Saturday, 3 January 2015

Alternate Best Supporting Actor 1965: Ian Hendry, Ian Bannen and Harry Andrews in The Hill

Ian Hendry did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Staff Sergeant Williams in The Hill.

The Hill depicts the entry of five soldiers into a soldier's prison out in the desert during World War II. The men are the discriminated against African (Ossie Davis), the sensitive Stevens (Alfred Lynch), the tough guy McGrath (Jack Watson), the self centered smuggler Bartlett (Roy Kinnear), and the disgraced hero Roberts (Sean Connery). The men put in charge to deal with the new recruits is prison guard Staff Sergeant Williams played Hendry. When Hendry first comes on the scene he seems to be all a bit much. The way he wears his hat, the way he always stands at attention, his strict movements, and constant attempt at being the imposing military type are almost all too obvious. The whole act to a certain extent seems to be put on by Hendry as it does not feel natural at all. This is not a mistake but actually is a stroke of genius in Hendry's performance. This is because Williams is not really a soldier by trade, merely a prison guard, and Hendry portrays a man basically putting on the best show, too much of a show really, so he can make up for that fact.

The one thing that Hendry shows is very natural in Williams though is the brutal treatment of the soldiers, something that no doubt carried over quite well from the way Williams probably treated civilian prisoners. Hendry brings a quiet but very strong sadism in Williams as he purposefully mistreats the soldiers in any way he can think of. Hendry's cap often covers his eyes leaving him to do so much with just his mouth. That little smirk of his when he watches the men suffer is absolutely putrid as Hendry exudes the pleasure Williams takes in harming the men. Hendry shows a complete comfort in this aspect of Williams's "duty". Hendry is particularly effective though in the moments where he sees that most of the men simply won't have his punishment and at times ignore him. The weaknesses of his facade are shown in slight reactions by Hendry as there is almost a fear as he sees that he might not really have it to control the men the way Williams probably did back home. Williams though is not the only prison guard which brings us to....

Ian Bannen who did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Staff Sergeant Harris in The Hill.

What was the idea of the official academy lineup no Oskar Werner, a serious case of extreme fraud from Frank Finlay, and they could not even give Tom Courtenay the win to make up for the nominees. But hey they did nominate Ian Bannen but for the wrong movie. He should have been nominated here where he plays Sergeant Harris who is a vastly different individual from Williams. He's already been in the camp for sometime, and also does not quite fit in though for a much different reason. Bannen also portrays the military manner in a way that helps establish Harris's character. Bannen portrays something off about his but not that Harris is faking it but really its just not his manner at all to do it. Bannen has just enough of a walk but does not exactly keep time as he should. He salutes and move as you'd expect but Bannen always brings this casual quality to Harris's movements. Bannen suggests a man also ill suited for the job, but not because he hates the men, rather he does not view them as simply toys that need to be broken down then rebuilt. Bannen presents Harris as a man first and a soldier second.

Bannen's performance is terrific as he plays the good Sergeant but it is never blunt as that. Although he is indeed a good man, Bannen is careful to show that Harris must exist within the limitations of being in the military still so he can't quite yell his discontent right out in the open. Bannen instead, in the earlier scenes of the film anyways, is quite memorable how he plays the scenes where Harris questions Williams's treatment of the men. Bannen brings an excessive jovial quality to Harris as he basically makes his complaints in a joking way. Bannen does not suggest that Harris is not serious about his complaints, but rather shows the method in which Harris has to voice his complaints in order not to face punishment himself. Bannen shows the true extent of Harris's problems with the system. These are quick reactions but Bannen does the very most with them. In a quick moment, when Harris alone, Bannen quickly shows the very real anger that Harris has not only at what's happening but perhaps at his inability to stop it. The man Harris tries to complain to leads us to....

Harry Andrews who did not receive an Oscar nomination, despite winning NBR and being nominated for BAFTA, for portraying Regimental Sergeant Major Wilson in The Hill.

Now Andrews also utilizes his military manner to express his character although he technically is a bit more straight forward in this regard, but just as good at showing who Wilson is. The reason he's more straight forward here because Andrews's mannerisms are that of the perfect soldier. The way he walks and talks carries an absolute authority. Every step seems to have the utmost precision and there never seems to be a moment where Wilson is at a loss while on duty. Andrews makes Wilson the military personified in his physical depiction of him which is an absolute necessity. Wilson is not merely the head of the guards but also in charge of the prison, even though technically there is a commandant above him, but the commandant is far more interested in frequenting a prostitute than actually acting as the head of the prison. Wilson is the one in charge and Andrews importantly gives that command in his performance. It just seems a natural thing as he lords over almost all, but what makes this film great is that Wilson is no way like Williams.

The difference between Williams and Wilson, even though they both try to be as firm as possible, is that Wilson has no sadism in him. Now that does not mean Wilson is an easygoing guy but the way Andrews portrays the strict behavior of Wilson differs vastly from Hendry's performance. Andrews does no express any pleasure ever from breaking down any of the men, and there is a particularly effective scene early on where Wilson releases two of the former prisoners. Both men now seem to be right back where they should be as ideal soldiers. Andrews is terrific in this scene as he looks upon the men with great pride in his accomplishment. Andrews in this scene suggests Wilson's thinking which is that he is there to help the men in his view. He does not want to break them down for enjoyment, like Williams does, but rather because he sees it as a necessity to build them back up again. Andrews is particularly good in the way he portrays the only hatred in Wilson as a sorta put on when merely when he needs to take charge, and it is not that he truly hates the men. 

Not every scene depicts the three men on duty and these very important moments in realizing the nature of each man. Bannen, who is the most calm anyways, loses the least technically speaking as he shows that Harris does not put on too much of an act. Next is Andrews who shows that much of his bluster is only a purposeful method he uses to command. Andrews is quite good by playing these scenes in a far more relaxed fashion, as he manages to convey that Wilson has his whole plan worked out quite well. Hendry is equally interesting as there still a considerable amount of tension he brings to Williams, who spends some of his spare time running up and down the hill of punishment to prove that he can do it even though he is doing it in far less severe of conditions. Hendry though is also great by losing the facade in these scenes completely. Yes Hendry still shows that Williams never can really relax, but that there is no soldier in him whatsoever when he is not on duty. All three actors here to fantastic job of just giving even more depth to their characters, and realizing them to be more than just the prison guards we first meet.

For a little while Hendry gets a stronger focus as the film depicts him trying to break down the five men, but not exactly having an easy time of it. Hendry makes the despicable nature of Williams all too human as Williams sets his strongest sight on Stevens. When he does this Hendry doesn't suggest that its simply because he can, but rather that Williams almost readjusts his aims to Stevens because he sees him as the easiest target to handle. This is because Stevens does not handle it well at all, and there is an especially good scene for Bannen as Harris quietly urges Stevens to find a way to survive. Again Bannen exudes a subtle warmth as Harris tries to tell him this, while not trying to break his position. Stevens soon dies from the treatment though leaving Wilson to try to cover up for Williams, simply because he's one of his men. Andrews is great as he keeps that military manner as he tells the camp's doctor (Michael Redgrave) to consider it an accident, but is particularly effective though as he shows the actual frustration in the man when he warns Williams that death is not the point of the treatment.

The death causes an uproar in the prison and almost a riot as all the prisoners demand an answer to who killed Stevens. This leads to perhaps Andrews's best scene in the film as he goes about handling every man in the prison. Andrews is in absolute command of every second of the scene and portrays him as almost a master of ceremonies at a circus. There is that viciousness needed as he does threaten the men if they continue the course, yet interestingly Andrews at the same time he's actually quite entertaining as he flawlessly delivers Wilson's jokes in order to calm the situation. He has a particularly brilliant back and forth with Bannen in the scene where they lighten the mood as almost a comedic pair. Andrews, and to a slightly lesser extent Bannen, make it believable that they could get the crowd in line with very few threats through their performances. It's a marvelous scene as you fully scene the way that Wilson rules over the prison. Andrews is not just menacing, even if he is certainly that, but there is certain heart that he brings as Wilson seems to be the prisoners' friend even though he is kinda their enemy.

Williams does not seize in his behavior though as he has Roberts beaten due to Roberts wishing to press the issue of Stevens's death. Hendry again reveals the very human side of Williams as he is almost shaking as he brings the beaten Roberts back, as though he has just realized he's probably gone too far. Andrews is again terrific as Wilson, amidst brow beating prisoners, admonishes Williams for once again doing wrong. Andrews proceeds to be amazing once again when he faces off with Roberts. Andrews, although very forceful, stands particularly distraught as he questions a true military man like himself but who has somehow rejected that path. Andrews portrays Wilson as almost ready to cry in one moment simply because the way Wilson's view is being shattered because how could a man just like him hate the military code so much. Bannen, though put somewhat to the side, is never forgotten though through his reactions as he expresses the growing discontent in Harris, and slowly gains the strength to finally stand up to Wilson fully.

This all comes to a head when the issue is raised that Roberts should be treated at a hospital not in a cell. Hendry again keeps Williams as absolute slime as he keeps his reserve trying to keep pushing the envelope to basically trick Wilson into protecting him. Andrews is equally good as he puts on his most forceful act as Wilson tries to push everyone into doing what he wants. Then there is Bannen who brings such a poignancy and power as he reveals Harris's own passion to try to stand firmly against Wilson and Williams. The way Andrews accepts every defeat, as the doctor and Harris won't stand down, is perfect. Andrews expresses it as a man who will not lose face so its just an instance and acts as though his yelling was just because he lost his head in the moment. The sparks might as well fly in the scene as Bannen, Hendry, Andrews, as well as Connery and Redgrave go at it. They are all on top form and they make it a spellbinding scene as it unfolds. There is no reason not to state it, this is one of, if not the, greatest film ensembles of all time. There's Connery's passionate lead performance, as well the very fine work from Ossie Davis, Roy Kinnear, and Michael Redgrave, and even Watson and Lynch are memorable in somewhat simpler roles. Rounding it out all out the Ians and Andrews who each give a complex and compelling portrait of not only what each man represents, but also of who the man is.  

64 comments:

luke higham said...

Louis: Ratings & Thoughts for the rest of the cast.

luke higham said...

Louis: Also, Your top ten Ensemble casts.

Michael McCarthy said...

Wow...I figured at least Andrews would get a 5 but now it looks like these might even be the top 3 of the year.

GM said...

I'm still rooting for Courtenay to keep on being the winner.

Louis, what are your thoughts on Faye Dunaway in Three Days of Condor?

Michael McCarthy said...

Also, am I the only one who thinks Harry Andrews and Michael Rooker look practically identical?

Matt Mustin said...

Michael: Now that you mention it...

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Kinnear - 4(Kinnear's an actor I generally like anyways. He's great fun here as the weasel of the group, and Kinnear offers a well earned bit of comedy relief in the film. Kinnear though does not overplay his part and still shows the way the punishments wears on his character as well. He's actually quite moving as well and is great in his "I'm Fat" scene)

Redgrave - 4(His role is somewhat small at first but Redgrave is good in portraying the doctor as just an exasperated guy just kinda going through the motions. He's great in his last scene though as he shows the way the doctor almost has to fight his through his ambivalence and give a damn for a once. I particularly love his reaction of disgust and disbelief when Hendry tries to blackmail him at the end)

Watson - 3.5(He's mostly just the thick headed tough guy but Watson does this well avoiding becoming a caricature. When he's given a bit more to do near the end Watson delivers showing there's more to even a brute like him)

Lynch - 3.5(Although his character intent is technically to give greater expansion for the other characters Lynch is quite affecting in portraying the particularly intense emotional desperation of Stevens. You see the toll of Williams's brutal treatment in his performance)

After re-watch I'd raise Davis up to a 4.5.

Top Ten Ensembles:

1. The Hill
2. Rashomon
3. Clue
4. Doctor Zhivago
5. JFK
6. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy
7. It's A Wonderful Life
8. Glengarry Glen Ross
9. The Thin Red Line
10. Fargo

GM:

Dunaway - (I think she's really quite good there. Although there is the whole thing where they get together a little too quickly, Out of Sight was right about that, but Dunaway is very interesting in far more unassuming performance than the rest of her early work. She's effectively meek though and very good at being something genuine in that film's world of lies)

GetDonaldSutherlandAnOscar said...

No Lawrence of Arabia and Back to the Future in those rankings, Louis?

koook160 (Robert MacFarlane) said...

I thought you said Alien was one of your favorite ensembles. Anyway, did you see The Babadook yet?

RatedRStar said...

Tom Courtenay didn't turn up to the ceremony that year, and it shows, he probably saw the nominees sheet that year in the newspaper and thought "FUCK THAT". I hope Courtenay wins as well, I think this is his last chance, as 1962 is really just an uphill climb for him.

The Hill is so easy to find as well on YouTube its everywhere lol.

Anonymous said...

Louis what are your ratings and thoughts on the whole cast of Since You Went Away (1944)? Also, do you think that Claudette Colbert and Jennifer Jones were nominated in the right categories or would you have put Jones in leading or viceversa?

GetDonaldSutherlandAnOscar said...

What's your favourite Tom Courtenay performance RatedRStar, I can't decide between The Dresser and The Loneliness of The Long Distance Runner where he actually beats O'Toole for me, though he can't quite top Peck.

GetDonaldSutherlandAnOscar said...

And is it just me or does anyone else think Ben Whishaw coukd prove to be the second coming of Tom Courtenay, I find they have rather similar acting styles

luke higham said...

GDSAO: My favourite's King & Country, but The Loneliness of the Distance Runner is very close, I love him in Billy Liar & Dr Zhivago also. I wholeheartedly agree with RatedRStar that he has no chance in hell of being Louis's number 1 for '62, since O' Toole's performance is legendary to him as well being my favourite for the year, but I'm confident enough for him to get a 5 anyway.

luke higham said...

GDSAO: I do see a bit of Courtenay in Whishaw, their delivery of dialogue, I feel is quite similar. Whishaw's best performance for me, as of now was in The Hollow Crown/Richard II TV Film.

Louis Morgan said...

GetDonaldSutherlandAnOscar:

I should have added that I made the list off the top of my head so there might be something missing. I would not include Lawrence at the moment, since I have not gotten to that year yet with the reviews, and Back to the Future would not quite make it for me as I've never been that much of a fan of Lea Thompson's performance. Not that I think she's bad but when ranking the very best ensembles she's enough for me not to put it in a top ten.

Robert:

Alien actually would be my number two. I'll probably be watching the Babadook today.

Anonymous:

Walker - 3(Walker's gee whiz voice might seem a bit much at times, but he still is rather endearing in the earnestness he brings to his character.)

Cotten - 3(Cotten is solid enough here just doing his charming guy routine go. As charmers go there certainly are stronger ones from the period but Cotten is likable enough here)

Colbert - 4(I generally like Colbert anyways, and this is not necessarily her most challenging role. She's mostly just there to be the concerned mother or wife and not all that much more. Colbert though certainly is good at playing the concern though and has the needed genuine warmth for such a role)

Jones - 3.5(It's the type of role she was apparently made for since when she goes out of being sweet she sometimes can be pretty bad. Luckily here's she just all about sweetness which Jones is rather good at. I think I might put her lead as well, but I think she could go either category and I'd be fine with)

Anonymous said...

@Louis: I think Colbert and Jones were great, as well as Wooley and Walker (who was very moving for me). Jones was supporting for me, she has a lot of screen-time but it never feels like she carries the movie. Cotten was fine and charming but that's it. Hattie McDaniel was pretty good and Shirley Temple was okay actually, although annoying sometimes.

luke higham said...

Louis: If you do, I'm going to ask for your thoughts on the film, plus your ratings & thoughts on Essie Davis and Noah Wiseman, which you can respond to later on today or tomorrow.

mcofra7 said...

Thoughts/ rating for Gian Maria Volonte in For a Few Dollars More

RatedRStar said...

@Donald: My favorite would be between The Loneliness of The Long Distance Runner and Doctor Zhivago, the two darkest performances I have seen him do (discountng A Dandy in Aspic).

RatedRStar said...

Ben Whishaw is just awesome in film and in real life, there arent too many male actors who would just casually say " I am married to a man" =D so cool.

luke higham said...

RatedRStar: Have you ever seen his performance in The Hollow Crown.

Also, have you seen anything new recently.

Anonymous said...

Speaking of Gian, Louis what would your thoughts be on his role in Fistful of Dollars as well?

RatedRStar said...

Yes I have, =D I thought he was great although I had some problems with The Hollow Crown series, he was the best part of it, I was stunned when he won the Bafta though lol I really thought he had no chance.

luke higham said...

RatedRStar: I particularly loved his death scene, as well as his Christ like pose in the casket.
I know some people on this blog and friends of my own, who feel overexposed with Cumberbatch, but I'm really looking forward to his portrayal of Richard III for the next series.

RatedRStar said...

Cumberbatch has gotten a bit of that he always plays himself tag from a lot of people, I think he is perhaps a little limited when he isnt playing calculated characters, but since Richard III is a calculating character I would say its good casting.

houndtang said...

Great film, great ensemble, great review

Anonymous said...

Louis what are your ratings and thoughts on Susannah York, Edith Evans, Diane Cilento and Joyce Redman in Tom Jones, Shani Wallis in Oliver! and Jane Wyman in The Lost Weekend?

Michael Patison said...

Saw American Sniper and The Imitation Game this weekend. Really liked both, especially Imitation Game (reviews to be posted on my blog soon). Cast ratings:
American Sniper:
Bradley Cooper-4.5 or 5 (haven't decided yet)
Sienna Miller-3.5
who was the Oregon priest-3.5

The Imitation Game:
Benedict Cumberbatch-5
Keira Knightley-4
Matthew Goode-3.5
Mark Strong-3.5
Charles Dance-3.5
Allen Leech-3.5
Matthew Beard-3.5
Rory Kinnear-3
Alex Lawther-3.5

koook160 (Robert MacFarlane) said...

Just saw Stretch. Totally weird, but very enjoyable. My ratings for the cast:

Wilson - 4.5
Pine - ??? (I honestly have no clue what to make of him. I'm pretty sure he's at least a 3, but I'm not sure how much higher)
Helms - 3.5
Alba - 3
Dale - 2 (A shame, because I usually like him)

Louis Morgan said...

Luke: Well I watched it.

The Babadook - (Well I'm glad I correctly predicted that it would be up my alley because it certainly was. Rather than going for the cheap ways of over the top gore or constant jump scares here it was terribly effective in just creating such an atmosphere of dread. It's the type of chilling stuff I love and easily makes it into my top ten of the year)

Davis - 5(Fantastic work here. She starts off well by just giving a down to earth portrayal of a mother's fear and unease of her own son. She's heartbreaking as she channels the awkward feelings so naturally and obviously along with the grief of her husband's death that she still haunts her. It's amazing how she only is able to create an even greater tension as she builds the fear of the titular creature that becomes something truly palatable as the film proceeds. She continues to be great though when her character shift comes in and is quite frightening herself as she goes just far enough in the madness. Then she rounds it out nicely at the end to give a strangely heartwarming performance in the end)

Wiseman - 4(He's quite good in the early scenes as he does not play the creepy kid in the usual way. He's feels perhaps more genuine while being perhaps even more off putting. His performance is very off-putting but in the way that it should be. He also is effective though in portraying the boy's fear as well even if he is somewhat overshadowed by Davis in these scenes. When there is the protagonist shift late in the film Wiseman matches it rather well and opens up just enough not to lose the character but become sympathetic in the way he needs to be)

mcofra7:

Volonte - For a Few Dollars More - 4.5(I'd love to be able to see the Italian dub but disregarding the voice work Volonte is still great. I mean the best parts of his performance are when he's not talking anyways. Volonte carries himself with such a brilliant casual menace, as he never tries to be imposing, yet he seems deadly every second he is onscreen. He also has an odd poignancy in his portrayal of the way he is haunted by the watch. His best scene though is the final duel with Cleef. He's great as he starts with such pompousness as he fixes the game. Then he is so perfectly loses this and begins to see his fate before it comes as it becomes clear who will win the duel)

Anonymous:

Volonte - A Fistful of Dollars - 4(Basically a somewhat less complex version of his performance in a Few Dollars More. Volonte has the same exact good qualities though and he can match stares with Eastwood beautifully. He does not get to stretch the way he does in the sequel, but he certainly makes a good villain)

houndtang:

Thank you.

Anonymous:

York - 3.5(She's incredibly sweet and quite charming. She's not meant to be much more than that other than to portray her sometimes disgust with Tom. York handles those scenes as well, and she's quite good in a simple role)

Evans - 4(It's a role that she played more than once which is the spunky old lady quick to one liners. Well Evans does this quite well and she is pretty funny particularly in the scene where she handles the robber)

Cilento - 3(She's very one note of just kinda being perpetually randy. She's decent enough at this, but I did think she was kinda forgettable)

Redman - 4(She's good in her other scenes but really her performance is all about the eating scene with Albert Finney. Well she's great in that scene, and along with the sound they make that the most memorable scene in the film)

Wallis - 3.5(She's a nice charming opposite of Reed's performance which actually does not seem from a musical. She delivers on all of her musical numbers and is a nice presence throughout the film)

Wyman - 3.5(It's Milland's film without question but Wyman does offer some nice support. It mostly her being the sole source of warmth in the film, but she does this well)

Robert:

I'm glad you enjoyed it and I think your rating on Pine is just about right.

koook160 (Robert MacFarlane) said...

I'm SO glad you enjoyed The Babadook and especially Davis.

Anonymous said...

What are your thoughts/ratings on the cast of MASH (1970)?

koook160 (Robert MacFarlane) said...

When it comes to Pine, I'm veering anywhere from a 3 to a 5 right now. Such a bizarre performance. I'm still trying to make sense of it.

RatedRStar said...

Louis (or anyone else) what are your thoughts and ratings on the cast of Black Narcissus(minus Farrar)cause I just watched it and I am sure you have done it before but I can't find them.

GM said...

Louis' thoughts on Byron and Kerr

Byron - 5 (I'm not actually a huge fan of the film as a whole as I found it quite inconsistent with many of the subplots being a bit boring. The reason for that inconsistency partially is how strong the story of Sister Ruth was, and great deal of credit for that does need go to Byron. Bryon gives a stunning portrayal of the slow decay of her character. From the beginning with the subtle withdrawn madness, and builds it exquisitely as Ruth's desires become known. When the madness seems to fully come its particularly fascinating because Byron does not simply make it chilling. It's certainly that, but something even more memorable in the way there is something so alluring about the way Byron illustrates Ruth's descent. It's fantastic performance, and I have no hesitations in calling my favorite supporting actress performance all time)

Kerr - 4(The performance to remember from the film is Kathleen Byron's. Kerr still gives a solid enough, if a bit limited, performance herself. Her character is suppose to be the mostly sensible but somewhat troubled Nun. In turn Kerr brings enough of the spiritual passion in her performance but there is always a certain weakness that effectively suggests her character's doubts)

Anonymous said...

I personally would give a 4.5 to Kerr, but it's true that Byron easily steals the movie - groundbreaking work. What are your ratings and thoughts on them, RatedRStar?

RatedRStar said...

Kerr (4) I think she is limited in that I think her performance is mostly reactionary to all the events, but her key scenes, also reactionary to Byron descent are really quite well done.

Byron (5) It won't surprise me at all if this is his favourite female supporting performance, um just wow lol, I think it might be mine as well, she is so interesting yet so, unhinged, I mean her scene when Kerr is looking aimlessly and then the camera zooms into a demonic looking Byron laughing at her is just fucking awesome lol,. I just cant speak enough about the ending, when she stalks Kerr, I mean like the shot of her eyes, and then when she opens the door and she looks like this gothic demon lol is just amazing =D, I actually really liked the film, it was beautifully shot, mostly well acted, and well I found it interesting.

RatedRStar said...

Sister Ruth makes the creature from The Night Of The Demon seem human lol.

GetDonaldSutherlandAnOscar said...

What did we all think of Jean Simmons, if you ask me highly distracting makeup and overall performance by a usually very capable Actress.

RatedRStar said...

Besides the makeup, and silly thing on her nose which looks like a dead beetle lol, I thought she was serviceable and at least tried for some passion, something Sabu didn't do at all, he was actually fine in The Thief of Baghdad lol as he had a bit of adventure in him.

luke higham said...

Louis: I'm very happy, you loved the Babadook, and Davis's Performance.

Anonymous said...

@GDSAO: Yeah the make-up was distracting but she was fine to me, she brought the right deal of passion and carnality to the role. She didn't have much to do though. I liked Flora Robson's brief performance, though, her big scene with Kerr was quite good.

luke higham said...

Louis: There's a new copy of Whiplash online, with no dubbing.

http://www.putlocker.tw/watch-whiplash-online-free-2014-putlocker-hd.html

I'm also going to give you links to films I've seen recently, as well.

http://www.putlocker.tw/watch-71-online-free-putlocker-2014.html

http://www.putlocker.tw/watch-starred-up-online-free-putlocker-2013.html

http://www.putlocker.tw/watch-the-drop-2014-online-free-putlocker-hd.html

http://www.putlocker.tw/watch-joe-online-free-putlocker-2013.html

http://www.putlocker.tw/watch-enemy-online-free-putlocker-2013.html

RatedRStar said...

The one I found (not on putlocker) had korean subtitles lol. I would love to watch Whiplash again though, definately will be in my top ten of 2014.

luke higham said...

RatedRStar: Your ratings for Simmons & Teller.

RatedRStar said...

Simmons (4.5) Simmons predictably gives an intense and very unpredictable turn as a man who knows and demands the best, and uses vicious control to ensure that happens, the reason he is only a 4.5 is that he isnt given too much time aside of the vicious scenes where he pushes Teller, he does have his one oscar scene which is the bar scene, he is terrific though as he shows he isnt really a monster, just a man who does what he believes is right and suddenly realises when he has gone too far.

Teller (4) I am very close to giving him a 4.5, a second viewing might do that, I should say he is physically great as he drums and shows the pain and struggle very well, his breaking point is also very well done as he completely snaps from all the hurt and bad things going wrong, my only problem was in his scenes with Melissa Benoist, there seemed to be a lack of chemistry between the two and it seemed Teller didnt seem particularly passionate about the relationship, and I didnt quite feel in this scene he passionately showed why he wanted to be a great musician, he just kinda says it rather stoicly.

RatedRStar said...

2014 has been a better year than 2013 for films, Foxcatcher is the only oscar contender I have seen that I havent liked and that could change soon, 2013 had plenty of films that I didnt care for at all.

2014 was shit for video games, not for films though.

GetDonaldSutherlandAnOscar said...

Well I saw Big Eyes and thanks to Luke, Joe and Enemy, I might re - watch The Drop just to ensure Hardy warrants his 5.

Big Eyes
Adams-4.5
Waltz-2.5 (he has a couple of good scenes where he's genuinely unsettling, but he really hams it up unnecessarily towards the end, really I'm being a but generous considering how awful he is in the last few scenes)
Huston-2 (useless character)
Schwartzman-3 (I could've gone for much more of him)
Ritter-3 (likewise)
Stamp-3.5 (I might be being a bit generous here considering how little screen time he has but he is a real scene stealer here)
Shiegta-3 (rather entertaining work by a solid actor)

Joe
Cage-4.5 (I was very, very surprised)
Sheridan-4
Blevins-3.5
Poulter-4.5 (verging on a 5)

Enemy
Gyllenhaal-4.5 (also verging on a 5)
Gadon-4
Laurent-4

GetDonaldSutherlandAnOscar said...

I must add out of those 3 films I only loved Joe, I didn't care much for Big Eyes and with each and every Burton film I'm losing faith in the man who made Ed Scissorhands, Ed Wood, Big Fish and The Corpse Bride.

Enemy was decent but a bit frustrating, I think I was to generous with Laurent and I'll give her a 3.5, I thought Gyllenhaal did well and Gadon was impressive but the film as a whole was no Dead Ringers.

I must re-iterate, I loved Joe, and Cage and Poulter could both easily go up after a re - watch, I found Sheridan to be rather solid but never reaching the heights of Mud.

luke higham said...

GDSAO: I personally thought it was a career best for Cage and certainly the best non manic performance he's ever given. Poulter's my favourite supporting performance of the year so far, although I'm in the middle of watching Whiplash, so it may change.

Gyllenhaal has had an amazing year.

After watching the 5 films I recently watched, it has come to a point where Louis should do a lineup of 15, or at least do ten full reviews and 5 extra mini reviews.

luke higham said...

GDSAO: I gave Sheridan a 4.5, but it was a pretty low one anyway and I did think he was overshadowed by Cage & especially Poulter.

luke higham said...

Whiplash Ratings
Teller - 4.5
Simmons - 5

John Smith said...

I just saw the gamble which hsa a 5 star peformance from Wahlberg. Has anyone else seen it? Toughts on Wahlberg would be appreciated.

luke higham said...

Updated List of 5s
Lead Actor
Jake Gyllenhaal in Nightcrawler
Jake Gyllenhaal in Enemy
Tom Hardy in Locke
Brendan Gleeson in Calvary
Guy Pearce in The Rover
Philip Seymour Hoffman in A Most Wanted Man
Matthew McConaughey in Interstellar
Ralph Fiennes in The Grand Budapest Hotel
Timothy Spall in Mr Turner
Nicolas Cage in Joe

Lead Actress
Rosemund Pike in Gone Girl
Marion Cotillard in Two Days, One Night
Essie Davis in The Babadook

Supporting Actor
Michael Fassbender in Frank
Gary Poulter in Joe
J.K. Simmons in Whiplash

None Currently in Supporting Actress

I've yet to see:
Birdman
The Imitation Game
Inherent Vice
A Most Violent Year
Big Eyes
Selma
American Sniper
Into The Woods
Wild
& Paddington (which I'll be seeing tomorrow).

Anonymous said...

@Michael Patison, RatedRStar, and Koook160, being that you have seen The Imitation Game, one of the things I was curious about since I havent seen it yet, does it go in depth at all into Alan Turings homosexuality or does it simply follow his wartime effort?

JackiBoyz said...

I forgot to add my name, that message was from me.

JackiBoyz said...

Actually I am not sure who saw The Imitation Game, I am sure some of you have???? sorry if I missed someone or said someone who hasn't

Michael McCarthy said...

I've seen it too, the film is mostly about his wartime efforts but his homosexuality turns out to be a fairly large plot point (by large I'm referring to importance to the outcome more than amount of screen time devoted to it).

RatedRStar said...

Yes I would say the homosexuality is a fairly brief but major plot point, pretty much the whole of the film is just the wartime story, um to be fair there didnt need to be too much empthasis on his homosexuality, its mentioned and hinted at, his troubles, his secrecy, but its not the most important part of what Turin did. A film like this can really only go so far with Turins personal life because well there isnt that much info on his Homosexuality in books and factual documents so, the good thing is that the film acknowledges it and I think was what the filmmakers tried to do on that plot area.

Michael Patison said...

Daniel and the other Michael have the nail on the head.

koook160 (Robert MacFarlane) said...

I'm going to think about the question concerning The Imitation Game before I answer. I will say the more I think about the film the less I like it.

RatedRStar said...

What about Wild =D, what are your thoughts on that Robert lol.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Duvall - 3.5(Does a strict pompousness well to a crazed madness well while being rather humorous. Although I feel his performance is perhaps a bit cut short, but I certainly enjoyed him while he was around)

Skerritt - 3(He's a bit overshadowed in terms of the antics for most of the film, but he's a surprisingly a bit moving though when he is told that it is time to leave)

Auberjonois - 3(Does not get to do much more than be a compassionate face among much of the sardonic men, but he does this well)

Kellerman - 2.5(Really the only part I really liked about her performance was her very brief serious moment at the very end. The rest of the time I just did not find her antics very funny particularly not when she was the cheerleader)

Sutherland - 4(Sutherland is pitch perfect at bringing the right type of sardonic wit throughout his performance. He's purposefully fairly consistent in terms of style, but when there is something that suggests a bit more depth in Hawkeye Sutherland manages to deliver as well)

Gould - 3.5(Basically an echo of Sutherland's work although I preferred Sutherland. Gould though is entertaining as well though and makes for an enjoyable pair with Sutherland)