Saturday, 11 February 2017

Alternate Best Supporting Actor 2016: Shinya Tsukamoto, Yoshi Oida, Tadanobu Asano, Issey Ogata, Liam Neeson, and Yosuke Kubozuka in Silence

Shinya Tsukamoto and Yoshi Oida did not receive Oscar nominations for portraying Mokichi and Ichizo respectively in Silence.
Although Silence may seem to be a story about an individual's journey, the story of Jesuit priest Sebasti√£o Rodrigues, played brilliantly by Andrew Garfield,  as he attempts to spread Christianity in Japan while learning of the whereabouts of his former mentor, it is so much more than that. The film is built around Rodrigues, but through him we encounter so many different people within 17th century Japan. Two of the first Rodrigues, and his fellow priest Garupe (Adam Driver), encoutner are Mokichi and Ichizo played by Shinya Tsukamoto and Yoshi Oida. The two men are Japanese Christians with Ichizo having even been trained to give baptisms. Their performances are defined by an honesty in their very presence. Both Tsukamoto and Oida portray this desperate passion in the men in order to renew their faith once more. The two portray a direct uncompromising respect for the priests, which comes with this palatable attachment the villagers have to what they bring in to their lives.

What is important about both of their performances is that even within the intensity of that attachment the two directly show the appreciation that each man has for the priests, which directly connects to their faith. The desperation is real but within it Oida and Tsukamoto reveal what it is that Mokichi and Ichizo are granted from it. When in direct interaction, of their faith, they portray the solace they receive from it. Their joy is overwhelming at times and in that they directly suggest not only what they find in their beliefs but also what it grants them. All in this though we are given an insight into the very peculiar status of the men's beliefs considering that they are technically praying in secret. This is found in their performances that convey this terrible attempt to keep hidden something they hold dear. That intense fear they both bring when they believe they may loses the priests, it is not that either of them are holding onto the men, but rather the idea of the men being such powerful tools of their belief.

Their test of faith comes though when the Japanese inquisition visits their village, and again both actors excel in these scenes. There is real power in the terror that grace their face as they attempt to stand in front of the inquisition. It is decided that both Mokichi and Ichizo must be hostages, but they must find two more. Oida has a terrific scene where he reveals the pure unadulterated faith in Ichizo as he pleads with another to join them in their sacrifice. Here in these scene there such a poignancy in depicting both men attempting to deal with their own struggle to abandon their faith in order to save themselves. Both are exceptional in the moment where Rodrigues grants them the permission to trample the image of Christ they will be presented with. Rodrigues's own statement is given understanding through the sheer horror that Tsukamoto portrays as he asks what to do, and Oida is equally effective as he conveys Ichizo's surprise at the advice. The two fail though to apostatize to the inquisitions requirement, they do trample the image Christ but without certainty. Again both of the performances are essential in these moments as silently they given the terrible struggle in both men, and allude to their belief. The men are sentenced to death and slowly executed by the tide while placed upon wooden crosses. This is Tsukamoto's scene and he is heart wrenching throughout the scene. As he reveals the man's slow emotional death in painful detail. What makes it so moving though is that Tsukamoto depicts still that solace in the man's eyes as he says a pray for his friend when Ichizo dies, and then later when he sings a hymn as he tries to hold onto life or perhaps ease his death. Both actors give very strong performances as they so effectively, and importantly grant a face to the Japanese Christians and their struggle. Their deaths are not meaningless, as they continue to haunt long after their departure.
Tadanobu Asano and Issey Ogata did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying The Interpreter and the inquisitor Inoue Masashige respectively in Silence.

The lead persecutor of Christians in Japan we actually meet relatively early on as the Japanese inquisition first visits the Christian villagers. Ogata appears but does not speak for some time. In these scenes though we do get a glimpse into his rather brilliant approach to the part. As he's riding through the village he does not stare down at the villagers with hate, but actually a rather pleasant smile. Ogata's approach is not to present Inoue as this sinister villain instead playing the role kind of like a kooky old grandfather. The amazing part of it is how well he pulls it off. He's unassuming as we see him yet there is just something so interesting about the old man who rides with the inquisition. Everything about Ogata's demeanor is kind of something else, and again brilliantly so. The way he squints his eyes, his hunch, and especially that almost sweet? voice that he does, grants a most unique presence within the film to say the least. He gives though the age of the character, but also this man of power who essentially behaves in a way that only a man with his power could behave.

A shame about a transformative performance like this is it is not one that can be readily appreciated, though Ogata was the only supporting actor from the ensemble recognized anywhere to begin with, but if one actually goes to see the man in an interview one can see that he truly went out on a limb with his performance here. It absolutely works though and makes him the all the more effective as a villain. Ogata does not really speak for over an hour into the film, even though we see him before that point, after Rodrigues has been captured with a group of Japanese Christians. He speaks and we get a glimpse of Inoue's most unusual method of defeating his enemies. In that Ogata delivers his initial words against the Christians as though he is merely pleasantly giving them a bit of advice. This even continues as he opens up to Rodrigues, but this changes when Rodrigues makes it clear that he will not be an easily defeated priest. Ogata's switch is perfect, as well as rather menacing, revealing a more exact hatred, when he makes his frustrations known directly to him. I especially admire his venomous delivery of "The price of you glory is their suffering" suggesting a less gentle man when he sees that this priest will take some time.

We are soon introduced to the second persecutor with considerable emphasis within film which is the man only named as the interpreter. He is the man who most often interacts with Rodrigues as they attempt to get him to apostatize. Although the interpreter fulfills the requirements of his name that is not his only purpose. Tadanobu Asano's work is yet another striking turn in this film. Asano again twists the part in rather compelling way. He does not scream at Rodrigues, but he rather, well what's the best word to describe, yes I know, he trolls him. Asano delivers this palatable disdain in everything about his performance that is so effective in offering this curious atypical yet still sinister presence. What's so great about Asano's approach is just how much passive aggression he brings to the part, though he portrays all of the interpreters hatred as very much a natural state of being that he's quite comfortable with. Asano is not one note though even quite effectively delivering a real passion as he states what the value in Buddism is. Asano delivers this straight to even allow one to potentially agree with the interpreter, of course then Asano is so incisive as he turns this honest defense into a vicious attack against Rodrigues's own beliefs.

Now the reason I discussed Ogata and Asano together, besides that their characters are in supportive of each other in the same task, is that they are also kind of hilarious. Despite being the most identifiable villains for the film, they are also the source of the most light hearted moments in the film. What is astonishing is that it somehow feels not only natural it only elevates the film's strengths all the more. A great deal of the credit for this needs to go to both actors. Asano's comedic moments come from that general sense of superiority he grants the Interpreter. Asano though is suddenly funny when he is funny, particularly his timing when Rodrigues asks if their plan is to let their body betray him and he instantly counters "Not at all" with such abrasive indifference. Ogata's very being is amusing particularly with the little business he goes in whether it is shooing a fly in his initial interrogation or his manner of calling or punishing those he needs when he's trying to straighten up. Both make the humor genuine, and fitting to their characters. In these instances Asano and Ogata reflect the attitudes of the men whose job it has become to inflict such punishments, and they're so comfortable in it that they can be rather blas√© about it all. 

Ogata and Asano do not compromise their characters intentions though with those lighter moments. They are a natural part of their overarching characterizations of these inquisitors. When they become more direct in their technique both are brutally effective. Again one of the most notable sequences of the film is when Rodrigues is forced to watch Father Garupe drown in a failed attempt to save some of the Japanese Christians. Asano is bone chilling in the scene as he offers such exact remarks towards Rodrigues throughout it. There is no sympathy just the intention to break the man with his cruel words that are made all the crueler through Asano's direct almost unemotional delivery. Ogata excels in crafting this most unusual man's way of destroying those who oppose him, and he manages to make something so menacing out of only usually implying what he's capable of. We actually don't really ever hear him order someone to be directly executed or tortured. Ogata gives us that sly smile and even a warmth as he speaks to Rodrigues about a story regarding concubines, even offering this shyness as he ponders if he should regale such a story to a celibate priest. When the story is revealed to be a metaphor for the other countries interfering in Japan, there is this darker shade in his eyes, which only worsens when Rodrigues's resolve is not lost. Ogata in those moments suggests the man responsible for the torture and murders of so many. Ogata though in the end presents a man who has come to attempt to convert rather than kill, though that may involve the killing of others. I feel this is best represented in Ogata's final scene where he actually comforts the defeated Rodrigues, and delivers his message as "hey you tried your best but it was all against you". Ogata gives a great performance as he not only offers such a unique character, that you feel has quite the life outside of the frame we view him in. Asano and Ogata realize the effectiveness of the inquisition. They present men who have become so very comfortable and efficient in their task, making it almost second nature to them, even though it involves so many horrible deeds.
(Asano)
(Ogata)
Liam Neeson did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Father Cristovao Ferreira in Silence.

Liam Neeson plays almost the Colonel Kurtz for the journey, in that he's technically the end goal of the missionaries. Unlike Marlon Brando in Apocalypse Now we actually do see Liam Neeson before the end. He opens the film as we witness part of Father Ferreira's, who lead the Christian mission in Japan, downfall as he watches his fellow priests being slowly tortured. Neeson is devastating in these glimpses offering a man worn away by his anguish. Neeson in the flashbacks later as well shows a man who has been through hell and is almost hollow in the way his strength has been purged from him. We do not see Ferreira again for over two hours when he finally appears to be a final weapon of sorts by the inquisition in order to get Rodrigues to apostatize, as Ferreira had done. Ferreira is mentioned several times before his reappearance, as the inquisition name him as a great example for all others as he has not only given up his faith but also lives as a Japanese. There is this buildup to the man, again not unlike Kurtz in Apocalypse Now, so Neeson needs to live up to this.

Neeson does live up to his character's reputation but not in the way you may think. Neeson's work here is fascinating as seems aware of his own screen persona. Neeson is of course no way a stranger to playing mentors, on the contrary it is one of his specialties. Neeson though in those roles though is always known for the confidence and command he brings to them. That is not what Neeson brings here and he makes a tremendous impact from his first scene where Ferreira sits across from Rodrigues to speak. Neeson is notable as he gives us this broken man. Neeson realizes what was done to Ferreier in every aspect of his performance. Neeson shares almost no eye contact with Garfield throughout the scene, almost like beat dog, showing this shame as Ferreira knows how he must look to his old student. Neeson inflicts this hesitation in his early greetings, this stops in speech reflecting this overwhelming sadness of the man. When he asks "do I seem so different" to Rodrigues, there is such distress in his voice, as Neeson shows a man who honestly knows the answer already. When he speaks of being happy to finally be of use, Neeson reveals a man writhing in pain just below his skin, torn apart by just what he has become.

Neeson shows that Ferreira only can come out of this depression when he attempts to speak Rodrigues into following his example. Neeson portrays this in no way as Ferreira having become some true believer for the Japanese's  cause. There is something as painful as his depressed state as he attempt to argue for Rodrigues to denounce his faith himself. There is a passion that Neeson grants the words but a cynical passion. Neeson plays this as a man grasping onto his olds doubts to be able to speak these words. Neeson perhaps gives us the most direct Ferreira as he attempts to convince Rodrigues that the Japanese never understood Christianity to begin with. Neeson again does not deliver this as some man whose made a revelation, it is rather a man writhing in his own torments. There is no hope left in Neeson's voice or eyes in his miserable teachings towards his old student. Neeson's work is incredibly striking and oddly enough soulful as he depicts a man who has had his own faith ripped from him. As powerful as Neeson's performance is up until he helps to "break" Rodrigues, one of the most affecting moments though is in his final quiet scene as he and Rodrigues go about their duties as pawns of the anti-christian Japanese. Ferreira states that only "Our Lord" can judge their minds, and in that brief moment Neeson alludes to the man and teacher Ferreira once was, and that his faith was perhaps still within him. This is an outstanding performance by Liam Neeson as it is such compelling subversion of his usual presence, and leaves such considerable imprint on the film despite his very brief screentime. 
Yosuke Kubozuka did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Kichijiro in Silence.

The final performance I write about comes through the character who is probably given the second greatest importance within the narrative, behind Rodrigues of course. Kichijiro we are introduced to outside of Japan as he is living as an expatriate in Macau. Although living might be an overstatement as the two priests are shown the man who is little more than drunken wreck, with the only reason why he's the best man for the job of guide is because he's the only man for the job. Kubozuka does not give a quiet performance, but nor should he. The man after all from his first scene is shown to be a druken fool. Kubozuka excels in being just that as he yells nonsensically against going with them. Kichijiro needs to be an obvious mess to anyone who sees him, and Kubozuka brings that. He makes him a bit of a joke, which again is an intentional realization of the character who is a bit of joke to everyone who speaks of him. There is a moment though that Kubozuka effectively undercuts this slightly when he lashes out at being called a Christian. His lament that Christians die could merely be the ramblings of an idiotic drunk, but Kubozuka infuses it with a bit more pathos than that even if only lasts for a moment.

Kichijiro does in the end take the priests over to Japan where we eventually learn the cause of the man's state. The revelation is that Kichijiro is not only indeed a Christian but also his whole family was murdered by the Japanese inquisition. Kichijiro only survived himself by apostatizing yet he still saw his family die. We are given a brief insight into the former man as we flashback to see his family being massacred as he watched. Kubozuka's presence is different in that he stands not as the drunken fool, but a normal man. As the family is massacred though Kubozuka's reaction is truly haunting as it echoes the pain the man is suffering, a pain that could bring him to the state the Fathers originally found him in. The scene gives sense to Kubozuka's performance which not of a drunken fool, but rather a man driven to madness due his grief. In the scene where Kichijiro tells Rodrigues his story Kubozuka is absolutely heartbreaking by revealing the real man beneath the wretch. He portrays so well the hint of hope in the man with such poignancy as he asks if there is a chance that God may forgive him.

When the inquisition arrives though Kubozuka shows that although we may have a greater understanding of the man, he's in no way recovered. Kubozuka instead portrays this rather problematic attachment that Kichijiro gains towards Rodrigues. Kubozuka depicts it as that same madness in the man, but now he has a method of trying to find some respite which is through looking towards Rodrigues for guidance and absolution. When the villagers asks for Kichijiro's help, as well as accuse him of wrongdoing, Kubozuka's reaction grants an insight into the man. He reacts in utter fear but his protests are all aimed right towards Rodrigues in attempt for him to escape from his personal demons somehow. Kichijiro is one of the few Japanese who consistently avoids being killed by his willingness to apostatize again and again. Kichijiro for the rest of the film ends up being a rather strange ghost of sorts, though very much alive, who follows around Rodrigues. Again Kubozuka's work offers an understanding to this behavior by portraying that attachment that is so strong to the priest. Kubozuka's terrific because he really is absolutely the wretch Kichijiro seems to be, only becoming more wretched when he apparently betrays Rodrigues to the authorities. There is even a slightly comic element in this as Kichijiro continues to appear no matter where Rodrigues goes in order to deliver his confession. Kubozuka's performance touches upon a humorous undercurrent yet that is only an aspect in his realization of the terrible pathetic state of the man. What's so remarkable about his work is his ability to infuse Kichijiro with that history, and that at all points he carries that very real pain that brought him to this point with a very real desperation in his attempts to find some solace. Kubozuka is the last of the prominent supporting actors to appear in the film as he acts as a servant to the now apostatized Rodrigues. Years have past and Kubozuka gives a slightly more put together Kichijiro, having been living a different life of sorts. Kichijiro still asks to have his confession heard and it is comic in a way yet also tragic because Kubozuka makes the intention of his wish to have his sins forgiven so honest. He's incredibly moving and Kubozuka also manages to give understanding to Kichijiro as a man, despite his pathetic state. He's never a caricature as Kubozuka delivers his own embodiment of man's journey to finding his own path in regards to his faith, that mirrors Rodrigues's own though Kichijiro's perhaps is a less noble one. 

66 comments:

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Is this the greatest ensemble in film history for you.

Anonymous said...

Easily the best film of the year. All of the performances are astounding.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

One of the best, certainly.

Charles Heiston said...

Every performance is 5 star worthy. Fucking amazing ensemble!

Louis: Your updated top 10 film ensembles.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I wasn't surprised to find out that Ogata is actually known as a comedian in Japan.

Calvin Law said...

Wow, so glad all are 4.5's and above.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: Your too 10 scenes in Silence.

RatedRStar said...

=D The Silence Gang =D what a name.

Calvin Law said...

*top

Glad Kubozuka stuck with you as much as he did.

Charles Heiston said...

Kubozuka left the biggest impression on me. He was really haunting. No character in this film was wasted.

Louis Morgan said...

Charles:

1. Lawrence of Arabia
2. Silence
3. The Hill
4. Alien
5. Rashomon
6. Clue
7. Doctor Zhivago
8. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy
9. It's A Wonderful Life
10. The Thin Red Line

Calvin:

1. Crucifixion by the tide.
2. The Silence is broken
3. Kichijiro's first Confession
4. Garupe's test
5. The Opening.
6. The Ending.
7. Face in the water.
8. "I am Inoue"
9. Arrival on the Island
10. Rodrigues is reunited with Ferreira

Anonymous said...

Louis: What are your overall thoughts on Andrew Garfield's Spider-Man in his two films?

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: Leaving that franchise, really paid off for Andrew, yet I always felt he was abit old for the part to begin with, despite managing to blend in fairly well.

Anonymous said...

Luke: Personally, I thought he was okay. But we still don't have our perfect live-action Spider-Man performance.

Michael McCarthy said...

I'm honestly disappointed that I didn't see the greatness in Kubozuka's performance that everyone else seems to see.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: That's bound to change with Tom Holland.

Charles Heiston said...

Michael: Which cast member left the most impact on you?

Anonymous said...

Luke: He probably will be the perfect live-action Spider-Man, but Homecoming needs to be a good movie.

Michael McCarthy said...

Charles: Probably Garfield and Neeson, though Ogata and Asano have both been sitting very well with me.

Anonymous said...

Strangely some people thought of Jake in Nocturnal Animals as a likable person, I would say Garfield in Silence was pretty likable.

Anonymous said...

Shannons nomination over Neeson angers me even more, Liam Neeson will probably never ever get another Oscar nomination.

Charles Heiston said...

Michael: I'm surprised that you liked the rest of the great cast members but didn't see greatness in Kubozuka. To each is own.

Charles Heiston said...

Anonymous: Believe me, the more i think about the more it bothers me.

Calvin Law said...

I don't think it's odd Michael didn't see the greatness, I feel it's quite a divisive performance.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: Glad we share the same favourite scene, did it remind you of Ikiru too?

RatedRStar said...

Siskel and Ebert would have loved Silence, I am certain at least one of them would have had it at number 1 on their top 10, it just seems like they would love it.

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar: Ebert certainly, he loved Scorsese's religious films prior to Silence, so it would've shocked me if it wasn't his #1.

RatedRStar said...

Siskel also loved Last Temptation Of The Christ and had it as his number 1 =D I reckon and imagine they both loved it.

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar: I'm sure Siskel loved it as well, but since Ebert was a Christian, he would've embraced it even more.

Anonymous said...

Silence is easily 2016s masterpiece, possibly the only film that in 20 years time will be regarded as a hidden masterpiece.

Giuseppe Fadda said...

Love Kubozuka. I really like Ogata, Asano and Neeson although they'd "only" be 4.5s to me. Tsukamoto and Oida are 4s for me, but they're both very good.

Charles Heiston said...

Giuseppe: Would Garfield be a 5 for you?

Charles Heiston said...

Luke: Silence would of been an easy 4 for Ebert. And would of appeared on his favorite film list. I think Silence is not only the best film of the year and decade. But slowly arising on my favorite film list.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your updated top 5 Scorsese films.

Giuseppe Fadda said...

@Charles: Yes Garfield is definitely a 5. Amazing performance and probably my own winner.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Ebert DEFINITELY would have called Silence his favorite of 2016. I cannot think of any other movie that would have resonated for him as much (though I could see him doing backflips for Arrival).

RatedRStar said...

Siskel and Eberts reaction to Silences Oscar snub would be on par with Hoop Dreams I think.

Charles Heiston said...

RatedRStar: Or your reaction when you heard Claude Rains lost for Notorious. =D

RatedRStar said...

Charles: Haha probably =D lol.

RatedRStar said...

Louis: Business as usual when it comes to 1946 I am sure you know lol =D.

RatedRStar said...

Ohh now I am thinking about Rains losing 4 Notorious again ohhh.

Anonymous said...

RatedRStar: Don't worry, Claude will keep his win.

94dfk1 said...

If only Paramount would've handled the campaign for this movie better...though they already put their chips on Arrival and Fences.

Charles Heiston said...

94dfk1: It was a bad idea to put their eggs in one basket. Paramount should be more open.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

He was a better Spider-man than a Peter Parker, just as Tobey Maguire was better Peter Parker than a Spider-man. The way Garfield makes a less likable protagonist, because Parker technically is more important when it comes to spider-man as a character, even made me reassess Maguire's take a bit. Garfield just is a little too cool for school to be Peter, but that does work for Spider-man. He's not working with great material though. I will say he is better than most of the things in Amazing Spider-man 2, though that is not saying a lot. The best part of his performance is his chemistry with Stone, and frankly should have just reworked both films into a romantic comedy with the two of them, we would've been all better off, especially the guys who played the villains in the second movie.

Calvin:

Yes it did.

Anonymous:

1. Goodfellas
2. Silence (It is close though)
3. The Wolf of Wall Street
4. After Hours
5. The Age of Innocence

94dk1:

The film needed to be released probably at Cannes of this year. I don't know if it would been completely embraced by the Academy, though I think Scorsese probably would have had a much better chance at a nod, the critics could potentially have narrowed in on one of the supporting actors, Garfield would not have been competing with himself. It's a film that needed to slowly build momentum.

Having said that Paramont also did screw things up by not marketing it until the last minute since they still were not sure if they were going to release it in 2016.

I have hope though that down the line this will be something like Vertigo, which took over 20 years to gain the stature it has today.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: Who'd you cast in a 1980s version of Silence? I'm thinking Daniel Day-Lewis as Rodrigues, obviously.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Day-Lewis of course, Paul Scofield as Ferreira, and Ciaran Hinds as Garupe instead.

Anonymous said...

Louis: So, are you looking forward to the Spider-Man Homecoming movie?

Robert MacFarlane said...

Louis: Concerning your thoughts on Ansel Elgort on the previous thread, have you watched that awful music video of his yet?

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Yes I am. I have my reservations, I really hope they don't waste Michael Keaton. I liked Holland in the role though, and hopefully they do something unique through the high school setting.

Robert:

Yes I did, well at least the first minute or so, a man can only take so much, but I'll admit there was something so fascinating about just how bad it was. Unfortunately it also makes me even more skeptical that he'll be able to deliver a good performance in Baby Driver.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Funniest part is that the video was directed BY HIS FATHER.

Robert MacFarlane said...

One reason why I requested Alden Ehrenreich in Beautiful Creatures is that it's practically an audition to play Han Solo in terms of sheer charm and charisma. It'll make you appreciate him getting cast over Elgort even more.

Louis Morgan said...

*Looks up parents* well that explains things a bit.

BULLET DODGED in regards to Han Solo.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Yeah, no kidding. A film group I'm in on Facebook practically threw a parade whenever Ehrenreich got it over him.

94dfk1 said...

Louis: My thoughts exactly regarding Silences future status as a classic.

Thoughts on Alec Baldwin as an actor?

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

I'm so glad everyone from Silence is a 4.5 at the very least (I was hoping Driver would get upgraded, but oh well). I wonder how Kubozuka, Neeson, and Ogata will factor into Louis's favorite supporting performances of the decade.
Louis: Have you seen the 70s version of Silence? I've heard that it's far less faithful to the novel than this masterpiece is, but I'm wondering if it's still worth a watch.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Also, do you think this is Neeson's best work?

Psifonian said...

I think Ogata's casting is inspired. Here you have a dude who is pretty much Japan's answer to Martin Short, and Martin Scorsese casts him as a character who is both hilarious and horrifying. I think one of the most enduring images of the film is the scene where he's sitting across from Garfield, and all of a sudden he slowly deflates from the pomp regality into something of a serpentine predator stance. Fiercely compelling.

I gotta say, though, wasn't all that crazy about Kubozuka. He was fine but easily my least favorite of the cast.

Robert MacFarlane said...

@Psifonian: That moment is only something a seasoned comic actor could pull off. A mixture of precise comic timing while still transitioning into something sinister.

Louis Morgan said...

94dk1:

Baldwin's a funny case in that I think he excels at ballbreakers. In that when he's in a role like, Glengarry Glen Ross, The Departed, he such a magnetic and compelling presence. When he's not though I find he's generally only serviceable sometimes even forgettable presence in his films.

Tahmeed:

I have. It is an interesting alternate viewpoint for the material, but this is the far superior film.

Not sure in regards to Neeson.

Psifonian:

I felt that way about Kubozuka the first time I watched the film, his work grew with me considerably.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your top 10 battle scenes in film or television.

Anonymous said...

I reckon Andrew Garfield will win the Bafta tonight, he surely has to be the favorite, being the only brit in the lineup.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: I forgot it was even on tonight but yeah, Garfield's winning, which will hand the oscar to Denzel.

Charles Heiston said...

Anonymous: I cannot be more happy that Garfield will win the Bafta. Sadly not the Oscar.

Luke Higham said...

Charles: It'll be his 2nd BAFTA (Film/TV) win after Boy A.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

1. Pelennor Fiels - Return of the King
2. Final Charge - Zulu
3. Hardhome - Game of Thrones
4. Normandy Beach - Saving Private Ryan
5. Battle for Castle Black - Game of Thrones
6. Battle of Stirling - Bravheart
7. Chaos - Battleground
8. Little Round Top - Gettysburg
9. First Attack - Hacksaw Ridge
10. Battle of the Bastards - Game of Thrones