang (WINS)
Best Actor 1932: Scarface (#5 loses to himself)
Best Actor 1946: Angel on My Shoulder (#7 loses to James Stewart)
Walter Huston, 8 noms 2 wins

Best Supporting Actor 1929: The Virginian (#2 loses to Louis Wolheim)
Best Actor 1930: Abraham Lincoln (#6 loses to Lew Ayres)
Best Supporting Actor 1931: The Criminal Code (#9 loses to Boris Karloff)
Best Supporting Actor 1932: Rain (#7 loses to John Barrymore)
Best Actor 1936: Dodsworth (#4 loses to Edward Arnold)
Best Supporting Actor 1941: The Devil and Daniel Webster (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1945: And Then There Were None (#6 loses to James Dunn)
Best Supporting Actor 1948: The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (WINS)
Joseph Schildkraut, 3 noms 1 win 

Best Supporting Actor 1937: The Life of Emile Zola (#5 loses to Erich von Stroheim)
Best Supporting Actor 1940: The Shope Around the Corner (#8 loses to John Carradine)
Best Supporting Actor 1959: The Diary of Anne Frank (WINS)
Walter Brennan, 5 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1936: Come and Get It (#6 loses to Peter Lorre)
Best Supporting Actor 1938: Kentucky (#5 loses to Pat O'Brien)
Best Supporting Actor 1940: The Westerner (#2 loses to John Carradine)
Best Supporting Actor 1951: Along a Great Divide (#5 loses to Karl Malden)
Best Supporting Actor 1955: Bad Day At Black Rock (#6 loses to Raymond Massey)
Frank Morgan, 3 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1936: The Great Ziegfeld (#5 loses to Peter Lorre)
Best Supporting Actor 1939: The Wizard of Oz (#5 loses to Cedric Hardwicke)
Best Supporting Actor 1940: The Shop Around the Corner (#5 loses to John Carradine)
William Powell, 10 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1928: The Last Command (WINS)
Best Actor 1929: The Canary Murder Case (#8 loses to Ronald Colman)
Best Actor 1932: Jewel Robbery (#4 loses to Paul Muni)
Best Actor 1933: The Kennel Murder Case (#8 loses to Charles Laughton)
Best Actor 1934: The Thin Man (#2 loses to Clark Gable)
Best Actor 1936: After The Thin Man (#5 loses to Edward Arnold)
Best Actor 1936: My Man Godfrey (#7 loses to Edward Arnold)
Best Actor 1936: The Great Ziegfeld (#8 loses to Edward Arnold)
Best Actor 1939: Another Thin Man (#9 loses to Charles Laughton)
Best Actor 1941: Love Crazy (#4 loses to Humphrey Bogart)
Clark Gable, 9 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1931: A Free Soul (#3 loses to Boris Karloff)
Best Supporting Actor 1931: Night Nurse (#6 loses to Boris Karloff)
Best Actor 1934: Manhattan Melodrama (#6 loses to himself)
Best Actor 1934: It Happened One Night (WINS)
Best Actor 1935: Mutiny on the Bounty (#7 lose to Victor McLaglen)
Best Actor 1936: San Francisco (#10 loses to Edward Arnold)
Best Actor 1939: Gone With the Wind (#2 loses to Charles Laughton)
Best Actor 1958: Teacher's Pet (#6 loses to James Stewart)
Best Actor 1961: The Misfits (#7 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Leslie Howard, 4 noms

Best Actor 1934: Scarlet Pimpernel (#9 loses to Clark Gable)
Best Actor 1936: The Petrified Forest (#9 loses to Edward Arnold)
Best Actor 1938: Pygmalion (#5 loses to James Cagney)
Best Actor 1941: "Pimpernel" Smith (#8 loses to Humphrey Bogart)
Herbert Marshall, 4 noms

Best Actor 1932: Trouble in Paradise (#8 loses to Paul Muni)
Best Supporting Actor 1935: Dark Angel (#6 loses to James Cagney)
Best Supporting Actor 1940: Foreign Correspondent (#4 loses to John Carradine)
Best Supporting Actor 1941: The Little Foxes (#7 loses to Walter Huston)
John Carradine, 2 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1936: The Prisoner of Shark Island (#8 loses to Peter Lorre)
Best Supporting Actor 1940: The Grapes of Wrath (WINS)
Victor McLaglen, 3 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1934: The Lost Patrol (#5 loses to Clark Gable)
Best Actor 1935: The Informer (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1952: The Quiet Man (#2 loses to Barry Fitzgerald)
Wallace Ford, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1934: The Lost Patrol (#7 loses to Henry Brandon)
Best Supporting Actor 1935: The Informer (#10 loses to James Cagney)
Edward Arnold, 4 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1935: Crime and Punishment (#7 loses to James Cagney)
Best Actor 1936: Come and Get It (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1938: You Can’t Take It With You (#2 loses to Pat O’Brien)
Best Supporting Actor 1941: The Devil and Daniel Webster (#6 loses to Walter Huston)
Raymond Massey, 4 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1932: The Old Dark House (#10 loses to John Barrymore)
Best Supporting Actor 1934: The Scarlet Pimpernel (#3 loses to Henry Brandon)
Best Supporting Actor 1946: A Matter of Life and Death (#10 loses to Claude Rains)
Best Supporting Actor 1955: East of Eden (WINS)
Louis Calhern, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1934: The Affairs of Cellini (#8 loses to Henry Brandon)
Best Supporting Actor 1950: The Asphalt Jungle (#7 loses to George Sanders)
Paul Lukas, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1938: The Lady Vanishes (#10 loses to Pat O'Brien)
Best Actor 1943: Watch on the Rhine (#3 loses to Joseph Cotten)
Erich von Stroheim, 4 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1928: The Wedding March (#2 loses to Conrad Veidt)
Best Actor 1929: The Great Gabbo (#3 loses to Ronald Colman)
Best Supporting Actor 1937: Grand Illusion (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1943: Five Graves to Cairo (#4 loses to Dana Andrews) 
Jean Gabin, 5 noms

Best Actor 1936: The Lower Depths (#6 loses to Edward Arnold)
Best Actor 1937: Pepe Le Moko (#2 loses to Robert Montgomery)
Best Actor 1937: Grand Illusion (#7 loses to Robert Montgomery)
Best Actor 1938: The Human Beast (#2 loses to James Cagney)
Best Actor 1954: Touchez Pas Au Grisbi (#9 loses to Marlon Brando)
Pierre Fresnay, 3 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1937: Grand Illusion (#6 loses to Erich von Stroheim)
Best Actor 1942: The Murderer Lives at Number 21 (#2 loses to Humphrey Bogart)
Best Actor 1947: Monsieur Vincent (#2 loses to Richard Attenborough)
Louis Jouvet, 2 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1936: The Lower Depths (#3 loses to Peter Lorre)
Best Supporting Actor 1947: Quai des Orfèvres (WINS)
Ray Milland, 3 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1944: Ministry of Fear (#7 loses to Fred MacMurray)
Best Actor 1945: The Lost Weekend (WINS)
Best Actor 1954: Dial M for Murder (#3 loses to Marlon Brando)
Gregory Peck, 2 noms

Best Actor 1944: Keys to the Kingdom (#10 loses to Fred MacMurray)
Best Actor 1962: To Kill a Mockingbird (#6 loses to Peter O'Toole)
Robert Mitchum,  7 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1945: The Story of G.I. Joe (#5 loses to James Dunn)
Best Actor 1947: Out of the Past (#9 loses to Richard Attenborough)
Best Actor 1955: The Night of the Hunter (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1960: Home From the Hill (#9 loses to Renato Salvatori)
Best Actor 1962: Cape Fear (#5 loses to Peter O'Toole)
Best Actor 1970: Ryan's Daughter (#10 loses to George. C. Scott)
Best Actor 1974: The Yakuza (#10 loses to Gene Hackman)

Kirk Douglas, 5 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1947: Out of the Past (#5 loses to Louis Jouvet)
Best Actor 1949: Champion (#6 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Actor 1951: Ace in the Hole (#8 loses to Michael Redgrave)
Best Actor 1956: Lust for Life (#3 loses to James Mason)
Best Actor 1957: Paths of Glory (#2 loses to Alec Guinness)
Burt Lancaster, 9 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1946: The Killers (#9 loses to James Stewart)
Best Supporting Actor 1957: Sweet Smell of Success (#2 loses to Sessue Hayakawa)
Best Actor 1960: Elmer Gantry (#3 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Supporting Actor 1961: Judgment At Nuremberg (#9 loses to Montgomery Clift)
Best Actor 1964: The Train (#10 loses to Richard Attenborough)
Best Supporting Actor 1964: Seven Days in May (#9 loses to Sterling Hayden)
Best Actor 1968: The Swimmer (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1983: Local Hero (#10 loses to Darren McGavin)
Best Supporting Actor 1989: Field of Dreams (#10 loses to Sean Connery)
Lee Marvin, 4 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1953: The Wild One (#7 loses to Ernest Borgnine)
Bes Supporting Actor 1956: Attack (#7 loses to Ed Wynn)
Best Supporting Actor 1962: The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (#6 loses to Peter Sellers)
Best Actor 1980: The Big Red One (#8 loses to Tatsuya Nakadai)
James Coburn, 2 noms

Best Actor 1977: Cross Of Iron (#9 loses to Art Carney)
Best Supporting Actor 1998: Affliction (#8 loses to Elias Koteas)
Robert Ryan, 6 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1947: Crossfire (#7 loses to Louis Jouvet)
Best Supporting Actor 1948: Act of Violence (#5 loses to Walter Huston)
Best Supporting Actor 1953: The Naked Spur (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1962: Billy Budd (#2 loses to Peter Sellers)
Best Supporting Actor 1969: The Wild Bunch (#3 loses to Ernest Borgnine)
Best Supporting Actor 1973: The Iceman Cometh (#2 loses to Robert Shaw)
Sterling Hayden, 4 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1950: The Asphalt Jungle (#5 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Actor 1956: The Killing (#8 loses to James Mason)
Best Supporting Actor 1964: Dr. Strangelove (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1973: The Long Goodbye (#8 loses to Robert Shaw)
George C. Scott,  5 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1959: Anatomy of a Murder (#3 loses to Joseph Schildkraut)
Best Supporting Actor 1961: The Hustler (#4 loses to Montgomery Clift)
Best Supporting Actor 1964: Dr. Strangelove (#2 loses to Sterling Hayden)
Best Actor 1970: Patton (WINS)
Best Actor 1980: Changeling (#10 loses to Tatsuya Nakadai)
Alec Guinness, 17 noms 2 wins

Best Supporting Actor 1948: Oliver Twist (#2 loses to Walter Huston)
Best Supporting Actor 1949: Kind Hearts and Coronets (WINS)
Best Actor 1951: The Lavender Hill Mob (#4 loses to Alastair Sim)
Best Actor 1951: The Man in the White Suit (#8 loses to Alastair Sim)
Best Actor 1954: The Detective (#5 loses to Marlon Brando)
Best Actor 1955: The Ladykillers (#7 loses to Robert Mitchum)
Best Actor 1955: The Prisoner (#8 loses to Robert Mitchum)
Best Actor 1957: The Bridge on the River Kwai (WINS)
Best Actor 1958: The Horse's Mouth (#2 loses to James Stewart)
Best Actor 1959: The Scapegoat (#8 loses to James Stewart)
Best Actor 1959: Our Man in Havana (#9 loses to James Stewart)
Best Actor 1960: Tunes of Glory (#8 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Supporting Actor 1962: Lawrence of Arabia (#9 loses to Peter Sellers)
Best Actor 1970: Cromwell (#5 loses to George C. Scott)
Best Supporting Actor 1970: Scrooge (#2 loses to Karl Malden)
Best Supporting Actor 1977: Star Wars (#4 loses to Dennis Hopper)
Best Supporting Actor 1987: Little Dorrit (#5 loses to Mandy Patinkin)
Jack Hawkins, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1957: The Bridge on the River Kwai (#5 loses to Sessue Hayakawa)
Best Supporting Actor 1964: Zulu (#8 loses to Sterling Hayden)
Sessue Hayakawa, 2 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1950: Three Came Home (#9 loses to George Sanders)
Best Supporting Actor 1957: The Bridge on the River Kwai (WINS) 
John Mills, 4 noms

Best Actor 1946: Great Expectations (#10 loses to James Stewart)
Best Actor 1950: Morning Departure (#10 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Supporting Actor 1960: Tunes of Glory (#7 loses to Renato Salvatori)
Best Supporting Actor 1970: Ryan's Daughter (#4 loses to Karl Malden)
Orson Welles, 8 noms  1 win

Best Actor 1941: Citizen Kane (#7 loses to Humphrey Bogart)
Best Actor 1948: Macbeth (#10 loses to Humphrey Bogart)
Best Supporting Actor 1949: The Third Man (#2 loses to Alec Guinness)
Best Actor 1952: Othello (#9 loses to Takashi Shimura)
Best Supporting Actor 1958: Touch of Evil (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1959: Compulsion (#6 loses to Joseph Schildkraut)
Best Supporting Actor 1966: A Man For All Seasons (#7 loses to Lee Van Cleef)
Best Supporting Actor 1970: Catch-22 (#10 loses to Karl Malden)
Joseph Cotten 3 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1941: Citizen Kane (#8 loses to Walter Huston)
Best Actor 1943: Shadow of A Doubt (WINS)
Best Actor 1949: The Third Man (#9 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Ralph Richardson, 7 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1933: The Ghoul (#10 loses to Robert Donat)
Best Supporting Actor 1938: The Citadel (#9 loses to Pat O’Brien)
Best Supporting Actor 1939: The Four Feathers (#6 loses to Cedric Hardwicke)
Best Actor 1948: The Fallen Idol (#4 loses to Humphrey Bogart)
Best Supporting Actor 1949: The Heiress (#3 loses to Alec Guinness)
Best Supporting Actor 1951: Outcast of the Islands (#5 loses to Karl Malden)
Best Supporting Actor 1955: Richard III (#9 loses to Raymond Massey)
John Gielgud, 3 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1953: Julius Caesar (#2 loses to Ernest Borgnine)
Best Actor 1977: Providence (#6 loses to Art Carney)
Best Supporting Actor 1981: Arthur (#3 loses to Robert Prosky)
Edward G. Robinson, 10 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1931: Little Caesar (#2 loses to Peter Lorre)
Best Actor 1935: The Whole Town's Talking (#5 loses to Victor McLaglen)
Best Actor 1940: Brother Orchid (#7 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Actor 1941: The Sea Wolf (#2 loses to Humphrey Bogart)
Best Actor 1944: The Woman in the Window (#6 loses to Fred MacMurray)
Best Supporting Actor 1944: Double Indemnity (WINS)
Best Actor 1945: Scarlet Street (#5 loses to Ray Milland)
Best Supporting Actor 1948: Key Largo (#3 loses to Walter Huston)
Best Supporting Actor 1956: The Ten Commandments (#5 loses to Ed Wynn)
Best Supporting Actor 1973: Soylent Green (#4 loses to Robert Shaw)
James Stewart, 20 noms 3 wins

Best Supporting Actor 1936: After the Thin Man (#4 loses to Peter Lorre)
Best Supporting Actor 1938: You Can’t Take It With You (#6 loses to Pat O’Brien)
Best Actor 1939: Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (#3 loses to Charles Laughton)
Best Actor 1940: The Shop Around the Corner (#3 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Actor 1940: The Mortal Storm (#9 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Actor 1946: It's A Wonderful Life (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1948: Rope (#4 loses to Walter Huston)
Best Actor 1948: Call Northside 777 (#7 loses to Humphrey Bogart)
Best Actor 1950: Harvey (#2 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Actor 1950: Winchester '73 (#9 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Supporting Actor 1952: The Greatest Show on Earth (#4 loses to Barry Fitzgerald)
Best Actor 1952: Bend of the River (#10 loses to Takashi Shimura)
Best Actor 1953: The Naked Spur (#5 loses to William Holden)
Best Actor 1954: Rear Window (#4 loses to Marlon Brando)
Best Actor 1955: The Man From Laramie (#10 loses to Robert Mitchum)
Best Actor 1956: The Man Who Knew Too Much (#9 loses to James Mason)
Best Actor 1958: Vertigo (WINS)
Best Actor 1959: Anatomy of a Murder (WINS)
Best Actor 1962: The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (#7 loses Peter O'Toole)
Best Actor 1965: Shenandoah (#9 loses to Terence Stamp)
Thomas Mitchell, 5 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1937: The Hurricane (#4 loses to Erich von Stroheim)
Best Supporting Actor 1937: Make Way For Tomorrow (#9 loses to Erich von Stroheim)
Best Supporting Actor 1939: Stagecoach (#2 loses to Cedric Hardwicke)
Best Supporting Actor 1939: Gone With the Wind (#8 loses to Cedric Hardwicke)
Best Supporting Actor 1939: Only Angels Have Wings (#10 loses to Cedric Hardwicke)
Basil Rathbone, 4 noms 

Best Actor 1930: Sin Takes a Holiday (#7 loses to Lew Ayres)
Best Actor 1930: The Bishop Murder Case (#10 loses to Lew Ayres)
Best Actor 1939: The Hound of Baskervilles (#7 loses to Charles Laughton)
Best Supporting Actor 1938: The Adventures of Robin Hood (#3 loses to Pat O'Brien) 
Claude Rains, 20 noms 2 wins

Best Actor 1933: The Invisible Man (#2 loses to Charles Laughton)
Best Actor 1935: The Mystery of Edwin Drood (#10 loses to Victor McLaglen)
Best Supporting Actor 1936: Anthony Adverse (#10 loses to Peter Lorre)
Best Supporting Actor 1937: The Prince and the Pauper (#7 loses to Erich von Stroheim)
Best Supporting Actor 1938: The Adventures of Robin Hood (#4 loses to Pat O’Brien)
Best Supporting Actor 1939: Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (#3 loses to Cedric Hardwicke)
Best Supporting Actor 1941: The Wolfman (#9 loses to Walter Huston)
Best Supporting Actor 1941: Here Comes Mr. Jordan (#10 loses to Walter Huston)
Best Supporting Actor 1942: Casablanca (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1942: Now Voyager (#2 loses to himself)
Best Supporting Actor 1942: Kings Row (#4 loses to himself) 
Best Supporting Actor 1942: Moontide (#5 loses to himself)
Best Actor 1943: The Phantom of the Opera (#8 loses to Joseph Cotten)
Best Actor 1944: Mr. Skeffington (#9 loses to Fred MacMurray)
Best Actor 1945: Caesar and Cleopatra (#3 loses to Ray Milland)
Best Supporting Actor 1946: Notorious (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1946: Angel on My Shoulder (#7 loses to himself) 
Best Supporting Actor 1949: The Passionate Friends (#4 loses to Alec Guinness)
Best Supporting Actor 1962: Lawrence of Arabia (#4 loses to Peter Sellers)
Best Supporting Actor 1963: Twilight of Honor (#9 loses to Tsutomu Yamazaki)
John Wayne,  7 noms

Best Actor 1930: The Big Trail (#9 loses to Lew Ayres)
Best Actor 1939: Stagecoach (#10 loses to Charles Laughton)
Best Actor 1949: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (#10 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Actor 1952: The Quiet Man (#2 loses to Takashi Shimura)
Best Actor 1956: The Searchers (#2 loses to James Mason)
Best Actor 1962: The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (#9 loses to Peter O'Toole)
Best Actor 1976: The Shootist (#3 loses to Peter Finch)
Trevor Howard, 4 noms

Best Actor 1945: Brief Encounter (#9 loses to Ray Milland)
Best Supporting Actor 1949: The Third Man (#6 loses to Alec Guinness)
Best Actor 1951: Outcast of the Islands (#4 loses to Michael Redgrave)
Best Supporting Actor 1970: Ryan's Daughter (#3 loses to Karl Malden)
James Whitmore, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1949: Battleground (#9 loses to Alec Guinness)
Best Supporting Actor 1994: The Shawshank Redemption (#2 loses to Martin Landau)
Burl Ives, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1958: Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (#2 loses to Orson Welles)
Best Supporting Actor 1958: The Big Country (#3 loses to Orson Welles)
Takashi Shimura,  8 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1943: Sanshiro Sugata (#10 loses to Dana Andrews)
Best Actor 1947: Snow Trail (#7 loses to Richard Attenborough)
Best Actor 1948: Drunken Angel (#5 loses to Humphrey Bogart)
Best Actor 1949: Stray Dog (#8 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Supporting Actor 1950: Rashomon (#5 loses to George Sanders)
Best Actor 1952: Ikiru (WINS)
Best Actor 1954: Seven Samurai (#8 loses to Marlon Brando)
Best Supporting Actor 1955: I Live in Fear (#2 loses to Raymond Massey)
Masayuki Mori, 3 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1950: Rashomon (#2 loses to George Sanders)
Best Actor 1953: Ugetsu (#6 loses to William Holden)
Best Supporting Actor 1960:  When a Woman Ascends the Stairs (#8 loses to Renato Salvatori)
Karl Malden, 4 noms, 2 wins

Best Supporting Actor 1951: A Streetcar Named Desire (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1954: On The Waterfront (#4 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Supporting Actor 1961: One-Eyed Jacks (#7 loses to Montgomery Clift)
Best Supporting Actor 1970: Patton (WINS)
Peter Ustinov, 4 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1951: Quo Vadis (#3 loses to Karl Malden)
Best Supporting Actor 1960: Spartacus (#6 loses to Renato Salvatori)
Best Actor 1964: Topkapi (#2 loses to Richard Attenborough)
Best Actor 1978: Death on the Nile (#3 loses to Robert De Niro)
Eli Wallach, 4 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1956: Baby Doll (#4 loses to James Mason)
Best Supporting Actor 1960: The Magnificent Seven (#2 loses to Renato Salvatori)
Best Supporting Actor 1961: The Misfits (#8 loses to Montgomery Clift) 
Best Actor 1966: The Good, The Bad And The Ugly (WINS) 
Lee Van Cleef, 3 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1965: For A Few Dollars More (#5 loses to Terence Stamp)
Best Supporting Actor 1966: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1981: Escape From New York (#8 loses to Robert Prosky)
Gian Maria Volontè, 3 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1964: A Fistful of Dollars (#7 loses to Sterling Hayden)
Best Supporting Actor 1965: For A Few Dollars More (#10 loses to Tom Courtenay)
Best Actor 1970: Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion (#4 loses to George C. Scott)
Marcello Mastroianni, 4 noms

Best Actor 1960: La Dolce Vita (#9 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Actor 1961: Divorce, Italian Style (#4 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Actor 1961: La Notte (#8 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Actor 1977: A Special Day (#8 loses to Art Carney)
Toshiro Mifune, 22 noms 5 wins

Best Supporting Actor 1947: Snow Trail (#3 loses to Louis Jouvet)
Best Actor 1948: Drunken Angel (#3 loses to Humphrey Bogart)
Best Actor 1949: The Quiet Duel (#2 loses to himself)
Best Actor 1949: Stray Dog (WINS)
Best Actor 1950: Rashomon (WINS)
Best Actor 1950: Scandal (#8 loses to himself)
Best Supporting Actor 1951: The Idiot (#8 loses to Karl Malden)
Best Supporting Actor 1952: The Life of Oharu (#5 loses to Barry Fitzgerald)
Best Supporting Actor 1954: Seven Samurai (WINS)
Best Actor 1954: Samurai I: Musashi Miyamoto (#7 loses to Marlon Brando)
Best Actor 1955: I Live in Fear (#6 loses to Robert Mitchum)
Best Actor 1956: Samurai III: Duel At Ganryu Island (#6 loses to James Mason)
Best Actor 1957: Throne of Blood (#3 loses to Alec Guinness)
Best Supporting Actor 1957: The Lower Depths (#6 loses to Sessue Hayakawa)
Best Actor 1958: The Hidden Fortress (#3 loses to James Stewart)
Best Actor 1958: The Rickshaw Man (#5 loses to James Stewart)
Best Actor 1960: The Bad Sleep Well (#5 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Actor 1961: Yojimbo (WINS)
Best Actor 1963: High and Low (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1965: Red Beard (#4 loses to Tom Courtenay)
Best Supporting Actor 1966: The Sword of Doom (#8 loses to Lee Van Cleef)
Best Actor 1967: Samurai Rebellion (#5 loses to Robert Blake)
Ward Bond, 4 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1934: It Happened One Night (#10 loses to Henry Brandon)
Best Supporting Actor 1948: Fort Apache (#7 loses to Walter Huston)
Best Supporting Actor 1952: The Quiet Man (#7 loses to Barry Fitzgerald)
Best Supporting Actor 1956: The Searchers (#6 loses to Ed Wynn)
Boris Karloff, 11 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1929: Behind That Curtain (#10 loses to Louis Wolheim)
Best Actor 1931: Frankenstein (#6 loses to Peter Lorre) 
Best Supporting Actor 1931: The Criminal Code (WINS)
Best Actor 1932: The Mummy (#6 loses to Paul Muni)
Best Supporting Actor 1932: The Old Dark House (#4 loses to John Barrymore)
Best Supporting Actor 1933: The Ghoul (#5 loses to Robert Donat)
Best Actor 1934: The Black Cat (#7 loses to Clark Gable)
Best Supporting Actor 1934: The Lost Patrol (#2 loses to Henry Brandon)
Best Actor 1935: Bride of Frankenstein (#2 loses to Victor McLaglen)
Best Actor 1935: The Black Room (#6 loses to Victor McLaglen)
Best Supporting Actor 1953: Abbott & Costello Meet Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (#8 loses to Ernest Borgnine)
Bela Lugosi, 2 noms

Best Actor 1931: Dracula (#5 loses to Peter Lorre)
Best Actor 1934: The Black Cat (#10 loses to Clark Gable)
Ronald Colman, 8 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1929: Bulldog Drummond (WINS)
Best Actor 1929: Condemned (#2 loses to himself)
Best Actor 1935: A Tale of Two Cities (#8 loses to Victor McLaglen)
Best Actor 1937: The Prisoner of Zenda (#3 loses to Robert Montgomery)
Best Actor 1937: Lost Horizon (#9 loses to Robert Montgomery)
Best Actor 1938: If I Were King (#10 loses to James Cagney)
Best Actor 1942: Random Harvest (#4 loses to Humphrey Bogart)
Best Actor 1947: A Double Life (#3 loses to Richard Attenborough)
Fredric March, 8 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1930: The Royal Family of Broadway (#3 loses to Louis Wolheim)
Best Actor 1931: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (#7 loses to Peter Lorre)
Best Actor 1935: Les Miserables (#9 loses to Victor McLaglen)
Best Actor 1937: A Star is Born (#5 loses to Robert Montgomery)
Best Actor 1946: The Best Years of Our Lives (#5 loses to James Stewart)
Best Supporting Actor 1954: Executive Suite (#6 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Actor 1955: Desperate Hours (#9 loses to Robert Mitchum)
Best Supporting Actor 1964: Seven Days in May (#3 loses to Sterling Hayden)
Peter Lorre, 5 noms 2 wins

Best Actor 1931: M (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1936: Secret Agent (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1941: The Maltese Falcon (#3 loses to Walter Huston)
Best Supporting Actor 1944: Arsenic and Old Lace (#4 loses to Edward G. Robinson)
Best Supporting Actor 1954: 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (#9 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Sydney Greenstreet,  4 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1941: The Maltese Falcon (#5 loses to Walter Huston)
Best Supporting Actor 1944: The Mask Dimitrios (#8 loses to Edward G. Robinson)
Best Supporting Actor 1945: Conflict (#7 loses to James Dunn)
Best Supporting Actor 1945: Christmas in Connecticut (#9 loses to James Dunn)
Laird Cregar, 4 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1941: I Wake Up Screaming (#4 loses to Walter Huston)
Best Supporting Actor 1942: This Gun For Hire (#3 loses to Claude Rains)
Best Supporting Actor 1942: The Black Swan (#6 loses to Claude Rains)
Best Actor 1944: The Lodger (#4 loses to Fred MacMurray)
Vincent Price, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1943: The Song of Bernadette (#9 loses to Dana Andrews)
Best Supporting Actor 1944: Laura (#10 loses to Edward G. Robinson)
William Bendix, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1944: Lifeboat (#3 loses to Edward G. Robinson)
Best Supporting Actor 1946: The Blue Dahlia (#8 loses to Claude Rains)
Cary Grant, 6 noms

Best Actor 1937: The Awful Truth (#4 loses to Robert Montgomery)
Best Actor 1938: Bringing Up Baby (#3 loses to James Cagney)
Best Actor 1938: Holiday (#6 loses to James Cagney)
Best Actor 1940: His Girl Friday (#6 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Actor 1946: Notorious (#8 loses to James Stewart)
Best Actor 1959: North By Northwest (#2 loses to James Stewart)
Ralph Bellamy, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1937: The Awful Truth (#10 loses to Erich von Stroheim)
Best Supporting Actor 1983: Trading Places (#7 loses to Darren McGavin)
Joel McCrea, 4 noms

Best Actor 1930: The Silver Horde (#8 loses to Lew Ayres) 
Best Actor 1941: Sullivan's Travels (#3 loses to Humphrey Bogart)
Best Actor 1942: The Palm Beach Story (#6 loses to Humphrey Bogart)
Best Actor 1943: The More the Merrier(#5 loses to Joseph Cotten)
Robert Donat, 6 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1933: The Private Life of Henry VIII(WINS)
Best Actor 1935: 39 Steps (#3 loses to Victor McLaglen)
Best Actor 1938: The Citadel (#4 loses to James Cagney)
Best Actor 1939: Goodbye, Mr. Chips (#5 loses to Charles Laughton)
Best Actor 1951: The Magic Box (#9 loses to Michael Redgrave)
Best Supporting Actor 1958: The Inn of the Sixth Happiness (#7 loses to Orson Welles)
Michael Redgrave, 3 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1938: The Lady Vanishes (#7 loses to James Cagney)
Best Actor 1940: The Stars Look Down (#10 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Actor 1951: The Browning Version (WINS)
John Barrymore, 6 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1932: State's Attorney (#7 loses to Paul Muni)
Best Actor 1932: Bill of Divorcement (#10 loses to Paul Muni)
Best Supporting Actor 1932: Grand Hotel (WINS)
Best Actor 1933: Counsellor At Law (#3 loses to Charles Laughton)
Best Supporting Actor 1933: Dinner At Eight (#2 loses to Robert Donat)
Best Actor 1934: The Twentieth Century (#8 loses to Clark Gable)
Lionel Barrymore, 8 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1928: Sadie Thompson (#2 loses to William Powell)
Best Supporting Actor 1931: A Free Soul (#2 loses to Boris Karloff)
Best Supporting Actor 1932: Grand Hotel (#3 loses to John Barrymore)
Best Supporting Actor 1933: Dinner At Eight (#4 loses to Robert Donat)
Best Actor 1935: Public Hero No. 1 (#4 loses to James Cagney)
Best Actor 1938: You Can’t Take It With You (#9 loses to James Cagney)
Best Supporting Actor 1946: It's A Wonderful Life (#2 loses to Claude Rains)
Best Supporting Actor 1948: Key Largo (#6 loses to Walter Huston)
Roger Livesey, 2 noms

Best Actor 1943: The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (#2 loses to Joseph Cotten)
Best Supporting Actor 1946: A Matter of Life and Death (#5 loses to Claude Rains)
Monty Woolley, 2 noms

Best Actor 1942: The Pied Piper (#3 loses to Humphrey Bogart)
Best Actor 1942: The Man Who Came to Dinner (#7 loses to Humphrey Bogart)
Laurence Olivier, 13 noms 4 wins

Best Actor 1939: Wuthering Heights (#4 loses to Charles Laughton)
Best Actor 1940: Rebecca (WINS)
Best Actor 1940: Pride and Prejudice (#8 loses to himself) 
Best Actor 1944: Henry V (#2 loses to Fred MacMurray)
Best Actor 1948: Hamlet (#2 loses to Humphrey Bogart)
Best Actor 1952: Carrie (#4 loses to Takashi Shimura)
Best Actor 1955: Richard III (#3 loses to Robert Mitchum)
Best Supporting Actor 1959: The Devil's Disciple (#4 loses to Joseph Schildkraut)
Best Actor 1960: The Entertainer (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1960: Spartacus (#3 loses to Renato Salvatori)
Best Supporting Actor 1969: Oh! What a Lovely War (#6 loses to Ernest Borgnine)
Best Actor 1972: Sleuth (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1976: Marathon Man (WINS) 
Humphrey Bogart, 8 noms 3 wins

Best Supporting Actor 1936: The Petrified Forest (#2 loses to Peter Lorre)
Best Supporting Actor 1937: Dead End (#3 loses to Erich von Stroheim)
Best Actor 1941: The Maltese Falcon (WINS)
Best Actor 1941: High Sierra (#9 loses to himself)
Best Actor 1942: Casablanca (WINS)
Best Actor 1943: Sahara (#9 loses to Joseph Cotten)
Best Actor 1946: The Big Sleep (#4 loses to James Stewart) 
Best Actor 1948: The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (WINS)  
Anthony Quinn, 6 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1943: The Ox-Bow Incident (#3 loses to Dana Andrews)
Best Supporting Actor 1952: Viva Zapata! (#3 loses to Barry Fitzgerald)
Best Supporting Actor 1956: Lust for Life (#3 loses to Ed Wynn)
Best Actor 1954: La Strada (#10 loses to Marlon Brando)
Best Actor 1957: Wild is the Wind (#8 loses to Alec Guinness)
Best Actor 1964: Zorba the Greek (#4 loses to Richard Attenborough)
Barry Fitzgerald, 3 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1944: Going My Way (#2 loses to Edward G. Robinson)
Best Supporting Actor 1945: And Then There Were None (#4 loses to James Dunn)
Best Supporting Actor 1952: The Quiet Man (WINS)

Charles Coburn, 3 noms
Best Actor 1941: The Devil and Miss Jones (#6 loses to Humphrey Bogart)
Best Supporting Actor 1943: The More The Merrier (#2 loses to Dana Andrews)
Best Supporting Actor 1946: The Green Years(#9 loses to Claude Rains)
 
Clifton Webb, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1944: Laura (#5 loses to Edward G. Robinson)
Best Actor 1953: Titanic (#7 loses to William Holden)
Lee J. Cobb, 5 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1939: Golden Boy (#7 loses to Cedric Hardwicke)
Best Supporting Actor 1943: The Song of Bernadette (#6 loses to Dana Andrews)
Best Supporting Actor 1954: On the Waterfront (#3 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Supporting Actor 1957: 12 Angry Men (#4 loses to Sessue Hayakawa)
Best Supporting Actor 1958: The Brothers Karamazov (#5 loses to Orson Welles)
George Sanders, 4 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1940: Rebecca (#3 loses to John Carradine)
Best Supporting Actor 1940: Foreign Correspondent (#6 loses to John Carradine)
Best Supporting Actor 1943: This Land is Mine (#7 loses to Dana Andrews)
Best Supporting Actor 1950: All About Eve (WINS)
Richard Attenborough, 12 noms 3 wins

Best Actor 1947: Brighton Rock (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1950: Morning Departure (#4 loses to George Sanders)
Best Supporting Actor 1958: Dunkirk (#4 loses to Orson Welles)
Best Actor 1960: The Angry Silence (#4 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Actor 1963: The Great Escape (#7 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Actor 1964: Guns at Batasi (WINS)
Best Actor 1964: Seance on a Wet Afternoon (#7 loses to himself) 
Best Supporting Actor 1966: The Sand Pebbles (#6 loses to Lee Van Cleef)
Best Supporting Actor 1967: Doctor Dolittle (#2 loses to Alan Arkin)
Best Actor 1971: 10 Rillington Place (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1977: The Chess Players (#8 loses to Dennis Hopper)
Best Supporting Actor 1993: Jurassic Park (#9 loses to Richard Jordan)
James Mason, 18 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1945: The Seventh Veil (#6 loses to Ray Milland)
Best Actor 1947: Odd Man Out (#4 loses to Richard Attenborough)
Best Supporting Actor 1949: The Reckless Moment (#5 loses to Alec Guinness)
Best Actor 1951: The Desert Fox: The Story Of Rommel (#10 loses to Michael Redgrave)
Best Actor 1952: 5 Fingers (#5 loses to Takashi Shimura)
Best Actor 1953: Julius Caesar (#3 loses to William Holden)
Best Actor 1953: Charade (#4 loses to William Holden)
Best Actor 1954: 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (#2 loses to Marlon Brando)
Best Actor 1954: A Star is Born (#6 loses to Marlon Brando)
Best Actor 1956: Bigger Than Life (WINS)
Best Actor 1959: Journey to the Center of the Earth (#10 loses to James Stewart)
Best Supporting Actor 1959: North By Northwest (#5 loses to Joseph Schildkraut)
Best Actor 1962: Lolita (#2 loses to Peter O'Toole)
Best Actor 1966: The Deadly Affair (#6 loses to Eli Wallach)
Best Supporting Actor 1977: Cross of Iron (#2 loses to Dennis Hopper)
Best Supporting Actor 1978: The Boys From Brazil (#7 loses to Christopher Walken)
Best Supporting Actor 1982: The Verdict (#2 loses to Rutger Hauer)
Best Actor 1985: The Shooting Party (#9 loses to Raul Julia and William Hurt)
 Van Heflin, 5 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1941: Johnny Eager (#2 loses to Walter Huston)
Best Actor 1946: The Strange Love of Martha Ivers (#6 loses to James Stewart)
Best Actor 1948: Act of Violence (# 6 loses to Humphrey Bogart)
Best Actor 1956: Patterns (#10 loses to James Mason)
Best Actor 1957: 3:10 to Yuma (#9 loses to Alec Guinness)
Hume Cronyn, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1944: The Seventh Cross (#7 loses to Edward G. Robinson)
Best Supporting Actor 1947: Brute Force (#8 loses to Louis Jouvet)
Jose Ferrer, 2 noms

Best Actor 1950: Cyrano De Bergerac (#5 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Supporting Actor 1962: Lawrence of Arabia (#7 loses to Peter Sellers)
Dana Andrews, 2 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1943: The Ox-Bow Incident (WINS)
Best Actor 1946: The Best Years of Our Lives (#2 loses to James Stewart)
William Holden, 4 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1950: Sunset Blvd. (#3 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Actor 1953: Stalag 17 (WINS)
Best Actor 1957: The Bridge on the Rive Kwai (#6 loses to Alec Guinness)
Best Actor 1969: The Wild Bunch (#3 loses to Dustin Hoffman)
Edmond O'Brien, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1949: White Heat (#8 loses to Alec Guinness)
Best Actor 1950: D.O.A. (#6 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Gig Young, 3 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1951: Come Fill The Cup (#10 loses to Karl Malden)
Best Supporting Actor 1958: Teacher's Pet (#6 loses to Orson Welles)
Best Supporting Actor 1969: They Shoot Horses, Don't They? (#2 loses to Ernest Borgnine)
Montgomery Clift, 5 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1948: The Search (#9 loses to Humphrey Bogart)
Best Actor 1951: A Place in the Sun (#5 loses to Michael Redgrave)
Best Actor 1953: From here to Eternity (#2 loses to William Holden)
Best Supporting Actor 1961: Judgment At Nuremberg (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1961: The Misfits (#10 loses to himself)
Marlon Brando, 5 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1951: A Streetcar Named Desire (#7 loses to Michael Redgrave)
Best Actor 1952: Viva Zapata! (#8 loses to Takashi Shimura)
Best Supporting Actor 1953: Julius Caesar (#4 loses to Ernest Borgnine)
Best Actor 1954: On The Waterfront (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1979: Apocalypse Now (#6 loses to Robert Duvall)
James Dean, 2 noms

Best Actor 1955: East of Eden (#5 loses to Robert Mitchum)
Best Supporting Actor 1956: Giant (#4 loses to Ed Wynn)
Alastair Sim, 4 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1950: Stage Fright (#6 loses to George Sanders)
Best Actor 1951: Scrooge (#2 loses to Michael Redgrave)
Best Supporting Actor 1954: An Inspector Calls (#5 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Actor 1956: The Green Man (#5 loses to James Mason)
Dirk Bogarde, 5 noms

Best Actor 1952: Hunted (#6 loses to Takashi Shimura)
Best Actor 1961: Victim (#6 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Actor 1963: The Servant (#2 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Actor 1964: King & Country (#9 loses to Richard Attenborough)
Best Supporting Actor 1977: Providence (#10 loses to Dennis Hopper)
Rod Steiger, 4 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1954: On the Waterfront (#2 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Actor 1965: The Pawnbroker (#3 loses to Terence Stamp)
Best Supporting Actor 1965: Doctor Zhivago (#3 loses to Tom Courtenay)
Best Actor 1967: In the Heat of the Night (#3 loses to Robert Blake)
Ernest Borgnine, 3 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1953: From Here to Eternity (#2 loses to Robert Ryan)
Best Actor 1955: Marty (#2 loses to Robert Mitchum)
Best Supporting Actor 1969: The Wild Bunch (WINS)
Fred MacMurray, 2 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1944: Double Indemnity (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1960: The Apartment (#10 loses to Renato Salvatori)
Steve McQueen, 2 noms

Best Actor 1963: The Great Escape (#6 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Actor 1973: Papillon (#8 loses to Jack Lemmon)
Burgess Meredith, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1975: The Day of the Locust (#4 loses to Robert Shaw)
Best Supporting Actor 1976: Rocky (#6 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Christopher Lee, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1958: Horror of Dracula (#8 loses to Orson Welles)
Best Supporting Actor 1973: The Wicker Man (#7 loses to Robert Shaw)
Alain Delon, 3 noms

Best Actor 1960: Purple Noon (#10 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Actor 1967: Le Samourai (#2 loses to Robert Blake)
Best Supporting Actor 1971: Red Sun (#5 loses to John Hurt)
Dean Stockwell, 3 noms

Best Actor 1959: Compulsion (#7 loses to James Stewart)
Best Supporting Actor 1986: Blue Velvet (#5 loses to Dennis Hopper)
Best Supporting Actor 1988: Tucker: A Man and His Dream (#9 loses to Michael Palin)
Henry Fonda, 5 noms

Best Actor 1940: The Grapes of Wrath (#4 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Actor 1943: The Ox-Bow Incident (#7 loses to Joseph Cotten)
Best Actor 1956: The Wrong Man (#7 loses to James Mason)
Best Actor 1957: Twelve Angry Men (#7 loses to Alec Guinness)
Best Supporting Actor 1968: Once Upon a Time in the West (#2 loses to Jason Robards)
Donald Pleasence, 3 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1963: The Great Escape (#5 loses to Tsutomu Yamazaki)
Best Supporting Actor 1971: Wake in Fright (#2 loses to John Hurt)
Best Actor 1978: Halloween (#4 loses to Robert De Niro)
Tony Curtis, 3 noms

Best Actor 1957: Sweet Smell of Success (#4 loses to Alec Guinness)
Best Actor 1958: The Defiant Ones (#8 loses to James Stewart)
Best Supporting Actor 1968: The Boston Strangler (#3 loses to Jason Robards)
Jack Lemmon, 6 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1955: Mister Roberts (#3 loses to Raymond Massey)
Best Actor 1960: The Apartment (#6 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Actor 1962: The Days of Wine and Roses (#4 loses Peter O'Toole)
Best Actor 1973: Save the Tiger (WINS)
Best Actor 1979: The China Syndrome (#8 loses to Brad Dourif)
Best Actor 1992: Glengarry Glen Ross (#4 loses to Harvey Keitel)
Walter Matthau, 3 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1957: A Face in the Crowd (#9 loses to Sessue Hayakawa)
Best Supporting Actor 1966: The Fortune Cookie (#2 loses to Lee Van Cleef)
Best Actor 1974: The Taking of Pelham One, Two, Three (#7 loses to Gene Hackman)
Art Carney, 2 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1974: Harry And Tonto (#3 loses to Gene Hackman)
Best Actor 1977: The Late Show (WINS) 
Peter Falk, 3 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1960: Murder, Inc. (#5 loses to Renato Salvatori)
Best Actor 1979: The In-Laws (#10 loses to Brad Dourif)
Best Supporting Actor 1987: Wings of Desire (#9 loses to Mandy Patinkin)
Alan Arkin, 4 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1967: Wait Until Dark (WINS)
Best Actor 1968: The Heart is a Lonely Hunter (#9 loses to Burt Lancaster)
Best Actor 1979: The In-Laws (#9 loses to Brad Dourif)
Best Supporting Actor 2006: Little Miss Sunshine (#5 loses to Michael Caine)
Albert Finney, 6 noms

Best Actor 1960: Saturday Morning and Sunday Night (#7 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Actor 1963: Tom Jones (#10 loses Toshiro Mifune)
Best Actor 1970: Scrooge (#7 loses to George C. Scott)
Best Actor 1983: The Dresser (#6 loses to Christopher Walken)
Best Supporting Actor 1990: Miller's Crossing (#5 loses to Joe Pesci)
Best Supporting Actor 2007: Before the Devil Knows You're Dead (#5 loses to Ben Foster)
Tom Courtenay, 8 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1962: The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner (#8 loses to Peter O'Toole)
Best Actor 1963: Billy Liar (#4 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Actor 1964: King & Country (#3 loses to Richard Attenborough)
Best Supporting Actor 1965: Doctor Zhivago (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1967: The Night of the Generals (#8 loses to Alan Arkin)
Best Supporting Actor 1968: A Dandy in Aspic (#6 loses to Jason Robards)
Best Actor 1983: The Dresser (#3 loses to Christopher Walken)
Best Actor 2015: 45 Years (#4 loses to Jacob Tremblay)
Max von Sydow, 6 noms

Best Actor 1957: The Seventh Seal (#10 loses to Alec Guinness)
Best Actor 1968: Shame (#7 loses to Burt Lancaster)
Best Actor 1971: The Emigrants (#8 loses to Richard Attenborough)
Best Actor 1972: The New Land (#4 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Supporting Actor 1973: The Exorcist (#9 loses to Robert Shaw)
Best Supporting Actor 1975: Three Days of the Condor (#3 loses to Robert Shaw)
Eddie Axberg, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1971: The Emigrants (#6 loses to John Hurt)
Best Supporting Actor 1972: The New Land (#4 loses to Bruce Dern)
Klaus Kinski, 2 noms

Best Actor 1972: Aguirre, The Wrath of God (#3 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Actor 1979: Nosferatu the Vampyre (#3 loses to Brad Dourif)
Oskar Werner, 2 noms

Best Actor 1965: Ship of Fools (#7 loses to Terence Stamp)
Best Supporting Actor 1965: The Spy Who Came in From the Cold (#5 loses to Tom Courtenay)
Maximilian Schell, 3 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1961: Judgment At Nuremberg (#6 loses to Montgomery Clift)
Best Actor 1975: The Man in the Glass Booth (#7 loses to Jack Nicholson)
Best Supporting Actor 1977: Cross of Iron (#5 loses to Dennis Hopper)
Sidney Poitier, 8 noms

Best Actor 1950: No Way Out (#7 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Supporting Actor 1955: Blackboard Jungle (#8 loses to Raymond Massey)
Best Actor 1958: The Defiant Ones (#7 loses to James Stewart)
Best Actor 1961: A Raisin in the Sun (#9 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Actor 1963: Lilies of the Field (#8 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Actor 1965: Patch of Blue (#8 loses to Terence Stamp)
Best Actor 1967: In The Heat of the Night (#4 loses to Robert Blake)
Best Actor 1967: To Sir, With Love (#6 loses to Robert Blake)
Sean Connery, 8 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1963: From Russia With Love (#5 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Actor 1965: The Hill (#4 loses to Terence Stamp)
Best Actor 1972: The Offence (#6 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Actor 1975: The Man Who Would Be King (#5 loses to Jack Nicholson)
Best Actor 1976: Robin and Marian (#8 loses to Peter Finch)
Best Supporting Actor 1981: Time Bandits (#10 loses to Robert Prosky)
Best Actor 1986: The Name of the Rose (#7 loses to Bob Hoskins)
Best Supporting Actor 1989: Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (WINS)
Paul Newman, 8 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1958: The Long, Hot Summer (#4 loses to James Stewart)
Best Actor 1961: The Hustler (#3 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Actor 1963: Hud (#3 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Actor 1967: Cool Hand Luke (#9 loses to Robert Blake)
Best Actor 1969: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (#4 loses to Dustin Hoffman) 
Best Actor 1977: Slap Shot (#10 loses to Art Carney)
Best Actor 1982: The Verdict (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 2002: Road to Perdition (#4 loses to Bernard Hill)
Robert Redford, 4 noms

Best Actor 1969: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (#6 loses to Dustin Hoffman)
Best Actor 1972: The Candidate (#8 loses Laurence Olivier)
Best Actor 1975: Three Days of the Condor (#8 loses to Jack Nicholson)
Best Actor 1976: All The President's Men (#6 loses to Peter Finch)
Peter Sellers, 7 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1955: The Ladykillers (#4 loses to Raymond Massey)
Best Supporting Actor 1959: I'm All Right Jack (#10 loses to Joseph Schildkraut)
Best Supporting Actor 1960: Never Let Go (#4 loses to Renato Salvatori)
Best Supporting Actor 1962: Lolita (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1963: The Pink Panther (#6 loses to Tsutomu Yamazaki)
Best Actor 1964: Dr. Strangelove (#5 loses to Richard Attenborough)
Best Actor 1979: Being There (#2 loses to Brad Dourif)
Robert Blake, 2 noms 2 wins

Best Actor 1967: In Cold Blood (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1997: Lost Highway (WINS)
Paul Scofield, 3 noms

Best Actor 1966: A Man For All Seasons (#3 loses to Eli Wallach)
Best Actor 1971: King Lear (#5 loses to Richard Attenborough)
Best Supporting Actor 1996: The Crucible (#10 loses to Steve Buscemi)
Richard Burton, 2 noms

Best Actor 1965: The Spy Who Came in From the Cold (#2 loses to Terence Stamp)
Best Actor 1966: Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf (#4 loses to Eli Wallach)
Peter O'Toole, 8 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1962: Lawrence of Arabia (WINS)
Best Actor 1964: Becket (#6 loses to Richard Attenborough)
Best Actor 1966: How To Steal A Million (#9 loses to Eli Wallach)
Best Actor 1968: The Lion in Winter (#3 loses to Burt Lancaster)
Best Supporting Actor 1980: The Stunt Man (#3 loses to Joe Pesci)
Best Actor 1981: My Favorite Year (#10 loses to Paul Newman)
Best Supporting Actor 1987: The Last Emperor (#10 loses to Mandy Patinkin)
Best Supporting Actor 2004: Troy (#6 loses to Philip Seymour Hoffman)
Richard Harris, 5 noms

Best Actor 1963: This Sporting Life (#9 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Actor 1990: The Field (#9 loses to James Caan)
Best Supporting Actor 1974: Juggernaut (#4 loses to John Cazale)
Best Supporting Actor 1992: Unforgiven (#6 loses to Gene Hackman)
Best Actor 1995: Cry, The Beloved Country (#4 loses to Morgan Freeman)
Omar Sharif, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1962: Lawrence of Arabia (#3 loses to Peter Sellers)
Best Actor 1965: Doctor Zhivago (#6 loses to Terence Stamp)
Ian Bannen, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1965: The Hill (#7 loses to Tom Courtenay)
Best Supporting Actor 1972: The Offence (#9 loses to Bruce Dern)
Peter Finch, 4 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1954: The Detective (#7 loses to Toshiro Mifune)
Best Supporting Actor 1967: Far From The Madding Crowd (#6 loses to Alan Arkin)
Best Actor 1969: The Red Tent (#10 loses to Dustin Hoffman)
Best Actor 1976: Network (WINS)
Malcolm McDowell, 2 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1971: A Clockwork Orange (#3 loses to Richard Attenborough)
Best Supporting Actor 2000: Gangster No. 1 (WINS)
Terence Stamp, 4 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1962: Billy Budd (#10 loses to Peter O'Toole)
Best Actor 1965: The Collector (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1967: Far From The Madding Crowd (#3 loses to Alan Arkin)
Best Actor 1984: The Hit (#8 loses to F. Murray Abraham)
Alan Bates, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1967: Far From the Madding Crowd (#5 loses to Alan Arkin)
Best Actor 1968: The Fixer (#8 loses to Burt Lancaster)
David Warner, 4 noms

Best Actor 1968: The Bofors Gun (#10 loses to Burt Lancaster)
Best Supporting Actor 1974: Little Malcolm (#9 loses to John Cazale)
Best Supporting Actor 1976: The Omen (#9 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Supporting Actor 1977: The Iron Cross (#3 loses to Dennis Hopper)
Nicol Williamson, 2 noms

Best Actor 1968: The Bofors Gun (#6 loses to Burt Lancaster)
Best Supporting Actor 1976: Robin and Marian (#8 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Clint Eastwood, 8 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1964: A Fistful of Dollars (#8 loses to Richard Attenborough)
Best Actor 1965: For A Few Dollars More (#10 loses to Terence Stamp)
Best Actor 1966: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly (#7 loses to Eli Wallach)
Best Actor 1971: Dirty Harry (#7 loses to Richard Attenborough)
Best Actor 1971: The Beguiled (#9 loses to Richard Attenborough)
Best Actor 1976: The Outlaw Josey Wales (#2 loses to Peter Finch)
Best Actor 1992: Unforgiven (WINS)
Best Actor 2008: Gran Torino (#6 loses to Brendan Gleeson)
David Carradine, 2 noms

Best Actor 1976: Bound for Glory (#4 loses to Peter Finch)
Best Supporting Actor 2004: Kill Bill Vol. 2 (#4 loses to Philip Seymour Hoffman)
Robert Shaw, 9 noms 2 wins

Best Supporting Actor 1963: From Russia With Love (#4 loses to Tsutomu Yamazaki)
Best Supporting Actor 1966: A Man For All Seasons (#5 loses to Lee Van Cleef)
Best Supporting Actor 1972: Young Winston (#5 loses to Bruce Dern)
Best Actor 1973: The Hireling (#10 loses to Jack Lemmon)
Best Supporting Actor 1973: The Sting (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1974: The Taking of Pelham One, Two, Three (#3 loses to John Cazale)
Best Supporting Actor 1975: Jaws (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1976: Robin and Marian (#2 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Actor 1978: Force 10 From Navarone (#9 loses to Robert De Niro)
Oliver Reed, 3 noms

Best Actor 1969: The Assassination Bureau (#9 loses to Dustin Hoffman)
Best Actor 1971: The Devils (#6 loses to Richard Attenborough)
Best Supporting Actor 2000: Gladiator (#4 loses to Malcolm McDowell)
Timothy Dalton, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1968: The Lion in Winter (#5 loses to Jason Robards)
Best Supporting Actor 2007: Hot Fuzz (#3 loses to Ben Foster)
Anthony Hopkins, 6 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1968: The Lion in Winter (#4 loses to Jason Robards)
Best Supporting Actor 1977: A Bridge Too Far (#7 loses to Dennis Hopper)
Best Actor 1978: Magic (#6 loses to Robert De Niro)
Best Actor 1980: The Elephant Man (#9 loses to Tatsuya Nakadai)
Best Supporting Actor 1991: The Silence of the Lambs (#2 loses to John Goodman)
Best Actor 1993: Shadowlands (#2 loses to Jeff Daniels)
Brian Cox, 3 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1986: Manhunter (#7 loses to Dennis Hopper)
Best Supporting Actor 2001: L.I.E. (#4 loses to Sean Bean)
Best Supporting Actor 2011: Coriolanus (#4 loses to Mark Strong)
Jean-Louis Trintignant, 2 noms

Best Actor 1969: Z (#5 loses to Dustin Hoffman)
Best Actor 2012: Amour (#5 loses to Joaquin Phoenix and Mads Mikkelsen)
Tatsuya Nakadai, 11 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1959: The Human Condition I (#3 loses to James Stewart)
Best Actor 1959: The Human Condition II (#5 loses to James Stewart)
Best Supporting Actor 1961: Yojimbo (#2 loses to Montgomery Clift)
Best Actor 1962: Harakiri (#3 loses to Peter O'Toole)
Best Supporting Actor 1962: Sanjuro (#5 loses to Peter Sellers)
Best Supporting Actor 1963: High and Low (#8 loses Tsutomu Yamazaki)
Best Actor 1966: The Sword of Doom (#2 loses to Eli Wallach)
Best Actor 1966: The Face of Another (#8 loses to Eli Wallach)
Best Actor 1968: Kill! (#5 loses to Burt Lancaster)  
Best Actor 1980: Kagemusha (WINS)
Best Actor 1985: Ran (#3 loses to Raul Julia and William Hurt)
Tsutomu Yamazaki, 6 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1963: High and Low (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1965: Red Beard (#8 loses to Tom Courtenay)
Best Supporting Actor 1980: Kagemusha (#2 loses to Joe Pesci)
Best Supporting Actor 1984: Farewell to the Ark (#9 loses to James Woods)
Best Supporting Actor 2001: Go (#7 loses to Sean Bean)
Best Supporting Actor 2008: Departures (#6 loses to Heath Ledger)
Jack Albertson, 2 noms

Best Actor 1968: The Subject Was Roses (#4 loses to Burt Lancaster)
Best Supporting Actor 1971: Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factor (#9 loses to John Hurt)
Edward Woodward, 2 noms

Best Actor 1973: The Wicker Man (#2 loses to Jack Lemmon)
Best Actor 1980: Breaker Morant (#4 loses to Tatsuya Nakadai)
Gene Wilder, 4 noms

Best Actor 1967: The Producers (#8 loses to Robert Blake)
Best Supporting Actor 1967: Bonnie And Clyde (#10 loses to Alan Arkin)
Best Actor 1971: Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (#4 loses to Richard Attenborough)
Best Actor 1974: Young Frankenstein (#8 loses to Gene Hackman)
Michael Caine, 9 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1966: Alfie (#5 loses to Eli Wallach)
Best Actor 1971: Get Carter (#2 loses to Richard Attenborough)
Best Actor 1972: Sleuth (#10 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Actor 1975: The Man Who Would Be King (#4 loses to Jack Nicholson)
Best Supporting Actor 1986: Hannah and Her Sisters (#6 loses to Dennis Hopper)
Best Supporting Actor 1986: Mona Lisa (#10 loses to Dennis Hopper)
Best Actor 1992: The Muppet Christmas Carol (#10 loses to Harvey Keitel)
Best Supporting Actor 2006: Children of Men (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 2006: The Prestige (#9 loses to himself) 
Martin Sheen, 2 noms

Best Actor 1973: Badlands (#5 loses to Jack Lemmon)
Best Actor 1979: Apocalypse Now (#7 loses to Brad Dourif)
Gene Hackman, 14 noms 3 wins

Best Supporting Actor 1967: Bonnie and Clyde (#4 loses to Alan Arkin)
Best Supporting Actor 1969: Downhill Racer (#5 loses to Ernest Borgnine)
Best Actor 1970: I Never Sang For My Father (#3 loses to George C. Scott)
Best Actor 1971: The French Connection (#9 loses to Richard Attenborough)
Best Actor 1973: Scarecrow (#4 loses to Jack Lemmon)
Best Actor 1974: The Conversation (WINS)
Best Actor 1975: French Connection II (#3 loses to Jack Nicholson)
Best Supporting Actor 1978: Superman (#2 loses to Christopher Walken)
Best Actor 1986: Hoosiers (#8 loses to Bob Hoskins)
Best Actor 1988: Mississippi Burning (#6 loses to Jeremy Irons)
Best Supporting Actor 1992: Unforgiven (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1995: Get Shorty (#8 loses to Kevin Spacey)
Best Supporting Actor 1996: The Birdcage (#8 loses to Steve Buscemi) 
Best Actor 2001: The Royal Tenenbaums (WINS)
Roy Scheider, 3 noms 

Best Actor 1975: Jaws (#6 loses to Jack Nicholson)
Best Supporting Actor 1976: Marathon Man (#10 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Actor 1979: All That Jazz (#6 loses to Brad Dourif)
Ned Beatty, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1972: Deliverance (#7 loses to Bruce Dern)
Best Supporting Actor 1978: Superman (#10 loses to Christopher Walken)
James Caan, 4 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1972: The Godfather (#3 loses to Bruce Dern)
Best Supporting Actor 1977: A Bridge Too Far (#6 loses to Dennis Hopper)
Best Actor 1990: Misery (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 2003: Dogville (#4 loses to Sean Astin)
Robert Duvall,  12 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1962: To Kill a Mockingbird (#10 loses to Peter Sellers)
Best Supporting Actor 1969: True Grit (#7 loses to Ernest Borgnine)
Best Supporting Actor 1972: The Godfather (#6 loses to Bruce Dern)
Best Supporting Actor 1976: Network (#7 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Actor 1979: The Great Santini (#5 loses to Brad Dourif)
Best Supporting Actor 1979: Apocalypse Now (WINS)
Best Actor 1983: Tender Mercies (#2 loses to Christopher Walken)
Best Actor 1997: The Apostle (#4 loses to Philip Baker Hall)
Best Supporting Actor 1998: A Civil Action (#10 loses to Elias Koteas)
Best Actor 2003: Open Range (#5 loses to Russell Crowe)
Best Supporting Actor 2009: The Road (#8 loses to Christoph Waltz)
Best Actor 2010: Get Low (#2 loses to Choi Min-Sik)
Dustin Hoffman, 5 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1967: The Graduate (#10 loses to Robert Blake)
Best Actor 1969: Midnight Cowboy (WINS)
Best Actor 1976: Marathon Man (#7 loses to Peter Finch)
Best Actor 1978: Straight Time (#8 loses to Robert De Niro)
Best Actor 1982: Tootsie (#7 loses to Paul Newman)
Harry Dean Stanton, 5 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1978: Straight Time (#5 loses to Christopher Walken)
Best Supporting Actor 1979: Alien (#10 loses to Robert Duvall)
Best Actor 1984: Paris, Texas (#2 loses to F. Murray Abraham)
Best Supporting Actor 1984: Repo Man (#2 loses to James Woods)
Best Supporting Actor 1990: Wild At Heart (#2 loses to Joe Pesci)
Charles Durning, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1975: Dog Day Afternoon (#8 loses to Robert Shaw)
Best Supporting Actor 1982: Tootsie (#9 loses to Rutger Hauer)
Kenneth McMillan, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1984: The Pope of Greenwich Village (#2 loses to James Woods)
Best Supporting Actor 1984: Dune (#5 loses to James Woods)
Jack Nicholson, 9 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1969: Easy Rider (#4 loses to Ernest Borgnine)
Best Actor 1970: Five Easy Pieces (#2 loses to George C. Scott)
Best Actor 1974: Chinatown (#4 loses to Gene Hackman)
Best Actor 1975: One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest (WINS)
Best Actor 1976: Missouri Breaks (#5 loses to Peter Finch)
Best Supporting Actor 1981: Reds (#2 loses to Robert Prosky)
Best Actor 1987: Ironweed (#2 loses to John Lone)
Best Actor 2001: The Pledge (#6 loses to Gene Hackman)
Best Actor 2002: About Schmidt (#4 loses to Ray Liotta)
Al Pacino, 7 noms

Best Actor 1972: The Godfather (#2 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Actor 1973: Scarecrow (#6 loses to Jack Lemmon)
Best Actor 1974: The Godfather Part II (#5 loses to Gene Hackman)
Best Actor 1975: Dog Day Afternoon (#2 loses to Jack Nicholson)
Best Actor 1983: Scarface (#10 loses to Christopher Walken)
Best Supporting Actor 1992: Glengarry Glen Ross(#4 loses to Gene Hackman)
Best Actor 1997: Donnie Brasco (#6 loses to Philip Baker Hall)
Jeff Bridges, 7 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1971: The Last Picture Show (#10 loses to John Hurt)
Best Actor 1974: Thunderbolt and Lightfoot (#9 loses to Gene Hackman)
Best Actor 1989: The Fabulous Baker Boys (#9 loses to Daniel Day-Lewis)
Best Actor 1991: The Fisher King (#10 loses to John Turturro)
Best Actor 1998: The Big Lebowski (#4 loses to Brendan Gleeson)
Best Actor 2009: Crazy Heart (#10 loses to Viggo Mortensen)
Best Actor 2016: Hell or High Water (#2 loses to Andrew Garfield)
Robert De Niro, 10 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1973: Mean Streets (#3 loses to Robert Shaw)
Best Supporting Actor 1974: The Godfather Part II (#5 loses to John Cazale)
Best Actor 1976: Taxi Driver (#9 loses to Peter Finch)
Best Actor 1978: The Deer Hunter (WINS)
Best Actor 1980: Raging Bull (#3 loses to Tatsuya Nakadai)
Best Actor 1982: The King of Comedy (#3 loses to Paul Newman)
Best Supporting Actor 1985: Brazil (#9 loses to Christopher Lloyd)
Best Actor 1988: Midnight Run (#9 loses to Jeremy Irons)
Best Supporting Actor 1987: Angel Heart (#8 loses to Mandy Patinkin)
Best Supporting Actor 1990: Goodfellas (#4 loses to Joe Pesci)
Harvey Keitel, 3 noms

Best Actor 1977: The Duellists (#3 loses to Art Carney)
Best Actor 1992: Bad Lieutenant (#2 loses to Clint Eastwood)
Best Supporting Actor 1994: Pulp Fiction (#7 loses to Martin Landau) 
Dennis Hopper,  5 noms 2 wins

Best Actor 1969: Easy Rider (#7 loses to Dustin Hoffman)
Best Supporting Actor 1977: The American Friend (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1979: Apocalypse Now (#3 loses to Robert Duvall)
Best Supporting Actor 1986: Blue Velvet (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1987: River's Edge (#6 loses to Mandy Patinkin)
Peter Fonda, 2 noms

Best Actor 1969: Easy Rider (#8 loses to Dustin Hoffman)
Best Actor 1997: Ulee's Gold (#7 loses to Philip Baker Hall)
Christopher Walken, 5 noms 3 wins

Best Supporting Actor 1978: The Deer Hunter (WINS)
Best Actor 1983: The Dead Zone (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1994: Pulp Fiction (#6 loses to Martin Landau)
Best Supporting Actor 2002: Catch Me If You Can (#2 loses to Bernard Hill)
Best Supporting Actor 2012: Seven Psychopaths (WINS)
Bruce Dern, 5 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1972: The Cowboys (WINS)
Best Actor 1972: Silent Running (#5 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Actor 1976: Family Plot (#10 loses to Peter Finch)
Best Supporting Actor 1989: The 'burbs (#2 loses to Sean Connery)
Best Actor 2013: Nebraska (#6 loses to James McAvoy)
Jon Voight, 3 noms

Best Actor 1969: Midnight Cowboy (#2 loses to Dustin Hoffman)
Best Actor 1972: Deliverance (#9 loses to Laurence Olivier)
Best Actor 1978: Coming Home (#2 loses to Robert De Niro)
Brad Dourif, 2 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1975: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (#6 loses to Robert Shaw)
Best Actor 1979: Wise Blood (WINS)

Bruno Ganz, 3 noms

Best Actor 1977: The American Friend (#5 loses to Art Carney)
Best Actor 1987: Wings of Desire (#7 loses to John Lone)
Best Actor 2004: Downfall (#2 loses to Tom Cruise)
Richard Farnsworth, 4 noms 1 win 

Best Supporting Actor 1978: Comes a Horseman (#8 loses to Christopher Walken)
Best Actor 1982: The Grey Fox (#2 loses to Paul Newman)
Best Supporting Actor 1990: Misery (#6 loses to Joe Pesci)
Best Actor 1999: The Straight Story (WINS) 


Richard Jordan, 2 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1973: The Friends of Eddie Coyle (#5 loses to Robert Shaw)
Best Supporting Actor 1993: Gettysburg (WINS) 
Harrison Ford, 6 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1977: Star Wars (#9 loses to Dennis Hopper)
Best Supporting Actor 1980: The Empire Strikes Back (#6 loses to Joe Pesci)
Best Actor 1981: Raiders of the Lost Ark (#4 loses to Mel Gibson)
Best Actor 1982: Blade Runner (#8 loses to Paul Newman)
Best Actor 1986: Mosquito Coast (#3 loses to Bob Hoskins)
Best Actor 1989: Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (#5 loses to Daniel Day-Lewis)
John Travolta, 3 noms

Best Actor 1977: Saturday Night Fever (#7 loses to Art Carney)
Best Actor 1981: Blow Out (#10 loses to Mel Gibson)
Best Actor 1994: Pulp Fiction (#10 loses to Gary Oldman
Michael Douglas,  4 noms

Best Actor 1993: Falling Down (#7 loses to Jeff Daniels)
Best Actor 1997: The Game (#8 loses to Philip Baker Hall)
Best Actor 2000: Wonder Boys (#6 loses to Guy Pearce)
Best Supporting Actor 2000: Traffic (#9 loses Malcolm McDowell)
John Cazale, 4 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1972: The Godfather (#8 loses to Bruce Dern)
Best Supporting Actor 1974: The Godfather Part II (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1975: Dog Day Afternoon (#2 loses to Robert Shaw)
Best Supporting Actor 1978: The Deer Hunter (#4 loses to Christopher Walken)
Donald Sutherland, 6 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1970:  Kelly's Heroes (#6 loses to Karl Malden)
Best Actor 1973: Don't Look Now (#7 loses to Jack Lemmon)
Best Supporting Actor 1975: Day of the Locust (#10 loses to Robert Shaw)
Best Actor 1978: Invasion of the Body Snatchers (#7 loses to Robert De Niro)
Best Actor 1980: Ordinary People (#5 loses to Tatsuya Nakadai)
Best Supporting Actor 1991: JFK (#8 loses to John Goodman)
Wilford Brimley, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1981: Absence of Malice (#6 loses to Robert Prosky)
Best Supporting Actor 1982: The Thing (#6 loses to Rutger Hauer)
Tim Curry, 2 noms

Best Actor 1975: The Rocky Horror Picture Show (#10 loses to Jack Nicholson)
Best Actor 1985: Clue (#8 loses to William Hurt and Raul Julia)
Ossie Davis, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1965: The Hill (#9 loses to Tom Courtenay)
Best Supporting Actor 1989: Do The Right Thing (#9 loses to Sean Connery)
Bob Hoskins, 3 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1981: The Long Good Friday (#2 loses to Mel Gibson)
Best Actor 1986: Mona Lisa (WINS)
Best Actor 1987: Who Framed Roger Rabbit? (#2 loses to Jeremy Irons)
James Woods, 6 noms1 win

Best Actor 1979: The Onion Field (#4 loses to Brad Dourif)
Best Actor 1983: Videodrome (#4 loses to Christopher Walken) 
Best Supporting Actor 1984: Once Upon a Time in America (WINS)
Best Actor 1986: Salvador (#4 loses to Bob Hoskins)
Best Actor 1989: True Believer (#4 loses to Daniel Day-Lewis)
Best Actor 1996: Killer: A Journal of Murder (#4 loses to William H. Macy)
Jeff Goldblum, 3 noms 

Best Supporting Actor 1983: The Big Chill (#9 loses to Darren McGavin)
Best Actor 1986: The Fly (#2 loses to Bob Hoskins)
Best Supporting Actor 1993: Jurassic Park (#7 loses to Richard Jordan)
Jeremy Irons, 5 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1982: Moonlighting (#5 loses to Paul Newman)
Best Actor 1986: The Mission (#6 loses to Bob Hoskins)
Best Actor 1988: Dead Ringers (WINS)
Best Actor 1990: Reversal of Fortune (#3 loses to James Caan)
Best Supporting Actor 1994: The Lion King (#10 loses to Martin Landau)
Daniel Day-Lewis, 10 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1985: My Beautiful Laundrette (#2 loses to Christopher Lloyd)
Best Supporting Actor 1986: A Room With A View (#2 loses to Dennis Hopper)
Best Actor 1989: My Left Foot (WINS)
Best Actor 1993: In the Name of the Father (#3 loses to Jeff Daniels)
Best Actor 1993: The Age of Innocence (#4 loses to Jeff Daniels)
Best Actor 1996: The Crucible (#5 loses to William H. Macy)
Best Actor 1997: The Boxer (#9 loses to Philip Baker Hall)
Best Actor 2002: Gangs of New York (#6 loses to Ray Liotta)
Best Actor 2007: There Will Be Blood (#2 loses to Casey Affleck)
Best Actor 2012: Lincoln (#4 loses to Joaquin Phoenix and Mads Mikkelsen)
Mel Gibson, 5 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1981: Gallipoli (WINS)
Best Actor 1982: The Year of Living Dangerously (#8 loses to Paul Newman)
Best Actor 1990: Hamlet (#6 loses to James Caan)
Best Actor 1995: Braveheart (#7 loses to Morgan Freeman)
Best Actor 1996: Ransom (#9 loses to William H. Macy)

Christopher Lloyd, 5 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1985: Back to the Future (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1985: Clue (#7 loses to himself)
Best Supporting Actor 1988: Who Framed Roger Rabbit (#4 loses to Michael Palin)
Best Actor 1990: Back to the Future III (#10 loses to James Caan)
Best Supporting Actor 1993: Twenty Bucks (#6 loses to Richard Jordan)
Michael J. Fox, 2 noms

Best Actor 1985: Back to the Future (#4 loses to Raul Julia and William Hurt)
Best Actor 1989: Casualties of War (#2 loses to Daniel Day-Lewis)
Michael Palin, 2 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1979: Life of Brian (#4 loses to Robert Duvall)
Best Supporting Actor 1988: A Fish Called Wanda (WINS)
Alan Rickman, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1988: Die Hard (#3 loses to Michael Palin)
Best Supporting Actor 1999: Galaxy Quest (#4 loses to Sam Rockwell)
Willem Dafoe, 5 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1986: Platoon (#4 loses to Dennis Hopper)
Best Supporting Actor 1990: Wild At Heart (#7 loses to Joe Pesci)
Best Actor 1992: Light Sleeper (#7 loses to Clint Eastwood)
Best Actor 2000: Shadow of the Vampire (#2 loses to Guy Pearce)
Best Supporting Actor 2004: The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou (#2 loses to Philip Seymour Hoffman)
Fred Gwynne, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1989: Pet Sematary (#6 loses to Sean Connery)
Best Supporting Actor 1992: My Cousin Vinny(#9 loses to Gene Hackman)
Philip Baker Hall, 3 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1984: Secret Honor (#6 loses to F. Murray Abraham)
Best Actor 1997: Hard Eight (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1999: Magnolia (#3 loses to Sam Rockwell)
Michael Keaton, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1982: Night Shift (#4 loses to Rutger Hauer)
Best Actor 2014: Birdman (#2 loses to Jake Gyllenhaal)
Bill Murray, 3 noms

Best Actor 1988: Scrooged (#7 loses to Jeremy Irons)
Best Actor 1993: Groundhog Day (#8 loses to Jeff Daniels)
Best Actor 2004: The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou (#4 loses Tom Cruise)
Steve Martin, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1986: Little Shop of Horrors (#8 loses to Dennis Hopper)
Best Actor 1987: Planes, Trains and Automobiles (#10 loses to John Lone)
John Hurt, 10 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1966: A Man For All Seasons (#3 loses to Lee Van Cleef)
Best Supporting Actor 1971: 10 Rillington Place (WINS)
Best Actor 1974: Little Malcolm (#6 loses to Gene Hackman)
Best Supporting Actor 1979: Alien (#5 loses to Robert Duvall)
Best Actor 1980: The Elephant Man (#2 loses Tatsuya Nakadai)
Best Actor 1984: The Hit (#5 loses to F. Murray Abraham)
Best Actor 1984: 1984 (#7 loses to F. Murray Abraham)
Best Actor 1984: Champions (#10 loses to F. Murray Abraham)
Best Supporting Actor 2005: The Proposition (#8 loses to Ed Harris)
Best Supporting Actor 2011: Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (#8 loses to Mark Strong)
Ian Holm, 5 noms 

Best Supporting Actor 1968: The Bofors Gun (#10 loses to Jason Robards)
Best Supporting Actor 1979: Alien (#2 loses to Robert Duvall)
Best Supporting Actor 1981: Chariots of Fire (#4 loses to Robert Prosky)
Best Supporting Actor 1985: Dreamchild (#3 loses to Christopher Lloyd)
Best Actor 1997: The Sweet Hereafter (#5 loses to Philip Baker Hall)
Sam Shepard, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1978: Days of Heaven (#9 loses to Christopher Walken))
Best Supporting Actor 1983: The Right Stuff (#2 loses to Darren McGavin)
Ed Harris, 6 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1983: Under Fire (#8 loses to Darren McGavin)
Best Supporting Actor 1983: The Right Stuff (#4 loses to Darren McGavin)
Best Actor 1989: The Abyss (#6 loses to Daniel Day-Lewis)
Best Supporting Actor 1992: Glengarry Glen Ross (#10 loses to Gene Hackman)
Best Supporting Actor 2005: A History of Violence (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 2013: Snowpiercer (#6 loses to Ben Foster)
William Hurt, 7 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1983: The Big Chill (#6 loses to Darren McGavin)
Best Actor 1985: Kiss of the Spider Woman (WINS)
Best Actor 1986: Children of a Lesser God (#9 loses to Bob Hoskins)
Best Actor 1987: Broadcast News (#5 loses to John Lone)
Best Actor 1988: The Accidental Tourist (#5 loses to Jeremy Irons)
Best Supporting Actor 1995: Smoke (#10 loses to Kevin Spacey)
Best Supporting Actor 2005: A History of Violence (#6 loses to Ed Harris)
Raul Julia, 6 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1985: Kiss of the Spider Woman (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1988: Moon Over Parador (#10 loses to Michael Palin)
Best Actor 1989: Romero (#10 loses to Daniel Day-Lewis)
Best Supporting Actor 1990: Presumed Innocent (#9 loses to Joe Pesci)
Best Actor 1991: The Addams Family (#6 loses to John Turturro)
Best Supporting Actor 1994: Street Fighter (#3 loses to Martin Landau)
Martin Landau, 4 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1959: North By Northwest (#9 loses to Joseph Schildkraut)
Best Supporting Actor 1988: Tucker: The Man and His Dream (#7 loses to Michael Palin)
Best Actor 1989: Crimes and Misdemeanors (#3 loses to Daniel Day-Lewis)
Best Supporting Actor 1994: Ed Wood (WINS)
 
Bruce Willis, 4 noms

Best Actor 1988: Die Hard (#10 loses to Jeremy Irons)
Best Supporting Actor 1994: Pulp Fiction (#8 loses to Martin Landau)
Best Actor 1995: 12 Monkeys (#6 loses to Morgan Freeman)
Best Actor 1999: The Sixth Sense (#9 loses to Richard Farnsworth)
Ray Liotta, 5 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1986: Something Wild (#9 loses to Dennis Hopper)
Best Supporting Actor 1989: Field of Dreams (#7 loses to Sean Connery)
Best Supporting Actor 1997: Cop Land (#10 loses to Robert Blake)
Best Actor 1990: Goodfellas (#4 loses to James Caan)
Best Actor 2002: Narc (WINS)
Tom Hanks, 4 noms

Best Actor 1998: Saving Private Ryan (#10 loses to Brendan Gleeson)
Best Actor 1999: The Green Mile (#8 loses to Richard Farnsworth)
Best Actor 2000: Castaway (#3 loses to Guy Pearce)
Best Actor 2013: Captain Phillips (#5 loses to James McAvoy)
Forest Whitaker, 2 noms

Best Actor 1999: Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai (#6 loses to Richard Farnsworth)
Best Actor 2006: The Last King of Scotland (#6 loses to Ulrich Mühe)
Tom Cruise, 4 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1983: Risky Business (#9 loses to Christopher Walken) 
Best Actor 1996: Jerry Maguire (#10 loses to William H. Macy)
Best Supporting Actor 1999: Magnolia (#2 loses to Sam Rockwell)
Best Actor 2004: Collateral (WINS)
Val Kilmer, 3 noms

Best Actor 1991: The Doors (#2 loses to John Turturro)
Best Supporting Actor 1993: Tombstone (#3 loses to Richard Jordan)
Best Supporting Actor 2005: Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (#5 loses to Ed Harris)
Christian Bale, 4 noms

Best Actor 2000: American Psycho (#4 loses to Guy Pearce)
Best Actor 2006: The Prestige (#3 loses to Ulrich Mühe)
Best Actor 2007: Rescue Dawn (#7 loses to Casey Affleck)
Best Actor 2010: The Fighter (#8 loses to Choi Min-sik)
Viggo Mortensen, 7 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1991: The Indian Runner (#3 loses to John Turturro)
Best Supporting Actor 2001: The Fellowship of the Ring (#8 loses to Sean Bean)
Best Actor 2005: A History of Violence (#2 loses to Ray Winstone)
Best Actor 2007: Eastern Promises (#5 loses to Casey Affleck)
Best Actor 2009: The Road (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 2011: A Dangerous Method (#7 loses to Mark Strong)
Best Actor 2016: Captain Fantastic (#3 loses to Andrew Garfield)
John Lone, 2 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1985: Year of the Dragon (#9 loses to Christopher Lloyd)
Best Actor 1987: The Last Emperor (WINS)
Albert Brooks, 3 noms

Best Actor 1987: Broadcast News (#4 loses to John Lone)
Best Actor 1991: Defending Your Life (#5 loses to John Turturro)
Best Supporting Actor 2011: Drive (#2 loses to Mark Strong)
Kevin Bacon, 2 noms

Best Actor 2003: Mystic River (#6 loses to Russell Crowe)
Best Actor 2004: The Woodsman (#6 loses to Tom Cruise)
Kevin Spacey, 3 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1995: The Usual Suspects (#5 loses to Morgan Freeman)
Best Supporting Actor 1995: Seven (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1997: L.A. Confidential (#2 loses to Robert Blake)
James Cromwell, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1995: Babe (#5 loses to Kevin Spacey)
Best Supporting Actor 1997: L.A. Confidential (#3 loses to Robert Blake)
Robin Williams, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 2002: Insomnia (#3 loses to Bernard Hill)
Best Actor 2002: One Hour Photo (#9 loses to Ray Liotta)
Robert Downey JR., 5 noms

Best Actor 1992: Chaplin (#5 loses to Harvey Keitel)
Best Actor 2005: Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (#8 loses Ray Winstone)
Best Supporting Actor 2006: A Scanner Darkly (#7 loses to Michael Caine)
Best Actor 2008: Iron Man (#9 loses to Brendan Gleeson)
Best Supporting Actor 2008: Tropic Thunder (#4 loses to Heath Ledger)
Nicolas Cage, 4 noms

Best Actor 1990: Wild At Heart (#7 loses to James Caan)
Best Actor 1995: Leaving Las Vegas (#3 loses to Morgan Freeman)
Best Actor 2002: Adaptation (#5 loses to Ray Liotta)
Best Actor 2009: Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans (#5 loses to Viggo Mortensen)
Anthony Wong, 2 noms

Best Actor 1998: Beast Cops (#6 loses to Brendan Gleeson)
Best Supporting Actor 2003: Infernal Affairs II (#10 loses to Sean Astin)
Tony Leung Chiu-Wai, 3 noms

Best Actor 1998: The Longest Nite (#7 loses to Brendan Gleeson)
Best Actor 2000: In the Mood For Love (#8 loses to Guy Pearce)
Best Actor 2002: Infernal Affairs (#3 loses to Ray Liotta)
Gary Oldman, 8 noms 2 wins

Best Actor 1986: Sid and Nancy (#5 loses to Bob Hoskins)
Best Actor 1987: Prick Up Your Ears (#6 loses to John Lone)
Best Supporting Actor 1990: State of Grace (#3 loses to Joe Pesci)
Best Supporting Actor 1991: JFK (#3 loses to John Goodman)
Best Actor 1994: Immortal Beloved (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1994: Leon: The Professional (#4 loses to Martin Landau)
Best Supporting Actor 2008: The Dark Knight (#3 loses to Heath Ledger)
Best Actor 2011: Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (WINS)
Morgan Freeman, 5 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1987: Street Smart (#3 loses to Mandy Patinkin)
Best Actor 1989: Driving Miss Daisy (#8 loses to Daniel Day-Lewis)
Best Supporting Actor 1992: Unforgiven  (#8 loses to Gene Hackman)
Best Actor 1994: The Shawshank Redemption (#4 loses to Gary Oldman)
Best Actor 1995: Seven (WINS)
Sam  Neill, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1995: Restoration (#5 loses to Kevin Spacey)
Best Supporting Actor 2016: Hunt for the Wilderpeople (#2 loses to Ben Foster)
Liam Neeson, 4 noms

Best Actor 1993: Schindler’s List (#5 loses to Jeff Daniels)
Best Actor 1996: Michael Collins (#7 loses to William H. Macy)
Best Actor 2012: The Grey (#10 loses to Joaquin Phoenix and Mads Mikkelsen)
Best Supporting Actor 2016: Silence (#4 loses to Ben Foster)
Joe Pesci, 5 noms 2 wins

Best Supporting Actor 1980: Raging Bull (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1990: Goodfellas (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1991: JFK (#4 loses to John Goodman)
Best Actor 1992: My Cousin Vinny (#6 loses to Clint Eastwood)
Best Actor 1992: The Public Eye (#9 loses to Clint Eastwood)
John Goodman, 3 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1990: Arachnophobia (#10 loses to Joe Pesci)
Best Supporting Actor 1991: Barton Fink (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 1998: The Big Lebowski (#3 loses to Elias Koteas)
Ted Levine, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1991: The Silence of the Lambs (#5 loses to John Goodman)
Best Supporting Actor 2010: Shutter Island (#6 loses to John Hawkes)
Tommy Lee Jones, 3 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1991: JFK (#6 loses to John Goodman)
Best Actor 2005: The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada (#7 loses to Ray Winstone)
Best Supporting Actor 2007: No Country For Old Men (#10 loses to Ben Foster)
Samuel L. Jackson, 4 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1991: Jungle Fever (#9 loses to John Goodman)
Best Actor 1994: Pulp Fiction (#3 loses to Gary Oldman)
Best Supporting Actor 2012: Django Unchained (#3 loses to Christopher Walken)
Best Supporting Actor 2015: The Hateful Eight (#7 loses to Tom Hardy)
Ralph Fiennes, 5 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1993: Schindler’s List (#2 loses to Richard Jordan)
Best Actor 1994: Quiz Show (#7 loses to Gary Oldman)
Best Actor 2002: Spider (#10 loses to Ray Liotta)
Best Supporting Actor 2008: In Bruges (#2 loses to Heath Ledger)
Best Actor 2014: The Grand Budapest Hotel (#5 loses to Jake Gyllenhaal)
Pete Postlethwaite, 3 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1993: In The Name of the Father (#4 loses to Richard Jordan)
Best Supporting Actor 1996: Brassed Off (#7 loses to Steve Buscemi)
Best Supporting Actor 2010: The Town (#5 loses to John Hawkes)
Ben Kingsley, 5 noms

Best Actor 1982: Gandhi (#4 loses to Paul Newman)
Best Supporting Actor 1993: Schindler’s List (#5 loses to Richard Jordan)
Best Actor 1994: Death and the Maiden (#8 loses to Gary Oldman)
Best Supporting Actor 2001: Sexy Beast (#5 loses to Sean Bean)
Best Supporting Actor 2010: Shutter Island (#3 loses to John Hawkes)
Keanu Reeves, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 2005: Thumbsucker (#7 loses to Ed Harris)
Best Actor 2006: A Scanner Darkly (#10 loses to Ulrich Muhe)
Johnny Depp, 3 noms

Best Actor 1990: Edward Scissorhands (#8 loses to James Caan)
Best Actor 1994: Ed Wood (#6 loses to Gary Oldman)
Best Actor 2003: Pirates of the Caribbean (#8 loses to Russell Crowe)
Leonardo DiCaprio, 5 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1993: What’s Eating Gilbert Grape (#10 loses to Richard Jordan)
Best Actor 2006: The Departed (#5 loses to Ulrich Mühe)
Best Supporting Actor 2012: Django Unchained (#8 loses to Christopher Walken)
Best Actor 2013: The Wolf of Wall Street (#4 loses to James McAvoy)
Best Actor 2015: The Revenant (#10 loses to Jacob Tremblay)
Stephen Lang, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1993: Gettysburg (#8 loses to Richard Jordan)
Best Actor 2003: Gods and Generals (#3 loses to Russell Crowe)
John C. Reilly, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1999: Magnolia (#5 loses to Sam Rockwell)
Best Actor 2007: Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story (#9 loses to Casey Affleck)
Sam Rockwell, 4 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1999: Galaxy Quest (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 2007: The Assassination of Jesse James By the Coward Robert Ford (#7 loses Ben Foster)
Best Actor 2009: Moon (#4 loses to Viggo Mortensen)
Best Supporting Actor 2012: Seven Psychopaths (#4 loses to Christopher Walken)
Don Cheadle, 4 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1995: Devil in a Blue Dress (#6 loses to Kevin Spacey)
Best Supporting Actor 1997: Boogie Nights (#7 loses to Robert Blake)
Best Actor 2004: Hotel Rwanda (#8 loses to Tom Cruise)
Best Supporting Actor 2011: The Guard (#9 loses to Mark Strong)
Jude Law, 4 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1997: Gattaca (#4 loses to Robert Blake)
Best Supporting Actor 1999: The Talented Mr. Ripley (#6 loses to Sam Rockwell)
Best Supporting Actor 2001: A.I. Artificial Intelligence (#2 loses to Sean Bean)
Best Supporting Actor 2002: Road to Perdition (#7 loses to Bernard Hill)
Ethan Hawke, 2 noms

Best Actor 1995: Before Sunrise (#10 loses to Morgan Freeman)
Best Actor 2001: Training Day (#9 loses to Gene Hackman)
Benicio Del Toro, 3 noms

Best Supporting Actor 2000: Traffic (#6 loses to Malcolm McDowell)
Best Actor 2008: Che (#9 loses to Brendan Gleeson)
Best Supporting Actor 2015: Sicario (#9 loses to Tom Hardy)
Javier Bardem, 4 noms

Best Actor 2004: The Sea Inside (#3 loses to Tom Cruise)
Best Supporting Actor 2004: Collateral (#8 loses to Philip Seymour Hoffman)
Best Supporting Actor 2007: No Country For Old Men (#6 loses to Ben Foster)
Best Supporting Actor 2012: Skyfall (#2 losesto Christopher Walken)
Josh Brolin, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 2008: Milk (#7 loses to Heath Ledger)
Best Supporting Actor 2014: Inherent Vice (#3 loses to Gary Poulter)
Philip Seymour Hoffman, 8 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 1999: Magnolia (#7 loses to Sam Rockwell)
Best Supporting Actor 2000: Almost Famous (#7 loses to Malcolm McDowell)
Best Supporting Actor 2004: Along Came Polly (WINS)
Best Actor 2005: Capote (#4 loses to Ray Winstone)
Best Actor 2007: Before the Devil Knows You're Dead (#3 loses to Casey Affleck)
Best Actor 2008: Doubt (#10 loses to Brendan Gleeson)
Best Actor 2012: The Master (#3 loses to Joaquin Phoenix and Mads Mikkelsen)
Best Actor 2014: A Most Wanted Man (#8 loses to Jake Gyllenhaal)
Joaquin Phoenix, 3 noms 1 win

Best Actor 2012: The Master (WINS)
Best Actor 2013: Her (#8 loses to James McAvoy)
Best Actor 2014: Inherent Vice (#7 loses to Jake Gyllenhaal)
Derek Jacobi, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1989: Henry V (#8 loses to Sean Connery)
Best Supporting Actor 1996: Hamlet (#4 loses to Steve Buscemi)
Kenneth Branagh, 2 noms

Best Actor 1995: Othello (#9 loses to Morgan Freeman)
Best Actor 1996: Hamlet (#2 loses to William H. Macy)
Ian McKellen, 6 noms

Best Actor 1995: Richard III (#2 loses to Morgan Freeman)
Best Actor 1998: Apt Pupil (#2 loses to Brendan Gleeson)
Best Actor 1998: Gods and Monsters (#5 loses to Brendan Gleeson)
Best Supporting Actor 2001: The Fellowship of the Ring (#3 loses to Sean Bean)
Best Supporting Actor 2003: The Return of the King (#8 loses to Sean Astin)
Best Actor 2015: Mr. Holmes (#3 loses to Jacob Tremblay)
Andy Serkis, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 2002: The Two Towers (#6 loses to Bernard Hill)
Best Actor 2010: Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll (#7 loses to Choi Min-sik)
Paul Bettany, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 2003: Master and Commander (#3 loses to Sean Astin)
Best Actor 2003: Dogville (#7 loses to Russell Crowe)
Barry Pepper, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 2005: The Three Burial of Melquiades Estrada (#3 loses to Ed Harris)
Best Supporting Actor 2010: True Grit (#7 loses to John Hawkes)
Jackie Earle Haley, 3 noms

Best Supporting Actor 2006: Little Children (#2 loses to Michael Caine)
Best Supporting Actor 2009: Watchmen (#3 loses to Christoph Waltz)
Best Supporting Actor 2010: Shutter Island (#9 loses to John Hawkes)
Mickey Rourke, 8 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1981: Body Heat (#9 loses to Robert Prosky)
Best Supporting Actor 1982: Diner (#3 loses to Rutger Hauer)
Best Supporting Actor 1983: Rumble Fish (#3 loses to Darren McGavin)
Best Actor 1984: The Pope of Greenwich Village (#9 loses to F. Murray Abraham)
Best Actor 1987: Barfly (#8 loses to John Lone)
Best Actor 1987: Angel Heart (#9 loses to John Lone)
Best Supporting Actor 2005: Sin City (#4 loses to Ed Harris)
Best Actor 2008: The Wrestler (#4 loses to Brendan Gleeson)
Edward Norton, 5 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1996: Primal Fear (#3 loses to Steve Buscemi)
Best Actor 1998: American History X (#3 loses to Brendan Gleeson)
Best Actor 1999: Fight Club (#7 loses to Richard Farnsworth)
Best Supporting Actor 2005: Kingdom of Heaven (#2 loses to Ed Harris)
Best Supporting Actor 2014: Birdman (#4 loses to Gary Poulter)
Jim Carrey, 4 noms

Best Actor 1994: Dumb and Dumber (#9 loses to Gary Oldman)
Best Actor 1998: The Truman Show (#9 loses to Brendan Gleeson)
Best Actor 1999: Man on the Moon (#2 loses to Richard Farnsworth)
Best Actor 2004: Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (#5 loses to Tom Cruise)
George Clooney, 2 noms

Best Actor 2000: O Brother Where Art Thou? (#10 loses to Guy Pearce)
Best Actor 2010: The American (#6 loses to Choi Min-sik)
Mads Mikkelsen, 2 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 2006: Casino Royale (#4 loses to Michael Caine)
Best Actor 2012: The Hunt (WINS) 
Cillian Murphy, 4 noms

Best Actor 2002: 28 Days Later (#8 loses to Ray Liotta)
Best Supporting Actor 2005: Red Eye (#10 loses to Ed Harris)
Best Actor 2006: The Wind That Shakes The Barley (#9 loses to Ulrich Mühe)
Best Supporting Actor 2010: Inception (#4 loses to John Hawkes)
Jake Gyllenhaal, 3 noms 1 win

Best Actor 2001: Donnie Darko (#8 loses to Gene Hackman)
Best Actor 2013: Prisoners (#9 loses to James McAvoy)
Best Actor 2014: Nightcrawler (WINS)
Brendan Gleeson, 7 noms 2 win

Best Actor 1998: The General (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 2002: 28 Days Later (#5 loses to Bernard Hill)
Best Supporting Actor 2002: Gangs of New York (#9 loses to Bernard Hill)
Best Actor 2005: Six Shooter (#10 loses to Ray Winstone)
Best Actor 2008: In Bruges (WINS)
Best Actor 2011: The Guard (#7 loses to Gary Oldman)
Best Actor 2014: Calvary (#9 loses to Jake Gyllenhaal)
Matthew McConaughey, 6 noms

Best Actor 1996: A Time to Kill (#8 loses to William H. Macy)
Best Actor 2012: Killer Joe (#9 loses to Joaquin Phoenix and Mads Mikkelsen)
Best Supporting Actor 2013: The Wolf of Wall Street (#5 loses to Ben Foster)
Best Supporting Actor 2013: Mud (#8 loses to Ben Foster)
Best Actor 2013: Dallas Buyers Club (#2 loses to James McAvoy)
Best Actor 2014: Interstellar (#6 loses to Jake Gyllenhaal)
Woody Harrelson, 2 noms

Best Actor 2011: Rampart (#5 loses to Gary Oldman)
Best Supporting Actor 2012: Seven Psychopaths (#6 loses to Christopher Walken)
Ryan Gosling, 4 noms

Best Actor 2001: The Believer (#5 loses to Gene Hackman)
Best Actor 2010: Blue Valentine (#3 loses to Choi Min-sik)
Best Actor 2011: Drive (#2 loses Gary Oldman)
Best Actor 2016: La La Land (#6 loses to Andrew Garfield)
Billy Bob Thornton, 4 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1998: A Simple Plan (#2 loses to Elias Koteas)
Best Actor 2001: The Man Who Wasn’t There (#3 loses to Gene Hackman)
Best Actor 2001: Monster’s Ball (#10 loses to Gene Hackman)
Best Actor 2003: Bad Santa (#4 loses to Russell Crowe)
Ewan McGregor, 4 noms

Best Actor 1996: Trainspotting (#6 loses to William H. Macy)
Best Actor 2001: Moulin Rouge! (#4 loses to Gene Hackman)
Best Actor 2010: The Ghost Writer (#5 loses to Choi Min-sik)
Best Supporting Actor 2012: The Impossible (#10 loses to Christopher Walken)
Robert Carlyle, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 1996: Trainspotting (#6 loses to Steve Buscemi)
Best Supporting Actor 1999: Ravenous (#9 loses to Sam Rockwell)
Jason Isaacs, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 2000: The Patriot (#2 loses to Malcolm McDowell)
Best Supporting Actor 2003: Peter Pan (#7 loses to Sean Astin)
Daniel Craig, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 2002: Road to Perdition (#8 loses to Bernard Hill)
Best Actor 2006:  Casino Royale (#7 loses to Ulrich Mühe)
Russell Crowe, 5 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1997: L.A. Confidential (#2 loses to Philip Baker Hall)
Best Actor 1999: The Insider (#4 loses to Richard Farnsworth)
Best Actor 2000: Gladiator (#7 loses to Guy Pearce)
Best Actor 2001: A Beautiful Mind (#7 loses to Gene Hackman)
Best Actor 2003: Master and Commander (WINS)
Guy Pearce, 5 noms 1 win

Best Actor 1997: L.A. Confidential (#3 loses to Philip Baker Hall)
Best Actor 1999: Ravenous (#5 loses to Richard Farnsworth)
Best Actor 2000: Memento (WINS)
Best Actor 2005: The Proposition (#6 loses to Ray Winstone)
Best Actor 2014: The Rover (#3 loses to Jake Gyllenhaal)
Choi Min-sik, 2 noms 1 win

Best Actor 2003: Oldboy (#2 loses to Russell Crowe)
Best Actor 2010: I Saw the Devil (WINS)
Byung-hun Lee, 2 noms

Best Actor 2005: A Bittersweet Life (#3 loses to Ray Winstone)
Best Actor 2010: I Saw the Devil (#6 loses to Choi Min-sik)
Michael Fassbender, 6 noms

Best Actor 2008: Hunger (#3 loses to Brendan Gleeson)
Best Supporting Actor 2009: Fish Tank (#9 loses to Christoph Waltz)
Best Supporting Actor 2009: Inglourious Basterds (#5 loses to Christoph Waltz)
Best Actor 2011: Shame (#8 loses to Gary Oldman)
Best Supporting Actor 2013: 12 Years a Slave (#4 loses to Ben Foster)
Best Actor 2015: Macbeth (#7 loses to Jacob Tremblay)
Brad Pitt, 4 noms

Best Actor 1995: Seven (#8 loses to Morgan Freeman)
Best Actor 2007: The Assassination of Jesse James By the Coward Robert Ford (#4 loses to Casey Affleck)
Best Supporting Actor 2008: Burn After Reading (#5 loses to Heath Ledger)
Best Supporting Actor 2011: The Tree of Life (#3 loses to Mark Strong)
Casey Affleck, 3 noms 1 win

Best Actor 2007: The Assassination of Jesse James By the Coward Robert Ford (WINS)
Best Actor 2007: Gone Baby Gone (#6 loses to himself)
Best Actor 2016: Manchester by the Sea (#9 loses to Andrew Garfield)
Michael Sheen,  2 noms

Best Actor 2009: The Damned United (#8 loses to Viggo Mortensen)
Best Supporting Actor 2015: Far From the Madding Crowd (#10 loses to Tom Hardy)
Christoph Waltz, 3 noms 1 win

Best Supporting Actor 2009: Inglourious Basterds (WINS)
Best Actor 2012: Django Unchained (#7 loses to Joaquin Phoenix and Mads Mikkelsen)
Best Actor 2013: The Zero Theorem (#10 loses to James McAvoy)
Sharlto Copley, 2 noms

Best Actor 2009: District 9 (#2 loses to Viggo Mortensen)
Best Supporting Actor 2013: Elysium (#10 loses to Ben Foster)
Damian Lewis, 2 noms

Best Actor 2005: Keane (#5 loses to Ray Winstone)
Best Supporting Actor 2016: Our Kind of Traitor (#10 loses to Ben Foster)
Simon Pegg, 2 noms

Best Actor 2004: Shaun of the Dead (#7 loses to Tom Cruise)
Best Actor 2007: Hot Fuzz (#8 loses to Casey Affleck)
Joel Edgerton, 2 noms

Best Supporting Actor 2010: Animal Kingdom (#8 loses to John Hawkes)
Best Actor 2016: Loving (#4 loses to Andrew Garfield)
Tom Hardy, 6 noms 1 win

Best Actor 2009: Bronson (#3 loses to Viggo Mortensen)
Best Supporting Actor 2011: Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (#6 loses to Mark Strong)
Best Actor 2014: Locke (#4 loses to Jake Gyllenhaal)
Best Supporting Actor 2015: The Revenant (WINS)
Best Actor 2015: Legend (#2 loses to Jacob Tremblay)
Best Actor 2015: Mad Max: Fury Road (#8 loses to Jacob Tremblay)


Matthias Schoenaerts, 2 noms

Best Actor 2011: Bullhead (#4 loses to Gary Oldman)
Best Actor 2012: Rust and Bone (#8 loses to Joaquin Phoenix and Mads Mikkelsen)
 
Ben Foster, 7 noms 3 wins

Best Supporting Actor 2007: 3:10 to Yuma(WINS)
Best Actor 2009: The Messenger (#6 loses to Viggo Mortensen)
Best Supporting Actor 2013: Lone Survivor (WINS)
Best Supporting Actor 2013: Ain't Them Bodies Saints (#2 loses to himself)
Best Supporting Actor 2013: Kill Your Darlings (#9 loses to himself)
Best Actor 2015: The Program (#6 loses to Jacob Tremblay)
Best Supporting Actor 2016: Hell Or High Water (WINS) 
Oscar Isaac, 2 noms

Best Actor 2013: Inside Llewyn Davis (#3 loses to James McAvoy)
Best Supporting Actor 2015: Ex Machina (#8 loses to Tom Hardy)
Andrew Garfield, 2 noms 1 win

Best Actor 2016: Silence (WINS)
Best Actor 2016: Hacksaw Ridge (#10 loses to himself)