Saturday, 9 July 2016

Alternate Best Supporting Actor 1985: Roddy McDowall in Fright Night

Roddy McDowall did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Peter Vincent in Fright Night.

Fright Night is rather enjoyable horror film about a teenager Charley (William Ragsdale) suspecting that his new neighbor Jerry Dandrige (Chris Sarandon) is a vampire.

Fright Night is not a by the numbers vampire movie due to the sense of humor it has about the subject with the characters in the film having seen other vampire movies. This element is perhaps best represented by Roddy McDowall who plays Peter Vincent, his names stemming from horror actors Peter Cushing and Vincent Price, a former horror movie actor turned horror TV host. Of course Peter Vincent unlike his namesakes isn't a very good actor as shown in the brief clips we see of his films shown on TV, as Roddy McDowall does some extreme slices of ham fitting for a terrible actor in the genre. We do not meet Peter Vincent in person until later in the film when Charley seeks some sort of expert in the field vampires in order to expose Jerry. Unfortunately that expert is Peter Vincent, who has just been fired from being host of the show. McDowall sets the tone well for his performance from his first scene as Peter outside of the television, so to speak. McDowall is rather entertaining as he plays Peter in a bit of a self loathing daze as he first assumes Charley is just a fan wanting an autograph, until his hilarious break in his mindset when Charley states he's interested in something else.

McDowall just adjusts throughout the scene so well as he portrays Peter's inability to exactly decipher how to interact with Charley. First as McDowall brings all the fluster of a proper actor's ego as he states that he's been fired due to low ratings. This suddenly changes when Charley pledges his belief in vampires, and McDowall's face light up so wonderfully as Peter believes he knows a true fan. McDowall has this dissolve into the best sort of confusion and fear as Charley makes it known that his belief is real. Despite Peter's hasty exit he is brought back into the situation by Charley's friends Amy (Amanda Bearse) and "Evil" Ed (Stephen Geoffreys), who want to use Peter as a method to prove to Charley that Jerry isn't a vampire. McDowall is once again a joy as Peter tries to put on the act of the true actor who just wants to move on from his experience, making it all the funnier in his snap delivery in accepting the assignment when offered a 500 dollar saving bond for his trouble. This leads Peter to go with the trio to set things "straight", with Peter going full costumed as a true vampire hunter.

This leads to a very enjoyable scene for McDowall as he plays it with such pride with Peter Vincent as a man finally in his element. McDowall is quite charming in the scene as he has Peter giving a bit of a show, for the money he has been payed, as Peter goes about "proving" Jerry is not a bloodsucker through a test. After the test though, Peter accidentally discovers Jerry's true nature through a mirror, and McDowall's surprised reaction is pure gold as the confidence of before disintegrates in an instance. After this point the film proceeds to its final somewhat darker act, and a bit of a challenge is presented to McDowall in terms of maintaining the right tone with his performance. McDowall succeeds in seeding in a few of the dramatic moments into his performance in a natural fashion. McDowall is rather affecting before the final battle, as the full extent of Peter's self loathing appears as refuses to help Charley.

That makes when he finally comes to Charley's aid all the more powerful, as McDowall earns the change through the way he shows Peter trying to build up his confidence. I love the way McDowall approaches this as an actor striving hard to stay in character as he even keeps reminding himself that he's a vampire hunter. The most remarkable moment for McDowall though is when he watches the death of one of the monsters. McDowall is surprisingly moving in the moment as reveals the empathy in Peter for the poor creature as it writhes in pain. Now the rest of his work is less serious minded in the finale.  McDowall never undercuts the intensity of the situation yet still manages to earn plenty of laughs through his very amusing reactions throughout the fight. I love how McDowall is constantly playing with Peter's act occasionally being the killer he needs to be, but more often a scaredy-cat just barely making it through. I must admit I really enjoyed this performance by Roddy McDowall. McDowall finds just the right touch for the movie and never slips in terms of treading the fine line of the dark yet humorous material.

51 comments:

Robert MacFarlane said...

Ratings and thoughts on the cast?

Calvin Law said...

Oh, I'm so pleased you took to this one. The film is one of my guilty pleasures...aw, heck, it's not even guilty. I'm glad you agree that it's enjoyable, I think it's a pretty well-made film, and the special effects are quite good too.

On a separate note don't check out the recent re-make starring Colin Farrell and David Tennant, who are both terribly uninspired, if not downright dreadful.

Anonymous said...

Louis: What are your thoughts and rating on his performance in Cleopatra? He's the best thing about that horrible film.

Michael McCarthy said...

What did people think of Stephen Geoffreys in this? I was initially dismissive of him, but then I thought about how horribly grating someone like Crispin Glover would've been in the role and I came to appreciate him more.

And Louis, could I get your top ten films of 1944, 1978, and 1984?

Robert MacFarlane said...

I actually think Geoffreys is a hoot.

Calvin Law said...

Anonymous: From Best Actor 1941,

McDowall - 3.5(The only guy who really bothered to bring any life to that turgid affair. McDowall avoids the blandness of pretty much all the other performances in the film and gives a fairly effective portrait of a youthful ambition. Frankly the film would have benefited if it was only about him.)

Calvin Law said...

I thought Geoffreys was fine, and watching McLovin in the remake version also made me appreciate him all the more.

Louis Morgan said...

Robert:

Ragsdale - 3(Kind of the thankless role when compared to the antics of Sarandon, McDowall and Geoffreys. He's just there to be the normal guy, not really even the straight man so much. Ragsdale is overshadowed by the rest, but I do think he does a more than decent job of just offering earnest reactions throughout the film)

Bearse - 3(Also fairly straight forward but I found she managed to be a nice enough presence within the confines of the role. Then when she has a bit of switch, I felt she pulled that off as well)

Stark - 3(One note of knowing weirdness which works well for the part.)

Geoffreys - 4(A difficult a part to pull off actually given that he's suppose to be grating. Geoffreys though I found to be quite entertaining in portraying the manic personality of the geek Evil Ed. I like that he found just a bit of vulnerability in there with his scenes where he does not want to be called Evil, and his scene with Jerry. Then he's brings the needed unbridled insanity after his transformation.)

Sarandon - 4(Bordering on a 4.5 for me. I love that he plays the part as a trolling jerk. Sarandon approach is fitting to Jerry as someone who has gotten everything his way forever, and thoroughly enjoys his life. The relish he puts in every smarmy line delivery of his is great. That intense smugness of his is marvelous particularly in the scene where he's with Charly's mother, and notes how he'll be stopping by often. Even with all that he's legitimately menacing whenever Jerry gets down to business.)

Michael:

1944:

1. Double Indemnity
2. Laura
3. Gaslight
4. Lifeboat
5. Henry V
6. The Miracle of Morgan's Creek
7. Arsenic and Old Lace
8. To Have and Have Not
9. Hail the Conquering Hero
10. Ministry of Fear

1978:

1. The Deer Hunter
2. Halloween
3. Invasion of the Body Snatchers
4. Superman
5. Straight Time
6. Death on the Nile
7. Magic
8. Days of Heaven
9. The Boys From Brazil
10. The Buddy Holly Story

1984:

1. Amadeus
2. Paris, Texas
3. The Killing Fields
4. Once Upon a Time in America
5. Ghostbusters
6. This is Spinal Tap
7. Gremlins
8. 1984
9. A Nightmare on Elm Street
10. The Karate Kid

Anonymous said...

Louis: What do you think of a version of Cloud Atlas with Kubrick as director?

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

If it is post-Space Odyssey Kubrick, his approach might be too clinical for the emotional nature of the material, though it would have been visually stunning. Peter Sellers would have been amazing in his various roles though.

Michael McCarthy said...

I just rewatched Dallas Buyers Club again. Man oh man does McConaughey's performance hold up for me. I thought McAvoy, Isaac, DiCaprio and Phoenix but McConaughey is my unquestionable winner for 2013. Also, I think Redmayne in The Danish Girl only made my opinion of Jared Leto's work go up. Easy five.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Although Van Cleef was perfect for Angel Eyes, I also think Bronson (Leone's original choice) could have been a perfect choice. What do you think?

Robert MacFarlane said...

Redmayne's performance in The Danish Girl is of course worse, but I still maintain Leto was too broad himself. His last few scenes were good though

Calvin Law said...

Funny, I re-watched ILD and it only pushed Isaac ahead of the pack of McConaughey, DiCaprio, Ejiofor and Hanks all the more. My new favourite scene of his is his reaction to Diane not having gone through the abortion.

Calvin Law said...

1960s Kubrick Cloud Atlas

Tom Hanks' roles: Burt Lancaster
Halle Berry's roles: No idea (also I've probably been overly harsh on Halle Berry's performance in the past she's actually pretty good in here)
Jim Broadbent's roles: Ralph Richardson
Hugo Weaving's roles: Peter Sellers Jim Sturgess' roles: James Shiegta
Doona Bae's roles: Jean Simmons
Ben Whishaw's roles: Tom Courtenay
James D'Arcy's roles: James Fox
Keith Davis' roles: Ossie Davis
David Gyasi's roles: Woody Strode
Susan Sarandon's roles: Angela Lansbury
Hugh Grant's roles: Laurence Olivier

Anonymous said...

Calvin: That Cloud Atlas cast is amazing.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Halle Berry can be Eartha Kitt.

Calvin Law said...

Kitt is a fabulous choice.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: your top 10 films of 1994?

Matt Mustin said...

Watched 10 Cloverfield Lane. I thought it was great. I love almost the entire film. I love how the tension built up to almost an unbearable degree. I can see how the last 20 minutes or so could've disappointed some, but I didn't mind it mostly due to one factor. I'm gonna review Goodman (and maybe Winstead, not sure) on my own blog, so I won't give my ratings and thoughts for them here, but I can talk about...
Gallagher Jr.-4 (I found he added some much needed humour to an otherwise relentlessly tense film. His more dramatic moments he handles well also, and he has some wonderful chemistry with Winstead)

Michael McCarthy said...

Coincidentally, I also watched 10 Cloverfield Lane. I really enjoyed it and thought Winstead and Goodman were very strong, but I must admit to being one of the people who thought the last 20 minutes were kind of silly.

On the subject of John Gallagher, Jr., does anyone know the musical Spring Awakening? Because he was awesome in it.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

I've never seen Bronson play a villain so that would have been interesting at the very least.

Calvin:

1. The Shawshank Redemption
2. Ed Wood
3. Pulp Fiction
4. Quiz Show
5. Leon: The Professional
6. Chungking Express
7. Dumb and Dumber
8. Speed
9. Maverick
10. The Madness of King George

Michael McCarthy said...

It pains me a little to see a top 10 of 1994 list without The Lion King.

94dfk1 said...

Man, I need to watch Cloud Atlas. Also, I think Jake Gyllenhaal will rack up some more Fives as time goes on and eventually reach Mifune.

Anyway, director and cast for 2010s remake of Dog Day Afternoon, Louis and everyone else.

I'm going to go ahead and put Oscar Isaac in for Sonny as I believe he'll be a lot of people's first choice for the part.

94dfk1 said...

Michael McCarthy:

Goes to show how good 1994 was in the year of movies.

Calvin Law said...

1994 was a solid year indeed.

Dog Day Afternoon 2010s version directed by Jeremy Saulnier
Sonny: Oscar Isaac
Sal: Macon Blair

Stumped on the rest of the cast but I think those two would be great.

Michael McCarthy said...

I may be biased because it was the single most influential movie of my childhood, but I'd rank The Lion King over Speed and Maverick in a heartbeat.

Anonymous said...

Isaac for Pacino's role is such an obvious choice.

Louis Morgan said...

94dk1:

Speaking of Jake Gyllenhaal I could see him in the role of Sonny. I like Calvin's choice of Blair for Sal.

For the rest:

Moretti: Brendan Gleeson
Agent Sheldon: Liev Schreiber
Agent Murphy: Ben Foster
Sylvia: Mary Elizabeth Ellis
Leon: Toby Kebbell

Calvin:

Wouldn't have to be renamed Red Afternoon or something? Seriously though I like Saulnier as a choice.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Also since he feels like a bit of a spiritual successor to him, a couple Peckinpah remakes by Saulnier.

The Wild Bunch:

Pike Bishop: Kurt Russell
Dutch Engstrom: Jeffrey Dean Morgan
Freddie Sykes: Powers Boothe
Lyle Gorch: Walton Goggins
Tector Gorch: Norman Reedus
Deke Thornton: Michael Biehn
Coffer: Macon Blair

Cross of Iron:

Sgt. Steiner: Viggo Mortensen
Captain Stransky: Nikolaj Coster-Waldau
Col Brandt: Christoph Waltz
Capt. Kiesel: Daniel Bruhl

Calvin Law said...

Wouldn't mind seeing Saulnier go through the whole spectrum of colours. Speaking of him I actually saw Blue Ruin and while I didn't love it as much as Green Room, it was a pretty darn good film. Although I did feel a bit disgusted at myself for rooting for Blair's character (who gave a fantastic performance) the whole way.

Love that Wild Bunch cast, especially Morgan as Engstrom.

Alex Marqués said...

Louis: Which would be your list of most underrated movies in your opinion?

Calvin Law said...

Louis: Mickey Rourke was originally chosen for the role of Charlie Costello in Seven Psychopaths. What do you think? I think if he'd allowed himself to go under McDonagh's direction, he'd have given a suitably menacing and intimidating performance, but Harrelson had a certain comedic bent to his menace that I'm not entirely sure Rourke could do (though never doubt an invested Rourke).

Anonymous said...

Louis: What are your overall thoughts on these actors:
Daniel Day-Lewis
Gary Oldman
Tom Hardy
Michael Fassbender
Ben Foster
Mark Rylance

Luke Higham said...

Louis:
Oscar Isaac
Joaquin Phoenix
Matthew McConaughey
Jake Gyllenhaal

Calvin Law said...

Pretty sure he's covered Jake at some point I'll take a quick look.

Calvin Law said...

From his supporting review of Thomas Mitchell for GWTW:


Gyllenhaal - (Gyllenhaal's career has had its ups and downs since his breakout performance in Donnie Darko, but throughout he's given solid work. I would it seems he's still struggling to find an exact path, though it seems around taking complex roles, but as proven by Southpaw that in itself does not guarantee success. Gyllenhaal as it is an exciting performer to watch, anyone who gave his performance in Nightcrawler has to from now on. He's been since Donnie Darko though, he does not always give great work, but more often than not it's at the very least good)

Louis Morgan said...

Alex:

10 Rillington Place
The Hill
High and Low
The Secret of Nimh
Stalag 17
The Duellists
The Last Emperor
Zulu
The Proposition
Barton Fink

Calvin:

It's shame that the apparent ego that sank Rourke's career in the 90's immediately returned, since I do think he would worked well in the role, though Harrelson was great so we hardly lost out.

Anonymous:

Daniel Day-Lewis - (The worthy successor to Laurence Olivier in terms of being used as the synonymous word for "great actor". Day-Lewis seems almost a guarantee for a film that he will give a good if not great performance, that stands out on its own. Even with the slight misstep of Nine, Day-Lewis has made his own performances events in themselves. The emphasis on devotion to his roles is perhaps overstated, to the point that Day-Lewis has made fun of it a bit himself. However the final result isn't something that is questioned since Day-Lewis delivered greatness throughout his career. He is one of the all time greats, and it is interesting how he is publicly accepted to be so evidenced by how easily he broke the lead actor record.)

Gary Oldman - (It's interesting to look at Oldman against Day-Lewis. They are both chameleons, Oldman perhaps more so possibly due to his detriment in terms of the popularity of his presence in terms of the public eye, and quite intense in style. They are both immensely talented. They could not be at more extreme odds though in terms of how they work though with Oldman being extremely prolific, and Day-Lewis being so selective. Oldman because of that often plays thankless roles, or too often is just given the villain part. Oldman unfortunately, especially recently, just has not been able to show off how talented he is. Like Day-Lewis he's one of the all time greats, but in a weird way gets to show it less despite acting more.)

Tom Hardy - (One of the all time greats already and it seems like he's just getting started. Tom Hardy is a unique performer given his ability to seemingly conquer all. He can disappear into the role like the best of them, yet his screen presence is distinctly his own. He can be a menacing villain, a charming hero, he can bare the soul, or just simply entertain. No single performance of his is the same, the overriding factor is that they are always compelling to watch.)

Louis Morgan said...

Michael Fassbender - (It is interesting how Fassbender and Hardy's careers are lining up. They both started in minor roles, expanding to leading ones in independent films, while slowly breaking out to more major films, to eventually garner their first Oscar nominations within years of each other under similair circumstances. Fassbender is a different type of performer as he's best when working within a certain range. Accents for example are not his strong suit. However Fassbender is quite capable of an array of different roles, he's best when the role strictly stresses his greatest assets an actor. He has an innate magnetism (no pun intended), and is a naturally captivating performer to watch.)

Ben Foster - (Foster is an amazing actor and the most underrated actor around. That star break out always alludes him in some way. That is such a shame as it is rare that Foster is not the highlight of any films in which he appears. He carries an innate intensity and knows exactly how to use it. He is defined by this though only so capable in withdrawn intimate work as well. He's one of a few performers that I'm always eager to see their work no matter what film they may be in.)

Mark Rylance - (Now I've only seen four performances of his. Two good, one amazing, one being one of the best you'll see in any form of media. Rylance is a fascinating performer as there is this certain modest about performances, yet they are no less daring, or compelling than say a Daniel Day-Lewis. What Rylance does is innately intriguing, and I only look forward to seeing more of him given his growing presence in cinema.)

Luke:

Oscar Isaac - (The reverse Pacino it is said, though I got a bad taste of the late Pacino from him recently with his turn as Apocalypse. Isaac perhaps should simply steer clear of broader material, at least in villainous roles. Isaac in every other role I've seen him in is such an interesting performer. He's one of those rare actors that's chameleon who hides his act. He never changes accent yet the essence of the characters seems so dissimilar he's difficult to recognize from role to role. The consistency is Isaac's abilities whether it is the right type of showboating in Ex Machina, old school charm in Star Wars, or the heartbreaking introspection of Show Me a Hero and Inside Llewyn Davis. He's a great actor, just maybe should stay away from parts that start at eleven.)

Joaquin Phoenix - (A mad scientist of a performer. Although there might be the occasional invention that just is a bit too much for its own good, there's also that one of a kind example of inspiration that could only come from a genius. Phoenix almost seems to work in waves of a cluster of intensities, that don't feel repetitive as they are more often than not a natural fit for the character he is portraying. I'll admit I don't always love what he does, but one cannot deny what he's capable of.)

Matthew McConaughey - (Matthew McConaughey had his middle period, as his early career already did show potential, but it is interesting to see an actor suddenly specifically decide to become recognized as one of the best. McConaughey will probably always be derided for some due to his thick accent, though he is capable of maneuvering somewhat. McConaughey is like some of the golden age greats in that he's able to prove the power of a performer without constantly changing his speaking voice. What McConaughey has is an incredible emotional range, and know how to utilize it. Although his McConaissance streak seems like it is wavering slightly, seemingly by no fault of his own as the stories all sound like they had plenty of potential, he's still one of the most remarkable actors around.)

Calvin Law said...

Oldman and Isaac are probably my favourites of the actors you've just mentioned, but I'd say McConaughey and Foster are easily the most consistent. Even in their bad films they're always watchable, whereas Oldman and Isaac have the occasional rare misstep. I don't like Phoenix as much as many seem to but I can't deny that his performance in The Master is probably the most daring lead performance of the 21st Century that's grown quite a bit on me.

Matt Mustin said...

Louis: Interesting that you mention Day-Lewis in you assessment of Mark Rylance, because Rylance is kind of the Daniel Day-Lewis of theatre.

Calvin Law said...

Also,

2010s Scarecrow directed by J.C. Chandor
Max: Matthew McConaughey
Lionel: Oscar Isaac

Michael McCarthy said...

Louis can I get your top ten films of 1930, 1954 and 2001?

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thoughts on:
Oliver Reed
Paul Scofield
Ian McKellen
John Gielgud
Christopher Lee
Richard Harris
Peter O'Toole
David Warner
Peter Cushing

And Ratings & Thoughts on Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (1979 & 2011)

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thoughts on:
Brendan Fraser & Rachel Weisz in The Mummy
Johnny Depp in Sleepy Hollow
and Heath Ledger in 10 Things I Hate About You

Robert MacFarlane said...

Has anyone seen the La La Land trailer? I'm the only person here who doesn't care for Whiplash, but have to admit this one looks great.

Calvin Law said...

It was very different to what I was expecting but I kinda loved it.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: for a 2010s Paths of Glory, who'd you pick as director? Just watched it and gosh, did not expect a film like that from Kubrick but it's quite remarkable what a strong emotional core it had to it.

Dax: Michael Shannon
Paris: Matthias Schoenaerts
Broulard: Michael Palin
Mireau: Paul Giamatti
Roget: Toby Jones
Arnaud: Colin Morgan
Ferol: Rory McCann

Anonymous said...

Louis: What are your rating and thoughts on:
Arthur Shields, Ward Bond, Jack MacGowran, Sean McClory, Charles FitzSimmons and Francis Ford in The Quiet Man
Billy Chapin and Sally Jane Bruce in The Night of the Hunter
Franchot Tone in Advise & Consent

Louis Morgan said...

Michael:

1930:

1. All Quiet on the Western Front
2. Another Fine Mess
3. The Blue Angel
4. Danger Lights
5. The Big Trail
6. Hell's Angels
7. The Silver Horde
8. Abraham Lincoln
9. The Big House
10. The Royal Family of Broadway

Though not crazy about most of these. Only included Broadway for March.

1954:

1. On the Waterfront
2. Seven Samurai
3. Rear Window
4. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
5. Samurai I: Musashi Miyamoto
6. Dial M For Murder
7. Hobson's Choice
8. Brigadoon
9. Robinson Crusoe
10. The Caine Mutiny

2001:

1. The Fellowship of the Ring
2. Mulholland Drive
3. The Royal Tenenbaums
4. The Man Who Wasn't There
5. Donnie Darko
6. In the Bedroom
7. Sexy Beast
8. Gosford Park
9. Black Hawk Down
10. Training Day

Calvin:

The power of that film makes me wish that Kubrick had not seemingly given up on humanity later on in his career. For director maybe Steve McQueen.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

I'm pretty sure I covered a few of those before. I know I covered Scofield for example. I'll get you the rest later.

Fraser - 3.5(Fraser's never exactly a great actor, but his performance really works here. This is just the right use of his sort of boyish charm, and naturally semi-comedic delivery. He's a very endearing old school leading man in this film. Though I can't help but ponder how DiCaprio would have fared in the role.)

Weisz - 4.5(I just about love her here, which is odd given I'm rarely a fan of her "prestigious" work. I find here she gives a far more honest work than in those later turns. For the secretly sexy Librarian role I found she managed to infuse it with this genuine enthusiasm that makes her absolutely winning in the part.)

Depp - 3.5(Perhaps the lead spoken off Depp/Burton collaboration I guess since it gets neither the love of Ed Wood/Edward Scissorhands nor the hate of Willy Wonka/Dark Shadows. That film is one where it seems like not every performer was exactly on the same page in terms of style, in fact Burton's own direction is a bit inconsistent in that regard. Depp however is on point here. He gives one of his more charming performances while carrying the right comic touch in his portrayal of his character's more cowardly streak.)

Ledger - 3.5(It's a thoroughly charismatic performance in what is not exactly the most amazing adaptation of Shakespeare. Ledger's performance works as the "bad boy" type as he succeeds in not making it as dumb as it should have been probably. It also needs to be said that his Franki Valli moment is something rather special)

Robert:

I rather liked it and it almost came off as an optimistic response to the LA presented in The Nice Guys and the Neon Demon.

Anonymous:

Arthur Shields - 4(Lovely work as he brings such a genuine warmth in his scenes. His little confessional scene with Wayne is one of my favorite in the film, as Shields offers such a earnest empathetic presence.)

Ward Bond - 4(I always like it in a Ford film when Bond has a bigger role. This isn't a huge role, but a memorable one. Bond is a hoot in portraying the proper pious radiance of a proper priest while undercutting brilliantly by so effectively showing the rashness of the man.)

Jack MacGowran - 4(A performance I'll admit you notice more if you've watched the film as many times as I have. A hilarious toady and troll in all of his scenes with McLaglen. His unmistakable glee in the scene before the fight begins always gets a laugh out me.)

McClory & FitzSimmons - 3.5/3(Both are very enjoyable in portraying just how much joy the men get out of Danaher's suffering, extra half a point for McClory in that he just is a bit more natural of a performer.)

Ford - 3(Calling upon his old silent films roots for a few rather amusing asides, particularly his face of finding life again during the fight)

Chapin and Bruce - 1(Both are quite terrible to be honest, and yes I still love the film. Their line readings are usually bland, and their facial expressions stilted and awkward. All the more credit should go to Robert Mitchum and Lillian Gish since they are so good they completely make up for the kids' failing.)

Tone - 3(Tone is fine in bringing the needed power of personality of the president while alluding to the man's ill health in every breath. He's not in the film much though and isn't able to make much of an impact)