Monday, 9 July 2018

Alternate Best Actor 1938: Charles Laughton in Sidewalks of London

Charles Laughton did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Charles Staggers in Sidewalks of London.

Sidewalks of London though a little tonally wonky, such as where it briefly devolves into The Great Ziegfeld, is somewhat unique for its time in its focus on working class Londoners. Although interesting in that sense it never quite mines deeply enough in terms of broaching what should be the heart of the material.

The film is about two Londoners in specific one being a Liberty "Libby" (Vivien Leigh) a pickpocket, later performer, and Charles Staggers a London street performer. Charles Laughton's performance style, particularly for his era, was remarkable given his approach. Laughton was an earlier instance of an actor attempting a more chameleon style approach, though certainly distinctly Laughton as well. Laughton though was clearly never pigeonholed by a role playing an affable timid butler, a forceful yet emotional Javert, and a tyrannical Captain Blight all in the same year after all. This idea is again further explored here where he is playing a man of no great historical note, rather is just playing a man. A cockney busker who appears on the street with a grand, yet low class, recitation for a random crowd. Now aside his cockney accent, which is hardly Laughton's greatest affectation though it is easy enough to get use to as the film progresses, however he makes up for it with his physicality in his performance which delivers the man's background and really personal style so effectively.

Laughton's approach on the whole finds the whole of the street style just in the openness of his physical movement. Whether this is just the way he bends his head, or even rubbing his nose is naturally not of a lord. It goes further than that though to realize the style of the man who mostly eases his way through life, at least that is what appears on the surface. This is further emphasized by Laughton when as a busker he compares himself to none other than John Gielgud in his recitation ability. The actual moment of performance is a bit of brilliance by Laughton as it is a bit of atypical charisma as he makes Charles more than sufficiently entertaining in the moment however in a rather specific way. There is something so wonderfully unassuming about the performance as Laughton delivers with such gusto the monologue as a man who just finds just a joy in the performance itself. Within that unassuming quality though Laughton also very realizes the somewhat haphazard, even if frequently recited, act very much fitting to a man of his ilk, as the energy Laughton brings is not only endearing but also somewhat wild natural to a man essentially improvising, not so much the words, rather the action itself.

The film shifts towards its intent when the street smart Charles spots the pickpocket Libby prying her trade rather literally, and confronts her over the matter. It is as Libby pleads her case, mostly over the pains of existence, where Laughton grants a different side to Charles that is rather well put. Charles does not try to hide any facts yet bluntly returns the difficulty of life, and Laughton in his delivery of this is strictly without sentiment. Laughton in the moment doesn't reveal that the performance as the busker is wholly an act, but very much the surface to the much more earthly man within. Laughton is brilliant in this moment by shedding any false bravado in his blunt approach to the words, and in his face so effectively revealing a man who has had a difficult life. There is an inspiration though in this through the calm that Laughton exudes showing that while Charles is aware of life burdens he is prepared to face them. After this Libby and Charles live together ostensibly as co-dependents in their pursuits towards the theater. Laughton carefully though alludes to the truth, while allowing the miscommunication in a sense by delivering so well again that charisma though with a certain timidness within it. For example when mentioning his age there is such a cheerfulness in creating the conversation, however a definite vulnerability Laughton brings when reinforcing that Charles is 39, not forty.

There is a potential problem in the film that arises as Leigh and Laughton really don't have chemistry, evidently having a poor relationship while making the film, however in a way this doesn't wholly matter as Laughton portrays his side effectively as a difficult state of unrequited love. He portrays the interactions well with that friendly glee as Laughton presents Charles certainly trying to win her over, however without a clear revelation of affection for her beyond just friendship. This in turn naturally delivers the moment in which Charles does reveal his real love for her which Laughton presents so well as a moment of a particularly quiet and modest Charles. Laughton reveals the man just barely airing out the message being very much against his nature to do so, but so earnest in his delivery of that truth. She rejects him bluntly, and the film essentially fumbles around a bit as it follows her rise to stardom and Charles's fall into despair and jealousy. Now Laughton is again on point performance wise however the film never quite finds the right approach in terms of its focus within these scenes to illicit the power possible from at least the concept of the material. This in turn leaves Charles's switch, from a wreck to letting Libby go, rather rushed. Laughton at the very least delivers in each of these moments in first having the man almost wholly losing that joy, having just the faintest twinkle in his spirit, such as his slight performance while being arranged, that makes it all the more terrible of state. These moments are moving in parts due to Laughton, however never build to something wholly remarkable. When the moment comes of his choice Laughton again delivers in bringing back the old sprightly Charles, however it doesn't quite deliver the impact it should due to the shortcomings of the film. Even with that though this is another strong performance by Charles Laughton who amplifies the strengths of the film, and avoids the majority of its shortcomings with yet another unique characterization.

163 comments:

Robert MacFarlane said...

Am I still allowed to switch one of my requested performances? If I can, I’d like to switch my request for Christopher Lee for 1983 Supporting to Keith Gordon in Christine for 1983 Lead Actor. I recently saw the movie and haven’t been able to get the performance out of my mind.

Louis Morgan said...

Since it is from the same year, yes.

Robert MacFarlane said...

If there’s ever a surprise 5 I’m hoping for, it’s Gordon in Christine. No joke, he became one of top 5 Stephen King movie performances. Was not expecting such prescient, disturbing portrait.

Robert MacFarlane said...

*one of my

Calvin Law said...

A very Bob Hoskins-esque role I'd say (it's on YouTube by the way), and I certainly agree with Louis on most counts here. What would you rate Leigh?

Luke Higham said...

Thoughts on Ant-Man and the Wasp & the cast.

Calvin Law said...

Also saw Ant-Man and the Wasp, it was fine, but super rushed and episodic.

Calvin Law said...

Rudd - 4
Lilly - 3.5
Pena - 3
Goggins - 3
John-Kamen - 3.5
Park - 3
Pfeiffer - 3
Fishburne - 3
Douglas - 3.5

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the cinematography of Yankee Doodle Dandy and Kings Row.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: There's 2 requests I'd like to switch. Balmer to Brandauer in La Revolution Francaise and McDowell in Caligula to Time After Time. I'd still like to see him reviewed for both but he should score higher for Time After Time.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Have you seen The Beachcomber (Vessel Of Wrath). If you have, your rating and thoughts on Laughton's work there.

Grady Tripp said...

I've always wondered about this, Louis: how are you able to watch all the films you're reviewing? Do you have an unbelievable amount of DVDs and such, or do you watch many of these online?

Luke Higham said...

Grady: I remember him saying his nearest library had a lot of options. I will say its harder to watch a wider array of films and tv shows online since Alluc got closed down. The only alternatives are Veehd and OK.RU yet I haven't got the right video player and I don't want to risk getting viruses for the former and there's a possibility of having Russian dubs on the latter.

Luke Higham said...

It's harder to find old B&W films as well as very obscure ones.

Bryan L said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the voices of Dwayne Johnson, Vin Diesel and Jason Statham? And your thoughts on the latter as an 'actor' from what you've seen him in?

Luke Higham said...

I honestly cannot wait to see that Hobbs/Shaw spin-off with Elba as the villain. If it's a success, hope to see Bautista on-screen with Johnson for a sequel.

Grady Tripp said...

Thanks, Luke! I expected him to download a lot of this stuff (illegally, I suppose), just to be able to have such a complete scope. Also, what's his mother tongue? I always think it isn't English.

Bryan L said...

Luke: I'm really looking forward to it as well and I hope Elba is better used as a blockbuster villain this time around, since I thought he was wasted in Star Trek: Beyond, though he was solid in Jungle Book.

Luke Higham said...

Grady: He's from North America. Most likely the Eastern time zone as the pages and comments are posted 5 hours behind GMT (UK).

Bryan L said...

Luke: I've noticed that as well, since I'm out in the West Coast and the comments show up as three (3) hours ahead for me.

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Even if their chemistry isn't the best, I quite loved Vivien Leigh and Charles Laughton in here. I'd give them very strong 4.5s

Louis: Thoughts and ratings on the rest of the cast?

Louis Morgan said...

Listen Grady, if you care to insult me please do so directly rather than this nebbish indirect BS. I take great care in doing my best to avoid any illegal means when watching a film, by streaming subscriptions, rentals, and purchases. The only time I will download, or torrent them is when there is no other option to see the film other than buying a bootleg, since that is just pointlessly paying for an illegal copy.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: I plan on requesting Von Sydow in Flight Of The Eagle at some point though it has no DVD release in the US. I could only find the Swedish DVD which is preferable to the English dub and apparently you could get a copy from Movie Detective for 14$.

Charles H said...

I finished The Mission, almost felt like it could've been an ensemble if Wong had only a little less screentime.

RatedRStar said...

The Mission is one of those films that has so many moments where I was just like " that was so cool" even if it seemed out of place or cartoonish, like when they are playing football with a paper ball lol 1999 was such a good year for HK.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

3.5.

Luke:

Ant-Man and the Wasp, as mentioned by Calvin is very episodic, and to me was again like Guardians of the Galaxy vol 2. in that it felt like Ant-Man and the Wasp the series with the way the various plot lines were pretty thinly strung together. I actually probably preferred it to that film, perhaps due to lower expectations from the outset. There is fun to be had through the various size related gags/action, and the central players are all good. It never overcomes its overstuffed nature though to realize any single thread to go the extra distance so to speak, which is more and more needed in the superhero genre. There's entertainment to be had, it is easy to get through, but it isn't anything special.

Rudd - (Rudding it up, which once again works for the Marvel style quite well, and thankfully is a major upgrade over his other work from this year. He is mostly just doing a straight reprise, which just means a bit of charm, comedy, and just a touch of earnest drama. There is a bit more in one scene, which I thought he actually pulled off more or less where he finds the appropriate balance in terms of the tone, which easily could have fallen flat, but it works.)

Lilly - (Despite being granted lead status in some ways she has less to do in her major arc was resolved last time. She once again has nice chemistry with Rudd, and gives overall a charismatic turn needed. There is a bit more, which Lilly does well with, however much like the film that only goes so far.)

Pena - (Eh I know many love him doing this shtick, but I do not. He's pretty much doing the same thing this time around.)

Goggins - (The character should be called MCGUFFIN the criminal, since he really is only there to help create the plot in a really obvious way. The only thing that grants him any character is Goggins's atypical style, which is very much appreciated. He isn't given much obviously, but Goggins at least does something with a severely underwritten role.)

John-Kamen - (Although they seek to make the character more complicated the pacing of the film still leaves her Ghost underdeveloped despite seeds of compelling ideas being in there. John-Kamen is able to play off of those ideas enough, through her effectively portrayal of an emotional desperation that defines her "villainy" however I wished she had been allowed to go further with it.)

Park - (Eh just a little too cartoony for his own good. I do think he has good comedic timing though, but he still came off as just a bit too much even for this film.)

Pfeiffer - (She's good however her major scene isn't even given to her. Her inherent charisma though leaves an impression if ever so brief.)

Fishburne - (Again his motivation just isn't made strong enough but Fishburne does his best to offer some weight to it. He is a welcome presence even if severely underutilized.)

Douglas - (Good once again in the role but once again bringing so much conviction to the part. He once again balances the right ego with the right mentor style warmth. I feel film could've allowed him to go further here, but it doesn't quite get there. He has some good moments that are associated with Pfeiffer, however the film just doesn't give them the time.)

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Yankee Doodle Dandy is stellar work as to be expected by James Wong Howe. It is most notable as an exercise in creating dynamic framing and composition of a shot while stuck with the "on stage" design of the film. Where many films of the period often became rather flat, Yankee Doodle Dandy achieves a real vibrancy in the work without "cheating". It is always clearly on a stage however Howe uses such a rich variety to leave it from ever becoming static. This is in addition to just some fine, 40's pristine lighting in the off-stage scenes, and a bit of more overt style granted to the on stage lighting. I particularly love the way Howe lights the titular number where he again evokes the stage but isn't confined by it.

I'll get to Kings Row briefly.

Bryan:

Johnson - (A voice made in wrestler's heaven as there is just defined by this supreme diction, perfect for exposition. It is something truly wonderful as it is intimidating yet can just as easily be so very comforting. One of his great assets to be sure.)

Diesel - (Uhhh kind of the opposite of Johnson when it comes to diction in fact he make Stallone look like Day-Lewis. Although even with that, there is a certain power to if properly used, usually in a limited way where one can make sure he gets the diction correct like saying "I am Groot" for example.)

Statham - (A most perfect blend between coarseness and refinement. Statham's voice is like the finest serrated blade one can find. Rough, but just so cool.)

Statham as an actor however is kind of in direct correlation to any film, typically better the film, probably better the Statham. That isn't to say the man is wholly without chops, he can pull off drama to an extent, and comedy to a greater extent honestly. What he's really there for though is the presence which is a guarantee. He needs the material though to make that presence more than just that, however that alone is at least worth something.

ruthiehenshallfan99:

Leigh - (Consistent to my typical view of Leigh, outside of her Oscar winning roles, is that she is usually good however lacks that extra something that made her Oscar winning turns so special. I do think she does well enough within the role as is. She has enough charm, and certainly conveys the desperation. Her transformation though is somewhat simplified by her choice to make Libby more so a surface character as her reactions are always direct and allude to that moment only. This makes her transformation from pickpocket to haughty starlet to more appreciative starlet a little too simple at times, and not as potent as it could have been.)

Harrison - 2.5(He's there, he's fine in just being essentially "charming hunk", but not much is asked from him.)

Charles H said...

Louis: What are your updated top 10 acting moments for John Hurt?

Bryan L said...

Louis: "Makes Stallone look like Daniel Day-Lewis" Haha That sounds about right

Are you looking forward to the Hobbs and Shaw spinoff by the way?

And lastly, your thoughts on Richard Dreyfuss as an actor?

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Kings Row is another remarkable piece of work by Howe. It is an often gorgeous atmospheric work as his gradients in lighting so beautifully evokes a certain splendor, a certain horror, a certain grandeur yet also isolation that creates the small town central to the film. It is emotionally dynamic work in that sense, but also the brilliant composition of certain moments. Most notably the moment of Drake draped in light in his good deed of lying, contrasted against the darkness encasing Dr. Gordon suggesting his intentions for the man later. Probably that film's greatest asset.

Charles:

1. Timothy finds his wife - 10 Rillington Place
2. 23rd Psalm - The Elephant Man
3. Timothy learns about his daughter - 10 Rillington Place
4. Richard Rich's testimony - A Man For All Seasons
5. The titular moment - The Hit
6. "I love you" - 1984
7. Timothy's testimony - 10 Rillington Place
8. Chestburster - Alien (Hm to "Not Again!" from Spaceballs)
9. Merrick is shown his face - The Elephant Man
10. The Bite - The Hit

Bryan:

Yes I am, as their chemistry was by far the best part of Fast 8.

Dreyfuss is very much an actor who is an unknown quantity but also a known quantity in that he will be something a bit off beat. No one can be quite like Dreyfuss which is both a good and potentially a bad thing. He isn't always great, however his range can sometimes be rather surprising. He has that unique energy and presence that is all his own. One could almost argue as sort of a Nicolas Cage, though perhaps not quite THAT energetic, in the sense that if Dreyfuss is pushed something special could arise from that as he has that star's charisma, and greater ability than sometimes given credit for, however a director needs to know how to use it.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your top 10 Nicolas Winding Refn directing moments?

Bryan L said...

Anonymous: I think we all know what #1 is. Hint: it takes place in something that rhymes with escalator :D

Anonymous said...

Louis: your top 20 jim carrey, ewan mcgregor and bob odenkirk acting moments

houndtang said...

Weird title for a British film - I don't think anyone in London has ever referred to a pavement as a 'sidewalk'!

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

houndtag: The movie is also called St. Martin's Lane (Primarily in the UK)

Luke Higham said...

Houndtang: Louis usually goes by the American title. E.g. Horror Of Dracula instead of Dracula (1958). I'm glad he didn't go by the US title for Witchfinder General which was The Conqueror Worm.

Calvin Law said...

houndtang: Now that you mention it...never thought of that but true haha

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Are there any James Stewart performances that could get upgraded to a five.

Luke Higham said...

And could Tom Courtenay go up for The Dresser.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Tom Courtenay's missing from the 1991 Supporting overall for Let Him Have It.

Calvin Law said...

As a Spurs fan, glad to see so many of its players do well for England.

Grady Tripp said...

Hey Louis, I did not in any way mean to insult you, or do it in an 'indirect' manner. I only responded to Luke's reply to a question that I asked *you*. As you may have noticed (because I post comments now and then), I've been a follower of this site for years and years, and I really admire you for it. I do (or did) however wonder how you're able to see *all* of these films whenever you decide you want to review a certain year, and I did not imply you downloaded every film you could lay your hands on in any matter. I hope this will clear the air somewhat, because I really think this site is marvelous (although I'm still hoping to somewhere a find a site just like it dedicated to actresses).

Once again: no, I did not mean to insult you in any way, nor did I mean to do it 'indirect'. I just asked you where you got all the films, because I'd love to see a lot of the older ones myself. Keep up the good work!

Grady Tripp said...

Adding to what I just stated: yes, I did expect you had to download a lot of the older ones, because I find it pretty hard to find a lot of them on DVD. I did not mean that in any derogatory way.

Luke Higham said...

Man, this match is killing me emotionally.

Anonymous said...

Blue Velvet (1960's, directed by Alfred Hitchcock)
Jeffrey: Martin Sheen
Dorothy: Sophia Loren
Frank: Richard Widmark
Sandy: Elizabeth Hartman
Ben: Gig Young
Detective Williams: Robert Ryan
Ms. Wiliams: Claire Trevor
Ms. Beaumont: Mary Astor
Aunt Barbara: Agnes Moorehead

Luke Higham said...

Congrats to Croatia yet I'm heartbroken.

RatedRStar said...

Sigh... Now as a Barca fan I have to choose between Umtiti/Dembele or Ivan Rakitic.

Augusto BSF said...

What a match!! Even better than France vs. Belgium. Thrilling! So happy for Croatia.

Luke Higham said...

Tahmeed, Charles and RatedRStar: What's your player, goal and game of the tournament. Mine's Jordan Pickford/Pavard vs. Argentina/France vs. Argentina

Luke Higham said...

Augusto: Good luck to you. Can't see Croatia beating France.

RatedRStar said...

Luke Higham -Russia would go quite mad if Croatia win the final lol.

Player - Luka Modric
Goal - Benjamin Pavard
Game - Argentina v France

RatedRStar said...

I should just say as well, that I have openly admitted to streaming films regularly and thats because I suffer from a Social Anxiety Disorder, I cant go to the cinema really, only really when a mainstream Marvel or Disney film is out, no friends are interested in seeing Oscar films with me. If the cinema was literally round the corner from me I would happily pay for films.

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar: I only ever stream Independent/Oscar films since my Cinema has 5 screens and show only mainstream films. Also my Brother saw the Incredibles 2 via stream yet I decided not to. It's a load of BS from Disney to make me wait a month for it because of the World Cup. Kids will see it regardless.

RatedRStar said...

I am seeing The Incredibles 2 this Friday in cinema, there isnt a chance ill be able to see a film like Leave No Trace.

Charles H said...

My cinema isn't great so i only ever stream films. I'm not one for going out to theaters anyway since i always leave with a headache.

Charles H said...

As far as the world cup, i'd agree with all of Daniel's choices. i hate to see England & Belgium out, so i'm hoping for Croatia now.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your cast for a 90's Watchmen?

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

The only Oscar film that ever came to Bangladeshi theaters in recent memory was La La Land. Hence, I often do have to resort to streaming sites, and to torrenting as well if I really can't find it elsewhere.

Anonymous said...

Louis: your top 10 isabella rossellini acting moments

Bryan L said...

Anonymous: He gave that 90s cast for Watchmen here :)

http://actoroscar.blogspot.com/2017/08/alternate-best-actor-1992.html

Anonymous: That Blue Velvet cast is perfect, especially Loren as Dorothy and Widmark as Frank Booth. And I'd also get Robert Blake in there for Raymond.

Louis Morgan said...

Grady Tripp:

Sorry about that, wasn't having the best day yesterday, and rushed to conclusions. I sincerely apologize.

Anonymous:

1. The Elevator - Drive
2. Opening heist - Drive
3. "Oh My Love" - Drive
4. Heist Gone Wrong - Drive
5. "Real Human Being" - Drive
6. Call to Nino - Drive
7. Motel - Drive
8. Confrontation with Bernie - Drive
9. Audition - The Neon Demon
10. Runway - The Neon Demon

Anonymous:

Carrey:

1. Crumbling House - Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
2. "Tired of having nobody" - Dumb and Dumber (His most underrated moment)
3. First Performance - Man on the Moon
4. Strange tape - Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
5. Funeral - Man on the Moon
6. "Here I come to save the Day" - Man on the Moon
7. "So you're saying I have a chance?" - Dumb and Dumber
8. Trying again - Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
9. "Cuban Pete" - The Mask
10. Tony Clifton invades Taxi - Man on the Moon
11. Reunion - The Truman Show
12. Meeting again - Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
13. "Meeting" the husband - Dumb and Dumber
14. Something amiss - The Truman Show
15. Waiting at the bar - Dumb and Dumber
16. The Choice - The Truman Show
17. Fight with Harry - Dumb and Dumber
18. On Letterman - Man on the Moon
19. Evil Laugh - Dumb and Dumber
20. Nightmare - The Cable Guy

McGregor:

1. Phone call - The Impossible
2. Love Medley - Moulin Rouge!
3. Cheers - The Ghost Writer
4. Reconciliation - Fargo
5. Cold Turkey - Trainspotting
6. Following the bread crumbs - The Ghost Writer
7. "You were the chosen one" - Revenge of the Sith
8. Bus argument - Fargo
9. Reunion - The Impossible
10. Love - Moulin Rouge!
11. First interview - The Ghost Writer
12. Confession - Fargo
13. Not the way he goes - Big Fish
14. Stare Down - Trainspotting
15. Last escape - I Love You Phillip Morris
16. Going to the opposition - The Ghost Writer
17. Ending - Moulin Rouge!
18. "Reconciliation" - Fargo
19. Love - Big Fish
20. Confrontation - T2

Odenkirk:

1. Confronting Chuck the first time - Better Call Saul
2. Telling Chuck his fate - Better Call Saul
3. Destroying the tape - Better Call Saul
4. "We're done when we say we're done" - Breaking Bad
5. Negotiation with Tuco - Better Call Saul
6. Final Talk with Walt - Breaking Bad
7. "It's never stopping me again" - Better Call Saul
8. Entrance - Breaking Bad
9. click - Better Call Saul
10. Confrontation with Jesse - Breaking Bad
11. Cross examining Chuck - Better Call Saul
12. Advising Badger's "Uncle" - Breaking Bad
13. Tough Love - Better Call Saul
14. Kevin Costner - Breaking Bad
15. "You're Fredo" - Better Call Saul
16. Dealing with a terrified Walt - Breaking Bad
17. Meeting the informer - The Post
18. Discussing their father - Nebraska
19. Pay phone - The Post
20. Stealing the air compressor - Nebraska

Luke:

I typically go by whatever the film is listed as on IMDB, which usually the most popular title.

Anonymous:

1. Surprise arrival - Blue Velvet
2. Finding Jeffrey - Blue Velvet
3. Frank arrives - Blue Velvet
4. Frank Beating Jeffrey - Blue Velvet
5. Sleeping with Jeffrey - Blue Velvet
6. Final talk with her son - Two Lovers
7. "Blue Velvet" - Blue Velvet
8. Farewell - Immortal Beloved
9. Her memories - Immortal Beloved
10. screwing over Sailor - Wild At Heart

Matt Mustin said...

Louis: What's your reasoning for referring to the Alastair Sim Christmas Carol as "Scrooge", because every one I know just calls it A Christmas Carol, and that's the title it is on IMDB as well.

Louis Morgan said...

Matt:

Well that one's been quite ingrained for me as every copy I owned and saw for the longest time had the "SCROOGE" title card.

Matt Mustin said...

Louis: Ah, fair.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Maybe Shop Around the Corner, or Harvey.

Yes.

Anonymous said...

Louis: your top 20 michael mckean and natalie portman acting moments

Grady Tripp said...

Glad to hear we're okay then, Louis! I really love your site, and all the work you obviously put into it.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Luke:
Player - Modric
Goal- Cheryshev
Game- Spain vs Portugal (a great game because of just how evenly-matched it was. France vs Argentina was great, but the result was inevitable after Mbappe's brace)

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Also, even if France will probably win the World Cup, I'll be rooting for Croatia. They've played some amazing football to get to this point, and first time winners are always nice to see :)

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the voice of David Lean.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your top ten Alastair Sim moments, and your thoughts on him as an actor.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your top ten Paul Dano moments.

Giuseppe Fadda said...

Twin Peaks: The Return (and MacLachlan, Watts and Dern above all) was robbed.

Louis Morgan said...

Will get to those other comments soon.

Giuseppe:

Indeed, at least Lynch got in for directing (and sound editing!), but those snubs were painful, (also including Angelo Badalamenti among them).

Cumberbatch was great, Plemons was very good, but I would've sacrificed both of their nominations for MacLachlan.

In other Emmy news, McClarnon was also snubbed (sadly I don't think he qualified for guest) but hey at least Jimmi Simpson got in for guest. Although he shouldn't have gotten in over McClarnon, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau at least finally got in, though I feel it should have been instead of Dinklage instead of with him.

Luke Higham said...

About fucking time for Nikolaj though it's 5 years too late for me.

Louis Morgan said...

And of course they don't nominate "Spoils of War" out of the Thrones episodes for directing, mind boggling as always.

Giuseppe Fadda said...

I’m thrilled for Nikolaj. I think he’s been consistently excellent in the role even when the screenplay was not backing him up. He should have been nominated before, but better late than never. I wouldn’t have necessarily nominated Dinklage, but at least this time it’s quite deserved unlike his puzzling nomination for Season 5 and 6. Rigg should win Drama Guest Actress.

I’m thrilled for all the nominations given to The Handmaid’s Tale (Kelly Jenrette’s nomination is a bit of a stretch but whatever). Yvonne Strahovski should win Supporting Actress, though Bledel is magnificent as well. And Fiennes gives by far his best performance in this show.

But I’m super pissed about Twin Peaks. The whole cast could have filled the supporting categories of TV Movie/Miniseries and I wouldn’t have complained. And MacLachlan gave one of the best performances ever, period.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on this:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=T5l8cvuo7IA

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Looks well mounted on a technical scale. Thought they laid it on a little thick with the "two women in power" angle, but hey it's the trailer hopefully that will be a touch more nuanced within the actual film. Robbie looks great, surprisingly I'm not so sure about Ronan, however she's yet to truly disappoint me so hopefully it will all work out in the end.

Mitchell Murray said...

I'm pretty much in agreement, Louis. They are advertising the feminine side of the story for sure, but we have to remember it was the 16th century, when the power women held in society was almost negligible. Nevertheless, I'm hopeful of the film both on a technical and narrative sense. I think Ronan looks solid at the very least, and I also might add, this is the second time we've had an Australian play Queen Elizabeth. I only wish Robbie impresses as much as her predecessor.

Calvin Law said...

I've started watching Atlanta and Silicon Valley and though far from being complete on either I'll say I'm rooting for them nevertheless.

How Leslie Jones, Aidy Bryant, and Alex Baldwin got in over Cecily Strong and Mikey Day, I just don't know.

Fuck the Maclachlan and McClarnon snubs, but super happy for Cumberbatch, Simpson, Wright, Newton.

Calvin Law said...

Also, man I hope that the tone of that Mary Queen of Scots trailer isn't indicative of what the film's tone is. Also unsure about Ronan, Robbie looks promising and on that note so does Jack Lowden. Also seems like if both are in contention that category fraud will be a hard pill to swallow.

Mitchell Murray said...

Calvin: If it helps, the concern you and Louis express for this movie's tone are similar to my initial reaction of the "Battle of the Sexes" trailer. Thankfully that film managed to build on contemporary themes, but did so in an even handed, reasonably effective fashion. There were certain reviews I read afterwards which felt Riggs should've been a more obvious villain, which I thought was missing the point of his part entirely, and luckily the directors didn't go for that angle.

Bryan L said...

Calvin: I'm puzzled at Jones and Baldwin getting in instead of Strong and Day as well, especially since Jones really isn't much of an actress IMO (flubbed lines, lack of range, etc.) Baldwin didn't stand out too much this season, but he was fine.

Charles H said...

Super happy about the Nikolaj, Cumberbatch & Wright nominations. the Twin peak snubs are criminal especially since they nominated Lynch for directing and no one from the cast.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

McKean:

1. This Chicanery - Better Call Saul
2. Warning Kim - Better Call Saul
3. "I'm gonna go home and sleep with my wife" - Clue
4. Revealing himself to Saul - Better Call Saul
5. Phony act - Better Call Saul
6. Copy Shop - Better Call Saul
7. Revealing himself - Clue
8. Calling the doctor himself - Better Call Saul
9. Saul giving him his fate - Better Call Saul
10. "We Shan't Work together again" - Spinal Tap
11. First Hospital Visit - Better Call Saul
12. Choosing to sing the song anyway - A Mighty Wind
13. "I had to stop her from screaming" - Clue
14. Reviews - Spinal Tap
15. Lawyer jokes - Better Call Saul
16. Confronting Slippin Jimmy - Better Call Saul
17. Giving Up - Better Call Saul
18. Discussing their past - A Mighty Wind
19. Getting Jimmy out of jail - Better Call Saul
20. "Mrs. Peacock was a man?" - Clue

Portman:

1. Describing the Assassination - Jackie
2. After the family massacre - The Professional
3. Confessing to the reporter - Jackie
4. Killing all the men - Cold Mountain
5. Meeting Stansfield in the bathroom - The Professional
6. Confessing to the priest - Jackie
7. Leaving - The Professional
8. First speaking to the reporter - Jackie
9. Checking into the motel - The Professional
10. Confronting Bobby - Jackie
11. Helping Inman - Cold Mountain
12. Making demands - Jackie
13. Dress up - The Professional
14. Television program - Jackie
15. Money being saved - The Professional
16. Wearing the dress - Jackie
17. Training - Leon
18. No Camelot - Jackie
19. Professing love - Leon
20. Dating Derek Zoolander? - Zoolander

Mitchell:

I feel I should clarify I do believe thematically taking that approach with Mary Queen of Scots is logical, however from trailer it makes it seem like it is going to have the subtly of a sledgehammer in that respect given how on the nose some of the lines were.

Tahmeed:

Luke:

Covered that here:

http://actoroscar.blogspot.com/2017/05/alternate-best-actor-1968-burt_29.html

Move taking the stage from Okja to #8.

Anonymous:

The only voice he could possibly have, aka essentially O'Toole's voice from The Stunt Man. An elegant yet someone with a distinct raw power about it.

Tahmeed:

Sim:

1. Accepting the invitation - Scrooge
2. His own grave - Scrooge
3. "Forgive me fan" - Scrooge
4. Waking up - Scrooge
5. "Are there no prisons" - Scrooge
6. Stealing the company - Scrooge
7. "Don't deserve to be so happy" - Scrooge
8. Ghost of yet to come - Scrooge
9. Watching the Christmas dinner - Scrooge
10. A Mysterious arrival - An Inspector Calls

An actor who I quite need to track more down from him, though he'll always stand out in my mind as having made the definite version of a well worn role. Sim though I've found in every appearance I've seen him in as a unique performer. He has a certain style, similair to Guinness I'd say, in that there is almost this comic element to even his most dramatic turns. There's a certain cheekiness almost that allows him to broach his roles in a very idiosyncratic yet still wholly dramatic, and dignified method. Honestly I still need to see more of him, but what I've seen so far is that of a rather remarkable actor.

Matt Mustin said...

Saw Ant-Man and the Wasp. I actually really enjoyed it. It's nothing special, but it's a whole lot of fun. Didn't care for the first one too much, but I had a blast with this.

Rudd-3.5
Lilly-3.5
Douglas-4
Pena-3
John-Kamen-3
Fishburne-3
Pfeiffer-3
Park-1.5(What the hell was this? So annoying.)

Matt Mustin said...

Oh, I forgot Walton Goggins. Testament to his character, eh? Anyway, he's a 3 because he does actually bring a lot of character the role.

Bryan L said...

Matt: Same here, but I'd go 2.5 for Park, since he did seem a bit grating but was fine otherwise.

Matt Mustin said...

Bryan L: I mean, Park's purpose was basically to be funny, I didn't find him funny at all, so to me that performance is a failure.

Calvin Law said...

I'll probably be in the minority but I found Park very funny but underused.

Mitchell Murray said...

Just thought I'd let you guys know, I'm reviewing 2013 best actor on my blog which will complete the century thus far. If anyone wants me to review an older year for best actor, just leave your choice in your prediction for the 2013, and of course win the prediction.

Calvin Law said...

Been thinking about the Emmy nominations and don't you guys agree that it's kind of ridiculous sometimes in their choice of categories. Rarely category fraud (though a bit of that happened this year, no way was Newton supporting this season of Westworld), but more it just seems weird to group certain performances together.

Like, how could you possibly group Jesse Plemons' work in 1 episode of Black Mirror, to Maclachlan's work in Twin Peaks, not necessarily in terms of quality, but just in terms of the fact that Plemons' work is essentially that of a film performance, whereas Maclachlan's was a piece of work that was developed throughout a whole 18-episode arc, and if you take one episode out of context, as I assume a lot of voters do, it just doesn't really have the same impact. And then when we get to someone like McClarnon whose very role is by definition a guest star, featured prominently only in one, maybe two episodes, but then discounting him from the category just because he appeared sparingly in a few other ones? And as much as Alec Baldwin continually getting in is a good way to piss Trump off and I greatly admire Leslie Jones and Aidy Bryant's contributions to sketch comedy, the more I think about it the more weird it feels to put them in a category with actors who do an ENTIRELY different thing in terms of having one character to develop over the course of a comedy series.

Also, as I'm going through Silicon Valley, I know I'm not even close to being at Season 5 yet but so long as there's not a huge dip in the quality of performances, there doesn't seem to be any reason that none of the supporting cast have received any Emmy nominations yet. And I am really enjoying the show, I should note.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the first scene with Frank Booth in Blue Velvet.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: What did you think of I, Claudius and Jacobi & Hurt.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Yeah, it is ridiculous that any one of Zach Woods, Matt Ross, Kumail Nanjiani or Martin Starr haven't received any Emmy nominations yet for Silicon Valley. It's hard to nominate the series without recognising how integral their work is to the show.

Calvin Law said...

Luke: Hurt is supremely entertaining and surprisingly chilling, with just the right slice of ham, and Jacobi is great but I need a rewatch.

Tahmeed: Woods is quite something, Jared is such a unique character.

Luke Higham said...

Saw Incredibles 2. Brilliant Animation, Action and Great Voice Acting. Okayish Plot and an extremely weak villain.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: In no particular order, What would be your top ten greatest performances of the 30s that we never got to witness. E.g. Charles Laughton in I, Claudius.

Unless anyone else would like to partake, I'm gonna ask the same question for the 40s onwards.

RatedRStar said...

Luke: I saw it 2, in the cinema with a nice Tango Blast =D, it was really good but yes the villain was weak, the moment I heard the word hacking I was like oh no poor choice.

Charles H said...

Louis: Is Mifune a 5 for The Bad Sleep Well

Anonymous said...

Louis: Who's your #1 for Lead/Supporting Actor and Supporting Actress this year so far?

Calvin Law said...

Louis: thoughts and rating for Adam Devine in Pitch Perfect?

Augusto BSF said...

After all, England did not really have an easier time against Belgium defense than Brazil, as I suspected. But its campaign was better than expected, since the project was/is to do a trully great job in 2022 and not necessarily at this world cup.

Luke: I was/am happy for Croatia getting at the finals, I know the odds are against them for tomorrow. I would love to see a first timer winning, specially one that sweated a lot, but I'm not rooting for anyone in particular.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Have you seen the 1971 animated version of A Christmas Carol, where Alastair Sim and Michael Hordern reprised their roles? If so, could I have your thoughts on it?

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your top 10 acting moments for Charlie Chaplin

Matt Mustin said...

Saw First Reformed. I'm gonna have to think about this one. What I'll say for now is it hit me *much* harder in the end than I was expecting it to, the cinematography is fantastic, and Ethan Hawke, that terrific, for some reason consistently underrated actor, is indeed extraordinary. The praise his performance is getting is justified.

Hawke-5
Seyfried-4.5
Kyles-4
Hill-3
Ettinger-4

Louis Morgan said...

Saw Leave No Trace, one of the best of the year so far.

McKenzie - 5
Dickey - 4
Pittman - 3.5

Will get to the comments soon.

Matt Mustin said...

Louis: I saw the trailer for that in front of First Reformed. Foster looked extraordinary.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Downright terrifying scene, which is the case any time Lynch chooses to inspire a real fear. I love bare bones Lynch actually directs just keeping that voyeur pov perhaps making it all the more deeply disturbing with just how raw everything Frank does is, amplified wholly by Hopper's brilliantly unhinged performance. One of the all time great, and wholly unforgettable villain entrances as it instantly establishes him as someone to be very very afraid of through such a darkly twisted method.

Luke:

I'd grant you the list, unfortunately can't seem to find my resource for that a site that listed all the roles an actor turned down/was considered for.

Matt:

Fingers crossed for that nomination finally, although sadly I have my doubts it will happen.

Anonymous:

Ignoring saves Foster, Jordan, Brolin, Wolff

Actor: Ryan Reynolds - Deadpool 2
Actress: Thomasin McKenzie - Leave No Trace
Supporting Actor: Liev Schreiber - Isle of Dogs
Supporting Actress: Dale Dickey - Leave No Trace

Calvin:

As mentioned before, he's mildly amusing.

Charles:

No, but I've only seen the film once.

Tahmeed:

I have. Beautifully animated, and perhaps the darkest interpretation of the material I have seen, perhaps too dark. It's atmosphere is incredible however it doesn't quite inspire the hope needed for the material, though it still stands as a stunning looking piece amplified by strong vocal work by Sim, even if his age does come through in his voice. If one is looking for one that focuses on the "ghost story" aspect, it is a fascinating little piece of work even if it doesn't grasp the whole story in my mind.

Anonymous:

1. Man is not a machine - The Great Dictator
2. Pick yourself up - Modern Times
3. Seeing the tramp - City Lights
4. Freedom is stupid speech - The Great Dictator
5. Final bow - Limelight
6. Song - Modern Times
7. Defending Murder - Monsieur Verdoux
8. Playing with the world - The Great Dictator
9. Potatoes - The Gold Rush
10. A Sad Clown - Limelight

Calvin Law said...

Foster and McKenzie are extraordinary. Glad you loved it Louis, thoughts and rating on the cast and film itself, and do you agree that Foster's co-lead?

Calvin Law said...

Although he's probably don't to be campaigned in Supporting.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Unquestionably lead in my mind, very much Brie Larson to Jacob Tremblay in Room in terms of the dynamic of the roles, though I'd say he has a bit more focus actually than Larson did.

I'll get to the detailed thoughts a bit later.

Emi Grant said...

Louis: Are you interested in Bo Burnham's Eighth Grade? Do you have any expectations on it?

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Are you able to give thoughts on Toni Collette in Hereditary.

Luke Higham said...

Not including other contenders later this year and as much as I love Ben Foster, I'd rather see Hawke get the win.

Calvin Law said...

I'll wait until I've seen Hawke to give my opinion on that.

As for Eighth Grade, I'll admit I'm super interested to see whay something which on the surface seems like pretty typical Sundance fare is getting so much acclaim.

Anonymous said...

Heat (1940's version, directed by Raoul Walsh)

Lieutenant Vincent Hanna: James Cagney
Neil McCauley: Humphrey Bogart
Chris Shiherlis: Richard Baseheart
Nate: Edward G. Robinson
Michael Cheritto: Richard Widmark
Justine Hanna: Claire Trevor
Eady: Dorothy Malone
Charlene Shiherlis: Ida Lupino
Detective Sergant Drucker: Arthur Kennedy
Detective Sammy Casals: Barton MacLane
Detective Mike Bosko: Alan Ladd
Roger Van Zant: Elisha Cook Jr.
Alan Marciano: Victor Mature
Trejo: Anthony Quinn
Waingro: John Carradine

Braveheart (1950's version, directed by David Lean)

William Wallace: Dirk Bogarde
Princess Isabella of France: Simone Signoret
Robert the Bruce: Richard Attenborough
King Edward "Longshanks": Claude Rains
Murron MacClannough-Wallace: Jean Simmons
Hamish: Dan O'Herilhy
Prince Edward: Roddy McDowall
Campbell: George Sanders
Stephen of Ireland: Patrick McGoohan
Bruce's father: Stanley Holloway
MacClannough: John Justin
Argyle Wallace: Ralph Richardson
Malcolm Wallace: Trevor Howard
Magistrate: Cedric Hardwicke

The Black Swan (1990's version, directed by David Lynch)

Nina Sayers: Laura Dern
Lily: Diane Lane
Thomas Leroy: Jeremy Irons
Erica Sayers: Anne Bancroft
Elizabeth MacIntyre: Isabella Rossellini
David Moreau: Mathieu Amalric

Louis: Your thoughts on William Goldman and Robert Bolt as screenwriters.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

The film seeks to do something very difficult, and in my mind succeeds in its bluntly and uncompromising low key approach. This is to the point that it makes Debra Granik's previous feature film Winter's Bone look like Deliverance by comparison in terms of tone. The film purposefully essentially avoids a single "Oscar scene" so to speak. Now this approach could easily lead to Gus Van Sant "walking forever" nonsense in its exploration of both the mundane, but also the hidden extremes within that. I found the film's approach turned not only successful but wholly powerfully, amplified at every point by the two central performances which I'll get to more of in a moment, in exploring by observation. There is never a "confession" or a true outburst, yet the emotional connect is poignantly realized and explored within the world so vividly created that manages to create both a harshness and warmth with such a elegant naturalism within it.

McKenzie - (Now the performances, even with such a low key tone, are especially essential to the film as so much relies on them because the film so often chooses to be wordless in its approach. This leaves the actors to need to convey so much, and McKenzie, who does indeed have the greater focus, never at a loss despite this potential handicap. Her performance is a brilliant piece of sheer naturalism at every point. This is in terms of creating the state of her character itself which she skirts any quirks, for such fascinating realization of the girl who is acclimated as a healthy person, though with this inherent shyness, and level of distance that evokes what her life has been to this point. She keeps this very restrained quality, yet never is this hollow always conveying such an emotional truth within it. What is most important is her chemistry/interactions with Foster, which evoke such a rich history, yet also so naturally realizes the central conflict while barely ever having to verbalize it past a few words. Her arc is so subdued yet McKenzie's work realizes every point of the transition so beautifully with such a strict and truly remarkable naturalism.)

Dickey - (Her performance, as a character who is the extreme opposite of her Winter's Bone role, I think is particularly essential, despite pretty small, in terms of easing one potential sort of plot point within the film. She essentially eases away the concerns of that through her performance which delivers such an effortlessly convincing warmth within every interaction, and does so well to make the good nature of the character wholly believable. She doesn't simplify though is the key, and does so well in conveying the moments of a different concern, with sort of this portrayal of an honest compromise that she portrays as defined by such a genuine care.)

Emi:

I'll admit I don't know much about it other than its critical acclaim, which means I'm naturally interested in it.

Calvin Law said...

Obviously a weird thought, but how great would Foster and McKenzie be in a 2010s Paper Moon? And maybe Kaitlin Olson as Trixie Delight.

Calvin Law said...

And speaking of Foster, Galveston teaser trailer is out.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: I'd like Hawke to get the win because Foster already has 3. Though we still have Schoenaerts, Diehl, Redford and Gosling left to see.

Luke Higham said...

Well Done France. :)

RatedRStar said...

I do feel sorry for Croatia I actually thought they were the better team, espeically poor Modric he looked so gaunt and haunted at the end, its probably the end for Croatia now though with all of their best players being over 30.

Bryan L said...

Anonymous: Some terrific casts right there, especially for Black Swan. That Heat cast might make more sense for the 50s I think, since De Niro and Pacino were both in their 50s when they starred in Heat, and Bogart and Cagney would've been in their 40s in that decade.

Charles H said...

Rains as Longshanks? yes, please.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

William Goldman is probably one of the most prolific screenwriters, who isn't also a director, with the greatest consistency. Of course as with any screenwriter he is at the mercy of director's to an extent. His work at its best, and even when part of lesser films, is essentially this focused cinema in a way. His work rarely has superfluous elements, every piece has a purpose within the film, which naturally builds towards an exact purpose. His work has consistency in that sense, and it is rarely showy, in a way in which the dialogue would be referred to as "William Goldman dialogue" yet his dialogue is written brilliantly. It is often to the point, and direct, yet still rich with character. His work extends as notable both as original and adapted material. Whether that be in creating one of the best Stephen King adaptations in "Misery" or adapting his own work with Princess Bride. That is a particularly notable achievement, as it is often hard for a novelist to kill his or her darlings so to speak, yet Goldman brilliantly streamlined his work towards cinema there. His work is so often almost about pacing to a point, with every element building towards either the climax, or the purpose. This can be found in his greatest work "All the President's Men", but even in a film like "Maverick". This attention to purpose though doesn't lead to sacrifice of character, rather the characters purpose is both to enrich the experience but also enrich the plot. Take for example "The Princess Bride" where even just the henchman of the sub-villain, end up being such essential figures, or how every single witness within "All the President's Men" is a person beyond their purpose within the investigation. Not all his works are masterpieces, though a few are, however most are good, and rare is the disaster.

Robert Bolt as a write in general, but specifically a screenwriter seemed to seek to personalize, and humanize history. Nearly all of his screenplays have something to do with history, yet his focus is not to create distance, rather to convey intimacy whether that be broaching a person, or a subject. This approach naturally balances thematic weight of the stories, helps to realize any more overarching themes in such naturalistic approach. A perfect match for Lean in some sense, as his brilliant contribution to Lawrence, which seemed to be the more influential voice in the final work than Michael Wilson, didn't realize this far off historical figure rather a man we know and see aspire to then becoming a "great man" while also realizing the human weakness within the man once he starts to believe too much in his own image. His dialogue is again someone who uses words so powerfully, and as weapons within Lawrence, and "A Man For All Seasons". It is never over stylized, nor strictly naturalistic, rather finds a balance between period, and dramatic intention. "A Man For All Seasons" is also another notable feat of such successful adaptation towards the screen, knowing what to change from his own work to make it conducive to the new form. His overarching success though is that individual exploration of history, even within his lesser works, he always creates the people who define the period, just as he so richly devises that history that influences people as well.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Sorry to Bother You is fucking nuts and I loved every second of it. Lakeith is a goddamn star.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

That would actually kind of work.

Can't take much from that teaser, truly just a series of images, however I'm still quite anticipating it. Although the reviews have been divisive (though possibly in a "Neon Demon" way which isn't problematic in my mind anyways), and even then some of the negative leaning ones still praised Foster, and Fanning.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your top 10 Jon Bernthal acting moments?

Charles H said...

Louis: Also, your top 10 Clark Gable acting moments?

Matt Mustin said...

Louis: What's your ratings and thoughts on Jim Carrey and Matthew Broderick in The Cable Guy?

Mitchell Murray said...

Anyone have thoughts on this trailer?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jSOMH_punxY

Something tells me we're not seeing the whole picture, but nevertheless I think the film looks quite good, as does Felicity Jones.

Anonymous said...

Louis: your top 15 michael rooker acting moments

Charles H said...

Mitchell: The film doesn't really hold my interest by the looks of it. Jones looks good, but this will be considered one of the most "Oscar-baity" films for the season.

Bryan L said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the voices of Christopher Nolan, Quentin Tarantino, and Francis Ford Coppola? I saw Hearts of Darkness last night and the latter reminded me of Elliot Gould in a way.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your top ten scifi films

Anonymous said...

Louis: your top 20 jeremy renner acting moments

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Is Eddie Marsan a 4 or 4.5 for Filth.

Anonymous said...

Tahmeed: He's a 4.5

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the South Park episodes 'Die Hippie Die' and 'Best Friends Forever'.

Giuseppe Fadda said...

Louis what are your ratings and thoughts on Christina Ricci in Monster and Melissa Leo in 21 Grams?

By the way what do you all think of Boy Erased's trailer? I think it looks promising, especially the ensemble.

Anonymous said...

Bryan L: Alright, I'll do a 50's Heat.

Heat (1950's version, directed by John Huston)
Lieutenant Vincent Hanna: James Cagney
Neil McCauley: Humphrey Bogart
Chris Shiherlis: James Whitmore
Nate: Edward G. Robinson
Michael Cheritto: Sterling Hayden
Justine Hanna: Claire Trevor
Eady: Marilyn Monroe
Charlene Shiherlis: Ava Gardner
Lauren Gustafson: Elizabeth Montgomery
Detective Sergant Drucker: Ossie Davis
Detective Sammy Casals: John McIntire
Detective Mike Bosko: Brad Dexter
Roger Van Zant: Louis Calhern
Alan Marciano: Anthony Caruso
Trejo: Anthony Quinn
Kelso: John Carradine

Didn't change Nate because I think it's a shame that Bogart, Cagney and Robinson never shared the screen together.

A dream cast that Louis made that I really love is this one:

Lincoln (1960's version, directed by William Wyler)

Abraham Lincoln: Laurence Olivier (Purposefully avoided those who already played him)
Mary Todd Lincoln: Bette Davis
William Slade: Robert Earl Jones
Robert Todd Lincoln: Robert Duvall
Ulysses Grant: Lee J. Cobb
Corporal Ira Clark: James Earl Jones
Edwin Stanton: Ed Begley
William Seward: Ralph Richardson
Fernanado Wood: Christopher Plummer
George H. Pendleton: Edward G. Robinson
James Ashley: Brad Dexter
Clay Hawkins: Harry Carey Jr.
Francis Preston Blair: Raymond Massey
William Bilbo: Peter Ustinov
Alexander Stephens: Burgess Meredith
Thaddeus Stevens: John Carradine

This cast is so perfect that I'm sad that it doesn't exist.

Anonymous: I believe he's done his top 10 Bernthal moments before, but I can't find them.
Charles H:
1. "I don't give a Damn" - Gone With the Wind
2. How to Hitchhike - It Happened One Night
3. Being awoken - Gone With The Wind
4. Walls of Jericho - It Happened One Night
5. One Last Stand - Gone with the Wind
6. Pretend Gangster - It Happened One Night
7. That's Rhett Butler - Gone With the Wind
8. Getting the "reward" - It Happened One Night
9. Meeting with his "sister" - Gone With the Wind
10. Being Fired - It Happened One Night

Mitchell Murray said...

Giuseppe: Boy Erased obviously has a powerful story right out the gate, but add Edgerton who's already proven to be a capable director, as well as his cast, well it looks pretty promising. If Crowe and Hedges deliver it might rival my favourite performances of theirs.

Luke Higham said...

I seriously would love to see Crowe back in contention again.

Bryan L said...

Anonymous: Perfect, especially Monroe as Eady and Gardner as Charlene.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Having re-watched I, Claudius, these are my top 5 performers.

1. Jacobi (His best performance)
2. Hurt (Easily the greatest portrayal of Caligula and I would rank his work #3 behind 10 Rillington Place and The Elephant Man)
3. Blessed (His death scene is one of the all-time greats on TV)
4. Phillips
5. Baker/Stewart

Anonymous said...

Luke: Yeah, me too. Crowe should definitely get nominated once more.

Calvin Law said...

Boy Eraseed looks promising from the trailer. I really hope Hedges nails this.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Seen any other 2018 releases lately.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Louis: What's your rating for Dougray Scott in Mission: Impossible 2? Because I just saw it for the first time yesterday and I kept asking myself "This smarmy James McAvoy-looking motherfucker was almost Wolverine?"

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Bernthal:

1. Graveyard - Daredevil
2. Trial - Daredevil
3. vs Billy - The Punisher
4. Diner - Daredevil
5. rooftop - Daredevil
6. Selling a pen - The Wolf of Wall Street
7. Torture - Daredevil
8. Teaching a Knife Lesson - The Punisher
9. Arrest - The Wolf of Wall Street
10. His Scene - Wind River

Matt:

Carrey - 3(The film itself struggles because there seems some strange tug of war between whoever behind the scenes between the film being a pitch black comedy, or a Jim Carrey vehicle more tuned to his typical work. I don't think it was Carrey because of his willingness to go back to such material, and test his range. Now though this struggle though leaves his own work in a strange place though as he is both giving sort of the more typical Carrey shitck, while alluding to something far darker. He isn't wholly unsuccessful with either there are moments where he is quite effective in tapping into a certain darkness, and even quite hilarious. There is a lack of consistency though due to the wavering tone, which leaves his performance in a sort of strange purgatory.)

Broderick - 2(Well I've never been overly fond of Broderick as the "likable" leading man, and here he quite struggles throughout. In also the strange tone of the film however he is not effective as a genuinely scared guy, nor as a comedic foil. He comes off as just a little bland much of the time, and is generally underwhelming.)

Mitchell:

Looks a little too "parody Oscar Bait" for its own good, given it is from the director of "Pay It Forward" I'm going to imagine that is the tone of the actual film as well.

Anonymous:

Rooker:

1. Henry's Past - Henry Portrait of a Serial Killer
2. Killing Otis - Henry Portrait of a Serial Killer
3. "love" - Henry Portrait of a Serial Killer
4. Family Massacre - Henry Portrait of a Serial Killer
5. Bill's theories - JFK
6. Not your Daddy - Guardians of the Galaxy vol. 2
7. How to kill - Henry Portrait of a Serial Killer
8. Opening - Cliffhanger
9. "You're me" - Guardians of the Galaxy vol. 2
10. Threatening Quill - Guardians of the Galaxy
11. Random Encounter - Henry Portrait of a Serial Killer
12. Breaking away - JFK
13. "Them or us" - Henry Portrait of a Serial Killer
14. "Warning" Garrison - JFK
15. Opening - Tombstone

Louis Morgan said...

Bryan:

Nolan - (Proper English, though the extreme difference between his and his brother accent seems so strange. Anyone proper calm refinement though for such a the watchmaker of directors.)

Tarantino - (One of the most annoying voices to ever grace mankind, exacerbated by the intensity of its use by him. A truly nerdy voice in the worst possible way.)

Coppola - (Indeed sounds just like Elliott Gould.)

Anonymous:

1. Back to the Future
2. Alien
3. Mad Max: Fury Road
4. Blade Runner 2049
5. The Thing
6. Aliens
7. The Fly
8. Blade Runner
9. Videodrome
10. Brazil

Anonymous:

Renner:

1. Way to make peace - Wind River
2. To tell the truth - Kill the Messenger
3. At Home - The Hurt Locker
4. Disposing of the killer - Wind River
5. Like I'm crazy - Kill the Messenger
6. Can't do anything - The Hurt Locker
7. Story of his daughter - Wind River
8. First Accusation - Kill the Messenger
9. Ending - Kill the Messenger
10. Car disposal - The Hurt Locker
11. With a whimper - Wind River
12. How to die - The Town
13. Magic tricks - The Immigrant
14. Home Invasion - Kill the Messenger
15. Personal investigation - The Hurt Locker
16. "Old habits?" - Kill the Messenger
17. I left - American Hustle
18. Trying to trick Bruno - The Immigrant
19. Final shootout - The Town
20. None of this makes sense - Age of Ultron

Tahmeed:

Die Hippie Die - (Just an altogether hilarious straight forward parody episode. Making Cartman the true hero is already great, and then they just have a lot of fun with doing a disaster movie, following the tropes to a t, but with hippies as the monster/earth shattering event.)

Best Friends Forever - (A great example of how good they could be at one time in terms of balancing a current event while also successfully telling the "boy's stories" this time successfully doing two of them. The one being the ludicrousness of the Kenny as the hero of heaven plot, against the boys just fighting over PSP rights, which both work anyways, then add on the euthanasia which they brilliantly do avoid taking a stance without resorting to nihilism by making a salient alternative point. More than anything it is a very funny episode, I don't hold it in "as" high of esteem as others, but I quite like it.)

Giuseppe:

Ricci - (This seems a performance almost it sounds like I'm criticizing more than I should as she is in no way terrible, she's just not on the same level as Theron, and that shows. Of course being on the same level as Theron would be also being one of the greatest performances given, so that's hardly fair, however it does make her work not being there more noticeable. She's not bad though in that she does create a believable enough sort of broken chemistry in a way in that she reveals the own right sort of desperation that makes them sympathetic, yet a distance in the nature of the desperation. Her performance works, however doesn't quite reach those emotional moments, which end up being more of left to Theron, which of course sells.)

Leo - (One that could actually make my top ten for those years if I re-watched the film, as I do recall her being quite good and going far beyond the role of just the "wife" in her few scenes. In that Leo conveys far beyond that alluding to her character's own struggles, and history far beyond the limits of the character shown in the film.)

Boy Erased looks good, Hedges I hope is great, though I'm not sure from the trailer (though I'm "not" not sure either) Edgerton, Crowe and Kidman all look very promising though.

Robert:

I've only ever sorta scene the second one (parts of it on cable) however I have seen enough not to ever go back, but also of his performance to say that potential casting along with Stuart Townsend as Aragorn, are two particularly extreme cases of near disaster castings that thankfully we never had to experience.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on The Charge of the Light Brigade as a missed opportunity. I find it interesting that Michael Powell was attached to direct the film at one point, but left because the screenwriter that he favored to write the script passed away. Also thoughts on his never made adaptation of Shakespeare's The Tempest.

Much like with the American Revolutionary War, I think this material would be perfect for Peter Weir to make a comeback. Speaking of comebacks, would you like Cronenberg to make a comeback as well?

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Orson Welles' Othello had an Italian release in 1951.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: And is the review coming tonight.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: your favourite 'one episode' wonder in television? For me it's Kieran Culkin in Fargo, followed by Robert Forster on Breaking Bad.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Calvin: Ed Sheeran in Game of Thrones..... just kidding xD.
On a serious note, Forster in Breaking Bad, quite easily.

Alex Marqués said...

Maybe Ian McShane in Game of Thrones.

Luke Higham said...

Alex: I agree on McShane being easily the most memorable from Game Of Thrones.

Luke Higham said...

Tahmeed: The question was One Episode Wonder so he does count. :)

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Ah, misread that. I'd put McShane just behind Forster then, with Toby Jones's work on Sherlock being up there as well.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Kind of a grey area, as it was the Italian DUB only, but I'll have to think about it.

Anonymous:

The material is obviously quite potent however the film lacked the appropriate life needed, and failed to either construe itself as a more direct war tragedy, or a satire. I think both approaches could have potentially worked, however it tries to ride the middle, and falls right off (pun sort of intended). A great film I'd say is potential from the material, Peter Weir would be a great choice.

A terrible shame, any project unrealized by someone like Powell is already unfortunate, who at the very worst was at least an "interesting" filmmaker, and a visionary at his best. Seeing his take on any Shakespeare could have been notable, particularly with James Mason in the lead, and cinematography by Jack Cardiff as was intended.

Of course I'd love to see Cronenberg comeback, I don't think he'd even need that major of a success so to speak, as he's had misses before his most recent failures, and I don't think he has to do anything specific other than get a decent screenplay that plays to his strengths, though I would love to see him return to "straight horror" again.

Calvin:

I'd probably say Kiernan Culkin as well.

Honorable mentions (disregarding anthology series): Robert Forster (Breaking Bad), William Windom (Star Trek), Albert Brooks (The Simpsons, specifically Scorpio), Philip Baker Hall (Seinfeld)