Friday, 7 April 2017

Alternate Best Actor 1984: Terence Stamp and John Hurt in The Hit

Terence Stamp did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Willie Parker and John Hurt did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Mitchell Braddock in The Hit.

The Hit is a terrific low key crime film about two hit men attempting to transport a police informant to face his former colleague.

The Hit features to begin with very interesting reverse casting for the accomplished actors in the two leads. Terence Stamp who often played the predator in films such as The Collector, Superman, and Far From the Madding Crowd plays the prey in the form of the police informant Willie while John Hurt who was often the unfortunate victim such as in Alien and 10  Rillington Place, is the would be assassin. The two very talented actors have no difficultly with this adjustment, as we first see Braddock in the film's stylized intro, but we first meet Stamp's Willie as he is successfully testifies against his old gang. Stamp technically plays his trick early on which is the basis for his characterization of Willie, but no reason to give away the trick quite yet. In terms of the sheer basic performance requirement it is a lot of fun seeing Stamp in this more passive sort of role especially in this opening scene as he testifies against his former colleagues. Stamp is curiously enjoyable as he portrays Willie almost a little too aloof in his testimony as though he's barely giving a second though, I particularly like his strangely passionless explanation that he's only testifying because he thinks it is the right thing to do.

The film then jumps ahead ten years to reveal Willie hiding in Spain where he gets caught up by some local thugs and is brought to the English hit men of Braddock and his young accomplice Myron (Tim Roth) who will take him the rest of the way. Once Willie sees the men, and figures where he's going he takes somewhat curious yet rather brilliant approach. In that he again makes Willie rather easygoing given his rather difficult situation. Stamp portrays this all the way in these scenes as his very physical manner is as though he is on a casual vacation, and speaks as though he's talking to some acquaintances. The trick is, though not specifically stated, is within Stamp's performance in that while rather aloof he's not entirely detached. Stamp instead suggests that Willie is playing a game, and is trying to work the men though without them noticing. Stamp's great as he actually gives a rather comedic performance at times by portraying Willie as trolling the two men in an attempt to mess up their plan. When early on Willie introduces himself to a stranger, Stamp's delivery is oh so pleasant yet there seems to be a distinct pleasure in the act that makes things a bit more complicated for Braddock and Myron.

Well that brings us to old Braddock played by the one and only John Hurt. Hurt's performance plays so perfectly against Stamp because he shows quite bluntly that Braddock is not playing a game, he's doing a job. Hurt's whole presence exudes this world weariness fitting to a man whose job is to kill people, and to a man who has doing it for quite some time. Hurt portrays no joy or eagerness when they initially catch Willie, he just gives him a straight stare as though he's confirming a work order. Hurt does not use this to suggest that Braddock is any way fed up with his job, but rather that he's so accustom to it that it has become rather routine. The two are a great balance, and only amplified more so by the overeager Myron. Braddock is the man of the least words leaving most of the speaking to Myron, except for the words that actually need to be said. Hurt's performance is almost the opposite of his turn in the Elephant, where his face was almost entirely covered, as so much of this turn relies on his facial reactions. Hurt, like Stamp, is often rather funny though with Hurt it is through exasperated reactions towards the stupidity of Myron or his attempt to figure out what exactly Willie is up to.

That is not to say Braddock is some hapless sap, in fact far from it. It is fascinating to see Hurt take on the role given that he is not the most physically imposing figure yet that does not matter. Hurt in a strange way makes use of his wiry frame to add to the personal style of Braddock which is this minimalist and specific action. Hurt is actually quite chilling in the role by so effectively realizing this method of Braddock, as he says so much even as he speaks so little. The menace that Hurt exudes is quite remarkable by how effortless he makes it. On one end this is in portraying the exactness of the man's action, as Hurt is excellent in his slight reaction conveying the way Braddock dissects then acts. For example there is a moment where Willie suggests that a third party probably will talk, and Hurt is rather chilling by managing to convey in his expression Braddock determining that the man must die. In the scenes where Braddock goes about killing someone Hurt is so quietly terrifying, as he does not show quite a true sadism as Braddock but does show just how simple the act has become for him.

I rather love how Hurt approaches this because it manages to do two things. On one hand he is the heavy he needs to be by making an act so vicious by being so unassuming while doing it, as he will just casually hold a gun or reveal it since he's done it for so many years. Hurt technically has the traits of the usual "cool" hit man, with his sunglasses, his way of smoking, his casual demeanor, but he uses for a more disturbing end. Hurt's work goes further than that as it also suggests the weight of the years of this life. Hurt though doesn't use this to garner Braddock a true sympathy but rather a troubling understanding. He can be so blase because he's killed so many people in his life, and there is something quite unnerving about such a situation. When Braddock gives sort of a stay of execution at times for Willie, as well as their unfortunate fourth passenger, Maggie who they take along as hostage, Hurt makes it less of the man feeling any sorrow for them rather just sort of saying "Hmm not quite the right time yet". In this way Hurt technically is on a similair wavelength to Stamp in that he's also playing a trick on his companions and the audience, the difference is it isn't quite as purposeful. You may think that Braddock might have a bit of mercy in him somewhere, but in reality we just don't know him well enough yet.

Now I seem to be wrongly ignoring Stamp who stays rather consistent through much of the film, which is not problem given what he shows his character's up to, and also the fact that he is also consistently entertaining in the role as Willie so jovially plants the seeds of doubt in his captors' minds. Stamp though does portray this gradual transition of sorts as though Willie is kind of slowly getting more and more into this character he's developed for himself to trick the men with. The character being a man who is frankly above it all, to the point that he even claims to be above dying. When he describes that death is but a natural process, Stamp grants it the sincerity of a true philosopher who maybe believes exactly what he says. Fittingly as always Hurt's equally good in the scene in portraying Braddock genuinely taken aback by someone who has come to terms with death, something he himself hasn't. The problem is all the tricks come to a head though and all is revealed. On one hand Stamp shows that this really is an act that old Willie has crafted, and over the day has almost begun believe his own acting. Stamp earns a change in this as when he is initially captured, as well as initially threatened by his old colleagues, he shows a man fearful of his life. This is revealed to be the real man when Braddock reveals he's decided to kill them all early. Stamp's actually rather heartbreaking as his act breaks with such a genuine moment of realization of the fear of death as Braddock tells him his time is up. Hurt on the other hand again was showing no trick, but rather a misinterpretation of his actions. Braddock reprieves were not out of any sympathy but just a man knowing he could finish the job later. As we are reminded of Braddock's violent moments which are all standout moments due to Hurt. There's a moment where Maggie attempts to get help, and Hurt's reaction is sheer perfection as it is less "oh no" and more "what you really think I haven't handled something like this before?". This everyday approach to the hit man is downright amazing especially in those small moments that seem so fitting to a man just going through the motions that make the character particularly menacing. Now Stamp gives a fantastic performance, but I absolutely loved Hurt's approach to his role. Although we never leave the confines of the job Hurt through these scenes gives such a vivid portrait of this hit man that in no way makes him any less intimidating.
(For Stamp)
(For Hurt)

110 comments:

Anonymous said...

They were great.
Louis: Your thoughts on Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke in The Miracle Worker. I don't think you have given them yet.

Calvin Law said...

I thought both were great, but yes Hurt went a step further. I don't know about you Louis, but I absolutely LOVED his reaction shots to getting bitten on the hand, and that final wink.

Also, I could see a version of this in about 10 years time with Fassbender in Stamp's role and Tom Hardy in Hurt' s.

Calvin Law said...

Also, thoughts and ratings for Bill Hunter and del Sol? And just about the only flaw I found with the film were those Fernando Rey cutaways which weren't bad, but not all that interesting.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Duke - (Duke's physical portrayal of Keller is stunning as she makes feel natural, and most importantly emotional. She's never just swaying around for the sake of it as every gesture she manages to implicate the thought process within the action. Her movements always actually speak for her which is absolutely remarkable whether it is revealing affection in her scenes with her mother, intensity towards Bancroft, or shying away when Bancroft gains the edge. Duke makes Keller knowable furthermore when she does speak it is as powerful as it should be.)

Bancroft - (Fantastic performance as she is so much more than the "great teacher" type. Now Bancroft has those moments and excels with them. She provides the warmth as well as the passion when revealing her own connection towards Keller due to her own childhood. Bancroft though goes further though as she never sugarcoats the method. Bancroft is terrific by showing essentially just how tough it is and I love the way that Bancroft does show her brushing off the hits. She takes them and feels them, and doesn't like them. Bancroft reveals the devotion of achieving the impossible but she also shows the difficulty of it. Bancroft like Duke's is such varied and vivid work. Neither are ever just figures of note, but rather extraordinary people we meet.)

Calvin:

Oh I loved pretty much every reaction Hurt had in the film.

Hunter - 4(I'd qualify him as a one scene wonder. Hunter gives so much life to his character in just a few minutes as he makes him a rather endearing hapless fool as he tries and fails to put on the face that he knows less than he really does. I found him to be very moving in his final moment as he realizes he's finished.)

del Sol - 3.5(Limited given that we aren't really suppose to connect to her when she's speaking, given our only translation is through Stamp. I liked her performance as I felt she worked well within the limits of the part in portraying directly the character's fears and anger in a straight forward fashion managing to make her sympathetic even if we know her the least out of the main four.)

I didn't mind the cutaways too much since they were pretty short, but they were a waste of Rey.

Calvin Law said...

You saving Roth? :)

Calvin Law said...

And agreed about Hunter, really want to check more of him out after this and Gallipoli.

Louis Morgan said...

Yes.

Charles Heiston said...

I downright loved both Stamp and Hurt in this. It's a shame that F. Murray Abraham's brilliant work just kills all competition.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: your 2010s cast for The Hit

Calvin Law said...

And lastly, why do you reckon

(SPOILERS)

Braddock spared Maggie in the end?

(SPOILERS)

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Willie: Ralph Fiennes
Braddock: Gary Oldman
Myron: Jack Reynor
Harry: Ray Winstone


My take was that since he ran out of bullets, and was running out of time he basically thought "ah screw it".

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the screenplays of Sweet Smell of Success and All About Eve.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Where would these performances rank among Hurt and Stamp's best work?

94dfk1 said...

Everyone: Anyone else curious as to who else Martin Scorsese was auditioning for the part of Rodrigues in Silence before he cast Andrew Garfield? I wonder who else he had in mind.

Oh and 2010s version of Fight Club anyone?

Calvin Law said...

94dfk1: Gael Garcia Bernal is the only name I know for sure.

2010s Fight Club directed by Jeremy Saulnier
The Narrator: Anton Yelchin
Tyler Durden: Michael B. Jordan
Marla: Imogen Poots

RatedRStar said...

Hurt "We'll go to Madrid"

Roth "MADRID!!!!"

Hurt " Madrid"

Roth " FUCK THIS I'VE HAD ENOUGH"

=D.

Alex Marqués said...

I need to chech this one out.
On a separate note, with three episodes of Big Little Lies left to watch... Kidman better win that Emmy.

Giuseppe Fadda said...

She is brilliant. Absolutely devastating in its subtlety.

Luke Higham said...

Terrific work from both. :)

Alex Marqués said...

Giuseppe: Holy s**t, her scene in the therapist office (Episode 5)...

Varun Neermul said...

I really miss Phillip Seymour Hoffman. Louis, what would you say is his top 12 acting moments?

Robert MacFarlane said...

I couldn't get past the first episode of Big Little Lies.

Giuseppe Fadda said...

@Robert: I understand your point. I actually liked the first episode but it's definitely the weakest and it don't think it's really indicative of the series' actual quality.

@Alex: the scene at the therapist's office is amazing. The way she naturally breaks down is downright incredible. I really hope she wins the Emmy.

Calvin Law said...

Re-watching The Hunt again and I think Mikkelsen may have to take a place in my top 5 of the decade.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: YES YES YES :)

Calvin Law said...

Luke: it's funny, the film only gets more infuriating with each re-watch but also all the more masterful. Also, the film itself might have to make it onto my top 10 of the decade. I was wondering, did the re-watch change your feelings in terms of who you felt the most anger towards? Because on first watch, it was towards the young girl, but re-watches have shown me that it's more the pack mentality of the crowds that really causes the ultimate tragedy of Lucas.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: I actually felt more hatred for the community than the little girl, even on the initial viewing, especially with the scene in the supermarket and the scene where one of Lucas' friends hit his son.

Anonymous said...

Mikkelsen is outstanding in The Hunt. He's probably my third in the ranks.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: I'm expecting Mikkelsen to come 2nd for 2012.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: Though he's my #1 for the year.

Luke Higham said...

2012 has to come after this year. I'm so hyped for both 'Mikkelsen' reviews.

Charles Heiston said...

I hope Mikkelson takes the win for 2012. as well as i hope Day-Lewis and Hoffman switch spots.

Charles Heiston said...

Louis: Your top 10 Casey Affleck acting moments as well.

Luke Higham said...

Charles: I think they will switch spots. It is a career best for Hoffman, which should go in his favour.

Mikkelsen winning would be brilliant, but I'm doubtful as Phoenix is his favourite of the decade.

Calvin Law said...

Luke: I think he'll come second.

I also hope Louis likes Thomas Bo Larsen enough to give him a high rating and potentially a review.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: I liked him too, I'd give him a very strong 4. What did you think of Wedderkopp.

Alex Marqués said...

That's interesting, I was hooked from the first episode of BLL.
Calvin: I second a review of Bo Larsen's performance.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Scratch that, he's a 4.5. :)

Alex Marqués said...

I would not have a problem with Phoenix keeping his win for a performance where his character does not show a traditional "arc" or development (the same reason DiCaprio would be my winner for 2013 atm), I find it very interesting.


Calvin Law said...

I give Bo Larsen a strong 4.5 too.

Luke: I thought Wedderkopp was very effective, though again I'm sure a lot of her reactions were created through the direction, since I doubt they'd want to really put a child through all of that. I'll have to stick with a 4 for now, but I do think the film utilized her in a great if very unrelenting fashion.

The whole ensemble was pretty watertight. I have to say certain characters like the butcher and Johan were perhaps one-dimensional, but it made sense in the film. The actress playing Theo's wife, the headmistress and the actor playing his son stood out because they really make you feel for them even when whwat they're doing is extremely questionable, espeically the headmistress.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Are these your accurate top 5 performances in a western?

1. Gene Hackman - Unforgiven
2. Eli Wallach - The Good, The Bad and The Ugly
3. Casey Affleck - The Assassination of Jesse James
4. Dana Andrews - The Ox-Bow Incident
5. Humphrey Bogart - The Treasure of the Sierra Madre

Calvin Law said...

Alex: I think a performance that succeeds without a traditional arc can sometimes be all the more fascinating. Like Phoenix, DiCaprio, Oscar Isaac in Inside Llewyn Davis, and Jake G in Nightcrawler.

Alex Marqués said...

Calvin: I agree. I include performances where there's a perceptible but small change in a constant character.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your top 10 Kenneth Branagh moments.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your Jean Valjean and Javert rankings.

Anonymous said...

Louis: How would you rank all the live-action versions of Superman you've seen?

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous:
1. Reeves
2. Cavill
3. Routh

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Sweet Smell of Success is a brilliant screenplay focused upon the two major characters of Sidney and JJ. It intelligently uses the plot in order to examine the man of power and the man controlled by his ambition. Again in no simplification it is fascinating look into the power a man of the media can have, and how that influences others. The dialogue is sharp and example where wit is more painful than funny. Through it creates the dog eat dog world of the story without ever resorting to true violence. It also manages to not simplify its two major side characters too much. They have less focus, but never seem two dimensional. They are of course not as complex as JJ and Sydney, but are good as pawns for them.

All About Eve I will say does have perhaps too simplistic of characters in the two husbands, although that is probably amplified by the bland actors in the roles, it is also a little questionable why it introduces Birdie seemingly as important only to disregard her without even a mention later on. Having said that it is terrific screenplay. It's plot when replicated is known as the All About Eve plot, in the depiction of the rising wannabe trying to take over the older starlet. The realization of the seemingly nastier side of the theater world is effective with so much praise and encouragement hiding jealousy and vulnerable desperation. It is in the most intense moments examining these ideas where the film most thrives particularly through the character of Addison DeWitt who lives for that sort of drama. The dialogue is natural and on point with the right amount of wit tendered to the aptly named Dewitt. Also special mention for the opening which is a dynamite bit in terms of setting the stage.

Tahmeed;

Interestingly #3 for both.

Varun:

Did a top ten in Anthony Wong's review for The Untold Story.

Charles:

1. The Assassination - The Assassination of Jesse James
2. "ways we're alike" - The Assassination of Jesse James
3. Meeting the gang - The Assassination of Jesse James
4. "I'm bob Ford" - The Assassination of Jesse James
5. Regretting the killing - The Assassination of Jesse James
6. Police Station - Manchester by the Sea
7. Jesse's "joke" - The Assassination of Jesse James
8. Plotting with Charlie - The Assassination of Jesse James
9. Bar Room break down - Manchester by the Sea
10. The Raid - Gone Baby Gone

Anonymous:

Yes.

Luke:

Branagh:

1. The Duel - Hamlet
2. Iago reveals his true self - Othello
3. End of the Act - Hamlet
4. Pledging his love - Much to do about Nothing
5. St. Crispin's Day Speech - Henry V
6. "I hate the Moor" - Othello
7. Alas - Hamlet
8. The Ghost - Hamlet
9. Initial meeting - Much to Do About Nothing
10. The Hanging - Henry V

Luke:

1. Colm Wilkinson
2. Richard Jordan
3. Hugh Jackman
4. Liam Neeson
5. Fredric March
6. Alfie Boe

1. Phillip Quast
2. Anthony Perkins
3. Charles Laughton
4. Norm Lewis
5. Geoffrey Rush
6. Russell Crowe

Calvin Law said...

Louis: have March and Crowe gone down, or Rush and Neeson gone up?

Anonymous said...

Louis: So, who would you have chosen over Marlowe and Merrill in All About Eve?

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Neeson and March should be switched. Crowe and Rush are both 3's anyway.

Anonymous:

Hume Cronyn instead of Marlowe and Edmond O'Brien instead of Merrill.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Speaking of March, has your opinion of him gone up or down?

Louis Morgan said...

My opinion on him is about the same.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: cast for a 2010s Harvey and Sweet Smell of Success?

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your casts for 2010's All About Eve and Sunset Boulevard.

Charles Heiston said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Harvey:

Elwood: Hugh Jackman
Veta: Lily Tomlin
Dr. Chumley: Robbie Coltrane

Sweet Smell of Success:

J.J: Leonardo DiCaprio
Sidney: Paul Dano
Susan: Elle Fanning
Steve: Emory Cohen

Anonymous:

All About Eve:

Margo: Nicole Kidman
Eve: Rooney Mara
Karen: Naomi Watts
Bill: Billy Crudup
Lloyd: Jon Hamm
Birdie: Joan Cusack
Max: Ciaran Hinds
Addison DeWitt: Jeffrey Wright

Sunset Boulevard:

Norma Desmond: Michelle Pfeiffer
Joe Gillis: Oscar Isaac
Betty: Analeigh Topton
Max von Mayerling: Roman Polanski
Martin Scorsese as himself
Jeff Goldblum, Beau Bridges and Mercedes Ruehl as Bridge Players

Michael Patison said...

Louis: I'm not completely sure about your All About Eve casting. Kidman is fine, but to me Mara feels old (even though the two's age difference is actually a few years more than Davis & Baxter's, and Mara's only a few years older than Baxter was). I just find the ideal of the ingenue so important, so Saoirse Ronan subtly playing against type would be my choice, and I think Cate Blanchett (or even still Kidman) would be a fascinating counterpoint to her.
I love your choices for the husbands, both character-wise, and because I am wholeheartedly behind absolutely any effort to give either of them more parts. Cusack is inspired, but I'm not sold on Wright at all. Perhaps I just haven't seen enough of him (like any of Westworld, where I'm sure he blows this reservation out of the water), but I haven't seen him show the incisiveness I feel he needs. Not sure who I'd replace him with, though.

As I was writing that, I thought a present day, all-black casting of All About Eve would be interesting:
Directed by: Ryan Coogler
Margo: Viola Davis
Eve: Janelle Monae (or Tessa Thompson, what with Coogler and all)
Karen: Regina King/Naomie Harris (I found this particularly difficult and don't really like my choices)
Addison: Idris Elba
Bill: Don Cheadle (Blair Underwood would be a potentially interesting left-field choice; maybe David Oyelowo)
Lloyd: Forest Whitaker (but I'm totally open to suggestions)
Birdie: Octavia Spencer, who else?
Max: Reginald VelJohnson
It's a shame Michael B. Jordan doesn't really fit in well anywhere, given Coogler.

Calvin Law said...

I could totally buy Michael B. Jordan as a very different variation on Addison. And I think Wright would probably nail it, would highly recommend Westworld Michael; his performance is in my opinion the best performance in anything this decade.

Charles Heiston said...

Calvin: I'm currently watching other TV shows but i eventually need to see Westworld too.

Michael McCarthy said...

Louis: I'm total behind that All Anout Eve cast, though personally I'd actually switch Hamm and Crudup.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: your top 10 Sidney Poitier acting moments, and Rod Steiger acting moments.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Do you ever think of giving the win for 1965 to Richard Burton?

RatedRStar said...

I am just casually watching the HK film awards =D through a livestream while eating fryed egg noodles =D, good times =D.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your rating for Sydney Greenstreet in Conflict.

Alex Marqués said...

SPOILER ABOUT MEMENTO
Does anyone know why does Leonard leave some bullets in the car at the end of the film? Is it to make himself aware of danger? I've never been sure about it...

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your ratings for Nigel Green in The Ipcress File and Jason and the Argonauts.

Charles Heiston said...

Louis: Could Arkin go to a 5 for Wait Until Dark?

Luke Higham said...

Charles: Louis did mention that some of his 4.5 Supporting winners could likely go up with Arkin, Dern, Bean, Astin and Massey, as well as Bettany, Shimura, Newman etc.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Roger Deakins as a cinematographer.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Lastly, your ratings for Eddie Marsan in Gangster No. 1 and Steve Buscemi in Twenty Bucks.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Poitier:

1. "The call me Mr. Tibbs" - In the Heat of the Night
2. "Amen" - Lillies of the Field
3. Drinking with Gillespie - In the Heat of the Night
4. Making love - A Patch of Blue
5. Brooks treats Biddle again - No Way Out
6. "Be Nice" - The Defiant Ones
7. Solving the mystery - In the Heat of the Night
8. Breakfast - Lillies of the Field
9. "Now you say it" - Blackboard Jungle
10. Confrontation - A Patch of Blue

Steiger:

1. Taxi Cab - On the Waterfront
2. Story of Pasha - Doctor Zhivago
3. Silent Scream - The Pawnbroker
4. Drinking with Tibbs - In the Heat of the Night
5. Flashback to his wife - The Pawnbroker
6. Pleading with Friendly - On the Waterfront
7. About Jews - The Pawnbroker
8. "I'm not an expert" - In the Heat of the Night
9. Murder attempt - Doctor Zhivago
10. Goodbye Virgil - In the Heat of the Night

Tahmeed:

It has crossed my mind.

Luke:

4, 3.5, 4, 4

Alex:

I took as one to ensure he lost any hints of the confrontation, having a loaded gun would suggest he was just in a dangerous situation, and two potentially as a safety measure since he wouldn't be aware that the gun was loaded.

Anonymous:

If Lubezki is the master of the movement then Deakins is the master of the static shot. Deakins at his best is a series of beautiful paintings in his mastery of framing, lighting and focus. There is no singular emotion, or style he's limited to. In that his work can create such grandeur but still grant such intimacy. He seems to find exactly what is needed for any genre or director he's working with.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your casts for 1940's and 1950's versions of Cape Fear.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

4

Anonymous:

Cape Fear 40's:

Sam Bowden: Fredric March
Peggy Bowden: Claire Trevor
Nancy Bowden: Elizabeth Taylor
Charlie Sievers: Thomas Gomez
Max Cady: Clark Gable

50's:

Sam Bowden: James Stewart
Peggy Bowden: Shelley Winters
Nancy Bowden: Tuesday Weld
Charlie Sievers: Karl Malden
Max Cady: John Carradine

Charles Heiston said...

Louis: Are there any Toshiro Mifune performances that could go up from a 4.5 to a 5?

94dfk1 said...

Louis: Top 10 Chris Pine acting moments?

Alex Marqués said...

Thanks Louis!

Calvin Law said...

So I just watched Man on the Moon and I don't know, I was extremely impressed with Carrey's impersonation of Kaufman and Kaufman's various acts and characters...but in terms of impact I'll admit I find his work in Eternal Sunshine and The Truman Show far more compelling overall. It's very solid work and he'll probably make my lineup, but in terms of films about comedians I much preferred Chaplin/Downey Jr.

Alex Marqués said...

Louis: could you watch Los Santos Inocentes from 1984? The two main leads won Best Actor in Cannes.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thoughts on the Thor: Ragnarok trailer.

Calvin Law said...

Now that was pretty awesome. I can already feel Taika Waititi's influence.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: It's certainly one to look forward to. I think Goldblum and Hiddleston might steal the show though.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: I'm really looking forward to the Thor/Hulk interactions. Thor will be wanting some payback for what happened in New York.

Calvin Law said...

Same. Also, how does Cate Blanchett become even more attractive with every film she makes.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Could you include Leaud and Truffaut in Day For Night in the 1973 rankings.

Louis Morgan said...

Charles:

I don't believe so.

94dk1:

1. Finale - Hell or High Water
2. The Brothers say their Goodbyes - Hell or High Water
3. "You believe it" - Hell or High Water
4. Sky Diving - Stretch
5. A Deadman's forgiveness - Smokin Aces
6. "Agony" - Into the Woods
7. Crayola scene - Stretch
8. A bad end - Smokin Aces
9. Watching the news at the casino - Hell or High Water
10. "Raised to be charming" - Into the Woods

Calvin:

Man on the Moon is almost as surface of a biopic as you can get, you could just about recreate the whole film using youtube clips.

Alex:

I'll try.

Luke:

LOVED IT. The Waititi was strong with the trailer, and it feels like he hasn't been stifled. Looks like we might get some classic Goldblum, and loved the Flash Gordon esque visuals particularly those title cards. Blanchett may just be an "I'm evil" villain but she seems to be doing that quite well from the trailer.

I will.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: What rating would you give Chris Pine in Stretch, because he's not in the 2014 Supporting ranking.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

He's still officially a ?, I need to watch the performance again to attempt to get a proper understanding of it.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Jack Gleeson's work on Game of Thrones, and your top 5 favorite guest stars on that show.

94dfk1 said...

Luke: That's actually why I asked about his Top moments haha. I heard he's pretty good in Stretch.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: I know exactly how you feel in regards to Pine's work in Stretch, Brad Dourif was a ? for me as well with his work in Wise Blood, until I let the performance settle in on a rewatch.

Alex Marqués said...

There are performances, like Dourif in Wise Blood and Lavant in Holy Motors, that didn't click with me immediatly, but on rewatch... wow.

Charles Heiston said...

I have felt like that with plenty of performances, such as Jon Voight in Midnight Cowboy, Sam Rockwell in Assassination of Jesse James, and John Huston in Chinatown that are some great performances that on first watch i was probably paying attention to another cast member, but on rewatch i fully appreciated their performances too.

Charles Heiston said...

Louis: Which performances have you considered to tie for the win in certain years?

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

I should add I also felt that way about Kirk Douglas's work when I watched Paths of Glory for the first time. While I did admire and like the effort, I thought the film needed a bit more time to allow him to explore the character even more. On a rewatch though, I fully saw the brilliance of everything he did, and like Louis said, I'd be hard pressed to name a better performance as a wholly good guy.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Charles: Louis said he was considering to give both Nicholson and Pacino the win for 75, I'm not sure about other years though. For me personally, I have these years tied-
1974 Lead (Pacino and Hackman)
2008 Lead (Gleeson and Farrell for In Bruges)
1969 Lead (Voight and Hoffman for Midnight Cowboy)
1984 Lead (Stanton and Abraham)
1997 Lead (Guy Pearce and Russell Crowe)
1994 Lead (Tim Robbins and Samuel L. Jackson)
2014 Supporting (JK Simmons and Gary Poulter)

Charles Heiston said...

Tahmeed: I'd totally tie Nicholson and Pacino, the rest of my ties include -

1969 Lead - Voight and Hoffman
1997 Lead - Guy Pearce and Russell Crowe
2009 Lead - Mortenson and Copley
1990 Supporting - Pesci and Stanton

Luke Higham said...

Charles: Your Lead Actor winners from 2010 to 2015.

Louis Morgan said...

Tahmeed:

You can find my thoughts on him in my review of Eli Wallach in The Misifts.

Top five, I'll say five episodes or less:

1. David Bradley
2. Richard Dormer
3. Ciaran Hinds
4. Alexander Siddig
5. Essie Davis

Charles:

66 Lead: Wallach/Nakadai
73 Supporting: Shaw/Ryan
75 Lead: Nicholson/Pacino
2015 Supporting: Hardy/Hoult

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Max Von Sydow and Ian McShane in Game Of Thrones.

Charles Heiston said...

Luke: Everyone is just about locked right now.

2010 - Choi Min-sik - I Saw the Devil
2011 - Gary Oldman - Tinker Tailor
2012 - Mads Mikkelson -The Hunt(I think i have settled for him now)
2013 - James McAvoy - Filth
2014 - Jake Gyllenhaal - Nightcrawler
2015 - Michael Fassbender - Macbeth
2016 - Andrew Garfield - Silence

Luke Higham said...

Louis: And Bradley, Dormer, Hinds, Siddig and Davis.

Luke Higham said...

Charles: Your 2015 choice really took me by surprise and a very pleasant one at that. I've gone back and forth between Macbeth and Hunger for my favourite Fassbender performance, though I hope The Snowman will change that.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Is Yamazaki's review coming tonight.

Charles Heiston said...

Luke: The Snowman could hopefully be career best for Fassbender, it looks promising enough. And i just loved his take on Shakespeare's Macbeth, although Tremblay's work certainly was impacting, Fassbender stayed with me more.

Luke Higham said...

Charles:
My Choices are:
2010: Min-Sik
2011: Oldman
2012: Mikkelsen
2013: McAvoy
2014: Gyllenhaal
2015: Rohrig (Son Of Saul)
2016: Garfield

Alex Marqués said...


2010: Eisenberg
2011: Shannon
2012: Phoenix/Lavant (need to rewatch Holy Motors)
2013: DiCaprio
2014: Gyllenhaal
2015: Bateman
2016: Affleck

Anonymous said...

2010: Eisenberg
2011: Oldman
2012: Phoenix/DDL
2013: McConaughey
2014: Gyllenhaal
2015: DiCaprio
2016: Garfield (Silence)

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

von Sydow - (He's good, as always, and really he does add more to his bits of exposition. In his little time he conveys the burden of his knowledge, and conveys a certain powerful sorrow particularly in his reaction to Bran changing time. He pretty much does everything possible with the part right down to that final somber moment when he realizes he's about to die.)

McShane - (Exceptional work as he gives you everything about this man, and his relationship with the Hound in about ten minutes. McShane beautifully realizes the man's own positive philosophy and outlook, while still underlying his performance with the pains of a man who has committed many sins in his life. As with von Sydow, McShane does so much with so little time offering such vivid work in so little time.)

Bradley - (Bradley work is such marvelous example of a man you love to hate. Bradley is so horribly despicable, yet manages to do so in a strangely entertaining way. Bradley's work is fitting to a man who essentially has had everything handed to him while giving nothing, as his whole work is indulgent in the right way, indulgent to a man who cares about nothing but himself enjoying himself fully while seeing other suffer. His work in a way feels the endgame to Gleeson's Joffrey in a way, as Bradley makes Frey that sort if he lived to be an old man.)

Dormer - (Dormer has a magnificent voice that must be noted first. Fitting a man who speaks in such divine statements and believes himself to truly be a servant of something greater. Dormer makes you believe how he could become the leader of such a group, but goes further. The deaths of the man Dormer realizes in his performance as there seems a constant suffering and a bleakness even within his passion alluding to his knowledge of his time in the blackness he described.)

Siddig - (One of the biggest mistakes was to trade him in for those yellow bastards. Siddig is an amazing example of one man attempting to try to save a storyline through his presence and he almost does it. Siddig manages to create such a powerful personality with such ease and grace while in such little time. It's a shame they decided to waste him, and particularly waste his fantastic final delivery in season 5.)

Davis - (Davis simply does a terrific piece of work in such short time in both time in creating the captivating stage performer and the quietly likable actress with an edge. It very well could have been a nothing part in another's hands yet Davis gives such life to her Lady Crane in such short time.)

I've covered Hinds before.

Robert MacFarlane said...

2010: Jesse Eisenberg in The Social Network
2011: Michael Shannon in Take Shelter
2012: Joaquin Phoenix in The Master
2013: Oscar Isaac in Inside Llewyn Davis
2014: David Oyelowo in Selma
2015: Jason Bateman in The Gift
2016: Joel Edgerton in Loving