Tuesday, 2 January 2018

Alternate Best Supporting Actor 1965: Richard Harris in Major Dundee

Richard Harris did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Captain Benjamin Tyreen in Major Dundee.

While discovering more of Richard Harris's work in general it has brought me to the conclusion that he is among a certain group of actors. Actors like Nicolas Cage and Jack Lemmon, who are this ball of raw talent who can certainly go off in the wrong direction, but when pointed in the right way with the right part they deliver something that only they could. This is certainly the case for Richard Harris here in Major Dundee. Major Dundee is already a slightly curious film as it is an example of Sam Peckinpah attempting to make his own film while still adhering to some older Hollywood standards, although thankfully we are granted a purer version of his vision through the film's extended altered cut. Richard Harris's performance, in any cut of the film, is primed to given Peckinpah exactly what he is looking for. His Benjamin Tyreen from the outset, even more so in that extended cut, is a figure draped in grey far beyond his confederate uniform. It is a fascinating little juxtaposition between the two leads though as though both seem to represent two paths for western, that of the old way. Dundee, a Union soldier, seems fitting enough for a classic John Ford western, while Tyreen's criminal rebel seems to be that of a revisionist approach to the genre.

Tyreen in his opening scene is leading an escape where he has killed one of Dundee's men in an attempt to escape from the Union army prison. In this first scene, and the followup after he and his men have been recaptured, Harris brings the real force of personality expected from a good Richard Harris turn I'll admit. Harris is particularly suited to this role from the outset though in his roguish charm is a natural fit for proper rebel commander. Harris in fact gets a mulligan for the initial murder committed by Tyreen essentially through that charm. Harris helps even more so though by so effectively establishing the will of the man in his first public then private showdown with Heston's Major Dundee. Where Heston is a wall of granite, Harris is the sharpened knife. Harris isn't all charm here bringing the right edge in his approach in these scenes by exuding such a palatable disdain for Dundee. Harris properly takes this a step further than just the hatred of an enemy there is a more severe venom in this hatred that Harris offers. That venom in his delivery alluding properly to their history that extends beyond enemy combatants as Dundee before the civil war even testified against Tyreen for participating in a personal duel that led him to be expelled by the army.

That old wound between Tyreen and Dundee is so effectively established within Harris work from the outset creating the underlying motivated hatred Tyreen has for Dundee. Although as much as Harris would be a proper scoundrel that is not all there is to his role as he effectively naturally changes his approach once the two men cut a deal. The deal being Tyreen and his men will help Dundee for better treatment for all the soldiers, in order to help Dundee avenge a massacre committed by renegade Apaches. Tyreen accepts the deal, and Dundee accepts Tyreen's help as since he gives him this word. Once Tyreen becomes the full commander against Harris is excellent in showing the minor transformation in Tyreen from hate filled prisoner to a proper commander. What I particularly love is how Harris differs from Heston in this regard realizing Tyreen as a very different kind of soldier. Where Heston emphasized strength, Harris emphasized essentially the class and mentality of being a soldier, which for Tyreen requires being a proper gentleman. This philosophy defines Harris's work in his whole physical manner he takes in the role which is always to grant a certain elegance to Tyreen even as he goes head first into violent battle. Harris never simplifies this or caricatures this, rather the history of this lifelong soldier is the foundation of this exemplified through the passionate way Harris plays every moment as the gentleman soldier. 

Now that is not to say Tyreen is this stiff soldier, far far from it, his gentlemanly qualities Harris performs in an exact way that feels natural to this man who both believes in a certain code even while breaking other laws. This never seems hypocritical by how effortlessly Harris applies this aspect as again a foundation of principles deep within the man. Harris properly electric in the role by while offering that stability, also challenges everything within Major Dundee and in a way Heston's performance. Throughout the film Harris is brilliant in the way he works with and in a way around Heston's more steadfast portrayal. Harris pressures and prods Heston's performance by the unpredictability within his work. Harris is very entertaining in offering these snide deliveries where Tyreen is attempting to have a little fun at Dundee expense however he also is very dynamic in the way he differs when one of Dundee's acts more closely contrasts with his own beliefs. This includes a scene where Dundee orders the death of one of Tyreen's men for desertion. Harris is outstanding in this scene by baring the complication of the moment in Tyreen mind. On the surface most directly revealing his still fervent hatred of Dundee as he stands against the command, however minding his distaste for his soldier's cowardice subtly within his eyes. When Tyreen disposes of the man himself it is a inevitable act and Harris is fantastic in revealing the pain in it as he shows a man doing what he knows is the right thing yet hating it since it appeases his sworn enemy.

Harris's work is the performance that remains truly captivating throughout the film as he embodies the more complex themes Peckinpah attempts to tackle in examining these two men. The one who fights for glory and the one who fights for honor. Although Harris is playing the rogue he's excellent in showing Tyreen as the man with a purer causes in terms of his personal beliefs in soldering. The film eventually briefly drifts from Tyreen, which on a side note cements Harris as a supporting player, in an extended sequence where Dundee recovers from his wounds in enemy territory and his own values are challenged. Tyreen though is the one who comes to rescue Dundee, and again I love Harris's portrayal of the Tyreen's methods in this. He's is indeed fun to simply watch perform here, but it also works within the character as Harris portrays even when directly saving Dundee there is this degree of spite in the moment. Not spite for rescuing him, but rather spite in the act of the rescue. Harris even in this brings this delicious bit of joy within Tyreen as he sees Dundee so low, and is the one who has to force the commander back to his proper place as a commander again. This never feels nonsensical to the character rather Harris's so precise portrayal of Tyreen's beliefs makes it a natural act as the honor bound man must help the man he's given his word to. Harris is outstanding as he embodies the Peckinpah hero fully here as a man you could almost is driven to an insane act in order to fulfill what he thinks is right in within his very specific beliefs. As with Pike in The Wild Bunch, or Bennie in Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia, Harris fully embraces the idea of this man going head first into fight even if it means his death. I especially have affection for how Harris matches his character's intent by fully embracing this spirit throughout the film's final scenes, right down to basically wearing Peckinpah's trademark bandana in the last battle. Harris is a proper mad man in the best of ways in the final scene that matches Peckinpah's intensity in the direction of the battle. Although it would be perhaps a few more years before Peckinpah got to direct a film fully in his own vision, this film is not far from it particularly through Richard Harris's dynamite portrait of rebel in spirit and political values, but not within his moral code.

106 comments:

Luke Higham said...

Could go as high as 3rd.

Luke Higham said...

Looking forward to Rains, Pleasence and Heston next.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your top 10 best uses of color in movies.

Robert MacFarlane said...

To everyone: Can anyone think of an emotional moment in a film or TV show that REALLY caught them off guard? Perhaps a sad moment in a comedy, or a tender moment in an action film, or anything along those lines. I'm just curious.

Hard mode: No Jurassic Bark or Luck of the Fryish from Futurama. That's everyone's go-to answer (myself included).

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Robert: There's quite a few, (especially those Futurama episodes), but the most surprising for me were-

The revelation- Your Name (the best example of an emotional trap in a film, I'd say)
Rejection by Unity- 'Auto-Erotic Assimilation', from Rick and Morty
Phone call to Watson- 'The Reichenbach Fall' from Sherlock
Preparing for the surgery- 'Homer's Triple Bypass' from The Simpsons
Marshall hears about his father- 'Bad News', from How I Met Your Mother (the moment I realized Jason Segel was extremely talented)
The ending- A Bittersweet Life

Mitchell Murray said...

well its probably not the most surprising given much of the movies tone, but the "This is as far as you go" scene in Edge of Tommorow really hits me, mainly for how genuine Cruise plays Cage's torment.

The same thing happens with Simon Pegg's big scene in "The Worlds End" since he so effectively realizes Gary's lack of self worth.

Matthew Cofrancesco said...

Robert: I’m reminded of an interested inversion of that idea: the death from licking the envelopes in Seinfeld.

They took what could have been a sad moment and instead made it really awkward and emotionless as possible. It did catch me off guard because of how bizarre it was though.



Matthew Cofrancesco said...

*Interesting

Robert MacFarlane said...

Mitchell: That scene from Edge of Tomorrow was EXACTLY what I was thinking of.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your cast and director for a 2010s version of Major Dundee?

Bryan L. said...

Robert: The "what-if" section of the epilogue in La La Land hit me harder than I thought, even as I knew it was coming.

Matt Mustin said...

Robert: This is gonna sound silly, but there's an episode of Family Guy where they sing "The Rose" and it's in all honesty the best version of that song I've ever heard. It's actually beautiful. And it's set up as a gag.

Calvin Law said...

Matt: that's a great choice!

Robert: Eh, off the top of my head (I agree with most of the ones I've seen so far), Charlie Kelly dancing by himself at the end of the IASIP episode 'Underage Drinking: A National Problem'.

Lezlie said...

Robert: I only have two uninspired answers, Desmond calls Penny on Lost, and Walter's final scene with Skyler from Breaking Bad.

While they weren't super surprising (especially the latter one) they did bring the feels for me.

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Your Top Ten Brad Pitt performances? And what past film roles do you think he'd be good in?

Alex Marqués said...

Robert: I would add:
Shawn's last scene with his mom in Shawn of the Dead
David Brent's plead in the second season's final episode of The Office
Troy comforting Annie/"You're a man now" in the "Mixology Certification" episode of Community

Alex Marqués said...

Pleading*

Alex Marqués said...

Shaun*

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Any Recent Viewings.

RatedRStar said...

I was ill, so good thing its only your first review of this lineup.

1) Harris
2) Shaw
3) Heston
4) Pleasence
5) Rains

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar: I think we're gonna get an extended lineup for 1966 Lead. I've checked through Letterboxd and there's an awful lot for Louis to catch up on with quite a lot of them being pretty lengthy and given classic status.

RatedRStar said...

Luke: I agree there is a lot for 1966 lead, I am disappointed with how many films I have seen for 1965 and 66, only 17 and 18 films

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar: 1963 is the next 60s year, which I'm pleased about since I really want Shaw, (Quite possibly his last review) Pleasence and Bates in The Caretaker, Lancaster and Delon in The Leopard, Bjornstrand in Winter Light, his thoughts on The Haunting and I'm intrigued about Rod Steiger in Hands Over The City.

And of course we'll have 2001 and the long-awaited reappraisal of Paul Bettany in A Knight's Tale afterwards. :)

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Could you watch the original Cry, The Beloved Country during your break. Myself and Calvin thought it was 1952 but had its South African release in 1951.

RatedRStar said...

Luke: What is the next year for each decade currently?

I havent seen a single one of those films for 63. Shaw might appear for 69 supporting as well.

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar:
1938
1948
1957
1963
1975
1980
1999
2008
2013

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar: I've seen Battle Of Britain a few times and he doesn't have a substantial role. It reminded me of The Longest Day where it's just a collective effort instead of one individual standing out.

RatedRStar said...

1957 is probably the only year in which I may have seen more than Louis has lol.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Going very specific with this.

Red light on Sister Ruth - Black Narcissus
Green in the Transformation Scene - Vertigo
Red Rain Coat - Don't Look Now
Emerald City - The Wizard of Oz
Red Hall - In the Mood For Love
Derrick Fire Red - There Will be Blood
Blue light - Blue Velvet
Yellow/Red armies, White lonely man - Ran
Crossing of Light sabers - Empire Strikes Back
Red while deactivating Hal - 2001: A Space Odyssey

Robert:

For an action film probably the "Indiana, Indiana,let it go" moment from The Last Crusade.

For comedy, The Simpsons with Homer's potential last words to Bart and Lisa in Homer's Triple Bypass.

Anonymous:

Major Dundee 2010's directed by James Mangold:

Major Dundee: Joel Edgerton
Captain Tyreen: Ben Foster
Lt. Graham: Boyd Holbrook
Potts: Jason Mamoa
Trooper Ryan: Will Poulter
O.W. Hadley: Walton Goggins
Sergeant Chillum: Dallas Roberts
Aesop: Sterling K. Brown

Bryan:

Pitt:

1. The Assassination of Jesse James
2. The Tree of Life
3. Burn After Reading
4. Seven
5. Killing Them Softly
6. Moneyball
7. Fight Club
8. True Romance
9. Babel
10. Ocean's Eleven

Liberty Valance
Buck Turgidson
Shelby - Laura

Luke:

The Florida Project
Killing of a Sacred Deer

Luke Higham said...

Thoughts on the films and casts.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your top ten Brad Pitt acting moments.

Luke Higham said...

1. The Assassination - The Assassination of Jesse James
2. You ever thought about suicide - The Assassination of Jesse James
3. Mr. O'Brien Apologizes - The Tree of Life
4. Meeting with Osbourne Cox - Burn After Reading
5. Going to see Ed - The Assassination of Jesse James
6. Talking about his shooting - Seven
7. Teaching the kids how to fight - The Tree of Life
8. The Train Robbery - The Assassination of Jesse James
9. John Doe appears - Seven
10. Calling Osbourne Cox - Burn After Reading

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

The Florida Project is very well directed, and particularly well shot. I'd describe it as quite good until its awful ending. Up until then I think it was an interesting blunt examination of the denizens of the motel's lives, but through visual styling created a perspective of the children in its sort of combination of a beauty within the garish. The ending is a horrible cheat to the concept as it always told the truth before then just through a certain visual lens, that moment though lies outright leaving the film on a sour note.

Prince - 4(I guess I'm low on her compared to most. I think for much of the film she does a good job in being a believable bratty child, but there is little more to the character than that. She does it well, particularly for a child actor, however I don't think her work pushes to a truly complex characterization by any means. The only change is this is in the ending where she is very effective in portraying a real emotional distress for the first time.)

Vinaite - 4.5(I found her performance more impressive as she does in a way play a role that is most often a caricature. Vinaite technically embodies that type of caricature and doesn't hold back. She in no way makes her character very likable in anyway, but that's not the intention. What she does do is go beyond the caricature while still making it so most would see her only as such. She has some very quiet subtle moments within her more overt scenes that effectively allude to the more desperate shamed individual within her direct purposefully unpleasant manner.)

Cotto & Rivera - 3(Both are fine delivering in bringing just the same believably and a certain kid chemistry so to speak. They are tasked with less than Prince, but they do fine what they have.)

Louis Morgan said...

The Killing of a Sacred Deer is about the opposite of the Lobster for me strangely enough in that I found the opening half interminable this time around, and the second half somewhat intriguing. I guess I probably prefer this film because at least it went out on a higher note for me than that film. Like that film though this was frustrating in that once again Yorgos Lanthimos is onto something yet takes his idiosyncrasies so far they dilute the dramatic potential. I find if he just eased back a bit his film's could still have a distinct style but not one that overwhelms the story. For example forcing everyone to deliver their lines in monotone just doesn't seem needed, nor do the weird moments for the sake of it like when Farrell's character says "my daughter is menstruating", because that's what people never say.

Farrell - 3.5(He's still stricken by I must say everything with no emotion disease, however he gives the best performance. His work though honestly always seems like this strange struggle to get a bit of emotion within the margins of Lanthimos's 1984esque decree. Farrell manages to do so enough in that he makes the doctor's struggle somewhat compelling if still diluted.)

Keoghan - 3(Another illustration of a major failing of Lanthimos's style as Keoghan's work in no way stands out as off-putting because everyone is off-putting and weird here. You'd never be able to guess a psychopath in this world since everyone is so bizarre. Keoghan does manage to differentiate his work just ever so slightly to at least be off-putting in a slightly different way, but this performance would probably be a whole lot more effective if everyone else acted normally around him.)

Cassidy, Kidman & Sulijic - 2.5(All are unable to escape big brother Lanthimos's control, and all are stuck within blank stares and bland deliveries.)

Calvin Law said...

I loved the ending to The Florida Project, and the film as a whole, but I understand your reservations. Much preferred Prince to Vinaite though.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Out of the major contenders, only The Post and Phantom Thread left to watch.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

I just finished watching Koe no Katachi (A Silent Voice). While I prefer Your Name overall, it is great in its own right, and I'd recommend it to Louis to watch during the break before the nominations.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Freddie Young and Robert Burks as cinematographers.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: You forgot about Lucky.

Calvin Law said...

Luke: I predict Louis's top 10 to be

1. Blade Runner 2049
2. Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
3. Phantom Thread
4. I, Tonya
5. Dunkirk
6. The Shape of Water
7. The Disaster Artist
8. Okja
9. Lucky
10. Detroit

Calvin Law said...

Just edited it :)

Luke Higham said...

Had a feeling, Logan wouldn't be in the top ten, yet it's a testament to how great a year this has been.

Calvin Law said...

Yeah, it's been a pretty great year. I've had to leave Blade Runner 2049 and Paddington off my top 10, and I haven't even seen a couple of the big awards heavy-hitters this year yet.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Your thoughts on Whishaw, Gleeson and Grant in Paddington 2 and what are your ratings for Shaw, Pleasence and Bates in The Caretaker.

Michael McCarthy said...

I finally rewatched Get Out last night, and man oh man am I officially on the bandwagon. Kaluuya and Williams are both fives for me now, Williams actually drops some really subtle hints to Rose's lack of empathy early on and as for Kaluuya I don't know why he wasn't a five in the first place for me. There are just so many great little details that you pick up on repeated viewings.

Louis: As far as Howrey's character, I actually felt the same way as you about him at first, but have you read Jordan Peele's summation of what he's meant to represent? It's really intriguing, and for me it made his character a lot easier to buy.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: By the way, please don't watch Paddington 2 until the 2017 bonus round because you really need to see the first one to have the emotional investment and I would like reviews for both Hugh and Brendan.

Calvin Law said...

Luke:

Whishaw - pitch perfect voice for the ol' bear as he was first time round, and he gets even more of an emotional arc this time round which ends up being rather affecting. He hits the comic and dramatic heights of the film and it's a thoroughly delightful vocal performance.

Gleeson - terrific 'chemistry' with Whishaw, and I thought he was appropriately intimidating to begin with, before seguing to wonderfully into a rather loveable big ol' bear who discovers a love for marmalade.

Grant - technically one-note as the egotistic actor with a Machievallian streak, but I absolutely enjoyed every second of his scheming antics, plus the moments where he revealed the goofily incompetent man underneath his many facades.

Shaw: 5
Pleasence: 4.5 (verging on a 5)
Bates: 3.5 (George MacKay was far superior in the stage adaptation I saw)

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Nevermind about Bates then. Just Robert and Donald to look forward to. :)

Luke Higham said...

Could only imagine if Shaw does get fives for Battle Of The Bulge and The Caretaker and if he hadn't died early, Louis would be calling him his favourite actor instead of Mifune.

Calvin Law said...

I haven't re-watched it in a while, to be fair. Bates could be a lot better than I give him credit for.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Are all 3 leads or is Bates supporting.

Mitchell Murray said...

I finally watched "The Disaster Artist" and honestly.. it's pretty damn good. I get the sense certain elements of Wisseau were over looked but on the whole, Franco really succeeded in balancing the humour and strange sort of tragedy within the man's story. It properly achieved what a movie of this sort should do, which would be to present him in an honest light with the right sympathy and enjoyment.

Franco as in Dave - 3.5 (He's genuinely good here at presenting the ambition and emotional conflict of Greg. Him and James work well together though that should be obvious.)

Rogen - 3.5 (Solid supporting work from him that didn't feel forced, and he gets some of the best lines in the movie)

Brie - 3 (Likable as usual and has the right dynamic with Dave, but I wish she had more to do.)

I'll say all the cameos worked for me and I didn't have a definet favourite, though if I was forced at gun point I may go Cranston.

Luke Higham said...

Predicted lineup for Alternate Lead
Jackman
Renner
Gosling
Hawke
Stanton
Pattinson
Coster-Waldau
Vaughn
Jane
Greenwood or Bale

Michael McCarthy said...

If Kaluuya gets nominated, we might only need a lineup of 5 in lead this year again. Gosling, Stanton, Jackman, Jane, and some mysterious fifth review (I'd vote for Renner or Greenwood at the moment, but I could also see Bale being a last-minute hit like Keaton last year).

Luke Higham said...

Michael: Pattinson, Coster-Waldau and Vaughn could do better than we expect them to and their roles are very intriguing.

I personally would rather have 10 again and I don't expect Chalamet to get a 5 at all.

Luke Higham said...

Michael: I do think Renner's getting a five so it probably will be 10.

Mitchell Murray said...

I doubt Louis will give Renner a 5 considering I'm pretty much the only one here that genuinely likes "Wind River". I have my hopes for Chalamet though.

Luke Higham said...

Mitchell: He hated Apt Pupil and gave McKellen a 5, Not caring for a movie doesn't always mean it'll affect his view on a performance.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I hate Wind River and would give Renner a 5, if that makes any difference.

Mitchell Murray said...

Fair enough. Renner ultimately seems to be the common ground here since, in the same spirit as "Lost In Translation", "Wind River" will always be something I appreciate more than everybody else.

Michael McCarthy said...

I can see a 5 for Renner, and MAYBE Pattinson, but probably not Coster-Waldau. Vaughn I haven't seen.

Mitchell Murray said...

I've seen Vaughn, and I won't be saving him for an alternate line up so I can give my thoughts on him here. I think he works for the movie he's in, and completely scrubbing his usual stick really helps. He's at his least verbose and I bought him in an action role so all things considered, he's a 4.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I would love if Pattinson got a 5. It’s a great example of how to play an absolute scumbag without any of the usual trappings of the role. Hell, the film itself is a great example of how a protagonist can have humanizing qualities and STILL be completely despicable.

Luke Higham said...

Mitchell: What about Johnson.

Louis: Could you watch Brawl in Cell Block 99 soon.

Mitchell Murray said...

I'll admit to enjoying Johnson, as he certainly knew what type of movie he was in and was perfectly cast for that sort of role. Its not a terribly memorable or amazing performance but he gets the job done. He's a 3, and so is virtually everyone outside of Vaughn for that matter.

Luke Higham said...

If Vaughn gets a 4 or a 4.5 then Greenwood and Bale for the final 2 spots.

Bryan L. said...

I'm already picturing the 5 Plainviews at the bottom of Renners review haha.

Luke Higham said...

Bryan L: No, the Plainviews are used exclusively for the 5 nominated performances. He'll get 5 mifunes.

Bryan L. said...

Luke: Ahh my mistake. Thanks for the heads up!

Calvin Law said...

I think 10 is the right number for this year. I really would love reviews for Pattinson, Renner, and Hawke.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: thoughts and rating for Wiseau as Henry in The Disaster Artist.

Matt Mustin said...

Just wanna say I watched Hunt for the Wilderpeople and absolutely loved it. Sam Neill is my Supporting Actor win for that year now, and I also wanna mention how much I loved Waititi's direction.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Back in 1995, Wizard Magazine wrote their first casting call article, in which they made an X-Men cast.

Here's the cast:
Professor X: Patrick Stewart
Wolverine: Glenn Danzig
Cyclops: Michael Biehn
Jean Grey: Nicole Kidman
Storm: Iman
Gambit: Jean-Claude Van Damme
Psylocke: Tia Carrere
Colossus: Dolph Lundgren
Bishop: Michael Dorn
Cable: Clint Eastwood
Magneto: Rutger Hauer
Sabretooth: Clancy Brown
Emma Frost: Rebecca de Mornay
Juggernaut: Big Van Vader

Thoughts on these choices? I couldn't have seen most of them working.

Anonymous said...

Oops, meant to say that some of them would have worked.

Bryan L. said...

Anonymous: Rutger Hauer as Magneto would've been great, especially if he had found a way to bring something new to what he already did in Blade Runner. I'm still glad with Mckellen, of course.

Matt Mustin said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Matt Mustin said...

Anonymous: Excluding Stewart, obviously, the only choice there I really like is Rutger Hauer. Most of the others are forehead-slappingly terrible (Glenn Danzig?!)

Matt Mustin said...

Louis: Who would be your ideal, currently working, actors to play Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton and Lyndon Johnson?

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Where would Choi Min-Sik and Lee Byung-Hun rank in your top ten co-leads for their work in I Saw the Devil.

Anonymous said...

Matt: I dunno, I think Brown would have been an awesome Sabretooth, or do you think he'd be much better if he voiced him in a Marvel animated project?

Matt Mustin said...

Anonymous: Actually, Brown could be a good live-action Sabretooth, but you're right, he'd be even better in animated form.

Anonymous said...

Michael Dorn would make for a good Bishop in animation, although Keith David and Dorian Harewood would work as well.

Calvin Law said...

My predictions for Luke's predicted lineup:

Jackman - 5
Renner - 5
Gosling - 5
Hawke - 5
Stanton - 5
Pattinson - 5
Coster-Waldau - 4.5
Vaughn - 3.5/4
Jane - 4.5
Greenwood - 4.5
Bale - 4.5

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: I'd take out Vaughn and that's the lineup I'd go with. Also, Psifonian will likely be determined to get Greenwood into the lineup as well.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Cruise was very entertaining but preferred him in Edge Of Tomorrow and with Gyllenhaal, it's just another 4.5 by the look of it and would rather see some first-timers in there.

Luke Higham said...

BAFTA Rising Star Nominees
Daniel Kaluuya (Winner)
Timothee Chalamet
Tessa Thompson
Florence Pugh
Josh O'Connor

Mitchell Murray said...

I just saw "The Florida Project" and I'd pretty much agree with Louis's thoughts. The movie is really quite charming and poignant up until the ending that undercuts everything it was striving for. Still, I greatly admire the lives it tries to represent and the emotional honesty it achieves on the whole.

Prince - 4 (This is genuinely a solid and convincing child performance, maybe not to an astonishing degree but Prince does succeed in giving the movie an appealing lead. She carries herself quite assuredly for her age and I always bought her interactions with the other children.)

Vinaite - 4 (Just as effective as Prince in giving a believable performance. She doesn't beg for sympathy so much as honestly earn it, since while her character acts very irresponsibly Vinaite does convey the error of her ways.)

Dafoe - 4.5 (Now I could easily go higher since the movie truly wouldn't be the same without him. Perhaps its unfair to compare this role and performance to Mahershala Ali's work in "Moonlight", considering Dafoe is so much more prevalent in his story to the point where I might classify him as a lead. He is in the same realm though due to what he achieves as a father figure. Dafoe plays it low key here and is truly great in the warmth and sincerity he shows for the kids. I completely bought him as this frustrated man who's day is brightened whenever they're around. And the fact Dafoe doesn't necessarily have the look or career to suggest a character of this register only serves to enhance his portrayal. Dafoe gives a great performance here in a career of many, and I would have no quarrel with him winning supporting actor.)

Robert MacFarlane said...

Yeah, I hated The Florida Project's ending as well. Reminded me of Radio Flyer.

Mitchell Murray said...

I still have to see Jenkins and Plummer but so far, I'm loving supporting actor this year.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your ratings and thoughts on Caleb Landry Jones, Betty Gabriel and Marcus Henderson in Get Out.

Also, on rewatch, Daniel Kaluuya is a strong 5 for me.

Calvin Law said...

The biggest bumps for me on re-watch were Keith Stanfield and Catherine Keener.

Calvin Law said...

Tahmeed: Louis gave his thoughts on Gabriel in 1947 supporting,

Gabriel - 3.5(Her performance is quite a brilliant little piece of work since she is so bizarre and off-putting in all her scenes. When you learn what the truth about her character everything suddenly makes sense because of her performance.)

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

I have to admit I have actually barely scratched the surface of Freddie Young's work a cinematographer. His best work was with David Lean where he helped to achieve the grand scope of his epics brilliantly particularly with Lawrence of Arabia. All his works with Lean though are essential in granting that scope however with such a palatable atmosphere in each. Although his best work is with Lean his consistency outside of it suggests that of a true master of his craft. Even in taking an epic with a lesser director at the helm with Lord Jim Young's work remains impressive. His work in general is boon as his work, no who is the director, evokes a grander vision whether it is one of the better shot Bond films in You Only Live Twice, The Inn of the Sixth Happiness or even in his black and white work with the 49th Parallel and Contraband. The trademark of his work is quality and a definite vision within the camerawork much as is the case
with Roger Deakins today.

The true testament to a talent of a cinematographer is the consistency of their work beyond their work with certain directors. Robert Burks is most certainly best known for his work with Hitchcock, I'd say particularly with Vertigo which by probably his most dynamic color work. All of his films with Hitchcock are notable though in creating this rather remarkable combination of pristine with that dynamic sense of use of colors, certainly in all of his colors film. His black and white work should not be overlooked particularly his stunning work with Strangers on a Train, which I could on and on with how well that film's cinematography amplifies the storytelling. That is the case for all his work really though even outside of Hitchcock. Even in the least impressive work that I've seen from him, The Music Man, is still above par within what seemed to be a mandated studio musical look. Again another cinematographer whose consistency was quality, which is probably what most cinematographers should aim for.

Calvin:

I'll admit I wasn't able to stay until after the credits.

Michael:

I've read his explanation, however he could have pulled off the comedic audience surrogate without giving such a farcical performance within what is otherwise a dark satire. Just as there was a reason the pie scene was taken out of Dr. Strangelove, the police station scene should have been removed from Get Out.

Anonymous:

Well obviously they got the professor right. Most of the others are not very good. Biehn would be a far better choice for Wolverine or Cable than Cyclops. Lundgren could potentially work as Colossus honestly if he was as he was in Deadpool. Hauer would've been a great Magneto though, and I certainly could see de Mornay as Emma Frost. Dorn would've been a good choice for Bishop, a character they still haven't done justice to in the films. Brown I'd actually say would've been a great choice for Sabretooth based on his work as the Kurgen.

Matt:

Nixon: Oscar Isaac
Reagan: Jim Carrey, in dramatic actor mode.
Clinton: Tom Hanks
Johnson: Jeff Bridges

Tahmeed:

Might as well wait until Kaluuya's review for the other two.

I'd probably put them number 8.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: here it is in its (mostly full) glory.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UK_Ytws9Xto

Luke Higham said...

Logan got a WGA nomination.

Calvin Law said...

I really hope by some miracle Logan's screenplay will make it in over Mudbound or Molly's Game. Not that either of them were bad, they just weren't great, whereas Logan's screenplay is one of its best and most underrated assets.

Louis Morgan said...

Glad to see those Logan and I, Tonya nominations in terms of the unexpected, would've loved to see Blade Runner make it there, but I digress. That was a miss for Phantom Thread in terms of Oscar prospects, and a major miss for The Post, which is starting to feel like Bridge of Spies or even War Horse (in terms of Oscar prospects) than Lincoln.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Who are the main contenders for Best Picture. Dunkirk, The Shape Of Water and Call Me By Your Name or a two horse race between the first two.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

I actually think it's between Ladybird, and Three Billboards now, with Shape of Water and Dunkirk potentially battling it out in director if they keep with the technical achievement trend in that category.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I kind of had issues with Logan’s screenplay (it was trying WAY too hard to be edgy with the cursing in the first third or so), but I’m happy to see such an against-the-grain choice. Also, as much as I like Blade Runner 2049, I might disqualify from my own ballot for screenplay just for Wallace’s 9 hour soliloquy.

Matt Mustin said...

Robert: I sort of agree with you on Logan's screenplay. Professor X shouldn't swear that much (Wolverine should, though).

Louis Morgan said...

Robert:

I don't disagree in regards to Logan in terms of the dialogue in the first act. I will defend Wallace though, as the self-indulgent fool with a god complex he's suppose to be.

Bryan L. said...

Everyone: How do you think Tom Hardy's career would've turned out if Star Trek: Nemesis had been a hit instead of a flop and launched his breakthrough seven (7) years earlier than it did with Bronson?

Louis Morgan said...

Bryan:

His breakout essentially also came after he became sober from his drug addiction, so it seems when he broke was simply the right time. I will say it always seemed a little strange since he stood out even in minor roles in Black Hawk Down and Layer Cake.

Calvin Law said...

I think it probably all panned out for the best that he broke out when he did.

Luke Higham said...

Bryan L: He did have drug issues at the time, so if his career somehow skyrocketed, it may have amplified the problem, so I'm thankful that it wasn't and he may not have starred in The Virgin Queen alongside Anne-Marie Duff which was my first exposure to his work and have loved him ever since.