Wednesday, 19 April 2017

Alternate Best Supporting Actor 1984: Kenneth McMillan in Dune & The Pope of Greenwich Village and Sting in Dune

Kenneth McMillan nor Sting received an Oscar nomination for portraying Baron Vladimir Harkonnen and Feyd-Rautha respectively in Dune.

Well you won't quite seen any film like David Lynch's Dune, but that isn't exactly a good thing unlike most Lynch films. Seeing Lynch take on something like this is interesting in itself, but unfortunately that's mainly in the concept. In the execution it's often a dull film with Lynch, strangely enough of all people, making sure to explain everything within the sci-fi universe with constant long winded exposition.

Adding to the curiosity of the film is its notable cast, though some would gain their notoriety after this film, including Jurgen Prochnow, Brad Dourif, Richard Jordan, Max von Sydow, Jose Ferrer, Linda Hunt and Patrick Stewart. I'm focusing on perhaps two of the lesser known performers, as actors mind you, Kenneth McMillan and the musician Sting. Much of the cast is as dull as so many of the lines they deliver, luckily there are these two crazies waiting in the wings. McMillan and Sting play the two central, active, villains in the film who are bent on destroying the house of Atreides to which our hero Paul (Kyle MacLachlan) belongs. McMillan plays the Baron Harkonnen who spends much of his time having his giant pustules drained of their pus while he murders his servants via a heart plug he has installed in them, while Sting plays his nephew Feyd-Rautha who spends much of the film seemingly waiting in his green room in order to do something evil.

These two are the highlights of the film in every way possible because they're the only ones who want to try to make this a fun sci-fi adventure. McMillan is terrific by embracing the grotesque nature of his character to the nth degree. McMillan just revels in it in the best of ways as he portrays such a sick glee in the Baron as he goes about scheming to destroy the Atreides but also just when he goes about randomly doing any evil act. McMillan is the excessively indulgent creep he should be as his performance feels like gluttony incarnate. McMillan wastes no image of himself as even the way he rises and floats, rather than walks, has this deliciously sick sinister quality to it. Sting's take is a bit different in just that he plays Feyd-Rautha as though he knows he's the main boss for the film, and I mean the main boss in video game terms. Sting provides this overpowering confidence in just his swagger particularly in his scene where he walks around in a speedo for some reason. Sting even makes that scene work in a way though because the sheer ego of his portrayal matches such an act.

The two of them together are a whole lot of fun and the film comes to life whenever they are onscreen. It rather struggles the rest of the time, but with either the Baron or Feyd-Rautha onscreen you are in for some real entertainment. Although they are almost kind of in a different movie, that's fine because it's a much better movie. In that the two turns are fitting for a crazy science fiction adventure film rather than a boring one. McMillan is a great villain in his scenes as he captures a real menace by portraying such disgusting sadism so effectively. McMillan makes his scenes compelling by so intricately realizing the vile nature of the Baron in such an entertaining way. McMillan's work here, though again with a sci-fi bent, feels like a proper personification of Lynchian insanity, something that is sorely lacking or strangely underwhelming in so many other aspects of the film. I wish the rest of the film was able to match the wavelength that McMillan is on as the Baron. The only person who is there for him is Sting who again is built up so much until his final scene which is not wasted by him. Sting comes in with such cockiness and just everything about him provides the perfect smugness for his villain. Of course the high point of all of it is Sting rather brilliant and properly absurd delivery of the line "I WILL KILL HIM!!!!" again and again. Do these two chew the scenery, sure, but have you seen this scenery? These two are the only ones who know how to handle the scenery and handle they do. They become one with ridiculousness that surrounds them to create two great stylized villains worthy to be David Lynch villains, even if the film is more than cut below the average Lynch.
(For Sting)
(For McMillan)
Kenneth McMillan also did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Barney in The Pope of Greenwich Village.

Kenneth McMillan sadly is one of those actors who died just as he was breaking out as a character actor. He proved his talents though in 1984 where he appeared in three high profile films. The aforementioned Dune, this film, and Amadeus. His appearance in Amadeus was only in two deleted scenes, added back into the director's cut, though I don't feel those scenes belong in the film McMillan was good in them. His larger two roles of 1984 are the ones I'm covering here which together are signs of a great character actor. In Dune he proves his ability to find his own path within a problematic film, and in Pope of Greenwich village he proves another important skill for a character actor through his success in a potential throwaway role. McMillan plays Barney a clock repairman but also a amateur safe cracker who goes along with the two hapless criminals/cousins of Charlie (Mickey Rourke) and Paulie (Eric Roberts) on a robbery in order to solve all their money problems. McMillan though ensures that Barney isn't just the third wheel of the crew even though he is given the least importance within the film.

First off McMillan proves that he is quite capable of given a far more low key performance here than in Dune. He is just as effective at giving a reality to this shop keep in New York as he is giving the grand madness to a space tyrant. From his first scene I love the history that McMillan infuses into Barney. He portrays a complete lack of ego as he explains his skills presenting the sort of man who has mostly come to terms with who he is. McMillan gives it a bit of somberness in his eyes yet with just a quiet touches of pride in his delivering showing a guy who isn't completely happy where he's ended up yet is not planning on giving up just yet. McMillan's work gives so much nuance to Barney even in the scenes where he is just watching Charlie and Paulie as they are talking. McMillan says so much even when he's saying nothing as Barney examines his two partners with a slight critical eye. McMillan adds a nice touch of humor by revealing just how unimpressed Barney is by them, but by also offering a contrast in style. McMillan portrays Barney with a very casual demeanor as they discuss the crime, as he's done similair work before, against Charlie and Paulie who bring far more intensity in the discussion given they are amateurs.

What I love about McMillan's performance is he's the lead of his own story, there is nothing about what McMillan does that limits Barney. McMillan leaves no moment just lying there as he brings depth to all his onscreen behavior. Even something like how he acts in the robbery scene McMillan does so well as he captures some underlying fear of the situation yet still brings the assurance of a guy whose had the past experience. McMillan adds just that that extra bit of honesty to every scene by giving every reaction and interaction this richness of a life lived. As good as McMillan is before the robbery scene he's great afterwards. Again Barney could have been a throwaway role with a lesser actor, just a footnote for Charlie and Paulie's story. McMillan doesn't allow that. In a scene afterwards where he asks Charlie to essentially make sure his family gets his share, McMillan offers such earnestness that made me care more about Barney than Paulie or even Charlie. I'll admit watching the film the first time I became quite concerned, since often things don't often turn out well for the older accomplice in films. This became all the more troubling when we see Barney ready himself to leave New York saying goodbye to his wife. McMillan is absolutely heartbreaking the scene as his strained delivery suggests his years of failures yet with such genuine affection in his eyes as he says farewell to his wife. In only a moment onscreen McMillan alludes to so many years and even allows you to sense his relationshis with his wife. I was overjoyed when Barney does escape and that was because McMillan made me so invested in this poor old guy. This is an incredible supporting performance as he goes far beyond the call of the role to create such a vivid portrait of this small time crook that could have been just an easily forgotten side character in the film. That achievement is the mark of a great character actor.

60 comments:

94dfk1 said...

Louis: Who would you cast for each of the roles in the upcoming reboot? Now that Villenueve is doing it.

Calvin Law said...

Thoughts and ratings on the other cast members in Dune, and Burt Young in Pope.

Calvin Law said...

Also, I watched The Pope of Greenwich Village and I'll admit I kind of loved the whole thing through and through (even Roberts, goodness me), reminded me a lot of Mississipi Grind in a way. Who'd you cast in a modern day adaptation? I'd go for Emory Cohen in Rourke's role and Alfie Allen in Roberts's role.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: I just checked your winning requests page and A Room For Romeo Brass is 2000 by your rules, not 1998.

Louis Morgan said...

94dk1:

Paul: Sam Claflin
Lady Jessica: Charlotte Gainsbourg
Duke Atreides: Richard Armitage
Thufir Hawat: Toby Jones
Duncan Idaho: Liev Schreiber
Gurney Halleck: Dominic West
Reverend Mother Mohiam: Juliette Binoche
Peter De Vries: Ben Whishaw
Emperor Shaddam: Ian McShane
Baron Vladimir Harkonnen: John Carroll Lynch
Feyd-Rautha: Dan Stevens

Calvin:

Glad you also loved it as well, possibly even more than I did.

Dune:

Jordan - 3(The best performance that isn't totally bonkers but Jordan's only in a couple of brief scenes. Jordan though manages just a bit of charm, strikes up just a bit of camaraderie with those he speaks in just his little time. He manages to avoid the blandness of the rest of the cast, but unfortunately has too little to do.)

MacLachlan - 2(He tends to be a little bland as a performer to begin with so this material does him no favors whatsoever. He's a very wooden hero to follow and does not make much of an impression.)

Jones, Annis, Ferrer, Hunt, Prochnow, Stewart - 2.5(They are not quite actively boring yet they can't quite make their material compelling in any real way. They give oddly stock performances from a sci-fi film.)

Dourif and Stockwell - 2(Very disappointing from these two since they come off so dry given given how entertaining they can be when they go a little mad. They don't though.)

von Sydow's barely in it.

Young - 3.5(Considering his usual casting as the hapless loser I was quite surprised by his work here as he managed to actually strike up quite the menace in a rather easy going way. He's legitimately great in the scene where he interrogates Roberts as he so effectively suggests the threat behind his words even as he speaks so casually on the surface. In just a few scenes he made a properly imposing figure in his mob boss.)

I actually think Charlie, based on Sin City 2 of all things, might be just the right role for Joseph Gordon-Levitt, though I like Allen as Paulie.

RatedRStar said...

Louis: What are your thoughts on The Police? I tend to think of them as being a pretty solid band =D.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: and maybe John Carroll Lynch or Richard Jenkins as Barney?

Calvin Law said...

Levitt would be a great choice, though! Hadn't thought of that.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Could you rank the casts of Seasons 1 and 2 of Fargo.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Boyd Holbrook in Narcos.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: What do you think of Sam Claflin.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Lastly, have you seen Jessica Jones.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: 5 character tropes/caricatures you think it's impossible/very hard to give a good performance playing.

Luke Higham said...

Tahmeed: Full Retard's surely one of them.

Louis: One more thing, thoughts on Pedro Pascal in Narcos.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your cast and director for a 1960's Dune.

Charles Heiston said...

What lovely performances by McMillan, he might have a shot at winning the overall.

Anonymous said...

Luke: I thought Jessica Jones was okay. Can't say I'm a fan of live-action comic book TV shows.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: Me neither.

94dfk1 said...

Tahmeed: Sociopaths/psychopaths can also be hard to play, since actors have to be on point and there's little margin for error; otherwise they can come off as cartoonish or over-the-top.

Charles Heiston said...

Tahmeed: As 94dfk1 mentioned, psychopaths. And also broad comedy.

Calvin Law said...

The jerk jock is also one that's hard to pull off. Seriously, seeing some bad examples of it makes me appreciate the good versions all the more.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Have you seen The Man With The Golden Gun.

Calvin Law said...

Anyone seen the season premiere of Fargo?

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the Fargo season premiere.

Anonymous said...

Finally saw The Fate of the Furious. I thought it was hit and miss. Good action, but it takes it self way too seriously for a Fast and Furious movie. I'm tired of this franchise. It has run its course. It was never great to begin with, the characters were never that interesting. Like the Transformers franchise, it should just fucking die.
Ratings:
Diesel: 2,5
Johnson: 3,5
Statham: 3,5
Bridges/Gibson: 3
Rodriguez: 2
Eastwood: 2,5
Russell: 3,5
Hivju: 3
Theron: 2
Mirren: 3

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: I'm glad we agree. I'm pretty much done with it now. Only Ben Foster or a Hobbs/Statham spin-off would entice me to come back.

Anonymous said...

Luke: Sure, a Furious film with Ben Foster would be good, but after he is killed off, and then they make another one, I won't care about it anymore. I doubt that one Furious film will be in a list of top 50 action films of all time.

Luke Higham said...

*Hobbs/Deckard

Anonymous: Fast Five could make the top 100, but certainly not the top 50.

Anonymous said...

Luke: I was thinking, if they made a Fantastic Four movie set in the MCU, I think JGL would be a great Reed Richards.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: Maybe.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Season 1:

1. Billy Bob Thornton
2. Martin Freeman
3. Adam Goldberg
4. Alison Tolman
5. Keith Carradine
6. Colin Hanks
7. Russell Harvard
8. Bob Odenkirk
9. Glenn Howerton
10. Oliver Platt
11. Key & Peele
12. Kate Walsh
13. Josh Close

Season 2 (Only the bottom four I wouldn't consider great, and they're still quite good):

1. Kirsten Dunst
2. Bokeem Woodbine
3. Angus Sampson
4. Jesse Plemons
5. Zahn McClarnon
6. Jean Smart
7. Patrick Wilson
8. Jeffrey Donovan
9. Nick Offerman
10. Ted Danson
11. Cristin Milioti
12 .Kieran Culkin
13. Rachel Keller
14. Keir O'Donnell
15. Adam Arkin
16. Brad Garrett
17. Bruce Campbell



Holbrook - (Ah he has a pretty thankless role. In that he might as be called "average dude" in terms of how much he is the audience surrogate. Holbrook has a certain charm, and even manages to portray well the little bit of conflict he is given. That is always very minor though. The problem is though he's really mostly there to set up scenes for the far more compelling Wagner Moura as Escobar. In the second season this dynamic really showed as his character could not sustain his scenes that felt out of the sphere of Escobar. Again Holbrook does what he can but the writing just really isn't there.)

I think that kid has potential I tell yah. Though I didn't think his performance in Catching Fire was amazing it showed potential in terms of having that presence needed for that sort of warrior hero type of role.

I have.

Pascal - (Like Holbrook his role is very limited and he is also overshadowed by Moura despite not sharing any scenes together. Also like Holbrook though he does have a certain charm and is good in portraying, basically in the margins, his character's moral conflict as he goes about extreme ends to take down Escobar. I also rather like his chemistry with Holbrook the two make for an endearing pair but again their scenes just don't stand out on their own. He's good but in the scheme of the show even he's not all that memorable. Although to be honest Moura was the only memorable thing really about season 2.)

Parts of.

Loved the premiere. Hawley's riffs on the familiar Coen brother tropes are again so much fun, and it's all amplified by so compelling visual direction. Great set up episode but also very satisfying as it stands. Really liked Winstead, McNairy was a lot of fun, McGregor seems like he's going to be great, and Thewlis in his single scene gave possibly his best work since Naked.

Tahmeed:

Very hard to pull off I think are the better description for these.

Jock/bully(Kudos Thomas F. Wilson)
Secondary gilted husband(Kudos Claude Rains/Sam Neill)
Weasel villain (Kudos Chris Sarandon)
Mental Retardation (Kudos Toby Kebbell)
Perpetual Whiner (Kudos Albert Brooks)

Anonymous:

Dune 1960's Directed by Robert Wise:

Paul: Oliver Reed
Lady Jessica: Deborah Kerr
Duke Atreides: Dirk Bogarde
Thufir Hawat: Burgess Meredith
Duncan Idaho: Brad Dexter
Gurney Halleck: Ricardo Montalban
Reverend Mother Mohiam: Vivien Leigh
Peter De Vries: Maximilian Schell
Emperor Shaddam: Basil Rathbone
Baron Vladimir Harkonnen: Burl Ives
Feyd-Rautha: Richard Harris

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Jessica Jones and thoughts on the cast.

Anonymous said...

Louis: What are your thoughts on the screenplay of All the President's Men? It's easily one of the best things about the film.

Charles Heiston said...

Louis: Your Top 10 supporting roles of the 90's. Although i think you gave them before.

Giuseppe Fadda said...

Thoughts on Kate Walsh in Fargo?

Calvin Law said...

You should watch Claflin in The Riot Club Louis. In a cast full of Douglas Booths and Max Irons, he stands out pretty brilliantly.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Charles: Got you covered mate, here they are:_

1. Martin Landau - Ed Wood
2. Richard Jordan - Gettysburg
3. Gene Hackman - Unforgiven
4. John Goodman - Barton Fink
5. Joe Pesci - Goodfellas
6. Robert Blake - Lost Highway
7. Kevin Spacey - L.A. Confidential
8. Elias Koteas - The Thin Red Line
9. Steve Buscemi - Fargo
10. James Whitmore - The Shawshank Redemption
Reference-http://actoroscar.blogspot.com/2016/08/alternate-best-supporting-actor-2011.html

Anonymous said...

Louis: Will you watch Akira in Japanese or in English? If you watch it in English, watch the 2001 dub. The 1988 dub is awful.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Both dubs suck, just watch it subbed.

Anonymous said...

Robert: Really? I thought the 2001 dub was good compared to the old one. Do you hate the 2001 dub because it has Johnny Yong Bosch in it? I'm not the biggest fan of him, but he was much better than Cam Clarke. I'll agree that the Japanese version is better than both.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I don't feel the 2001 aged well. Better to watch that one subbed.

94dfk1 said...

Louis: Thanks. I do wonder who Villeneuve will cast as Paul, and if he'll decide to make a trilogy of the book.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your ratings/thoughts on the supporting performances from Amadeus.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your rating for David Warner in The Fixer.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Lastly, your ratings for the Les Miserables (1978) cast.

Charles Heiston said...

Tahmeed: Oh thanks!

Louis: Your thoughts on Minoru Chiaki in I Live in Fear.

Louis Morgan said...

Saw Free Fire.

Luke:

Jessica Jones as with the other Marvel series suffers greatly from its structure which is at its core simply he hero vs the villain drawn out into 13 episodes. In order to reach all 13 it stretches out its concepts, makes revelations slow, and constantly repeats itself and situations. There are good moments in the series but just moments that are weakened by how spread out they are. It also introduces some ideas yet it doesn't truly explore them in more than a superficial way, which is problematic for such dark material in some cases. It's fundamentally flawed by its structure since it doesn't stay with its character enough to be a compelling character piece, but it is also far too dull to be much of an action oriented tv show.

Ritter - (In terms of being just sort of the tough PI she's more than just fine. She has enough of a presence and is able to carry herself and manages some intimidation. The show though does her no real favors though as it demands her to be emotionally desperate and vulnerable. When the show has her directly state she has PTSD that isn't very effectively shown in her performance. She'll have emotional moments which she handles well enough yet it doesn't seem representative of that underlying issue as she does realizes all that well within the rest of her performance. She's more than decent but she can't quite be everything the show needs her to be which is a challenge.)

Taylor - (She's not very good though not the worst thing about the show by any margin. I'll get to that in a moment. Her performance though is more fitting to the best friend in a sitcom as her performance often feels too lightweight given some of the situations again the show does her no favors in that regard. Her performance in turn is tonally awkward at times and is merely acceptable in the light scenes and very underwhelming in the dark scenes.)

Traval - (His performance is mostly just bland for his first scenes and again particularly underwhelming in the darker scenes. He struggles terribly when ever he tries to portray true anguish. When he switches to Nuke he's a major letdown failing to bring the intensity needed for the character, making his most violent actions seem random rather than natural to broken adrenaline fueled monster he should be.)

Moriarty - (As with Blood Father she's pretty awful here. That is particularly problematic when empathy for her is such a pivotal part of much of the series. Her performance though just isn't convincing in the least.)

Darville - (He's okayish in being the one note junkie type, but again he's pretty one note as the junkie. When he switches he's okay as the supportive friend, but there is not a great deal to his character after the switch.)

Louis Morgan said...

Moss - (She's good at providing the icy edge tongue needed for her character who I feel isn't exactly best utilized at any point. Unfortunately her subplots always feel like filler rather than substantial towards the main plot. Moss though does provide the right cutting lawyer stature even if the series fails to make the most of it.)

Tennant - (The best part of the show without question. He's legitimately great in providing a complete sociopath egomaniac. Tennant manages to find that combination of being entertaining while being genuinely menacing like a great comic book villain. He tears into every scene most effectively and his style is quite fitting to his character who gets whatever he wants from merely saying so. Tennant brings this casual manner that makes him particularly sinister as he portrays the ease of his character's evil. In addition he is good in the scenes where he is challenged in some way as he makes the struggle to try to find any sort of humanity within his psychopathy actually strangely affecting at times particularly the scenes where he talks about his origin. I do think the series kind of abuses his presence about it as it eventually becomes too much of a good thing, as it soon becomes obvious he isn't the series's ace, he's the only card they have. He's good and stays good, but it does feel like he's performing reruns before the end of the series.)

Amadeus:

Dotrice - 4(Love the way he captures sort of the particular father/son relationship with Wolfgang. In that Dotrice shows a definite love for his son and there is always a warmth with him particularly when they are speaking about music together. Dotrice though effectively undercuts that against his interactions with Berridge in portraying his disappointments in his son almost all are intensified and directed towards her. Dotrice is very good in portraying it through passive aggression as every comment has a certain bite behind it.)

Kay, Hines, Moore. Cook - 3.5(All four of these guys are so much fun as they set themselves apart yet unify in representing sort of the reaction to Mozart in one way or another. Kay as the snooty elite turning his nose against everything, Hines as the entertaining sycophant just going with the "critical" consensus, Moore as the ardent yet quiet supporter of the new, and Cook as the calm opportunist at what the native borne can do for his interests. Love the life they bring to every one of the court scenes.)

Louis Morgan said...

Callow - 3.5(Quite good in his vaudeville recreations and parodies. He's downright hilarious in his requiem scene though in portraying the sheer ego of the actor, revealing just how insufferable the man is when he isn't getting exactly what he wants.)

Ebersole - 3.5(She's entertaining as the very typical diva though her role is rather limited but does well in portraying the blunt anger when she also learns the true nature of Mozart.)

Frank - 4(One could almost take this as textbook example of a great reactionary performance in that he only has a few lines, and is mainly there to watch. Frank does so much in just that watching though making the most out of every interaction with Abraham and his final expression is such powerful moment in the finale.)

Warner - 3

Les Miserables:

Jordan - 5
Perkins - 5
Pleasence - 3.5
Langrishe - 2
Guard - 2
Holm - 3.5(Shame this was a reduced Thenardier)
Cusack - 3
Gielgud - 3
Dauphin - 3

Anonymous:

It's a brilliant screenplay and I would say helped to define the modern procedural. It so masterfully constructs the complicated story in a detestable form and although it never focuses on the characters per se he manages infuse life into them through the differing and pointed dialogue.

Giuseppe:

Walsh - (Her performance is pretty brief though she is rather enjoyable as the purposefully straight forward sexpot wife whose lost a bit of her luster over time. She's funny in her little bit of time, and serves her purpose quite well. She avoids becoming cartoon, but is somewhat absurd in the way she should be for the role.)

Anonymous:

Subbed for that film.

Charles:

Chiaki - 3(His role is relatively limited but I did like that he avoided making his character any sort of villain. Although he portrayed a little indifference towards his father's concerns he though underlined it with sort of this genuine dismay towards his more problematic behavior that while not selfless did not come as selfish. As Chiaki manages to bring this common sense to his manner that he shows partially defines his character.)

Calvin Law said...

Thoughts and ratings on the cast of Free Fire, and thoughts on the film itself?

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: You left Beauty and the Beast out of your 2017 ranking.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

I enjoyed the film but I wouldn't say I loved it. I thought it kind of ran out of steam by the end failing to go out on a real bang oddly enough. Not that it ended truly poorly but I did feel they had to stretch the concept just a bit. Still had a lot of fun with the concept for quite awhile. I do feel they could have given just a bit more meat to a few of the characters, and I actually think they may have picked the wrong order for who dies when.

Copley - 4(He's Copleying it up to 11 here which is fine by me and fitting both to his egotistical maniac and the semi-absurd tone of the film. I had a lot of fun with Copley here though as he really knew how to put the fun into the insanity as he even getting hit by a bullet in the arm he managed to make somewhat amusing through his reactions. He's ridiculous to be sure, but I felt he was ridiculous in the right way.)

Hammer - 4(Really enjoyed his performance as the consummate professional out of everyone. Hammer's style of delivery worked perfectly for that as I like how calm he kept his words even as the situation got more insane. Hammer's reactions also were great as I love the distance he keeps by always staying as just a man doing a job the whole time.)

Larson - 3.5(Thought they kind of underused her at points. I liked her performance though as she managed to get down the particular comedic tone of the material and for her character in particular. In that Larson manages to play well with sincerity and deception in just a moments notice. My favorite moment of hers was probably her to the side eye roll towards Copley's characters claim of not hitting women.)

Murphy - 3.5(The hero I guess? Murphy's good as sort of a straight man and offering the little bit of emotion to the film given he's one of the only ones who actually seems to care when people die. Murphy handles those moments well. He's a good balancing factor overall offering a more realistic take while avoiding becoming overshadowed by his more overt co-stars.)

Taylor - 3(Felt he was rather wasted given he really didn't have a role past "henchmen" I thought he did his best though within his very extreme limits.)

Smiley - 3(Needed more back and forths with Hammer I feel as I did enjoy the few they had. Again feel he could have been given a bit more to do once the shooting starts but he is pretty good in portraying the sheer exasperation of his older gangster.)

Ceesay - 3(Didn't make of an impression until his scene later on which I thought he managed to be rather entertaining in throwing himself really into portraying such sheer nonsensical behavior.)

Riley - 3(Little torn on him as was suppose to hate him that much, maybe. Then job well done as Riley is completely intolerable in portraying his drugged out jerk where everything he does just seems at least slightly obnoxious.)

Reynor - 3.5(Really enjoyed his performance as he managed to be kind of the guy who took it both the most and least seriously. Reynor does well in portraying this sort of comic intensity in that he portrays his character having a blast while also genuinely wanting to make sure he kills a certain someone.)

Calvin Law said...

Copley and Reynor were easily my favourites.

Luke: I realized, I think I might want to give it a re watch first before deciding on how to rate Evans and Stevens.

Calvin Law said...

Because I actually think they could have switched around Remote and Riley's allegiances (especially since Reynor is Irish) and made it work.

Louis Morgan said...

Sorry for deleting your other comment, but I feel we should avoid spoilers since it just came out. However I do agree that those deaths should have been switched around.

Calvin Law said...

That's alright Louis haha. Also, 1980s version of Free Fire? I've got a 1960s and 1970s one I'm working on how.

Calvin Law said...

Also, what did you make of the John Denver/Annie's Song scene? I found it strangely compelling.

Louis Morgan said...

Quite enjoyed that moment, though I think it would have been better a little earlier.

80's Free Fire:

Justine: Marcia Gay Harden
Chris: Gabriel Byrne
Martin: Delroy Lindo
Stevo: Tim Roth
Frank: Terence Stamp
Harry: Robert Carlyle
Bernie: Robert Powell
Gordon: James Fox
Ord: Mickey Rourke
Vernon: David Warner

Calvin Law said...

1960s directed by John Sturges

Julie Christie as Justine
Richard Attenborough as Vernon
Steve McQueen as Ord
Patrick McGoohan as Chris
Richard Harris as Harry
Ossie Davis as Martin
Don Rickles as Bernie
Scott Wilson as Stevo
Dan O'Herlihy as Frank

1970s directed by Sam Peckinpah

Jane Fonda as Justine
Gene Hackman as Vernon
Donald Sutherland as Ord
David Warner as Chris
James Woods as Harry
Rupert Crosse as Bernie
Warren Oates as Stevo
Patrick Magee as Frank

Calvin Law said...

*Rupee Crosse as Martin