Thursday, 19 April 2018

Alternate Best Actor 1957

And the Nominees Were Not:

Ben Gazzara in The Strange One

Rod Steiger in Across the Bridge

Victor Sjöström in Wild Strawberries

Robert Mitchum in Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison 

James Cagney in Man of a Thousand Faces

71 comments:

Luke Higham said...

1. Mitchum
2. Steiger
3. Sjöström
4. Gazzara
5. Cagney

Mitchell Murray said...

Not familiar with this line up admittedly. Just on a different note, Louis, I have to ask what is it about Cate Blanchett's performance in Benjamin Button that you seem so taken with. I mean, I've seen the movie and while she's not terrible she certainly didn't stick with me all that much.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Martina Gedeck in The Baader Meinhof Complex, Marisa Tomei in The Wrestler and Strong And Collison in The Happening.

You didn't respond to Matt's comment on the previous post and I've double checked.

Robert MacFarlane said...

1. Mitchum
2. Gazarra
3. Cagney
4. Steiger
5. Sjöström

Calvin Law said...

1. Cagney
2. Mitchum
3. Steiger
4. Sjöström
5. Gazzara

Out of this lineup I've seen Mitchum and Cagney (both phenomenal, especially Mitchum's chemistry with Deborah Kerr and Cagney's physical acting), and Sjöström who's pretty good despite the film being more of a director's showcase.

Calvin Law said...

I'm actually really excited for this lineup, seems like it's been a while since the last 'vintage' lineups.

Luke Higham said...

1. Mitchum
2. Cagney
3. Steiger
4. Sjöström
5. Gazzara

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: I'm liking this lineup a great deal too. I'm gonna post a list tomorrow but for Lead Actress, Nights Of Cabiria, The Cranes Are Flying and Tokyo Twilight.

Anonymous said...

1. Mitchum
2. Cagney
3. Gazzara
4. Steiger
5. Sjostrom

Anonymous said...

Louis: Films to watch.
The Enemy Below
The Tin Star
The Spirit of St. Louis
Desk Set
He Who Must Die
Pal Joey
Gunfight at the OK Corral
Raintree County
The Sun Also Rises
White Nights
The Wings of Eagles
The One That Got Away
Operation Mad Ball
Night of the Demon
The Naked Truth
Hell Driver
The Incredible Shrinking Man
Brothers in Arms
Men in War
An Affair to Remember
Barnacle Bill
The Curse of Frankenstein
Also, your 40s Wolf of Wall Street cast (with March in Chandler's role) and director.

Anonymous said...

Also watch Designing Woman, Band of Angels and Edge of the City.

Luke Higham said...

Louis:
Nights Of Cabiria
The Cranes Are Flying
Tokyo Twilight
Funny Face (Audrey Hepburn)
Edge Of The City
Le Notti Bianche (Marcello Mastroianni)
A King In New York (Charlie Chaplin)
Kanal (Wajda)
Pyassa
Il Grido (Antonioni)
The Tarnished Angels
Hell Drivers
Yelliw Crow
Elegy Of The North
Bitter Victory
Wonan In A Dressing Gown
Don Quixote (Cherkasov)
Old Yeller
The Pride And The Passion
The Tall T
Run Of The Arrow (Rod Steiger)
Forty Guns
Designing Woman
Quatermass II
Time Limit
I Vampiri
The Blue Sky Maiden
Time Without Pity (Michael Redgrave)
Saint Joan
The James Dean Story
Fear Strikes Out (Perkins/Malden)
Battle Hymn
Man On The Tracks

GM said...

1. Sjöström
2. Steiger
3. Mitchum
4. Cagney
5. Gazzara

Charles H said...

1. Mitchum
2. Steiger
3. Sjöström
4. Cagney
5. Grazzara

John Smith said...

1.Sjöström
2.Mitchum
3.Steiger
4.Cagney
5.Grazzara

Vanna Long said...

1. Mitchum
2. Gazzara
3. Cagney
3. Steiger
5. Sjostrom

Robert MacFarlane said...

Any chance Alan Ruck could go up for 1986 Supporting Actor? Because I rewatched a bit of Ferris Bueller and was surprised by just how well that performance has aged.

BRAZINTERMA Prêmio Fictício said...

1 - Mitchum
2 - Steiger
3 - Cagney
4 - Sjöström
5 - Gazzara

Deiner said...

Louis: can you please check out these performances?
- Deborah Kerr in An Affair to Remember
- Gulietta Masina in Nights of Cabiria
- Ineko Arima and Setsuko Hara in Tokyo Twilight
- Jean Simmons in Until They Sail
- Kay Kendall in Les Girls
- Lauren Bacall in Designing Woman
- Marilyn Monroe in The Prince and the Showgirl
- Nargis in Mother India
- Tatiana Samoilova in The Cranes Are Flying

Robson Nakazato said...

1. Sjöström
2. Steiger
3. Cagney
4. Mitchum
5. Gazzara

Deiner said...

Forgot my predictios:
1. Mitchum
2. Steiger
3. Cagney
4. Sjöström
5. Gazzara

Anonymous said...

Has Louis seen Snatch and Lock, Stock & Two Smoking Barrels?

Bryan L said...

Anonymous: I doubt it, since neither movie shows up in the Overall rankings for their respective years. I'm guessing he might get around to them once the Bonus rounds for 1998 and 2000 come up.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

1. Mitchum
2. Cagney
3. Steiger
4. Sjöström
5. Gazzara

Luke Higham said...

Louis: And The Prince and The Showgirl.

Maciej said...

1.Mitchum
2.Cagney
3.Steiger
4.Gazzara
5.Sjöström

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the adrenaline shot scene from Pulp Fiction.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on this video:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=yT6wLmisOCY

and thoughts on Paul Thomas Anderson as a director?

Anonymous said...

Louis: Did you give your thoughts and rating on Vicky Krieps in Phantom Thread? If not could you give them?

Omar Franini said...

1. Mitchum
2. Sjöström
3. Steiger
4. Cagney
5. Gazzara

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Did you watch Recount (2008) and have you seen any new releases lately.

Luke Higham said...

Guys, your rating predictions.
Mitchum - 5
Cagney - 4.5/5
Steiger - 4.5/5
Sjöström - 4.5
Gazzara - 4/4.5

Calvin Law said...

Luke:

Mitchum: 5
Cagney: 4.5/5
Steiger: 4.5
Sjöström: 4/4.5
Gazzara: 3.5/4 (I've read some pretty negative reviews of the film itself)

Calvin Law said...

Sophie Lillis is playing Nancy Drew and boy is that pitch perfect casting.

RatedRStar said...

1. Cagney
2. Mitchum
3. Steiger
4. Sjöström
5. Gazzara

Matt Mustin said...

Louis: Are you looking forward to whatever John Carroll Lynch does next as a director, assuming he continues down that path?

JackiBoyz said...

1. Mitchum
2. Cagney
3. Steiger
4. Sjöström
5. Gazzara

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Do you think Bright Eyes from Watership Down will win Original Song for 1978.

I've been watching it again lately and I like Briers just as much as Hurt on this viewing.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Is Walking In The Air from The Snowman eligible for 1982 original song.

Anonymous said...

Luke:

Mitchum: 5
Cagney: 4,5/5
Steiger: 4,5
Gazzara: 4,5
Sjostrom: 4

Louis: I've read that Gish, Garbo and Pickford were considered for Norma Desmond. Thoughts? Honestly, Gloria Swanson was perfect in the part.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your top ten directorial debuts.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: When you have time, could you check out Black (2005)? It has really compelling performances from Amitabh Bachchan and Rani Mukherjee.

RatedRStar said...

Time for my winning request, Robert Shaw has usually been known as a completely serious deadly actor, I think its time he had some fun and isnt that what people want to see, Robert Shaw having fun for once =D.

Robert Shaw - Swashbuckler

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar: I'm happy that The Caretaker won't be his last review. :)

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on this video:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=yT6wLmisOCY

and thoughts on Paul Thomas Anderson as a director?

Anonymous said...

Louis: Did you give your thoughts and rating on Vicky Krieps in Phantom Thread? If not could you give them?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous: You've already asked him to respond those two questions twice.

RatedRStar said...

Luke: I always had Shaw in the 76 lineup, just wanted to make sure for definite he was in.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: thoughts on these late 1950s/early 1960s versions of Martin McDonagh's films?

In Bruges directed by Akira Kurosawa
Ray: Toshiro Mifune
Ken: Takashi Shimura
Chloe: Kyōko Kagawa
Marie: Machiko Kyō
Harry: Masayuki Mori

Seven Psychopaths directed by John Schlesinger
Marty: Alan Bates
Billy: Tom Courtenay
Hans: Roger Livesey
Charlie: Harry Andrews
Zacharia: James Mason

Three Billboards directed by Guy Green
Mildred: Celia Johnson (if you think about it her career trajectory is kind of like McDormand's)
Bill: Trevor Howard (this would be incredibly powerful, methinks)
Dixon: Richard Attenborough
Anne: Wendy Hiller (don't need the younger wife aspect if I'm honest)
Charlie: David Farrar
James: Michael Dunn
Red: Alfred Lynch
Robbie: James Fox
Cedric: Bernard Lee
Penelope: Julie Christie
Abercrombie: Ossie Davis

Calvin Law said...

Actually, Sarah Miles instead.

Bryan L said...

Louis: Your past film roles for James McAvoy?

Luke Higham said...

RatedRstar: For 1976 Lead, Bowie and Gazzara are definites. For the other 2 spots, I've got Peter Falk in Mikey & Nicky, Gerard Depardieu in Novecento/1900, Anthony Quinn in The Message, Jacques Perrin in The Desert Of The Tartars and Donald Sutherland in Fellini's Casanova.

Luke Higham said...

RIP Verne Troyer

Calvin Law said...

Really upsetting. I can't even begin to imagine some of the demons he'd have to have gone through.

RatedRStar said...

RIP Verne Troyer

Its so hard for actors who suffer from dwarfism to get truly consistent roles, I mean Peter Dinklage and to a lesser extent Warwick Davis are the only ones I can think of that get consistent work, even Oscar nominee Michael Dunns career was ruined after Ship of Fools, its so upsetting.

RatedRStar said...

Luke: I do have Bowie and Gazzara, the others not so much, especially in the case of Gerard Depardieu, ever since my infamous disagreement with Louis on Cyrano De Bergerac back in the day, Depardieu has just been a let down nearly every time.

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar: Depardieu is only 1 option out of 5 for those 2 spots and honestly, you shouldn't give up hope on Louis liking one of his performances when he's only seen his post-1990 work.

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar: I thought he was quite great in Danton even though I probably preferred Brandauer in the same role 6 years later.

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar: What is your suggested lineup for 1976 Lead.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Gedeck - (Her performance/character felt like one of the few elements that became almost fully refined within the film. There is still a certain distance that leaves her work from becoming truly something special, however she does do very well with what she has. In that she effectively creates this largely subtle portrayal of a the growth towards this extremist. She handles this well with this certain nuance in her early reactions that creates this sense towards something more intense, while eliciting a more dignified delivery of her more ideological words. Eventually the change happens she does well in portraying this momentary zealousness of the cause, within even a hint of a near insanity towards the actions that show the loss of a more rational method. Near the end, which struggles a bit because the film offers no clear theory, she is at least good in portraying sort of a similair conviction yet a loss in a more fiery aspects, showing more of this colder resignation. It's is an interesting performance though a bit held back by the film's hesitation towards the material.)

My thoughts on Tomei really haven't changed.

I saw Recount...back in 08.

Yes.

I saw Chappaquiddick.

Anonymous:

The Wolf of Wall Street 1940's directed by Preston Sturges:

Jordan Belfort: Joel McCrea
Donnie: Jackie Gleason
Naomi: Veronica Lake
Patrick Denham: Fredric March
Mad Max: William Demarest
Brad: Dan Duryea
Mark Hanna: James Cagney
Jean-Jacques: Charles Boyer

Robert:

It's certainly possible, since I haven't watched that film properly through in about twenty years.

Tahmeed:

The adrenaline shot is perhaps a highlight for Tarantino in terms of his work as a director within Pulp Fiction since it relies far more on just some very careful choices as it ramps up the intensity so effectively through largely just his choices as director, and just brilliantly realizes the buildup in that way you barely realize you don't even actually see the shot take place, for example.

1. In Bruges (Martin McDonagh)
2. Badlands (Terrence Malick)
3. The Shawshank Redemption (Frank Darabont)
4. The Duellists (Ridley Scott)
5. The Maltese Falcon (John Huston)
6. Chariots of Fire (Hugh Hudson)
7. The Night of the Hunter (Charles Laughton)
8. The Killing Fields (Roland Joffe)
9. Citizen Kane (Orson Welles)
10. District 9 (Neill Blomkamp)

Based on film preference only.

Sure.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

A well thought analysis of PTA's central characters. I would say though I don't *quite* agree with the sentiment exactly in regards to the gender element in the film, as I don't believe it is quite that cut and dry. I would less say it is specifically men needing that completion through guidance and support of a woman, but just rather this idea, which runs through all of his film, of broken people (who are not whole as themselves) in general looking for some sort of outlet to become whole. As the video doesn't cover Maggie and Rollergirl from Boogie Nights, Linda and Claudia from Magnolia, nor does it fully examine the whole that is Alma and Cyril from Phantom Thread. These characters also are seeking something through their own relationships to someone or something, and are not merely there to fulfill the role needed by the men. Although I don't think video was implying that, I'm just saying the overarching theme I believe from PTA isn't defined so much on the gender boundary as it partially implies.

I believe I've given my thoughts on PTA before, but I'll write a little something here on something I've been thinking about in regards to his work. In what makes PTA different than other directors who have worked with clear influences, why is he the real deal so to speak rather than an imitator or pretender? What makes his work different than say a Craig Gillespie for example. Well the idea of influence is something that is never cut and dry. All filmmakers have some influence on their work even the most idiosyncratic. Even someone as unique as say David Lynch has acknowledged the influences of Ingmar Bergman and even Ed Wood. PTA obviously started with foundations within Altman, and Scorsese. The difference though is two fold. For one he found his own theme his own voice, even his more clearly influenced films as a storyteller to begin with. He also importantly took the influences but was not controlled by them. He used them to create his own distinct voice as a director that is not entirely like anyone else to the point that now a PTA film is clearly a PTA film. Of course that does not mean influences gone entirely, yet they so well inherited, and woven into his own style that he has advanced beyond them.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Krieps - (Well continuing on the point of PTA's characters Alma is a unique challenge that is again brilliantly realized by Krieps's performance. She's notable in that there is not anything inherently, or at least obviously, wrong with Alma from the outset which is unique for a central figure in one of his films. Krieps's performance instead very carefully embraces this idea of building up Alma initially through her relationship with Woodcock. In that in her reactions she portrays a fascination of him, but also this seeming interest to be part of what he is going to create. This grows what seems to be an affection within her work though that is diluted though through the frustrations she so naturally reveals in her on going struggle to be more than a prop for him. In the scenes of the argument though she very carefully plays them as there always this palatable intensity, and almost perseverance to her work. There's these little cheeky hints of glee almost though that in part perhaps alludes to her own unstable state, but also establishes the idea of the character's unwillingness to be disregarded by Reynolds at any point. In turn when working more directly with Reynolds to the common goal there is this forcefulness of her own work that is not of this subservience, but rather this exact joy in not only being part of his experience, but in a way making it her own. Krieps's work is pivotal in that she realizes that she is never just trying to specifically please Reynolds, there is the idea of genuine affection in her work, but there is most importantly that intensity in her moments of individual determination that shows her much the puppeteer as she is to be controlled by him. It's brilliant reflexive work though throughout in matching and playing with Day-Lewis's performance as well as they initiate so well in both these moments of a mental combat, but also this connection of mutual need for one another that is so effectively portrayed.)

Matt:

Of course, honestly I'd love it if he kept just making films starring other character actors.

Anonymous:

I don't think any of them would have been quite right as they weren't really the right diva type that Swanson was in her silent era presence even. Swanson was perfectly cast.

Calvin:

In Bruges sounds about right, though I might actually say make in the 60's with Nakadai as Ray, keep Shimura, and make Mifune as Harry since I'd say he would be the best fit for that role.

Seven Psychopaths seems about right, though maybe Richard Harris as Billy only because I feel has sort of that naturally comedic energy similair to Rockwell.

I can get behind the Three Billboards.

Bryan:

Billy Liar
Jimmy Porter
Joe Orton

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your ratings for the Recount cast and your thoughts on Chappaquiddick and ratings/thoughts on the cast.

RatedRStar said...

Luke: At the moment, Bowie, Gazzara, Shaw, Williamson and Bridges.

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar: I left off Williamson since Calvin only gave him a 3.5/4 from what I can recall.

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar: I think Peter Falk would be a better choice from what I've read.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Spacey - 3.5
Hurt - 2.5
Dern - 3.5
Wilkinson - 4
Leary - 3.5
Balaban - 3.5

Chappaquiddick is a film that is fine as is. In that it is well shot, well acted, and written well enough in its representation of the event. It doesn't really go far in terms of theory, however it doesn't really need to. It however is never anything truly remarkable despite there seeming avenues in that regard. The idea of the fourth son of the Kennedy family trying or burdened to live up to his name, and the destruction of the "dynasty" is only lightly touched upon, though those elements are quite compelling the few instances we see of that. It also has moments of more overt political satire that are very effective if not even rather humorous. There is also the idea of the sort of willing sacrifice of other's morality for their political cause that's another interesting idea compelling when explored, but not explored enough. These are all just lightly touched upon and I think it would have benefited the film if it had chosen to explore either a more satirical bent, or allowed more attention to those more potent themes. It doesn't though choosing just an okay representation of the event, but it doesn't distinguish itself because of this approach.

Clarke - 4.5(Well I suppose my favorite leading turn of the year so far. Clarke is more than game for the role, and again I think it is a shame the film didn't take the portrait further. Clarke is terrific though in finding this right balance in his work. In that he creates the moments of the true politician as the proper act, prepared and ready as the statesman. This is against his portrayal of Kennedy outside of the sphere as this man almost detached in his attempt to comprehend his purpose as a man. He finds this sense of this almost casual desperation so well in the early scenes in creating this underlying indifference almost as a man lacking the desire, yet almost requiring himself to be who he is. He brings just the right touch of somberness within this that spreads once the incident occurs. There Clarke is great in portraying this just almost a sympathy in his performance. He finds just the right line in that he portrays Kennedy's empathy almost where it should be yet just one step. He creates this almost certain barrier created by this state of assumed importance of self. This though that he undercuts well with that desperation that itself reveals to be almost slightly comic in how it reveals itself as he tries to take control of his life, but must defer in order to maintain his status. Clarke finds this right sort of stress as he's almost about to breakdown, almost about to do the right thing, but just never quite pushes himself there. His best moment is easily with Dern, where this is most painfully realized as he can't even quite breakdown in front of his father, even when he is so brutally mistreated wearing instead this horrible face of just looking for any love and exuding it himself, while obviously receiving none in return.)

Louis Morgan said...

Mara - 2.5(There's nothing wrong with her performance but it is just very much limited by the role. She's fine with what she has but just there isn't much there.)

Helms - 4(He's pretty good here in portraying the moral compass of the film, and technically the one with the arc. In the early scenes just creating the right chemistry with Clarke of a real warmth, but also that sense of excitement by living vicariously through him. This turns though effectively though as Helms gradually reveals just this very quiet and subdued disgust that slowly grows. He doesn't have a big moment where he breakdown but he doesn't need to. His final reactions are pitch perfect in just revealing the real distress of the man as his eyes carry the weight of seeing a morally questionable ground he cannot follow into.)

Dern - 3.5(His role is obviously very limited, he has three lines. Dern though is quite good in part his physical performance which doesn't feel too much, rather it feels an appropriate representation of the state of the man. What's great though is how he reveals the vindictive and forceful personality even within that limitation.)

Brown - 3(Delivers rather well as the political fixer that is Robert McNamara's representation here. Brown in particular uses his voice well in just bringing that incisiveness to every word properly being a man who is very much in control and on the ball.)

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thoughts on Wilkinson in Recount.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Wilkinson, despite being framed as the adversary in the film, never allows himself to fall into the caricature of just sort the brass company man. He certainly brims with a palatable and powerful confidence, and commands each of his political maneuvering sequences. He though finds the right nuance to exude the intelligence within his character making him far more a "worthy opponent" rather than a villain. His best scenes though are near the end of the film where he shows the most human sides of the man. Scenes that could have been potentially wasted however he makes the most of them. The first being his speech which he offers a real conviction to rather than self-aggrandizement then his personal moment where he creates a real moving motivation within his story.

PTV Brazil said...

1. Mitchum
2. Cagney
3. Steiger
4. Gazzara
5. Sjöström