Sunday, 30 August 2015

Alternate Best Supporting Actor 1976: Ron Howard in The Shootist

Ron Howard did not receive an Oscar nomination, despite being nominated for a Golden Globe, for portraying Gillom Rogers in The Shootist.

Ron Howard for some reason was the only actor to receive any recognition for film, although maybe just the Globes really like him. Howard's role here marks one of his last notable roles as an actor as it was just around this time as he was focusing more on being director. This role isn't any major departure from his earlier work other than The Shootist is a bit more dramatic than either Happy Days or The Andy Griffith Show. Howard's performance early enough seems right in his usual repertoire with his enthusiastic, perhaps overly enthusiastic delivery to most everything. To be fair to Howard though it fits the character of Gillom who's basically in the process of hero worshiping J.B. Books (John Wayne) from a distance. Howard plays Gillom just as a fan boy basically in the early scene where he discovers that his mother's new tenant is such a man that he dreams he would like to be. Howard importantly does not go too far this and just naturally portrays the admiration in Gillom for Books that technically is shallow though certainly pure.

Howard does well enough of portraying this adoration of Books, without overplaying too much, and nicely has just some slight other moments to give Gillom just a bit of variation in personality so he's not purely defined by that, even though that's mostly the point of his character. Although at first the young Gillom is mostly just getting his kicks from his slight interactions with Books, as well as his interaction with anything possibly associated with him. Eventually though Books allows Gillom to go shooting with him, and after they try Howard portrays Gillom as being appropriately cocky after he shoots almost nearly as well as the legendary gunfighter. This leads Books to let Gillom know about the truth behind killing man, which has more to do with will than accuracy. The scene belong unquestionably to Wayne, but Howard does offer some fine support in portraying the way the initial cockiness runs from Gillom face, as he begins to portray a more honest understanding of Gillom towards Books as a man instead of a legend.

Books eventually has Gillom gather the local wannabe gunmen who would not mind to gain the fame from ending the life of the legendary Books. This leads to a final showdown which stands in Books favor it was not for another shooter in the mix, which causes Gillom to step in and live out the moment that he no doubt fantasized in the past. Howard actually is very good in this moment giving the appropriately emotional intensity as Gillom shoots the man, as he portrays that will of conviction to kill in the moment, not for personal glory though but rather something rawer since he's only doing to avenge Books. Howard continues to be very effective as he portrays Gillom sudden realization of what it feels to kill, and shows the complete lack of glory in the moment. I will say much of his performance Howard does not make that much of an impact, although his performance works just fine in the context of what he is given to do. I'll give credit where it is due though since he does give some of the needed power to the pivotal final scenes of the film through his performance.

102 comments:

luke higham said...

Louis: I'm a bit surprised with the rating.

Your Rating & Thoughts on Stewart.

luke higham said...

Louis: Your Opinion on Liv Ullmann as an actress overall.

GM said...

1. George
2. Holbrook
3. Shaw
4. Duvall
5. Weathers

Anonymous said...

Louis: So, John Garfield was apparently the first choice to play Stanley Kowalski in the play of A Streetcar Named Desire. How do you think Garfield would have fared instead of Brando?
Oh, sorry to say this, but wasn't able to find some of the ratings I requested like Blondell in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Douglas in Detective Story, March in Grey Flannel Suit. Could you repost them?

Calvin Law said...

Yeah I'm changing.

1. George
2. Holbrook
3. Shaw
4. Duvall
5. Weathers

luke higham said...

Anonymous: Douglas is a 4.5 for Detective Story.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Louis, can I have your rating and thoughts on Paul Kandel's voice work in The Hunchback of Notre Dame? He's not in the rankings.

Anonymous said...

Luke: Thanks. :)

luke higham said...

Anonymous: :)

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Stewart - 4(His mere presence adds something just through the reunion of the Liberty Valance boys. Stewart though adds a lot in just essentially a role that there to give Books some bad news. Stewart is very effective in creating the sense of doom that awaits Books as through his somber delivery as he tells Books what will become of him. In addition though Stewart just adds a bit of something through his chemistry with Wayne as he creates a certain understanding between the men. I particularly love the moment where he insists that Books finds a better a way out.)

In regards to Ullmann I still need to see more really, but I'd say she's on her way to being one of my favorites.

Anonymous:

Garfield would have been miscast, and although I don't think he would necessarily have been bad, he likely would have been far less memorable.

Blondell - 3
March - 3.5

Robert:

Kandel - 3.5(Thanks for the remainder since I rather like his delivery of his songs as he brings the needed grandeur in the "Bells of Notre Dame", but in his more character based songs I like the lively joyful quality he brings along with always a certain mischievousness behind it)

Calvin Law said...

What are your thoughts and ratings for Anton Walbrook in The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp? I never like to try and sway your opinion but I do feel a re-watch of that film may bump him up in your rankings.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Just finished Show Me a Hero, and my goodness Oscar Isaac is still on his winning streak.

Calvin Law said...

Robert: Glad to hear. Reckon he has a good shot at the Emmy?

Anonymous said...

Louis: If Brando never became self-indulgent and kept on giving great performances, what performances could you seen him in? I know that he would be your choice for Clay Shaw in a version of JFK in the 70's, but more performances that would fit him.

Calvin Law said...

Any recommendations for travel destinations everyone? Planning an interrailing trip with friends and Vienna is my input (me being a Third Man fan and all), any other shout outs?

GM said...

Come to Brazil.

moviefilm said...

Thanks for the review.

Scott Gingold said...

Louis please please give thoughts & ratings on Brando in Missouri Breaks.

Anonymous said...

Scott:
Brando - 2(Michael will probably find this to be generous, but I did not quite find him grating, although I can see why someone would. I guess this is Brando doing Richard Harris after Harris did Brando in This Sporting Life. The problem is Brando's not even consistent with that approach. I think there could have been a great performance out of this character, but Brando never quite makes him feel as a whole. It feels like different mannerisms, and eccentricities that never quite add up to one man, instead it just feels like a self-indulgent acting showcase from Brando)

Michael McCarthy said...

In the scene where Brando kills Quaid I felt nothing but supreme irritation that his character was able to accomplish things so easily. I really don't think that was the intent.

Speaking of, Louis, what were your ratings and thoughts for Stanton and Quaid in The Missouri Breaks?

Psifonian said...

Harry Dean Stanton is the best thing about that film. And most films.

Scott Gingold said...

was that Louis' opinion on Brando or Anonymous'?

Robert MacFarlane said...

@Scott: Louis's.

@Psifonian: Have you seen Show Me a Hero yet?

Psifonian said...

I'm waiting for marathon it, Robert. I did DVR them all, though.

luke higham said...

Scott Gingold: It was Louis'. I gave you his thoughts also, a couple of days ago.

luke higham said...

R.I.P. Wes Craven

Anonymous said...

Luke: Oh my God, I didn't know he died. I thought he was doing well. RIP Wes Craven, Nightmare on Elm Street is an absolute horror classic, same with Scream.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: It was announced about 18 hours ago. I found out in the last half hour and am surprised no one noticed it by now. :)

Anonymous said...

Louis: Ratings and thoughts on:
Kirk Douglas in The Big Sky and The War Wagon
Burt Lancaster in Separate Tables, The Rainmaker and The Unforgiven
Paul Newman in Exodus
Gary Cooper in Friendly Persuasions
Gregory Peck in The Big Country
Bela Lugosi in Glen and Glenda and Bride of the Monster
William Holden in Love is A Many-Splendored Thing

Anonymous said...

Oh, and also ratings and thoughts on Tim Robbins and Paul Newman in The Hudsucker Proxy.

Matt Mustin said...

Louis, what's your ratings and thoughts on Peter Boyle and Gene Hackman in Young Frankenstein?

Anonymous said...

Hey guys, it's Michael Patison, but my Google account isn't working. Could somebody help me out.

On a different note: Louis, what would your 1986 female categories look like, with ratings. If he's already done that, could somebody help me out. I'm a miserable failure at finding those things.

Calvin Law said...

Anonymous: What's the problem, I'll see if I can help out!

Louis: Watching Badlands now and really loving it. What would your retroactive cast for a 1970s True Romance be like? Because based on what I'm seeing Sheen and Spacek would've been terrific in Slater and Arquette's roles.

Clarence: Martin Sheen
Alabama: Sissy Spacek
Drexl Spivey: Robert Shaw
Clifford Worley: Warren Oates
Don Vincenzo Coccotti: John Cazale
Floyd: Robert Redford
Virgil: Peter Boyle

Anonymous said...

Calvin: With Coppola as the director, right?

Anonymous said...

Calvin: Michael here. Yeah, I write a comment and select the Google Account option. Then I confirm I'm not a robot and hit submit. Then a screen comes up saying that I don't have access to this product and to contact by administrator or something like that. This has never happened to me before in almost 4 years of using it.

Michael Patison said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Michael Patison said...

Ok I figured it out. No bloody idea what the problem was though

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Walbrook - (I feel I should re-watch the film again considering I feel like I must have missed something. In regards to Walbrook I thought he was a bit over the top in the early scenes as he portrayed the part as a caricature. I felt this was odder that suddenly his character become one of the most serious in the film, but I do think he delivered on this side of the film particularly in the scene where he speaks about his family)

Anonymous:

Not sure of exact roles, but frankly he probably could have been a fit for any role taken by actors similair to his own age.

Michael McCarthy:

Quaid - 3(Felt he was quite endearing in his few scenes adding a bit of life, and I agree about that scene in that it failed to make his demise as heartbreaking as it should have been. I feel a lot of the problems with that came from Brando's approach which made it seem like he never cared about any given scene making his character's actions feel arbitrary)

Stanton - 4(I believe the more Stanton you have the better is the rule with any film, and the more screen time only the more he'll be able to bring. Stanton is very good, as always, and like in Straight Time he does not even have that much to work with yet you really feel like you get to know his character as he brings so much with so little material at his disposal.)

Anonymous:

Douglas - The Big Sky - 3.5(Arthur Hunnicutt does steal the show actually, but Douglas as usual is a fine lead. He does not really have all that much to work with in this instance. He's likable in the role though making up for his less charismatic co-star, and is engaging as usual)

The War Wagon - 3(I was a bit surprised with this film as I was sure Douglas would overshadow Wayne with his more flamboyant performance, but actually Wayne manages to the bigger impression. Douglas is a bit of fun, but it just does not add up to all that much in this particular case)

Lancaster - Separate Tables - 3(I find his story feels always as oddly a second though even thought it is treated as just as important. I don't mind Lancaster's performance though. He's fine enough in realizing his character's particular frustrations, but I suppose there is a problem when he never makes his story seem important)

Covered the Rainmaker in 56 results.

The Unforgiven - 2.5(He's not bad as the quiet hero who insists on doing the right thing, but it's pretty forgettable work)

Louis Morgan said...

Newman - 2.5(Oddly I felt he seemed lost in the whole thing, and weirdly is not even allowed to rely on his charm to make up for it all. He's not bad exactly, but his performance and in turn his character leave absolutely no impression)

Cooper - 3.5(Rather liked Cooper here actually as I felt this unassuming delivery and personality worked quite well for the peaceful Quaker type. The real arc in the film belongs to Perkins, but Cooper does some good work here in portraying a less assuming call to action)

Peck - 2.5(Eh it's not really Peck's fault that his character is so ridiculously bland, but Peck doesn't have needed charm to make up for that fact either. Peck just a bit to stoic for his own good making his character seem like maybe he has just too little of an impact)

Lugosi - Glen and Glenda (The point of his appearances is nonexistent, but hey his delivery is creepy enough though it serves no real purpose. Now comparatively speaking Lugosi is amazing, but that's because he's in an Ed Wood film)

Bride of the Monster - 2.5(Again comparatively it seems like I should go higher, but again it's not really saying much when one notes that he gave the best performance in the cast. Lugosi is doing an okay enough mad scientist, but I'll give him credit he's actually kinda moving in his whole "Home?" speech)

I believe I covered Holden, Newman and Robbins should be in their respective results I believe.

Matt:

Boyle - 3.5(I don't know if there's anything that special about his Frankenstein rendition, again Karloff influence is obvious. Boyle does it humorously enough though, and I do particularly enjoy the extra addition of his dead pan turn to the camera whenever particularly when he's interacting with the girl at the lake)

Hackman - (Ah such a enjoyably random cameo. Hackman's hilarious in kinda doing the somber old man act though while having perhaps just a bit too much of a zip in his step. I in particular have always loved just how forlorn he is in with his final line about making espresso)

Anonymous:

Ask Luke he should know.

Calvin:

I'll add:

Lee Donowitz: Elliot Gould
Elliot Blitzer: Jeff Goldblum
Detective Nicholson: Charles Durning
The Mentor: Elvis Presley

Anonymous said...

Louis: So I went to the 1994 lead/supporting results and I didn't see any thoughts and ratings on both Robbins and Newman in The Hudsucker Proxy. Could you post their ratings?
And since you gave a 2 to My Fair Lady and a 2,5 for West Side Story, what are your full thoughts on those films, Louis?

luke higham said...

Michael Patison: You'll find his Actress/Supporting Actress Top 5s for '86 on the Michael J. Fox/Casualties Of War review.

Calvin Law said...

Luke: Upon re-watch of The Man from Uncle, I've upgraded Hammer and Vikander to 3.5's, Cavill to a 4, and Debicki is very close to a 5 still.

Calvin Law said...

Luke: Have you seen anything new recently?

Calvin Law said...

I'm watching Kidnapping Freddy Heineken tonight. Should be interesting.

luke higham said...

Calvin: Apart from Love & Mercy, No.

Michael McCarthy said...

Huh. I actually thought Debicki was kind of bland in The Man from U.N.C.L.E.

luke higham said...

Macbeth Trailer
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YqHhKuCQmoY

The Danish Girl Trailer
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d88APYIGkjk

Robert MacFarlane said...

Wow, Macbeth looks great. Can't wait.

Wow, The Danish Girl looks... *sigh*

luke higham said...

Robert: I'm willing to give The Danish Girl a chance, though I'm looking forward mostly to Vikander's performance and to a moderate extent, Redmayne's. The direction and quite possibly the writing are gonna be the weakest aspects.

And yes, Macbeth looks amazing, I've been looking forward to the film for a year and a half, I'm quite certain that Cotillard's gonna be brilliant and just hope that Fassbender's fantastic as well. :)

Calvin Law said...

Michael: Each to his own. I just really like her whole style of performance.

Macbeth looks very good and I am starting to feel some of that old hype coming back.

As for The Danish Girl? I have a confession to make. I loved the trailer. Vikander looks, I know it's early to make judgement, fan-freaking-tastic. Hopefully she will go down the Felicity Jones awards route if this performance is as good as it turns out to be.

Whishaw and Schonearts look solid too. As for Redmayne? From what I've seen, I am very optimistic he'll give a great performance. Unlikely to be my favourite of the year, which I feel is still going to be McKellen at year's end. But still, I am really looking forward to it now.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I see Hooper is still stubborn about spacing his actors awkwardly towards the corner for the frame for no discernible reason. I'll see it for Alicia. Only for her.

luke higham said...

Calvin: I do feel that it's gonna be a better performance from him than last year and there is a chance of Alicia matching, if not bettering her work in Ex Machina.

Calvin Law said...

I seem to be the only one on here who still likes The Theory of Everything, and Redmayne's performance. :( He's still a 5 for me.

luke higham said...

Calvin: He's a low 4.5 for me. Prefer Jones.

Anonymous said...

Luke: Goddamn, Macbeth's gonna be great for sure. Hopefully, nominations for Cotillard and Fassbender.
On Danish Girl, I hope Redmayne gives a better performance than the one he gave in Theory of Everything. But like TOF, Danish Girl just has Oscar bait written all over it.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: I agree with you, though the acting should be better all-round this time and for me, that's mostly due to Vikander.

Anonymous said...

Calvin: Unfortunately, yes, you are the only one here on this blog. :) He's a low 4,5.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: I still believe Michael's likely to be nominated for Steve Jobs, though I could definitely see a nomination for Cotillard.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: I like his work, though I think Calvin should've said 'I really like Redmayne's performance'.

Anonymous said...

Luke: I agree with you that Vikander will likely be the reason why the acting will be better this time around. The flaws will likely be Hooper's cliched directing and the writing. Macbeth will be better than The Danish Girl, to be sure. It's quite a shame we never got to see a Macbeth with Olivier in the lead and Vivien Leigh as Lady Macbeth.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: Completely agree. :)

Anonymous said...

Luke: Of course Michael is gonna be nominated for Steve Jobs rather than Macbeth. That film is gonna be massively hyped and the Academy will be so amazed by his performance. And of course, they'll likely be impressed with Rogen's performance that they'll give him a nomination for Best Supporting Actor. He'll then have another nomination like Jonah Hill. They're not going to be like Arthur Kennedy when it comes to nominations, I'm sure.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: I feel really sad about it, Olivier planned to direct his own version of Macbeth, yet Richard III failed to make a profit. If it had come to fruition, it could've been the best Shakespearean performance to have ever graced the screen.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: I just want a 4.5 at the very least for that performance, whereas I'll be very disappointed if he didn't get a 5 for Macbeth and as everyone knows, I hardly ever complain about a rating.

Michael McCarthy said...

Oh my god I hate that corner thing that Hooper does too. And I noticed he had more close ups with soft focus in this trailer...and I hate the color palettes he uses. I'm just not optimistic cinematically about this movie. Vikander looks good though, and Redmayne looks like he could be quite good too.

Macbeth looks fucking metal.

Anonymous said...

Luke: Speaking of Shakespearean adaptations, I feel Robert Shaw (had he lived) could have been a great Brutus

Anonymous said...

*.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: I'm actually interested, whether or not he could've been a great Cassius, let alone a great Brutus.

Anonymous said...

Luke: Well, he could have been great as Cassius as well as Brutus, I believe.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: Apologies, What I meant was, He could've been great as Cassius, as well as Brutus. Just realized, I used the wrong meaning.

Anonymous said...

Luke: No problem. :) How many nominations will Vikander have at the end of her career, I wonder? Probably, more than Garbo and Bergman.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: What I should say right now, is wait until the first one, but an estimate for me would be 6-7 nominations.

Anonymous said...

Luke: For which performance do you expect a nomination for Vikander in this year?

luke higham said...

Anonymous: The Danish Girl, Definitely. Testament Of Youth came out way too early and I expect Genre bias as usual with Ex Machina.

Calvin Law said...

Robert Shaw played a magnificent Leontes in a filmed production of The Winter's Tale. Other Shakespearean roles I could've seen him in? Macbeth, certainly. Titus Andronicus, and Timon of Athens too.

Calvin Law said...

As for Julius Caesar I would have liked to have seen him as Brutus, in the 1960s. With Ralph Richardson as Cassius, and Terrence Stamp as Marc Anthony.

Anonymous said...

Luke: Oh, yeah. The Danish Girl for sure. I know that we still haven't reached awards season, but my best bet for the winner of Best Actress is Blanchett in Carol.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: I'm not 100% on Blanchett winning, she's not long after her most recent win, so at the moment I predict a Mulligan win. The biggest contenders though are from Dramas, so that might change depending on who wins the Golden Globe.

Calvin Law said...

My predictions:

BP
Bridge of Spies
Carol
The Danish Girl
Suffragette
The Revenant
Joy
The Hateful Eight
Steve Jobs
Inside Out

Actor
DiCaprio
Redmayne
Caine
Fassbender (I'm actually fairly certain about these 4)
McKellen/Segel (they might campaign him in supporting as Michael said)/Courtenay/Hiddleston/Foster/Hanks/Cooper (for Chef)/Cheadle

Actress
Mulligan (agree that she has the highest likelihood of winning)
Vikander
Lawrence
Blanchett
Binoche/Rampling/Ronan/Tomlin/Blunt

Supporting Actor
Hardy
Rylance
Keaton
De Niro
Keitel/Jackson/Rogan

Supporting Actress
Winslet
Bonham Carter
Stewart
Cotillard
Mara

luke higham said...

Calvin: Streep's not on the list, Thanks be to God.

luke higham said...

Calvin:
5th Slots
For Lead Actor: Hiddleston
For Lead Actress: Ronan
For Supporting Actor: Rogen

Calvin Law said...

Luke: she will probably be in the running for Florence Foster Jenkins next year, which sounds promising. My American friend says she's actually quite good in Ricki and the Flash, but that the film is pretty bad. And we know that her role in Suffragette is a mere cameo.

luke higham said...

Calvin: I won't mind as long as she's really good. :)

Calvin Law said...

The only Streep nomination I've had a problem with so far was August Osage County. And even then I think it was Adams who stole away Rooney Mara/Brie Larson's deserved spot (they were never in the running but a man can dream right?)

Anonymous said...

Everything Meryl Streep does is gold for the Academy.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: It pains me so much, but I obviously agree. :(

Michael McCarthy said...

I actually would put my money on Johnny Depp for the fifth Best Actor slot. Also Idris Elba supposedly has a strong supporting actor campaign for Beasts of No Nation.

Anonymous said...

Calvin: If you think Sergeant York is the only time where Cooper gave a bad performance, then you haven't seen The Westerner.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I actually heard that Suffragette's test screenings have not gone well.

luke higham said...

Michael McCarthy: Depp's my #6.

Robert: Hope it's not a bad omen for Mulligan.

Anonymous said...

Calvin: Do you actually believe Kristen Stewart will be nominated?

Louis Morgan said...

Macbeth looks very promising, although outside of techs and potentially Cotillard (if she goes supporting only) I don't think it will make much of an impact as only really Branagh and Olivier were able to make the Academy like Shakespeare.

Not sure what to make of The Danish Girl yet other than it appears Vikander is definitely lead.

Anonymous:

Newman - 3(I think he gets off the best in the film because he rejects attempting to do the style the other actors try, and does just fine by giving a fairly straight forward evil businessman performance. That said it's just a fairly straight forward evil businessman performance, he's good, but nothing special.)

Robbins - 2.5(Eh this performance just doesn't quite work for me as I never find he exactly matches the likes of Eddie Bracken or Joel McCrea as I feel that's the sort of thing he's going for. The style just isn't pure, and falters because of that.)

My Fair Lady - (This musical has some decent source material, but this is hampered by several things. There is something so inexpressive about the film as the sets could not feel more life less and uninteresting. The style is just so bland that it fails to make the musical engaging for its long running time. The cast just doesn't work all that well outside of old Stanley Holloway, and fails to give the needed vibrancy to the songs. I actually do like some of the numbers but the story drags to the point that it feels like a chore to finish.)

West Side Story - (Now here I'll give credit in that Robert Wise has a keener eye on how to make musical numbers come to life a bit. There's is an energy to them in this film that's not in My Fair Lady. Nevertheless Romeo and Juliet in itself is not a great story, and needs to get by through the extremes of the emotions involved. This is hurt here by the leads as well who both feel miscast in one way or another. A great deal of the supporting cast is problematic as well, but that's because they also feels too much from the stage. I don't hate the film, but it just doesn't do much for me)

Robert:

The same was true for Philomena, Selma, and Nebraska. I don't think it's anything to worry about yet.

Anonymous said...

Louis: I presume Romeo and Juliet is not one of your favorite Shakespeare plays?

Michael McCarthy said...

I have to admit West Side Story, like The Breakfast Club, is a movie I can't seem to not love despite all of it's glaring flaws.

omar! said...

Those are my fantasy predictions for 2016 oscar:
BP
Joy
Carol
The Danish Girl
The Hateful Eight
The Bridge Of Spies
The Revenant
Steve Jobs
Suffragette
Miles Ahead

BD
Quentin Tarantino
Todd Haines
Steven Spielberg
Tom Hooper
Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu

Best Actor
Don Cheadle
Leo DiCaprio
Eddie Redmayne
Michael Fassbender
Michael Caine / Tom Hiddleston / Tom Hanks

Best Actress
Alicia Vikander
Cate Blanchett
Jennifer Lawrence
Julianne Moore
Carey Mulligan

Best Supporting Actor
Samuel L. Jackson
Kurt Russell
Tom Hardy
Idris Elba
Robert DeNiro

Best Supporting Actress
Jennifer Jason Leigh
Kate Winslet
Rooney Mara
Ellen Page
Marion Cotrillard / Elizabeth Olsen / Someone from Joy

Anonymous said...

My predictions for Oscars 2016 for now.
Best Picture
The Revenant
The Danish Girl
The Hateful Eight
Joy
Carol
Suffragette
Steve Jobs
Bridge of Spies
Miles Ahead
Spotlight

Best Director
Alejandro Gonzalez Innaritu (The Revenant)
Steven Spielberg (Bridge of Spies)
Tom Hooper (The Danish Girl)
Quentin Tarantino (The Hateful Eight)
David O. Russell (Joy)

Best Actor
Leonardo DiCaprio (The Revenant)
Michael Fassbender (Steve Jobs)
Michael Caine (Youth)
Eddie Redmayne (The Danish Girl)
Tom Hiddleston (I Saw The Light)

Best Actress
Alicia Vikander (The Danish Girl)
Cate Blanchett (Carol)
Jennifer Lawrence (Joy)
Carey Mulligan (Suffragette)
Julianne Moore (Freeheld)

Best Supporting Actor
Tom Hardy (The Revenant)
Robert De Niro (Joy)
Michael Keaton (Spotlight)
Samuel L. Jackson (The Hateful Eight)
Harvey Keitel (Youth)

Best Supporting Actress
Jennifer Jason Leigh (The Hateful Eight)
Rooney Mara (Carol)
Marion Cotillard (Macbeth)
Helena Bonham Carter (Suffragette)
Kate Winslet (Steve Jobs)

Anonymous said...

Louis: Throughout the course of reviewing Cooper and Tracy's performances, did you came to the conclusion that they were praised for all the wrong reasons?

luke higham said...

Louis: Have you seen anything new recently.

Anonymous said...

Louis what are your thoughts on these films that you have seen;

Winchester 73
La Notte
Come Back Little Sheba
X: The Unknown
The Clock
4-D Man
The Lodger
Running On Empty

JackiBoyz said...

Louis I remember reading in your review of Redgrave for Mourning Becomes Electra (ive never seen the film), and I wanted to get more info on how you meant by the films quality, like what was strange about it?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous: No offense, but, don't you think that's a little too much? I mean, it's been 3 days and Louis still hasn't posted his new review.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Cooper I see his appeal as a performer though I don't think he was a great actor. Tracy I do think was praised for the flashiness of his early performances, even though I personally don't think he was very good at it.

Luke:

I'll let you know when I do. I've been very busy with certain things recently which is also why the reviews have been slow lately.

Anonymous:

I'll give my thoughts relatively briefly.

Winchester 73 - (The second best Mann/Stewart western I've seen as I find its fairly tight revenge story, although not as a good as The Naked Spur, still a fine western.)

La Notte - (A fine drama with appropriate style and subdued though effective performances. I suppose I don't love it, but I certainly liked it)

Come Back Little Sheba - (Not exactly the most subtle of alcoholic dramas though I think it does work well enough in this more explosive take mostly do to the fine performance by Burt Lancaster and the very good Oscar winning work from Shirley Booth)

X: The Unknown - (The film is all set up to work. It has decent atmosphere, the cast is surprisingly devoted, with this perhaps being the most I've ever liked Dean Jagger. Even the exposition jargon moves along nicely. The problem really is the monster is a major let down, and unfortunately leaves a hole in the center of the film)

The Clock - (Its a sweet romance with a nice sense of place in the City. It's breezy to be sure, but it the way you want a film like this to be. Garland and Walker are quite likable together, and I particularly liked the
scenes where they interacted with James Gleason and his real life wife.)

4-D Man - (It's very much like the Blob in style, but without as memorable of a monster or Steve McQueen to add an extra bit of cool to the proceedings. It's just not as much fun as that film, and mostly comes off as a bit goofy particularly due to the James Congdon's performance)

The Lodger - (I think a problem with the story is that there is no mystery whatsoever, while it pretends as though there should at least be a slight one. Therefore the film depends on how much atmosphere is made from the direction, there's some, and how good the lodger is. Since he's played by Laird Cregar the film works)

Running On Empty - (In the negative I do feel the film tips its hands a few times with a few of Judd Hirsch's scenes, and the way some of the supporting characters are feel a tad over the top. As the story of a boy needing to leave his parents it does work fairly well earning its more emotional moments rather well particularly the goodbye or when the mother visits her own father)

Jackiboyz:

Well what I meant was that it takes such a ludicrous over the top approach to its more theatrical moments. Obviously certainly scenes where going to be pretty big but the film comes off as a strange because it only goes BIG for those scenes while seeming just like standard drama the rest of the time.