Saturday, 22 July 2017

Alternate Best Actor 1954: Jean Gabin in Touchez Pas Au Grisbi

Jean Gabin did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Max in Touchez Pas Au Grisbi.

Touchez Pas Au Grisbi is a terrific crime thriller about an aging gangster who must come out of retirement after a rival gangster goes after his best friend and old partner in crime in order to ransom for an old score of theirs.

Jean Gabin fulfills what must be one of the earliest examples of the now well worn trope of the older man who has to come back for just one more job. Gabin, in what was apparently was his post-war comeback role, is a prime figure to fulfill such a role. This film came several years after his suave work in Pepe Le Moko, but Gabin did not lose a step in that time. In the early scenes, and really throughout the film, we do get plenty of classic smooth Gabin. Gabin once again just has this effortlessness in his presence here and just exudes the confidence of the character. This is a seasoned Gabin though and it seems like he even needs to try even less than he did in his earlier roles. Of course this is Gabin making it look so easy which is all the more notable here as Max is the ladies man to every woman in the general vicinity, and Gabin enables this to be wholly convincing. Again Gabin brings this charm with such ease that is perfect for this role as he presents a man who has just be on top of the world for many years, and this comes off him in a way that makes it so evident why he is such an appealing figure to just about everyone. Gabin sets his place at the head of the table without question.

Gabin though carefully compromises his role, in that obviously that confidence is something that is there and always evident yet he is aware of that even within the character in the right way. Gabin does not hide his age which works so well for the character who does not hide it on his own. Gabin though somehow makes himself seem all the more assured though in the way he delivers his lines about just wanting to retire early in the night, or his "I'm too old for this" type of lines. He has those in the film yet Gabin delivers them not as a man who is not unhappy about this, but rather is entirely content in this. There is a comfort in the age that Gabin presents that somehow only gives the character a greater inherent strength because of it. Gabin shows a man who simply know how to age, and some of his power seems to come from how well he is accommodate to himself essentially. In the first act Gabin has that needed presence as he does the little work he still deals with and Gabin makes Max the man at the top of his craft even in retirement. Again he could be the definition of smooth of how he creates in Max that skill of a master setting up the man who is at ease in his life, and someone who should never be taken lightly.

Unfortunately a younger gangster does try to force Max out of his semi-retirement by launching a plot involving kidnapping his old partner Riton (Rene Dary) in order to extort the considerable loot from an old heist. Once the plot starts, matching the perhaps less films that would come later, Max reveals his particular set of skills. Gabin, despite already seeming such a confident and strong figure manages to take it even further in these scenes. Gabin in these scenes, as Max breaks down the situation and goes about taking down his opponents, reminded me a bit of Alain Delon in Le Samourai or even more fittingly Albert Finney in Miller's Crossing. In that Gabin just in his physical manner is this man who apparently was born for this life and was destined to be a gangster. In every moment Gabin offers that complete control and even a certain thrill of it. Gabin shows Max technically exactly where he should be as he goes about defeating his much younger opponents. This is not merely Gabin being well, cool, there is more to the role in regards to his relationship with Riton. Although Max derides him early Gabin delivers these lines with the utmost warmth actually showing the very strong soft spot that Max has for his old partner, and a genuine love within the gangster. This carries the right underlying poignancy through the story as Gabin emphasizes that this goes further than business for him. Gabin holds onto this idea so effectively building towards his final moment in the film which is this nuanced but oh so powerful reaction where Gabin so subtly reveals Max's quiet sorrow due to the events of the film. This is a great performance by Jean Gabin as he perhaps set the initial standard for the badass ready for just "one more job".

72 comments:

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thoughts on the rest of the cast.

And thoughts on the Cinematography, Visual Effects, Sound Mixing/Editing and Film Editing of Dunkirk.

Charles Heiston said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Gabin as an actor.

Gabin is quite good here.

Calvin Law said...

Definitely interested in checking this out now.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Dary - 3.5(He carefully does not overplay sort of the haplessness of his character in comparison to Gabin creating an odds sweetness in how he's definitely not the brains of the operation. He furthermore though just has a nice chemistry with Gabin as they the ease of their friendship is felt even if it is not focused upon.)

Ventura - 3(I think the film could have perhaps given him more time to build up his character a bit more, Ventura though I did feel managed to at least bring enough of a bit of a pompousness and certainty in his limited screentime to create at least an okay villain.)

Cinematography - (Well Deakins just might have to wait again as van Hoytema's work recalls the magnitude of a David Lean epic in capturing such a grand scope yet with such beauty and vivid detail. The composition and lighting of just about every shot is magnificent. It though excels in those grandiose wide cinematic shots, yet it also never falters in the more kinetic shots of the dogfights or those claustrophobic sequences particularly underwater. It manages to realize both that greater scale yet with all the personal details within, those crowds shots in particular were magnificent. It's gorgeous film yet the grit and horror of the setting is never lost either. It's one of the best shot films of the decade without question.)

Visual Effects - (Well I think this is where it may run into trouble in terms of an actual nomination. I have to assume there were visual effects because I couldn't see a single one, but there had to be, right?.)

Sound Mixing - (Not really detrimental, certainly not as bad as Interstellar, but I some of the dialogue was drowned out. Past though the design is excellent in again just being another facet that places your right there, I will say the loudness of the enemy planes was particularly effective. Really I could convince myself to give it the win here, even with that quibble.)

Sound Editing - (Every sound here was on point I had particular affection for capturing the sound of the spitfire engine through the sky.)

Editing - (Smith's best collaboration with Nolan, after even some shaky work in his last few films. Smith though succeeds here in achieving Nolan's vision of the three intersecting stories making it so the cross cutting amplify each story rather than detract and it builds with such taught pacing to quite the climax in connecting all the threads into one finale.)

Charles:

Well Gabin is someone I really do need to see more of, and I'm eager to do so as I've yet to see a truly bad performance from him. The worst I've seen from him is Moontide, and perhaps performing in English just was not meant for him. In all his other work though he has charisma for miles, but also a rare naturalism for the period. He had a true range though as his work in the Human Beast reflects that against his other star turn type of roles that he also manages to differ despite surface similarities in the roles.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: thoughts on the Breaking Bad episodes 'Box Cutter', 'Thirty-Eight Snub', and 'Shotgun'.

Calvin Law said...

As for Dunkirk, I imagine the airborne sequences were very visual effects-heavy.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Box Cutter - (Sets the stage for the season by cutting through the tension with a knife, which only makes things work. You think you'll get your breather after the previous finale and you don't as they only build the things up all the more setting sort of the sword of Damocles that defines the season.)

Thirty Eight-Snub - (Amazing acting from Paul as it so powerfully depicts the fallout from his actions, though somehow still managing to find a bit of humor with Badger and Skinny Pete. Along with that though it continues to build Walter's precarious state as he tries to find some way out. I love in particular his final interaction with Mike, and his meeting to get the gun with Jim Beaver's great though minor role as the salesman.)

Shotgun - (Again the season just does not let up with the opening sequence that only is given a slight reprieve when we see where Jesse is. That hardly makes things simple as it so effectively places us in his mindset in terms of the exact purpose of the trip and the confusion around it.)

Oh I imagine so, though my question was more in jest given just how seamless the effects were.

Calvin Law said...

Could not agree more about Thirty Eight-Snub. Also, thoughts on Krysten Ritter, Charles Baker, and Jere Burns (the group leader)?

Matt Mustin said...

Well, Calvin, since you're asking thoughts on the Breaking Bad cast, I want to ask you, what do you think of Bob Odenkirk?

Calvin Law said...

Matt: He's terrific, and only gets better as the series is coming along. He's so delightfully sleazy and humorous in the role, and also quite sympathetic when things don't quite work out for him despite being as morally murky as anyone else on the show. He has great chemistry with everyone he interacts with on the show, but in particular he and Cranston have a terrific dynamic. Some of the funniest scenes of the series so far have been him making particularly dumb or corny jokes and Walt's memorable expressions of exasperation (paticularly the 'the very best, with just the right amount of dirty' line).

I can't wait to start on Better Call Saul to see more of his talents, and also if he has more scenes with Jonathan Banks.

Calvin Law said...

Also I just finished 'Problem Dog' and Paul is incredible, I actually think he's been better than Cranston in Season 4 so far.

Calvin Law said...

Matt: who's your MVP for each season? For me so far,

Season 1: MVP Cranston, Runner-up Paul

Season 2: MVP Paul, Runner-up Cranston

Season 3: Co-MVPs Cranston and Paul, Runner-up Norris

Matt Mustin said...

Calvin: Well, first of all, I think Cranston is MVP of the show overall, but the whole cast is wonderful. But my MVP's per season would probably be:

Season 1: Cranston
Season 2: Cranston
Season 3: Cranston and Paul (tied), runner up Norris
Season 4: Esposito overall, but Cranston probably has the best single scene
Season 5, part 1: Banks
Season 5, part 2: Cranston and Paul (tied), runner up: Norris

Matt Mustin said...

Actually, no, for part 2, Cranston, Norris and Paul about equal for me. Which is kind of cheating, but whatever.

Robert MacFarlane said...

For me:

Season 1: Cranston
Season 2: Paul
Season 3: Paul
Season 4: Cranston
Season 5-1: Banks
Season 5-2: Norris

Calvin Law said...

Louis and everyone else if they want: thoughts on 'Problem Dog' and 'Hermanos'. Sorry for saddling on the thoughts, but these two were some of the best. Especially the latter; gosh, that flashback...

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Hermanos is an absolutely brilliant episode, and Esposito should have won the Emmy for it.(although Aaron Paul was just as deserving).
My MVPs per season are:
Season 1- Cranston
Season 2- Cranston
Season 3- Paul
Season 4- Esposito
Season 5A-Banks
Season 5B-Cranston

Louis: Your thoughts on the Better Call Saul episode "Five-O".

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your interpretation of the ending to "Take Shelter".

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Also, it seems that Anthony Hopkins submitted Westworld's 7th episode for his Emmy nomination.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: What happened to your blog. It doesn't exist.

Anonymous said...

Louis and everyone else too: Would you consider Paul lead or co-lead in seasons 2-4? ? I believe he is certainly supporting in seasons 1, 5-1 and 5-2, but in the other seasons I'm not so sure, especially in season 4.

Calvin Law said...

Luke: I've changed it to reeldealfilm.blogspot.com

Calvin Law said...

Anonymous: I'd consider him co-lead in 3 and 4.

Calvin Law said...

Luke: sorry, I've changed it again, reelandroll.blogspot.com

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Which Technical categories would you give Dunkirk the win.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: I've been wondering, whether you could do a top 10/15/20 tracks by Hans Zimmer article for your blog.

Calvin Law said...

Luke: Cinematography, Editing, and Sound Editing for sure. I could look into that, especially focusing on specific tracks is a good idea; 20 seems to be the right number.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Also, do you plan on watching Game Of Thrones once it's finished.

Calvin Law said...

Luke: Maybe.

Well, just finished Salud and Crawl Space. Two amazing episodes culminating in some all-time great acting.

Alex Marqués said...

The ending of Crawl Space is my favourite scene from the show, and by extension one of the greatest moments on TV.

Calvin Law said...

Alex: The ending was mesmerizing. Not just the acting from Cranston, but also Gunn. Also, the episode as a whole was just so spellbinding.

Fring mocking Hector was so strangely heartbreaking yet satisfying. Fring confronting Walter in the desert, terrifying. That darkly hilarious comeuppance for Ted Beneke and Huell's hilarious response. Also, Oedenkirk was really great in this one in bringing the dramatic heft too.

Charles Heiston said...

Season 1: Cranston
Season 2: Paul
Season 3: Paul
Season 4: Esposito
Season 5/1: Banks
Season 5/2: Cranston

Charles Heiston said...

I adore Crawl Space. Certainly an amazing scene for Cranston. Although it wouldn't be my favorite in the show.

Matt Mustin said...

Actually, I had forgotten what season 2 was for some reason, and yeah, Paul's the MVP of that season, I changed my mind.

John Smith said...

Louis, have you seen 'Big Little Lies'? If so, what are your thoughts on the cast?

Charles Heiston said...

Anyone here watching 13 Reasons Why?

Anonymous said...

Louis and everyone else: Thoughts on the today's Game of Thrones episode?

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Ritter - (Though I think there are some iffy moments in portraying more of the rot of the character, I think where she does work quite well with is in terms of her chemistry with Paul. The self-destructiveness is so well realized amidst what also is genuine affection. They are great together as they both realize the way they are both intertwined in quite a remarkable yet truly tragic fashion. Ritter's good in that she brings even a sweetness in introducing Jesse to heroine, she does not portray this as psychopathic, but rather the unfortunate method she shares her love with him.)

Baker - (A great side man for Badger. He secondary but I like his little asides as much as that bombast though. Baker plays off of him so well though by showing the mutual mindset of both which again offers such natural comic relief even though they do technically realize the more tragic ideas behind this at the same time.)

Burns - (Downright amazing in every one of his brief scenes. He's incredible in his revelation scene in realizing both the subtle intensity of the pain yet through the lens of a man whose come to accept it. Burns finds that balance and creates such a heartbreaking moment there. He furthermore though is great in Problem Dog just through his reactions to Jesse and especially his delivery of the No. As Burns still does not show him truly judging, even though he states directly his disapproval, yet rather reinforces the man's sorrows towards the life they live.)

Problem Dog - (Speaking of that moment, that is the highlight of the episode due to both Paul's and Burns's performances. The episode though also is terrific in how he builds the tensions of all three strands of the plot so effectively from Walter's attempt to destroy Fring, to the conflict with the cartel, and Hank starting to become suspicion of the chicken man as well.)

Hermanos - (This episode very much does the same with that particularly tension filled moment with Walter and Hank visiting a chicken place. The episode though is Esposito's showcase and he delivers in offering the sympathy for the devil. Esposito gives us almost every side of Gus from the calm crime boss, and to the oh so reasonable businessman, but also the more emotional vendetta in that final scene with Hector and of course that incredible flashback.)

Tahmeed:

Banks is amazing without a doubt. His best single performance in any episode of either series. Everything in terms of dissecting who Mike is incredible. I do think the episode falters a tad first from really losing the momentum of the setup, and having the revelation of Mike's past being a little underwhelming. It does not help that the actors playing the cops in the flashback are kind of terrible.

It is as it appears, the apocalypse essentially given that Chastain sees it as well.

Hopkins made the right choice, though really all his scenes are great and it the whole of the work that really makes his performance so spectacular, so I doubt he'll win.

Anonymous:

Co-lead in 3 and 4.

John Smith:

I have not.

Calvin Law said...

Yeah I've come to realize how dumb the Emmy episode submission thing is. It kind of works for guest stars (for example, I assume Margolis submitted 'Face Off', a magnificent episode by the way for his nomination since he is absolutely spectacular in that episode, almost as great as Cranston). But for characters like Gus Fring the performance doesn't quite make sense if you just submit one episode. For instance, he's fantastic in Hermanos, but it's really the whole body of his restrained villainous performance that makes the flashback work so well; and in 'Face Off' that final scene with him is impactful because of the seasons-long buildup.

Having said that, I'd say my series MVP for Season 4 is like everyone else, easily Cranston now. In those final few episodes he truly ran through all the gamult of emotions and decisions through Walt and Heisenberg.

Matt Mustin said...

The one episode submission thing is like if someone decided on Oscar nominations based on a single scene.

Luke Higham said...

I do understand why they have that rule, since it's impossible for a voter to get around to everything, but they really should extend it to an actor's 3 or 4 best episodes.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: your top 5/10 actors for seasons 1 to 4? Mine would be:

Season 1
1. Cranston
2. Paul
3. Cruz
4. Norris
5. Arciniega

Season 2
1. Paul
2. Cranston
3. Norris
4. Odenkirk
5. De Lancie
6. Cruz
7. Jones
8. Margolis
9. Baker
10. Ritter

Season 3
1. Cranston and Paul
3. Norris
4. Odenkirk
5. Esposito
6. Banks
7. Costabile
8. Gunn
9. Jones/Baker
10. Brandt

Season 4
1. Cranston
2. Esposito
3. Paul
4. Margolis
5. Norris
6. Gunn
7. Odenkirk
8. Banks
9. Burns
10. Bauer

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Season 1:

1. Cranston
2. Paul
3. Cruz
4. Norris
5. Arciniega (Who I almost forgot was so good in episode 3)

Season 2:

1. Paul
2. Cranston
3. Norris
4. Odenkirk
5. De Lancie

Season 3:

1. Paul
2. Cranston
3. Esposito
4. Banks
5. Odenkirk

Season 4:

1. Cranston
2. Esposito
3. Paul
4. Banks
5. Odenkirk

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

And on that GOT episode, which I'll leave above the line in terms of spoilers for the moment, I thought was a rather poorly directed episode, where's Sapochnik when you need him? There were so many moments that could have just hit a lot harder visually whether it was the grand shots at the end or just those speaking scenes which were not exactly twelve angry men. Staying on the negative Emilia Clarke just cannot deliver the gravitas needed, she just doesn't have it which is such a shame. Having said that there was plenty I liked such as the setting up of the future clashes particularly in suggesting things won't be so easy for Daenerys, Jon Snow's difficulty being leader (with a nice call back to Ned's treatment of Littlefinger), everything involving Arya, and Sam with Jorah. The ending, which again I think could have been truly something with a better director as well as Mads Mikkelsen but I digress, did offer many nice things in terms of departures and also a few sighs of relief in terms of a few reprieves.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your cast for a 1980's Confessions of a Dangerous Mind.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Confessions of a Dangerous Mind directed by David Cronenberg:

Chuck Barris: James Woods
Penny Pacino: Frances Conroy
Jim Byrd: Stacy Keach
Patricia Watson: Glenn Close
Keeler: Marcello Mastroianni

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Anthony Mann and Fritz Lang as directors.

Giuseppe Fadda said...

I watched it.

Calvin Law said...

Everyone: who would you have chosen instead of Spacey to play Doc in Baby Driver? I was just thinking today that Steve Buscemi might have been able to pull it off.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Charles: Seen it. Solid performances from the leads, and the supporting cast is surprisingly competent for a teen show.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Calvin: John Goodman, so the Monsters Inc. line would be even funnier.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Just finished seeing the latest Game of Thrones, and it was a considerable step down from the premiere in terms of the direction. That being said, while Emilia Clarke is really proving her limitations as an actress, I did like quite a bit about this episode. I loved Conleth Hill and Pilou Asbaek's work on this episode, and plot-wise, things are just starting to go on the high gear.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Could you give your thoughts on the following GOT cast members-
Pilou Asbaek
Tobias Menzies
Diana Rigg

Giuseppe Fadda said...

I'm not sure I'm sold on Pilou Asbaek's performance yet. I agree about the direction (though probably to a lesser extent than you) and Emilia Clarke who was really off. Outside that I actually loved everything else about the episode and really Kit Harington has grown into a damn fine actor: I used to find him fine but kind of uninteresting in the early seasons, but in the past few ones he's been absolutely amazing.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your rating for Danielle Darrieux in 5 Fingers.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Giuseppe: Agree completely about Harrington. His and Sophie Turner's work is a large reason why the North storyline is actually my favorite part of GOT now.

Louis: How would you rank the various storylines of GOT? (based on the location, ie Dorne)

Luke Higham said...

Tahmeed: Dorne and Beyond The Narrow Sea (Except Braavos) are surely at the bottom of the list.

I've grown to appreciate Harington's work all the more (From an Apologist of The Wall storylines) in the earlier seasons, because it made sense character-wise from an inexperienced, somewhat naive boy to a strong, likeable and honourable leader who you'd be willing to fight and die for.

And I've made no secret on how much I hate Daenaerys. Clarke's performance is one of the most overrated in recent memory.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Mann - (Certainly an interesting director in terms of the material he was willing to broach along with James Stewart. Mann's work in those westerns I wouldn't quite say was a true deconstruction, but at the very least a removal of perhaps the glossy coat to reveal something far harsher. Although the film's are not flawless, Robert Ryan as the villain in all the westerns would have been appreciated and not every screenplay was equal, Mann offered a real intensity and urgent view that at the time was quite new to the genre. I've seen little of his work outside of his work outside of the west other than Glenn Miller which is interesting in that Mann proves himself to be quite the visual stylist for a fairly standard biopic, and A Dandy in Aspic which doesn't completely count since he was not able to finish the film and it shows.)

Lang - (Lang in Germany was one of the most daring and accomplished filmmakers of his day. He not only excelled in terms of his now iconic and unforgettable visual style, but also grafted that ability within well told and emotional stories. His early work is remarkable as his achievements went beyond a single genre, and have had a lasting effect to this day on cinema. In America, not so much. To be sure though what was lost in translation was not as severe as some other cases. Lang's vision was very diminished by the Studio system, however he did not become a bad director. He still made good films though far less memorable and when he had the chance within the film you could see the brilliance of his early work. It did never seemed like he ever was allowed a film that was wholly "own" again though, and we certainly lost something due to that.)

Tahmeed:

Asbaek - (Well I think I'll be able to give you a more definite answer by the seasons's end, since now we are only beginning to see what his Euron may or may not be. In last season though he actually did have a great scene on the rope bridge, as he not only evoked a menace but also a mysterious power in his seeming madness. He delivered on his "I am the storm" lines. Unfortunately they used up all his good lines for his second scene where he just came off as a fairly bland standard psycho. Now we're are back and I'm not sure about him still. He's now really focusing on the swagger with the madness, which is fitting to a mad pirate and it may work but again I need to see more of him.)

Menzies - (A very little role in the series as a whole. I did like him in season 3 though as I felt he captured the right sort of well meaning nature of the character but along with it a certain pompousness fitting to a spoiled lord. He was great though in his return in season 6 though in not only realizing the wear of his imprisonment but also realizing the man who has almost everything taken away from him except for his life. He was particularly strong in his scene with Jamie as presented the anguish of a man who essentially believed he was looking at season 1 Jamie.)

Louis Morgan said...

Rigg - (This performance has received a little flak for being one of the few recognized from the series, being derided as merely the "sassy grandma". Now on one hand Rigg has to be said is great at being as such, but I never felt that was all there was to work anyways. Even in her season 3 scenes she alluded to a bit more in a cutting remarks and successfully built on the darker side of the political player in her later seasons. Furthermore she was terrific in season 4 when she brought the even harder edges, and really showed her without basically her "wit". I had particular affection for the death stare she gave Cersei at Loras's hearing. Rigg played with perhaps the cliche but built upon to give a greater depth than the initial impression.)

Best to do per season as they do change.

Season 1:

1. King's Landing
2. The Riverlands/The Vale
3. Essos
4. The Wall
5. The North

Season 2:

1. The North/Iron Islands
2. The Riverlands
3. King's Landing
4. Stormlands/Dragonstone
5. The Wall
6. Essos

Season 3:

1. The Riverlands
2. Dragonstone
3. The Wall
4. King's Landing
5. The North
6. Essos

Season 4:

1. King's Landing
2. The Wall
3. The Riverlands
4. The North
5. Dragonstone
6. The Vale
7. Essos

Season 5:

1. The Wall
2. The North
3. King's Landing
4. Braavos
5. Essos
6. Dorne

Season 6:

1. The North
2. The Riverlands
3. King's Landing
4. Beyond the Wall
5. Braavos
6. Essos

Luke:

3.5

Giuseppe Fadda said...

Louis I completely agree with you on Asbaek. Also I agree that Rigg's portrayal is far more layered than it seems. I loved her performance in every season, and I'm actually kind of pissed she was not submitted by HBO for her work in Season 6. Her final scene with Natalie Dormer and her subsequent conversation with Cersei were amazing.

Luke Higham said...

I saw the second episode and boy, am I happy to see the Sand Bitches get their comeuppance.

I enjoyed all the scenes in The North, Oldtown and Arya reuniting with Nymeria. The Grey Worm/Missandei scene was horrendous. I give my MVP award to Conleth Hill, I really liked his performance at the beginning.

I'm not gonna bring up Daenerys in my thoughts ever again. I've come to a point where I'm tired of hating on her and wish she'd go away.

Luke Higham said...

My 2nd favourite was Harington.

Louis: I agree with you, Mikkelsen would've been something quite special as Euron.

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Louis: May I have your Top 10 Acting Moments for Vivien Leigh and Olivia de Havilland?

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your rating for Amrish Puri in The Temple Of Doom.

Michael McCarthy said...

I guess I'm in the minority because I actually thought Emilia Clarke did a pretty good job this time. It seemed to me like having more so many interesting personalities to play off of brought a little bit more character out of her.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your top 10 vocal performances in animation.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: He has a film top 15 somewhere with Hartman, Jay, Benson and McCambridge in the top 5.

I'd assume you want one for Television instead.

Anonymous said...

Luke: Yes, that's true.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: Annoyingly I can't find it anywhere. Louis posted the list sometime after he saw the Beauty And The Beast remake. :(

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Could you re-post your top 15 vocal performances in film animation. You might've deleted it by mistake.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Michael: Yeah, I didn't mind her this episode either. Her deliveries towards Colenth Hill were actually pretty good.

Louis Morgan said...

ruthihenshallfan99:

Vivien Leigh:

1. "Tomorrow is a another day" - Gone With the Wind
2. Kindness of strangers - A Streetcar Named Desire
3. Killing the Union Soldier - Gone With the Wind
4. Final Date with Mitch - A Streetcar Named Desires
5. Goodbye to Rhett - Gone With the Wind
6. Never go hungry again - Gone With the Wind
7. Looking for the doctor - Gone With the Wind
8. First date with Mitch - A Streetcar Named Desire
9. Meeting Rhett in jail - Gone with the Wind
10. The rape - A Streetcar Named Desire

Olivia de Havilland:

1. Bolt the door - The Heiress
2. the "snakepit" - The Snake Pit
3. Learning to be cruel - The Heiress
4. Opening - The Snake Pit
5. Being left by Morris - The Heiress
6. Finger waving - The Snake Pit
7. Being courted by Morris - The Heiress
8. Killing the Union Soldier - Gone With the Wind
9. A Wink - Strawberry Blonde
10. Accepting Scarlett - Gone With the Wind

Anonymous:

1. Elizabeth Hartman - The Secret of NIMH
2. Tony Jay - The Hunchback of Notre Dame
3. Robby Benson - Beauty and the Beast
4. Tom Hulce - The Hunchback of Notre Dame
5. Jeremy Irons - The Lion King
6. Robin Williams - Aladdin
7. Peter O'Toole - Ratatouille
8. Jerry Orbach - Beauty and the Beast
9. Luis van Rooten - Cinderella
10. Richard White - Beauty and the Beast