Wednesday, 14 December 2016

Alternate Best Actor 1951: Michael Redgrave in The Browning Version

Michael Redgrave did not receive an Oscar nomination, despite winning Cannes, for portraying Andrew Crocker-Harris in The Browning Version.

The Browning Version is a rather excellent film about the last days of a public school professor.

Michael Redgrave is an actor who I have appreciated his past work to be sure, though those were often in smaller roles, or as co-leads. Redgrave is the central figure to this film, and I won't attempt to obscure my feelings this is work is rather extraordinary. The film opens with his character, Crocker-Harris being introduced by the school headmaster as well as through the interactions of a few school students. It is far more common for films with a teacher at the focal point to be more broadly inspirational, not unlike Goodbye Mr. Chips which is referenced in this film. This film seems to purposefully subvert that trope. Both the head master and the students paint Crocker-Harris as an unlikable professor and almost view him as a dictatorial figure, with his first appearance sitting silently seemingly being the figure he is described as. This is a rather interesting character study from the outset as this sort of character is more often found as a side character, just a one note antagonist setup to be flustered when our free spirit protagonist wins the day. This film offers a fascinating alternative perspective to such a character, even though we are technically introduced to him a way in which we observe him through the limited lens that everyone else seems to.

Michael Redgrave's first speaking scene is found when we watch Crocker-Harris's replacement come to observe the man's methods in action. Although we are shown a loud uproarious classroom next door we are told such things do not occur in Crocker-Harris's classroom. Redgrave is downright brilliant as he reveals his crafting of this particular professor. It would not be good enough to simply be the posh stuck up gentleman, that wouldn't be correct, Redgrave instead creates something quite unique in his realization of the man. The vocal choice that Redgrave takes is a stroke of genius. He inflicts himself with a higher pitched voice. It is of course very proper yet dull, perfect for long recitations of foreign languages, also perfect for an imitation, as Crocker-Harris's students so often indulge. There is something particularly intelligent Redgrave does with this voice, which I will get to a bit more down below. Redgrave furthers his creation of Crocker-Harris as the perfect dusty old professor with his physical presence. There is an utter rigidity he brings to his performance as he takes his seat at the head of classroom, keeping this very particular gaze, and very specific tightness in place almost as a statue representing a teacher.

We are then allowed to see Crocker-Harris in action, and Redgrave is wholly convincing in being the master of his classroom. He does not do this by raising his voice, yet there is this cold incisiveness that has a strange power to it. There is an intensity within it which is absolutely believable in the way it controls the classroom. As he distributes his punishment in addition to stating the class's failures on their work it absolutely pierces through in the way Redgrave in such a matter of fact fashion carries the old crock. Redgrave shows us a man who does rule, not with an iron fist, rather an iron tongue and resolve of sorts which is unflinching. In this view you'd never second guess this man in his space of command, even if it appears to make the majority of his students so miserable. The whole idea of the image of the man, as stated by the students, is there in Redgrave's work. He is indeed a character though a character in terms of how the student's view of him. There is something even slightly comical about this, not that Crocker-Harris is being funny exactly, rather he's humorous in the way the student's see him. That is not all there is to Crocker-Harris as the film continues.

We are still given technically the limited view of him as one of the students, Taplow, comes for an additional lesson, much to his dismay, as does Crocker-Harris's fellow professor Frank Hunter under the pretense of a friendly visit, though in fact there to continue on his affair with Crocker-Harris's wife Millie. Redgrave shows Crocker-Harris ease up a bit, though not entirely, as he shows up for the additional lesson at first, suggesting just a hint of less prickly figure, though still rather prickly. Redgrave goes on as the tired old teacher until Taplow mentions translating "Agamemnon" from Greek properly, suggesting a real enthusiasm for the material. Redgrave is fantastic in this moment as he still portrays such reservation in the conversation, as though Crocker-Harris is carefully trying to understand whether or not Taplow is being genuine. Redgrave eventually reveals just a dim bit of passion that reveal itself from beneath his skin, quietly explaining his own interest in the work by mentioning his own attempt at translating it. After the lesson Taplow leaves though and we are left with Crocker-Harris and his personal life.

Now in terms of Redgrave's performance we also see a bit of loss in his vocal work in that his high pitched voice though retained, is now entirely natural sounding where in class it seemed just ever so slightly put on. Redgrave is also terrific in creating such anti-chemistry with Jean Kent as Millie, as they eat together in such complete detachment from one another. If there ever was love between them, it is absolutely gone. Redgrave's interactions though aren't those with a stranger though, but rather an enemy who has done him so much wrong he can barely spare her a look in the eye. They later on go to walk about the academy as a cricket game is going along, and we soon learn why this is the case. Crocker-Harris first goes to speak with the head master who informs Crocker-Harris that he not only will not receive his pension, but he is also asked that at his retirement ceremony that he speak before a younger teacher despite it being entirely against protocol. Redgrave's work is so remarkable in the way he internalizes Crocker-Harris is discontent so effectively in the moment, while just barely whispering out his protests that the head master easily waves away. Redgrave gives us a man so defeated by life, and makes the humanity within it so honest, that it is actually a bit painful to witness.

Of course his treatment by the head master is nothing compared to the way his wife brow beats him incessantly for his failures. Redgrave again makes you feel the pain, while maintaining the man's posture and stature as to what suits his position. The measure of suffering is deeply felt in Redgrave's performance, but it goes further in that you see the years of it in the man. He does not even speak against his wife treatment, though in his eyes he shows it hurts him no less, as he presents Crocker-Harris's terrible existence in such vivid detail. The idea of this is only grown as he explains his history as a professor to his successor, which is a tale defeat. In the scene though Crocker-Harris describes his intentional playing up of certain mannerisms to try to entertain the boys originally, which completely matches that somewhat heightened voice and physical performance we saw in his early scenes. The tale is more than just a revelation, and Redgrave instead expresses a confession. A striking confession of the anguish in a man who is admitting to his own loss of will to do what he believed to have been a noble cause.

There is just a bit of hope given to Crocker-Harris, to give his years some meaning when Taplow later returns to give him the titular Browning version of "Agamemnon". Redgrave give such poignancy to the moment as he allows a bit more of that old passion to reveal itself in the way he so beautifully breaks down in just a moment of joy from the gift. Unfortunately his wife refuses to grant any such happiness to Crocker-Harris as she proclaims that Taplow as merely mocking him with the gift, which is so hurtful that even the Hunter, the man having an affair with his wife, is horrified by it. Redgrave though is heart wrenching as he brings Crocker-Harris to almost the end, as you can feel the emotion all pent up and on the edge of the man with every tense word and irritated movement. Redgrave depicts the tremendous effort in Crocker-Harris as he's trying to keep himself proper, even while so clearly falling apart inside. He is especially heartbreaking when he reveals to Hunter that he's always known about the affair, since his wife told him. Redgrave makes the moment almost unbearable because he shows the man who has essentially accepted his pain as he reveals to Hunter, his wife's inability to love him. Redgrave is devastating since there is this sense of warmth he brings to the words, but a warmth lost long ago to the past. It isn't the end of Crocker-Harris though as Hunter tirelessly attempts to get him to stand up for himself, basically insisting he is not as useful as the way his wife treats him. Redgrave renders his understanding of this so eloquently and believable in his quiet reactions. Redgrave calls upon something within his work in the discontent to carefully and convincingly to create a change in Crocker-Harris. Redgrave does not compromise the character though, as when he dismisses his wife Redgrave's whole performance earns this suggesting it has been a long thing coming to begin with. Crocker-Harris's turn around does not end there though as in the farewell ceremony he insists on speaking second, as is his right to do so. Redgrave is downright amazing in the scene as he begins in Crocker-Harris's stilted professor manner at first, before breaking out to essentially giving an anti-inspirational speech. In that he admits his failures to all his students, and Redgrave finally wholly reveals the old passions of the man in this speech. It is a truly cathartic moment, and Redgrave manages to make inspiring in its own way. As now Redgrave, even when admitting defeat, he shows that Croker-Harris is no longer defeated as a man. I honestly could go on and on in discussing the greatness of this performance. I absolutely loved this performance not a second is wasted in Redgrave's outstanding work. He so effortlessly crafts this portrait of this distinct figure in such humanizing and powerful detail.

197 comments:

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

I am supremely glad you loved his work! I actually think he has a shot at taking the overall from Alastair Sim.
Ratings and thoughts on the rest of the cast?

Matt Mustin said...

This review has a very "one of the greatest of all time" tone to it. I think he can easily take the overall.

Matt Mustin said...

Louis, have you ever given your thoughts on Orson Welles and Michael Macliammor in Othello?

Calvin Law said...

I got my first 5 from a request!!!!!

My #13 of all-time, love his work here, and I couldn't have explained it better.

Louis: would also recommend checking out Ian Holm and especially Albert Finney's incarnations of the characters. Neither as brilliant as Redgrave but still incredibly strong takes on the character.

Calvin Law said...

Also, thoughts and ratings for the rest of the cast (always thought Brian Smith was absolutely brilliant) and could I have brief thoughts on the direction of this and Outcast of the Islands?

Calvin Law said...

Also: 'I am sorry because I have failed to give you what you had the right to demand of me as your teacher: sympathy, encouragement, and humanity.' Glad you loved that final speech as much as I did.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your cast and director for:
O Brother, Where Art Thou? (1940's version)
The Verdict (1950's version)
The Player (1960's version)

Charles Heiston said...

As Robert would say, 'Winner'

Charles Heiston said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
RatedRStar said...

Great work from a fairly underrated actor, I got a curious question for you Louis, if this was 1947, and we were predicting the Oscar nominations for Best Actor that year like not on a computer but in maybe a newspaper, do you reckon that Redgrave would not have been on your prediction list?

Can somebody tell me the plot twists for Colleteral Beauty because I cant find them and I need a giggle? There is more than just simply Smith being set up to be fired by Winslet/Norton/Pena, I heard there was a twist ending 2?

Luke Higham said...

The updated overall's certainly gonna be interesting.

Calvin Law said...

Luke: It'll be strange to probably see Brando edged out of the top 5.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Well, he'll still be a 5, which is better than nothing.

I do wish we could all be content with our favourites getting fives, than being disappointed with them not winning Louis' overall. If it's his choice, then it is his choice and we shouldn't get up in arms about it.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: Who could you see playing Crocker-Harris in a 2010s version? I'd pick Mark Rylance, but Gary Oldman, Stephen Dillane, Ciaran Hinds and the late great Alan Rickman could've been fantastic too.

Calvin Law said...

Luke: Oh it's a great year and as with any other I would be pleased/interested to know of Louis' first choice; Sim, Walker, Howard, Clift, Redgrave, Brando are all utterly brilliant.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Not long to go, until seeing Rogue One. One downside I've heard from reviews, is that Krennic (Mendelsohn) is a somewhat underwhelming villain, which sucks.

Calvin Law said...

I've heard opinions of both sides, some say underwhelming, some say he's incredibly intimidating. My friend says Mads Mikkelsen was one of the highlights which will please you :)

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Since the beginning of the bonus rounds, what are your ten favourite performances you've seen so far. Including Female performances and in no particular order, so as to not spoil the updated overall.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: That's great to hear.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Redgrave's definitely taking the overall though. Whenever Louis says, not a wasted second/facial gesture, it would give you the win in any year.

Anonymous said...

Varun Neermul: Which movie should i watch? Arrival or the new star wars?

Luke Higham said...

Varun: Wait a week, as none of us have seen Rogue One yet. Arrival is one of the best films of the year though.

Anonymous said...

Varun: I will see Arrival then (:

Anonymous said...

Louis: Have you seen the animated adaptation of The Killing Joke? If so, your thoughts on it. Personally, I found it disappointing.

Anonymous said...

Oh dear oh dear lol

Passengers currently has 17% on Rotten Tomatoes.

Luke Higham said...

Everyone: Who/What are your top 5 film critics.

Louis Morgan
Mark Kermode
Roger Ebert/Gene Siskel
Nostalgia Critic
Haven't got a 5th choice, so I'll go with Sight And Sound as my favourite magazine.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: Certainly one of the more disappointing ratings of the year so far.

Luke Higham said...

You know what, Calvin's my 5th choice.

Anonymous said...

Looks like Jennifer Lawrence made another bad movie, huh?

94dfk1 said...

Anonymous: Damn, I was actually looking forward to Passengers.

Louis Morgan said...

Tahmeed:

Smith - 4(Really liked his performance, and if his age on imdb is correct, bravo to his ability to seeming much younger than he apparently was. Smith though is very effective in the role in creating the complexity of his relationship with his teacher. In that he brings a degree of antagonism and humor, but is able to make it feel as unassuming and very natural typical behavior of a boy. He doesn't overplay it though making his enthusiasm for the literature feel wholly genuine and in the end more than a little endearing by giving basically an example of what Crocker-Harris could have accomplished if he had not given up.)

Patrick - 3.5(A slightly curious part to play in that he needs to pull off a difficult juxtaposition of mindless disregard to an honest empathy in his interactions with Crocker-Harris and his wife. I felt Patrick manages to pull it off though creating just a believable portrayal of a man whose decency is essentially forced to reveal itself.)

Kent - 3.5(She's properly horrible though with the right sense of desperation within her bitterness as well. I do kind of wish though that the apparent original choice of Margaret Lockwood had played the part since it would have continued hers and Redgrave's downward spiral from Lady Vanishes and The Stars Look Down.)

Calvin:

Outcast of Islands I'll admit I was a little disappointed in Reed in the early scenes of the film. Not that they were poorly directed, but compared to his work in The Third Man just two years before felt a little less inspired. However as the film proceeded it seemed as though Reed purposefully built up becoming more stylized kind of losing the the English proper veneer for the more primal intensity fitting to the isolated island setting. Climaxing with the brilliant final scene where Reed essentially matched the state of Howard's character.

Adapting a play is an interesting challenge but Anthony Asquith seemed to have a pretty good knack for it with the Browning Version being the best of his adaptations that I have seen so far. He knows how to allow the material to breath, letting scenes play out as they should, never adding any unneeded gimmicks to make it appear cinematic, something say the newer version of the Importance of Being Earnest did, rather knowing how set the scenes to focus squarely on the emotion, while breathing the right life into the atmosphere surrounding it.

Rylance seems like the perfect choice.

Anonymous:

O Brother Where Art Thou? (1940's Directed by Preston Sturges)

Ulysses Everett McGill: Joel McCrea
Pete HogWallop: Brian Donlevy
Delmar O'Donnell: Ray Bolger
Tommy Johnson: Lonnie Johnson
Washington Hogwallop: Pat O'Malley
Big Dan: Laird Cregar
Penny: Irene Dunne
Pappy O'Daniel: William Demarest
Sheriff Cooley: Boris Karloff
George Nelson: Lou Costello
Mr. Lund: Gene Lockhart
The Blind Seer: Bill Robinson

The Verdict (1950's directed by William Wyler)

Frank Galvin: James Cagney
Laura Fischer: Olivia de Havilland
Mickey Morrissey: Pat O'Brien
Ed Cocannon: Sydney Greenstreet
Judge Hoyle: Raymond Massey
Kaitlin Price: Teresa Wright

The Player (1960's directed by Billy Wilder)

Griffin Mill: Jack Lemmon
June: Leslie Caron
Walter Stuckel: Walter Matthau
Detective Avery: Lee Grant
Larry Levy: Tony Curtis
David Kahane: Robert Vaughn
Bonnie Sherow: Shirley MacLaine
Andy Civella: Ray Walston
Tom Oakley: Peter Ustinov

Stars of the Habeas Corpus:

William Holden: as himself
Audrey Hepburn: as herself

Luke:

Thanks.

Favorites not including new films.

Trevor Howard - Outcast of the Islands
Michael Redgrave - The Browning Version
Geraldine Page - Trip to the Bountiful
Woody Harrelson - Rampart
Vanessa Redgrave - The Devils
Tatsuya Nakadai - Ran
Matthias Schoenaerts - Bullhead
Byung-hun Lee - A Bittersweet Life
Richard Attenborough - The Angry Silence
Liv Ullmann - The Emigrants

Luke Higham said...

Louis: What about your ten worst of the bonus rounds so far.

And your welcome.

Luke Higham said...

:)

Charles Heiston said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Louis Morgan said...

RatedRStar:

Apparently for Collateral Beauty there's two other twists. One two characters are married the whole time, and the other is apparently everything is true after all.

Luke:

Here's five:

Elliot Gould - The Touch
Richard Burton - Villain
John Travolta - Battlefield Earth
Forest Whitaker - Battlefield Earth
David Oyelowo - Rise of the Planet of the Apes

Luke Higham said...

Louis: You ranked Ezra Miller two spots lower than Oyelowo.

94dfk1 said...

Luke: The only film critic I pay attention to is Jeremy Jahns. I don't trust him when it comes to Marvel (an Awesometacular for Age of Ultron?) or DC (worth buying on Blu-Ray for Suicide Squad), but besides that, he's pretty reliable.

Alex Marqués said...

SilentDawn and Aaron (both from Letterboxd) are fantastic film reviewers in my opinion.

Speaking of critics, has anyone seen this video?: https://vimeo.com/194508152
It's a superbly-edited compilation of critic David Ehrlich's favourite films of 2016. If you like it, you should check out his videos for 2013 and 2014, they're great as well.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Must have erased him from my mind. I'd switch those two then.

Luke Higham said...

I like Jahns well enough, though I haven't seen enough of his video reviews.

Alex: I should check them out. :)

Alex Marqués said...

In the last post I meant 2014 and 2015, not 2013 and 2014.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Luke: As for my top favorite critics:-
Louis Morgan
Roger Ebert
Gene Siskel
The Nostalgia Critic (his review of the Tom and Jerry Movie is a work of art, as are his other reviews.
Giuseppe and Calvin

Well, it'd be interesting to see how this overall pans out. I'd predict the overall top 5 to be:
1. Redgrave
2. Sim
3. Walker
4. Howard
5. Clift
Charles: Is Kapoor actually all that great?

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the screenplay of High Noon.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Whenever you do the 1970s again, '73 is an absolute must.

Charles Heiston said...
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Charles Heiston said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

I can't wait for Mads Mikkelsen to be reviewed for The Hunt :)

Luke Higham said...

Tahmeed: It'll be an almighty shock if he doesn't get a 5 for that film.

Charles Heiston said...

Easily the best performance of 2013, Tahmeed.

Luke Higham said...

Charles: 2012 for me personally.

Luke Higham said...

I think we will get 1973 and 2012 sometime within the next 12 months.

Charles Heiston said...

Luke, I've seen a lot of people consider it a 2013 film, Didn't quite know.

Luke Higham said...

Tahmeed: You should check out the Kermode and Mayo show on Youtube. The former is very entertaining to listen to. His over exaggerated impersonations of Danny Dyer and Zack Snyder are funny.

Luke Higham said...

Charles: It was first shown in 2012 and had it's first theatrical release in Denmark in the same year.

I'm completely fine with anyone going by Academy rules.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: What did you think of the Dunkirk Evacuation scene in Atonement.

Matt Mustin said...

Mikkelsen in The Hunt is my win for 2012.

Varun Neermul said...

Arrival:

Adams: 5

Renner: 4

Whitaker: 3.5

Charles Heiston said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
94dfk1 said...

If I don't watch Rogue One tonight, I'm definitely checking out The Hunt. Or at least sometime this weekend.

Calvin Law said...

Rogue One thoughts: N/A for time being. Not as enthused as I was about The Force Awakens, but I need time to ruminate. (Edited the ratings after some thought)

Ratings sans thoughts for the timebeing:

Jones: 4
Luna: 3
Mendelsohn: 3
Mikkelsen: 3.5/4
Ahmed: 3.5
Yen: 4
Jiang: 3.5/4
Whitaker: 3
Tudyk: 4

Robert MacFarlane said...

Louis: What was wrong with Oyelowo in Rise?

Matt Mustin said...

Robert: I'm in the same boat as you. I think he's pretty one-note, but nothing atrocious.

Matt Mustin said...

In fact, I think Tom Felton is worse than Oyelowo.

Michael McCarthy said...

I'm 100% with Louis on this one. Felton wasn't good, but I think he was playing the character exactly as it was intended so I didn't fault him much. Oyelowo on the other hand was a damn cartoon character.

Robert MacFarlane said...

How? I really didn't think about him one way or the other. Did I miss something?

Charles Heiston said...

Oh Robert :(

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: I'm in the exact same boat as you, apart from Jones, no one else had much character development. And those incredibly awkward CGI creations. :(

The film was good enough up until the final act, which I enjoyed a great deal, but at the same time, the film left me with little to no investment in the characters fates.

On another note, it felt like Guardians Of The Galaxy, but without much of the humour.

Cast Ratings
Jones - 4
Luna - 3
Mendelsohn - 3.5
Mikkelsen - 3.5
Ahmed - 3.5
Yen - 3.5
Jiang - 3.5
Whitaker - 3
Tudyk - 3.5

Luke Higham said...

Robert: I have a feeling, you're gonna hate this film.

Calvin Law said...

Luke: I'm experiencing both the light and the dark side now as I write my Rogue One review. Liked it a lot but also not...I don't know. Will share more thoughts in future.

Charles Heiston said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Luke Higham said...

Calvin: I will say this, the penultimate scene was absolutely awesome.

Varun Neermul said...

Louis, could Colin Firth's performance In 'Single Man' get ranked higher after a rematch? I just saw a 'Single Man' and though he was a 4.5/5

Varun Neermul said...

*Rewatch

Robert MacFarlane said...

Just got out of Rogue One. Meh. Diego Luna MVP.

Luke Higham said...

Robert: What did you think of CGI ? & ?.

Matt Mustin said...

I saw Arrival. I thought it was absolutely fantastic. The technical aspects are all excellent and Villenuve's direction is marvelous. Adams is amazing, but I can't really talk about why, because I'm operating on the assumption that some people have still not seen it yet.

Adams-5
Renner-3.5(could go higher)
Whitaker-1.5(He just didn't work for me at all here. I didn't believe him for a single second, and that ridiculous accent he had did him no favours)

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Can I have your thoughts on Rogue One and ratings and thoughts on the cast in advance please.

Robert MacFarlane said...

@Luke: David Ehrlich was entirely correct in his review, CGI Tarkin is a monstrosity.

Matt Mustin said...

Actually, thinking about it, Renner's not gonna go up.

Robert MacFarlane said...

@Matt: You thought Whitaker was bad in Arrival? Wait until you see him in Rogue One.

Matt Mustin said...

Robert: I'm realizing I've only ever really liked him in Last King of Scotland.

Robert MacFarlane said...

He does have that weird tendency to overenunciate. He always seems to fall back on it, and it just seems to get worse with his age.

Calvin Law said...

I've waken up with a far more positive reaction to Rougue One than before. Not perfect, but I really like it upon re-thinking.

RatedRStar said...

It is interesting that everyone seems to like Donnie Yens performance, he has only given about 3 good performances out of the 39 he has been in lol.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Well, Rogue One and La La Land both came to Bangladesh, and my local multiplex is showing them ten minutes apart. I'm now in the unenviable position of having to choose which film to see with my mother and sister.

RatedRStar said...

Tahmeed: Will they show them more than once?

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

RatedRStar: Oddly enough, they only get two screenings each every day. I guess I'll be seeing La La Land, as my mom and sister aren't the biggest Star Wars fans.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your rating for Olivier in Dracula (1979).

Luke Higham said...

Louis: What did you think of the sound design in Come And See, which is considered to be its most acclaimed technical aspect.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Just came back from La La Land. Me, my mom and my sister had three completely different reactions.
Gosling - 4.5
Stone-4.5
Both of them could easily go up.
As for the movie, I thought it was quite brilliant. The technical aspects of the film are undoubtedly top notch, and the musical sequences were flawlessly sung and choreographed. My sister honestly thought that the screenplay was cliché, and that Gosling and Stone's work suffered as a result, while she also thought that apart from Stone's final solo number, all the other numbers were forgettable and not very original. I personally thought that the songs were very good. Gosling and Stone were great together, although I did prefer Gosling slightly more. The ending was truly stunning, and I shan't say anything more about it. 4.5/5

Calvin Law said...

Congrats on being the first here to see La La Land. Rest of us shall envy you :) I can't see it till 13th January:/

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

I'm actually surprised af that it came to Bangladesh this early (or at all, frankly), I was honestly caught off guard. And this may surprise you guys: only 12 people bought tickets and showed up to see the film, and an annoyed-looking couple walked out before the half way point of the film.

Ruminating more on the film, I know most of you guys here would like it. To say that this was the first musical I loved in years would be a massive understatement, as I had a ton of fun watching it. When I asked my sister what she would give Gosling and Stone, she said a 3.5 and 3 respectively. I hope to god Louis ends up liking them as much as I did.

Luke Higham said...

Tahmeed: He certainly will.

Charles Heiston said...
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Luke Higham said...

Charles: Louis loved Whiplash and I highly doubt he's gonna hate this film.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

I'll need a rewatch of Whiplash to determine which one was better, but at the moment it's pretty neck and neck.

RatedRStar said...

La La Land does look very great indeed I cannot wait, damn that January 13th date.

Calvin Law said...

I just saw Captain Fantastic and really liked it. Mortensen and Radcliffe are neck to neck for my win. I'd say I liked Mackay a LOT more than Louis, though, and would give him a 4.5.

Anonymous said...

Watched Arrival. Great film.
My ratings:
Adams: 4,5/5
Renner: 3
Whitaker: 1,5/2 (What a poor performance)

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Calvin: I also liked Mackay so much more. I thought he played his character's social ineptitude flawlessly, and his dramatic scenes with Mortensen were great. I didn't think his attempts at comedy were cringeworthy, and I did think he did a good job. I'd give him a high 4.

94dfk1 said...

Mortensen is a 5 for me. Can't wait for Alternate Best Actor 2016!

Really want Mortensen to get an Oscar nom. The Golden Globes and SAG both nominated him and he is picking up momentum.

I like Andrew Garfield as an actor, but is it just me or does he look a little too modern in Silence? As in he doesn't really fit in to the era the movie's portraying. I've heard that he does deliver a great performance.

Charles Heiston said...

94dfk1, You don't to wait to alternate best actor 2016, Mortensen will get the nomination, jeez.

Calvin Law said...

94dfk1: He has a very contemporary look, but yeah by all accounts he gives an amazing performance so we shouldn't worry :)

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: I'm a Garfield fan, but he isn't someone you would expect to get 2 fives in the same year, if that happens to be the case by the end of the alternates.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

I think he may get a 4.5 and a 5 for either Hacksaw Ridge or Silence (or a 4.5 each). But you're right, I don't see him getting two 5's.

Luke Higham said...

Tahmeed: Silence is the more likely, but It wouldn't surprise me if he did get two.

Luke Higham said...

Tahmeed: And we shouldn't underestimate what ratings Louis will give, because Robert and Michael thought he would only give 5-7 fives max for 2015 Lead and ended up giving 11.

Anonymous said...

I'm honestly looking forward to Neeson than Garfield in Silence.

Calvin Law said...

I think he's getting two 5's personally. Although I might hold my tongue till I see Hacksaw Ridge in a few days' time :D

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Calvin: This is where luck evens out xD, where I got to see La La Land first, whereas Hacksaw Ridge won't ever come to Bangladeshi theatres.
*sadly walks off to corner*

RatedRStar said...

I would keep a cautious mind ahead for Viggo getting an Oscar Nomination, Jake Gyllenhaal also got Globe and Sag nominations for Nightcrawler, I do think Viggo will get it though simply because of that clever campaigning, but be careful.

Andrew Garfield will do well in Silence I am sure, its only 96% on Rotten Tomatoes, lets panic!!!

94dfk1 said...

Charles Heston: Oops, I mixed myself up. Either way, I'm looking forward to the full review of Viggo, whether he gets nominated or not. I'm still under the mentality that he'll get snubbed, though hopefully that won't be the case.

I just think that Adam Driver fits in the period of the film more than Garfield, mostly due to his unconventional looks rather than Garfield's boyish appearance.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Have you seen anything new in the past couple of days.

Charles Heiston said...

Louis hasn't replied to this thread in a while, Would love to ask him his top 5 favorite Peter Lorre performances.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I just saw Manchester. I have some quibbles, overall very good. Affleck, Hedges, and Williams do deserve the praise they're getting.

omar said...

Robert: What are your thoughts on Williams?

Robert MacFarlane said...

@omar: Perhaps a role too bait for its own good, but she steps up to the plate. Her limited screentime is a hindrance to the impact she makes, but she sells it like a pro. That said, Affleck does overshadow her in those scenes.

omar said...

Robert: yes i agree with you, i think everyone was overshadowed by Affleck, especially Williams in her last scene.

Charles Heiston said...

Affleck almost topped his Gone Baby Gone work.

Robert MacFarlane said...

He's not quite Robert Ford great, but not many performances are. Still, the best depiction of grief I've seen since Hutton in Ordinary People. I did like Hedges A LOT, so I didn't think he was too overshadowed.

Charles Heiston said...

My god he's fantastic, Affleck is captain fantastic :D

Charles Heiston said...

:D

Louis Morgan said...

Alright I can finally look at the comments again.

I purposefully avoided them to go into Rogue One without any preconceived notions, and it's fair to say I'm probably the most positive on it. Although I wouldn't have minded a more Seven Samurai style ending instead of a Wild Bunch one, the cgi recreations were awful, as was one cast member, but otherwise I really dug it. I'll give further thoughts tomorrow, and answer all other questions, I'm just a bit tired at the moment.

Cast ratings:

Jones - 4
Luna - 4
Mendelsohn - 3
Yen - 4
Tudyk - 3.5
Mikkelsen - 3.5
Ahmed - 3.5
Wen - 3.5
Whitaker - 1.5(What the heck was that?)

I also saw Manchester By the Sea, again more on that tomorrow.

Calvin Law said...

Definitely gonna need a rewatch now.

Calvin Law said...

I should note the more I think about Rogue One the more I realize I largely loved it. Just not in the way I'd expected. I need to re-evaluate Luna though based on all your responses.

Alex Marqués said...

Robert and omar: do you think Affleck gives the best male performance of the year? I really like Lonergan's two previous films, so I'm excited to see this one.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I seem to be the only one who feels increasingly apathetic to Rogue One. For the first two acts I kept wondering when I would start caring. Even with the impressive action in the last act, I could not find it in me to give a shit about any of the characters outside of the asshole robot.

@Alex: Poasibly. It's between him, Hanks, and Mortensen for my win.

omar said...

Alex: yes, I think it's the best male performance of the year, but i still have to see Captain Fantastic

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

The screenplay I find to be the weakest element of the film. There are certain threads of the story that seem almost entirely detached, Katy Jurado's whole plot line for example. The end result of her character is there to inspire Kelly's character to go back, but the actual substance of who this character is seems unnatural at best. The same goes for the DA who runs out, Kane's interaction with the priest, as well as that excessively evil bartender. Then there are the towns people who seem conveniently cowardly, and the fact that it was written by someone with a bone to pick is abundantly clear. Even then there is some broken logic most notably in the church scene. Kane goes to get support, then is even going to get some, until he allows himself to be ushered out? The film feels to force itself into its allegory, rather than naturally arrive to it.

Luke:

That tracking shot is good, though as tracking shots go not excessively memorable to me, beyond that it fell into my feelings regarding the rest of the film.

3

Come and See's sound design is excellent in terms of creating the horrors, often unseen, through what you hear particularly in the house of death sequence.

Further on Rogue One. Again in no ways a perfect film, and I would say Force Awakens is the more cohesive film, though I preferred the experience of Rogue One. Though keep in mind I'm not the biggest Star Wars fan overall, and I'm kind of a mark for this type of story. I loved that Edwards, and possibly Tony Gilroy, brought a new angle to the world both literally and metaphorically. The scale is something we have not seen before in the series. I loved that as well as the real sense of urgency in the story. Now again there are flaws. The characters are not excessively well developed, though I would argue that the development is fairly consistent with "men on a mission" type films. I thought there was enough there for each character which was in turn amplified by the performance. Each except strangely enough Jyn Urso. She needed more I will say that, or at least the moments she had needed to be a bit more substantial. Her cynicism honestly wasn't given the time it needed to make the transition really make the impact the film wanted, despite Jones's best efforts. Otherwise than that there were some individual, and by individual I mean very short moments, that were off. The whole tentacle scene, the first Vadar scene(made up for by the amazing second Vadar scene), and for me the film ended on a gigantic high note with the last act, though not through its image of a grotesque creation.

Louis Morgan said...

Jones - (Again she has quite the difficult task in that her character was a bit muddled particularly in the beginning. She gives it her best though and is made up for by her charisma that manages to make Jyn endearing if not entirely as she should be. I felt she hit the emotional moments within the film very well, again she has to weave through the problematic writing within her character. She does her best though, and I do think that effort mostly makes up for the writing somewhat though not entirely. I can't help but wonder what the changes were in regards to her with the re-shoots since in that original trailer she was clearly an active rebel originally.)

Luna - (He technically had less to work with than Jones but I felt he took the bit he had and went with it all the way. I really liked his portrayal of essentially the intensity needed for a soldier willing to do what it takes to win no matter what. I felt he rather eloquently managed to portray the change in his character to a less extreme philosophy particularly well. Also like everyone else below, except one, there is just this innate life to his work that already makes his character seem more than just just what was written for him.)

Tudyk - (Impeccable comedic timing and his light hearted approach, to technically a rather violent character was a enjoyable juxtaposition. What I found most interesting though was the way he managed to convert that into something more than just being the comic relief by the end.)

Mendelsohn - (Alright he's more than fine at doing the sleazy officer routine, similair really to all those who came before him in the original trilogy. I was hoping they were going to give more substance to the role than that, like perhaps he was actually friends with Galen. Instead he's just a straight villain, and Mendelsohn is good at doing that. He's capable of more, but they don't give him the chance.)

Yen - (I thought he and Wen both established there relationship without much time at all. I believed their friendship and their dynamic of the believer and his cynical friend. More time could have been given to this sure, but I thought they went with what they had rather well. Yen individually I felt was incredibly endearing in creating the sense of this inspiring magic of sorts that exudes from the man's internal optimism.)

Wen - (He'd be equal to Yen for me if it wasn't for his way over the top delivery of "AN IMPERIAL PILOT!!!!!!!!" Otherwise brought the right badass presence and sardonic attitude that balanced against Yen quite well. Then I found he succeeded in bringing the needed poignancy to his belief in his final scene.)

Ahmed - (I liked the awkwardness he brought throughout his performance fitting to a guy whose not exactly sure he knows who likes him, and just with this general sort of fear, believing that anyone might be trying to kill him any side. Then in the third act sequence he was especially good in portraying the tension throughout particularly in his final run.)

Mikkelsen - (Mikkelsen seems to always deliver and this is no exception. Mikkelsen in fact seems an essential choice in this part because of his innate ability to so effectively grasp the drama of any given moment. Mikkelsen does this once again and brings some substance to what otherwise would have been a rather hollow role.)

Whitaker - (Again what the heck. Kudos to those second two trailers for giving us what seemed like an entirely different performance. This was just awful, he redeemed himself a .5 just by his final few seconds or so. I can't help but feel he probably requested that oxygen mask just to overact some more. Everything was way over cooked, and felt like pure ham. A real waste as I think the character had potential for a decent impact, but Whitaker makes the wrong kind of impact.)

Varun:

No.

Charles:

1. M
2. The Maltese Falcon
3. Arsenic and Old Lace
4. Secret Agent
5. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

Alex Marqués said...

Louis: What did you think of Manchester by The Sea and Williams in it?

Anonymous said...

Louis I reckon that Best Actor 2016 could follow Best Supporting Actor 2014 in terms of what you said at the time which was "predictabilty seems to be a good thing"

Charles Heiston said...

If Garfield or Washington win the Oscar i certainly will be displeased.

Robert MacFarlane said...

@Charles: None of us has even seen Fences to judge if Washington is unworthy. For all we know it might be indisputable masterclass.

Charles Heiston said...

@Robert I've seen little clips of his performance, it looks exactly like his work in The Hurricane, I'm not a fan of Denzel. He's one of the most overrated actors in Hollywood and if he won a 3rd oscar it might add to his undeserved accolade closet.

Charles Heiston said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
94dfk1 said...

Charles: I actually like Denzel as an actor, but I don't want to live in a world where he had three Oscars lmao. Garfield is a little too young to be in, although that didn't stop Redmayne.

94dfk1 said...

*where he has

*too young to win

Anonymous said...

Louis: Although Cummings was very good in Saboteur, which actors do you think could have done a better job in the role?

94dfk1 said...

Rogue One thoughts: Despite not having very well-developed characters, the actions scenes and cinematography (specifically on the beach) are a sight to behold and succeed in taking the Star Wars franchise in a new tone.

Jones: 4
Luna: 3.5 (He's only a little better than Ahmed, otherwise he'd be a 3.)
Mendehlson: 4 (Very good as the villain, and even brings a bit of humor.)
Tudyk: 4 (He delivered the funniest lines in the movie and was quite good in his last scene.)
Mikkelsen: 3.5 (Second movie in a row I've seen where he gets slapped. Saw The Hunt on Thursday night. He's a 5 there BTW. Anyway, he makes the most out of every scene he's in, even if there really aren't that many.)
Ahmed: 3 (I guess some might like him more, but I didn't see something special. Just OK.)
Yen: 3.5
Wen: 3 (Overshadowed by Yen a little bit, but otherwise effective.)
Whitaker: 2 (Eehhh...I don't really know what he was going for. He reminded me a bit of Bane for some reason lmao.)

Luke Higham said...

Michael Sheen's quitting as an actor. DAMN. :(

RatedRStar said...

I am terribly sorry to see Michael Sheen retiring as an actor but he was always a good actor and he has given many good performances... I say good luck to him xxx.

RatedRStar said...

He will be missed.

RatedRStar said...

I was a bit harsh on Donnie Yen perhaps, he does have a presence in his films, and there is one performance where I thought he was terrific as he changed his heroic persona perfectly.

Does anybody want to guess what that film was????

Luke Higham said...

Louis: What are your top ten Ewan McGregor acting moments/scenes.

Alex Marqués said...

I just saw 45 Years. Brilliant. Rampling and Courtenay are perfect.

Louis Morgan said...

Alex:

I did not love the film. I do feel perhaps Lonergan lays on perhaps too much misery, given the multiple tragedies within the story. Also given the film's run time I felt he could've more development to a few of the character outside of Lee and Patrick. There is also one subplot I found most tiresome given the amount of time spent on it. Lonergan I suppose directs his visual sequences most often a series of montages of the film's locations, except in a few instances particularly one pivotal sequence in the middle of the film. Dialogue driven scenes do seem to be his preference though in these sequences I did think there were a few odd choices by Lonergan, as a director. Such as in Williams's big scene which is framed very strangely, or his cameo which almost felt Tarantinoesque (alright not that bad) by the way the camera followed for a second for no reason. I am sounding excessively negative though, but by contractual obligation I'm staying silent on a few things.

Williams - (She's good in her early brief scenes as a BAhston mother. I didn't find she made that much of an impact but she was more than fine. Then there's her big "one scene wonder" scene. I didn't love the scene itself, as I actually wish Randi had been developed a bit more. We get a fairly simplistic view of her relationship with Lee, and in the end we only get alluded to what happened later on. Williams has her big scene though where she kicks into the emotional high gear needed for the moment. She delivers I feel, even if the scene felt slightly unnatural though that did not have anything to do with the acting, but the greater impact of the moment I felt came from her co-star.)

The rest of the cast does well in their limited roles for the most part. There are a few exceptions like Kara Hayward, who I felt played the role in a stylized fashion which is all wrong for the film, and Matthew Broderick. Actually there's nothing wrong with Broderick's performance but his appearance so late into the film was unfortunately very distracting.

Luke:

Eh actors/directors make claims like this all the time. I mean how many of Steven Soderbergh's films have been his "last film".

Anonymous:

I can't think of any one else that is an obvious alternate choice. Not only was he good, but he was so well cast in the role of Hitchcock's youngest "wrong man".

RatedRStar:

Obviously Highlander End Game.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: I know that actors do make comebacks after a number of years, though I hope he's not gone for too long, I mean, look at Glenda Jackson.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Lonergan's framing choices didn't bother me too much, but his use of classical music for the flashbacks REALLY hurt the film. The writing and acting really made up for it for me. It had the sort of slice of life tone I was kind of needing. I also liked a lot of the little idiosyncrasies he threw in, like them not remembering where they parked their car. Overall an imperfect film, but one that I dug nonetheless.

Robert MacFarlane said...

(Also, my entire theater laughed when Broderick popped up.)

omar said...

Louis: What rating would you give to Williams?

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Well she was bit busy being a member of parliament.

McGregor:

1. The Phone Call - The Impossible
2. Figuring it all out - The Ghost Writer
3. Withdrawal - Trainspotting
4. Love Medley - Moulin Rouge
5. "You Were the Chosen One" - Revenge of the Sith
6. Confrontation on the plane - The Ghost Writer
7. The Reunion - The Impossible
8. Facing down Begbie - Trainspotting
9. The Ending - Moulin Rouge
10. Meeting Anna - Beginners

Robert:

My theater did as well.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Could you do the same for Fassbender, Hardy and Rylance.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Could you get around to War & Peace at some point in the near future. Paul Dano's truly brilliant there and I was rather disappointed he didn't get a Globe nomination.

RatedRStar said...

Louis: Well he was better than Bruce Payne so that is something lol =D.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Rating and thoughts on Porter Hall and Richard Benedict in Ace in the Hole and James Gleason in Come Fill the Cup.

Louis Morgan said...

Omar:

3.5 maybe 4.

Luke:

Fassbender:

1. The foal - Hunger
2. "How goes the queen" - Macbeth
3. "Scorpions is my mind" - Macbeth
4. The David Commercial - Prometheus marketing campaign
5. The Flogging - 12 Years a Slave
6. Argument with Sculley in the second section - Steve Jobs
7. The bar - Inglourious Basterds
8. "Welcoming Smile" - Frank
9. Rochester declares his love - Jane Eyre
10. "Hola" - The Counselor

I have to admit Shame has left no lasting impression on me whatsoever.

Hardy:

1. "God is a Squirrel" - The Revenant
2. Bronson's sanitarium story - Bronson
3. Locke speaks with his "father" the last time - Locke
4. Bronson has the guard prepare him - Bronson
5. "Won't take your top knot" - The Revenant
6. The Krays Come to Blows - Legend
7. Final Fight - The Revenant
8. The superbowl closing time - The Drop
9. Max gets all the guns - Mad Max: Fury Road
10. Ricki Tarr tells his story - Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

Though technically I could have just done ten of his scenes from Bronson, The Revenant or Locke.

Technically still need to see more from Rylance since it would be "standing man" and a series of scenes from Wolf Hall most prominently watching the two executions, reacting to the King's "death", interrogating Boleyn, finding out about his own family, reacting to the King's anger.

Louis Morgan said...

RatedRStar:

Well that's true.

Anonymous:

Hall - 3.5(It is interesting to see him not play a villain for once instead playing actually a moral conscience. Hall works fairly well in giving a non-sentimental nor sanctimonious delivery to his head shaking at Douglas's character's very questionable antics.)

Benedict - 3.5(Despite being stuck in a set position Benedict makes an impact. He's rather moving in terms of portraying his character's rather earnest attitudes especially when compared to almost everyone else in the film. He's also quite effective in portraying the slowly growing fear and physical degradation of the man as the film goes on.)

Gleason - 3.5(A nice heart felt performance from him, and particularly liked his naturalistic chemistry with Cagney. He made his character's wish to help everyone never forced yet just a very honest passion of a simple guy. He makes a quiet impact that makes his departure rather meaningful.)

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis:Please, please tell me Fassbender's rating for Shame is safe.
Has Harry's work in the Revenant remained your favorite supporting performance of the 2010s, or did Mark Strong surpass him?

Louis Morgan said...

Tahmeed:

Hardy's still the #1. Don't worry about Fassbender, I was referring to the film.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I say this as someone who loves Fassbender in Shame: Do whatever you feel is right with his placement. If he dropped down a few spots, so be it.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thank god. That would've pissed me right off.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Is Kapoor or ?' review coming tomorrow.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: I can't wait for you to see much more of Mikkelsen, The church scene from The Hunt would undoubtably be your #1 favourite of his.

Charles Heiston said...

Not a big fan of Fassbender in Shame, He was good, But certainly not a best of anything.

Luke Higham said...

Charles: What's your personal favourite performance of Fassbender's.

Matt Mustin said...

I kinda hated Shame as a movie but I think Fassbender was incredible. In fact, his performance during the threesome/orgy/whatever it was has stuck with me ever since I saw the film. His face there is absolutely haunting.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Trust me, I LOATHE films like Shame and Filth, which are two films undeserving of the great performances they have. They have two of the best performances of the 2010s if you ask me, but I simply can't stand rewatching either.

Matt Mustin said...

Luke: That church scene is probably one of my favourite pieces of acting from anyone in the last few years.

Luke Higham said...

Tahmeed: I'm not fussed on Shame either, but Fassbender is fantastic.

My views on Fassbender as an actor hasn't changed in the slightest and is definitely one of the best of his generation, though the best of accolade for me personally would go to either Hardy or Foster, they are completely on another level.

Matt Mustin said...

I don't know if I want to say "better" but I think Hardy is far more consistent that Fassbender.

Luke Higham said...

Matt Mustin: Most would agree with that, except for Robert, I think.

Luke Higham said...

I really want Fassbender to top his performance in Hunger with The Snowman. Alfredson got career bests out of Oldman & Strong and I hope he does the same with him.

Charles Heiston said...

@Luke, I'd have to say, Hunger, Brilliant.

Charles Heiston said...

And for Foster, I'd say 3:10 to Yuma.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Personally I think Hardy is pretty overpraised from what I've seen of him. His shtick is getting old, and my patience is almost gone. Fassbender has had some missteps, but I've been impressed by him more often than Hardy.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

I have to admit, while I love the performances of both, I do prefer Fassbender slightly more.

94dfk1 said...

Luke: I concur. The church scene was amazingly acted by Mr. Mikkelsen. It sealed the 5 for me.

Alex Marqués said...

Louis: an impossible task, but, what are your top 10 Mifune scenes/acting moments?

Anonymous said...

I dont know what you mean Robert, what shtick is Hardy doing? his performances are almost always completely different from each other, I think you are on your own with that statement of him being overpraised, I find he doesn't get nearly enough praise.

Anonymous said...

I would love to know who the actors are that in 10-15 years will be on top leading their films and getting regular awards consideration because surely Tom Hardy and Michael Fassbender would be on that lists??

JackiBoyz said...

The Snowman looks to have a pretty creepy premise especially the set up "A married woman has sex with a lover in the middle of the day, while her adolescent son waits in a car outside; their lovemaking is disturbed when they think somebody is looking at them from outside the window, but it turns out to have been only a tall snowman"

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: That question's hard to answer. Nothing's certain in life and god forbid, they could be in it for the paycheck. They should continue to do well during that amount of time, but who knows.

RatedRStar said...

We would never have predicted that Bruce Dern would get a second Oscar nomination considering his first was in 1978 but he did, same with Gary Oldman, if we were in 1987 we would have been predicting him to get lots of nominations but he only got 1 so far, Harrison Ford even when he did Witness and Mosquito Coast, we would have thought that he would continue to chase those roles but he didnt.

Robert MacFarlane said...

@Anonymous: You're kidding me with him being underpraised, right? Anyway, what I mean by his shtick is that he's always taking exceedingly macho grumblers to play with only a handful of exceptions. He's rarely bad, but after a while I really wish he'd take a role that works with his charm like Inception did instead. Plus his body language in a lot of these physicality-heavy roles are starting to repeat themselves. Same postures and mannerisms that are starting to become a noticeable trademark. I want him to stop falling back on it.

And yes, I am aware my annoyance with him is singular. I've never been one to mince words on any of my numerous unpopular opinions. Feel free to object any time, I'm used to it.

Alex Marqués said...

In my opinion, his shtick is noticeable but he has proven himself to be excellent at giving subtler, quieter performances where he has to tone those mannerisms down (Locke, TTSS), so it doesnt bother me too much.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I mean, I have issues with a few actors who fall back on certain things. Take Gosling, for example. After Drive, his next three performances were essentially him playing the Driver again no matter how unfitting it was for the role. Fassbender can be a little too laser-eyed. Bale gets a tad too methody. None of these make them bad actors, just ones that can be frustrating. Hardy is just one that's impressed me less times than the others.

Anonymous said...

So who would your favorite actor be Robert currently working?

Robert MacFarlane said...

Oscar Isaac, probably. We'll just have to pretend his pre-Deive work and X-Men Apocalypse don't exist. As a leading man, he's one of the most subtly creative of his generation.

Alex Marqués said...

I hope Isaac gets more great roles soon.

Anonymous said...

Don't forget The Promise, we will pretend that didnt happen 2.

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar & Calvin: Have you seen The Snowman (1982). I've seen it many times and think it's one of the greatest animated short films of all-time.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your cast and director for a 2010's version of The Caine Mutiny.

Charles Heiston said...

Hopefully Kapoor review is coming soon.....

RatedRStar said...

Luke: Yep I have seen it a few times although not recently and yes it is pretty well done, I am little surprised it was merely nominated for best animated short considering how popular it is, I wonder what the winner was like?

Louis Morgan said...

Alex:

1. King Gondo decides to pay the ransom - High and Low
2. The Bandit's Version of the duel - Rashomon
3. The Final Duel - Yojimbo
4. Archers - Throne of Blood
5. The Woodcutter's version of the duel - Rashomon
6. The Final Scene - High and Low
7. Isaburo releases his fury - Samurai Rebellion
8. The Doctor Breaks Down - The Quiet Duel
9. The samurai trolls both sides - Yojimbo
10. Red Beard goes to the Brothel - Red Beard

Anonymous:

Caine Mutiny 2010's directed by Edward Zwick

Captain Queeg: Liev Schreiber
Lieutenant Greenwald: Peter Sarsgaard
Lieutenant Maryk: Jon Bernthal
Lieutenant Kiefer: Jason Bateman
Ensign Keith: Jack O'Connell
Captain De Vriess: Paul Giamatti
Challee: Tobias Menzies

Anonymous said...

SEE HIS NEW MOVIES
Tyler Perry Movies and Tv Shows
Tyler Perry Plays