Tuesday, 23 January 2018

Best Supporting Actor 2017

And the Nominees Are:

Woody Harrelson in Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri

Sam Rockwell in Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri

Willem Dafoe in The Florida Project

Richard Jenkins in The Shape of Water

Christopher Plummer in All The Money In The World

91 comments:

Luke Higham said...

YES! Logan nominated for Adapted Screenplay.

Louis Morgan said...

PTA!!!!!

Louis Morgan said...

Also I'll take Blige if it gets me Manville.

Luke Higham said...

Washington in, Franco out.

Louis Morgan said...

Wow love this Phantom Thread over performance despite missing out on Original Screenplay.

John Smith said...

Denzel? Really? Wtf...

But im pretty happy about the others though.

Maciej said...

Phantom Thread definitely got a lot of love, Franco was snubbed in favor of Washington (who ranks last here, I'm sure). Really happy for Dunkirk - will win in the most technical categories, methinks.

Maciej said...

Predictions:

1.Rockwell
2.Harrelson
3.Dafoe
4.Plummer
5.Jenkins

RatedRStar said...

Looks like we know who is finishing last in Best Actor lol =D very happy with the nominations otherwise.

This lineup is actually great

1) Sam Rockwell
2) Woody Harrelson
3) Willem Dafoe
4) Christopher Plummer
5) Richard Jenkins

Luke Higham said...

Nolan finally got in. :)

1. Rockwell
2. Harrelson
3. Plummer
4. Dafoe
5. Jenkins

Omar Franini said...

1.Rockwell
2.Harrelson
3.Dafoe
4.Plummer
5.Jenkins

Robert MacFarlane said...

HAHAHAHAHAHA MCDONAGH GOT SNUBBED HAHAHAHAHA

1. Rockwell
2. Harrelson
3. Dafoe
4. Plummer
5. Jenkins

As for my rankings:

1. Dafoe
2. Plummer
3. Harrelson
4. Rockwell
5. Jenkins

Omar Franini said...

Louis: your ratings and thoughts on the Call Me By Your Name supporting actors?

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your overall thoughts on each category and thoughts on any performances that you're no longer saving.

I guess we're getting 10 for Lead then.

Mitchell Murray said...

I'm going to say:

5) Plummer (4)
4) Jenkins (4)
3) Dafoe (4/4.5)
2) Harrelson (5)
1) Rockwell (5)

RatedRStar said...

We should have seen this Franco snub coming a mile away, I imagine the moment his controversy came out I reckon hardly anyone voted for him after that, well James Franco has nobody to blame but himself.

Luke Higham said...

For Leading Actor

1. Day-Lewis
2. Kaluuya
3. Oldman
4. Chalamet
5. Washington

moviefilm said...

1) Rockwell
2) Dafoe
3) Jenkins
4) Harrelson
5) Plummer

Lezlie said...

1. Woody Harrelson
2. Sam Rockwell
3. Richard Jenkins
4. Willem Dafoe
5. Christopher Plummer

I'm also very proud that my country, Hungary, is represented once again at the Oscars for the third year in a row :)

I also did not expect that Phantom Thread love, and the Darkest Hour nomination, very interesting.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Feel bad for Stuhlbarg, who I thought was easily better than every non-Dafoe nominee here.

Maciej said...

Snap, just realized McDonagh was not nominated. Yet another snub.

As for Franco, guy's innocent until proven guilty: if he had done what he's accused of, he deserves to be punished. But it's kinda fishy to me that accusations appeared only after his GG win, not before.

GM said...

1. Rockwell
2. Harrelson
3. Dafoe
4. Plummer
5. Jenkins

Robert MacFarlane said...

Franco more than likely did what he was accused of, so fuck him. Plus I’m still dancing that McDonagh’s borderline amateurish direction of Three Billboards was rightfully snubbed.

RatedRStar said...

I am still very happy regardless of Denzel getting in =D.

Michael McCarthy said...

Maciej: I'm not horribly suspicious of that. People who go through that kind of thing are often genuinely motivated by having to see their abuser.

1. Sam Rockwell
2. Woody Harrelson
3. Willem Dafoe
4. Christopher Plummer
5. Richard Jenkins

Anonymous said...

No dench for Best Actress yay! Actually happy for Streep that she got nominated this year, unlike the past 10 years or so where I simply gave a "sigh" everytime she was nominated

RatedRStar said...

This supporting lineup kinda reminds me of the ones you get in the 1940s where all the nominees are respected character actors, =D

RatedRStar said...

I was quite worried early on during the Serkis and Haddish Oscar announcement because Victoria and Abdul picked up 2 early nominations which made me think "oh shit Judi Dench is getting in" fortunately that didnt happen =D.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

1. Sam Rockwell
2. Woody Harrelson
3. Willem Dafoe
4. Christopher Plummer
5. Richard Jenkins

Maciej said...

Any thoughts/comments on Haddish? Because I would personally see those cheesy prerecorded speeches rather than her.

Louis Morgan said...

Omar:

Ask me again when I review Chalamet.

Luke:

Visual Effects:

1. Blade Runner 2049
2. War for the Planet of the Apes
3. Star Wars: The Last Jedi
4. Kong: Skull Island
5. Guardians of the Galaxy Vol.2

The top two are in a league of their own in this category. Blade Runner so effortlessly uses its visual effects while also so brazenly doing so. It's astonishing just how seamless they are in every respect, and this is finally one film where the youthful CGI creation looked good enough to actually work.

War is the final refinement of already impressive effects. At this point you truly just feel as though the Apes are there in the scene, which is worth the nomination alone.

Star Wars in terms of the space battles and expected Star Wars features is strong as usual. Although Snoke is a major step up from his last appearance I still think he was obvious CGI man. The same goes for the Canto Blight sequence that frankly felt a little sloppy in some of the use particularly the effects when riding the space horses. Still strong work overall though.

Kong Skull Island certainly does its job as realistic isn't a objective in the film. It's there for the bombast and I'd say the effects at the very least do their jobs particularly in regards to Kong himself.

Guardians felt like a weaker effort where so much of the CGI looked like a cartoon candy land. Yes it isn't suppose to look real, but I don't think it needs to look quite so fake as so many of the scenes here did. A lot of just wasn't very original in that regard or interesting. Still not bad work really, but I would have preferred to see Dunkirk's seamless effects make it.

Sound Mixing:

1. Blade Runner 2049
2. Baby Driver
3. The Shape of Water
4. Dunkirk
5. Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Blade Runner's work is simply masterful here in creating such an atmospheric world from every futuristic hologram, or device, to any little bit of rain, or a malfunctioning Elvis. It's downright brilliant work.

A highlight of Baby Driver is the Sound Mixing which brings home the central concept of Baby's focus through music. The work here is remarkable as it so carefully aligns everything around that element, while never getting overwhelmed by the music either.

The Shape of Water strong more general work, well other than really the use of water which is throughout the film, and intricate part. Another facet of the film though that amplifies the atmosphere just a bit more.

Dunkirk would be higher but again there are a few moments where you can't hear characters speak, not as badly as in Interstellar, but it's still a mark against it. Overall though it is impressive work beyond that in putting you within every point of the war whether it be on land, sea or air.

Star Wars delivers fine work as per usual. I didn't find it overly special in this regard, but it certainly more than did its job to make this overall a strong lineup. Would've loved to see Phantom Thread here, for its low key, but brilliant use of sound mixing. I'm not going to complain too much.

Louis Morgan said...

Sound Editing:

1. Dunkirk
2. Blade Runner 2049
3. The Shape of Water
4. Baby Driver
5. Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Extremely impressive work from Dunkirk in every gun shot, wave, spitfire engine roar, everything just is exceptionally well realized.

Blade Runner 2049 also incredible work, using the template of the original, but certainly coming up with its own additional sounds of the future that so effortlessly blend with every other aspect of the futurescape.

The Shape of Water, great fishman noises it must be said.

Baby Driver, strong straight forward action film work. Wright always seems to make sure this is very precise in his film, so I'm glad one of his films got rewarded for that attention.

Star Wars strong work as well. Nothing too new, I mean the original Sound Editing of Star Wars is truly legendary, but this is nothing to sniff at either.

Production Design:

1. Blade Runner 2049
2. The Shape of Water
3. Dunkirk
4. Darkest Hour
5. Beauty and the Beast

Blade Runner 2049's work here is unparalleled, and that's saying a great deal with what's the runner up. Every set though has such a richness to it, whether it be the downright stunning Wallace's sets, or the down and dirty city ones. They are either beautiful in the most perfect way, or ugly in the best of ways. Not a single set honestly is wasted as they will speak something to the scene or the characters in the scene. Among the best I've seen in any film quite frankly.

The Shape of Water is also masterful work in its loving homage to essentially film sets of old whether it be the old sci-fi set, the old theater, the old musical sound stage, every one of them is stunning just to look at. They successfully pay tribute but also stand as a cohesive and unique whole within the incredible vision of the film.

Dunkirk brings yet another bit of minimalist work that adds a great deal to the film. A great deal of it is recreation but with just the right tinges of stylization in the work, for example those propaganda flyers weren't quite so dynamic in real life. It doesn't over do that though, just adding just the right bit of extra while maintain the proper grit and reality for the true to life story. Fantastic work.

Darkest Hour is perhaps production design overload a bit. In that I will say it does feel a bit overdone with how stylized every set is given the nature of the story. The choice to make everything look a little musty for example, I'm not quite sure about. I do think that plays more into how Wright uses it more than the work of the production designers though, who definitely still did fine work overall.

Beauty and the Beast is easily the weakest. The sets for the most part look like sets. They also mostly look pretty underwhelming whenever compared with their animated counterparts. They aren't horrible, but they look most expensive than impressive.

Shame no Phantom Thread.

Anonymous said...

1. Rockwell
2. Harrelson
3. Dafoe
4. Plummer
5. Jenkins

Anonymous said...

Even loving Three Billboards I'm in fine with Martin McDonagh being snubbed, I love his work on the film as a director, but the nominees also do a very good jobin their films and that´s fine. In addition I am very happy with the other nominees of the Three Billboards especially Woody Harrelson.

Deiner said...

I am so behind with this award season that I've only seen Jenkins from this group.
On another note, I'm so happy with Peele and Gerwig's nominations.

RatedRStar said...

Deiner: Get catching up then!!!, its a great year for the Oscars =D lol.


Roger Deakins....It is time.

John Smith said...

1.Rockwell
2.Harrelson
3.Jenkins
4.Dafoe
5.Plummer

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the "I said over easy!" from Anger Management.

Louis Morgan said...

Score:

1. Phantom Thread
2. Dunkirk
3. The Shape of Water
4. Star Wars: The Last Jedi
5. Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri

There is no competition here Johnny Greenwood's work here is a masterpiece. It makes Desplat's work in The Shape of Water look dingy by comparison and I love Desplat's score. Greenwood's score though truly something special in its elegant use of the piano, which he builds off of in one transcendent piece after another. It amplifies every scene of the film so brilliantly, and I'd say it is easily the best score of the year.

That's saying a lot when you have Hans Zimmer delivering one of his best scores in Dunkirk. I've written quite a bit about this score already, but its such a fantastic work that would be an amazing winner in most years.

The Shape of Water is a gorgeous score, despite slight ribbing in order to further praise Greenwood. It's incredible work though that adds to the general fairy tale tone of the film. I love the instrumentation as Desplat uses such a elegant blend of woodwinds and light strings. It's outstanding work that successfully feels like proper "water music", and will also make a deserving winner even if it is not my personal favorite.

Well I'm glad they chose Star Wars if they were going to choose a John Williams score, as I found his score in The Post a little detrimental actually. I will say I found there to be one truly memorable new piece, that being the trailer/Luke walking out moment. That's a fantastic piece though. The rest was more than serviceable even if I only really remembered that one piece and the reprises of the old themes.

Three Billboards is a little bit of a mixed bag. It's not Carter Burwell's best score from this year, though I am glad he's gotten more recognition considering how under nominated he is in general, but it has some good moments. I rather like the main theme for example which feels a little bit like twangy arrangement of Fargo's main theme. Mostly the score is just serviceable though.

Louis Morgan said...

Song:

1. "Remember Me" - Coco
2. "Mystery of Love" - Call Me By Your Name
3. "This is Me" - The Greatest Showman
4. "Mighty River" - Mudbound
5. "Stand Up For Something" - Marshall

"Remember Me" is just such a lovely song in all of its iterations in the film. Although do they have to specify which version? Anyway every version though is brilliant as they lyrics just carry such a joy yet poignancy at the same time whether it be realized in a glorious big band fashion, a more pop hit style, or a gentle lullaby. Also extra bonus points for being so well used in the film itself.

"Call Me By Your Name" although I didn't always love the way music was used in the film this is a wonderful song on its own. The vocals and the gentle instrumentation just blend so effectively together with just this quiet build within the song. Although even though the vocal rhythm is repetitive it works by the subtle changes within the instrumentation to really make the song work.

"This is Me" is a fine ballad, can't speak to its use in the film, but its well realized modernist show tune. From the single singer that seems to slowly build the instrumentation and other vocals that just keeps building the central melody. It follows that sort of structure of the show stopper almost step by step, but it does it fairly well.

"Mighty River" is a pretty good ballad. It is perhaps a little repetitious in its melody, but its instrumentation is nice as sort of a generalized old fashioned gospel style with just touches of modernization with the later chorus, which actually I'd say is the weakest part of the song. It's a good song though even if it is not anything too special.

Yet another ballad. Can't say I really cared for "Stand Up For Something" as a ballad though as the snare drum was mostly just kind of awkwardly done. It gets better once it introduces more instruments but it still isn't particularly well realized at any point. It feels like they just threw whatever together to try to get something out of it. It particularly doesn't blend well with the lyrics and the vocals, which I'd say could've had potential on their own. Then comes in Common once more who once again I didn't find added much to his Oscar nominated song.

Not a bad line up though.

TParker said...

Alternate Best Actor idea: Jason Sudeikis in Colossal.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Pretty sure, Phantom Thread is your costume design winner with ease.

Louis Morgan said...

Makeup and Hairstyling:

1. Victoria & Abdul
2. Darkest Hour

Victoria & Abdul seems just a little curious in that it is fairly straight forward work in this category. Certainly not bad, but surprising since usually there's a bit of overt makeup required to be nominated. I would've liked to see I, Tonya's memorable recreations rewarded though, and also just for the Olympic running makeup scene. Darkest Hour is all about Oldman's prosthetic chin which depending on the scene it sometimes looks amazing other times it looks like what is, fat man makeup. Still need to see Wonder, but from the trailer it looks fairly impressive.

Costume Design:

1. Phantom Thread
2. The Shape of Water
3. Victoria & Abdul
4. Darkest Hour
5. Beauty and the Beast

Masterful work from Phantom Thread. One of the best costumed films I've ever seen. They match the intended brilliance of the character, and are just gorgeous to look at, every single on of them whether they are the extravagant dresses, the simple ones or the suits.

The Shape of Water has terrific stylized period costumes to begin with, which again is just another facet to the overall vision of the film so well realized. The most remarkable feat though is the fishman which is an outstanding combination of some visual effects, some makeup and that costume that never feels as such.

As much as I hate Victoria & Abdul as a film I must admit it was well costumed. Great looking Victorian era attire, royal garb, and Indian pseudo royal garb to be seen. Fantastic work, even if the film is not.

I'm a little surprised Darkest Hour made it here as everything is fairly subdued fitting to war time attire. It well realized and recreated though. Fine work to be sure.

Beauty and the Beast is a bit of a mixed bag actually as some of the costumes are a little overdone actually. There are good ones, like Gaston's attire, but for the most part it is just another facet of that film that seems overproduced. I don't hate the yellow dress as some do in this version, but it's nothing special either. None of the costumes are special and some are far less than that.

Anonymous:

Don't Remember it.

Deiner said...

I just noticed Wonder Woman didn't receive any nominations. Too bad.

Luke Higham said...

Kobe Bryant got nominated for animated short.

Louis Morgan said...

Cinematography:

1. Blade Runner 2049
2. Dunkirk
3. The Shape of Water
4. Darkest Hour
5. Mudbound

Three of the best shot films of the decade, and two films that I think the camerawork might have suffered from the directorial vision a little bit. Shame Phantom Thread couldn't be here then there could have been four of the best shot films of the decade.

Blade Runner 2049 is among Roger Deakins's best work, one could make the argument that it is his best work. It is gorgeous every frame counts in this work, and frame is incredible. It is incredible the way he manages to use this color to create a definite vibrancy that in no way ever diminishes the equally powerful sense of isolation and grit of the often barren landscapes. The framing of every shot is sheer perfection. It seems that Deakins never wasted a single shadow, a single light source, a single color in any frame during the film. It's a masterpiece from a true master of the art form.

Of course Hoyte van Hoytema, Deakins's successor on James Bond, is also delivering the best work of his comparatively short though very impressive career with his work with Dunkirk. Dunkirk is incredible in terms of how elegantly it captures the grand scope, how beautifully in terms of clarity and cohesion yet never diminishes the intensity of any sequence. His small scale shots though should not be undervalued. Nolan sought to recapture the crowd scenes of a silent film, and van Hoytema helps to realize this. The framing, and careful lighting on the crowds, the people have this different sort of earthly vibrancy. Masterful work as well.

Dan Laustsen perhaps has the least impressive career of the two above him yet his work is also outstanding in the Shape of Water. It is pristine work. Again there is that touches of sort of a fairy tale magic here in just how vibrant every color there is particularly in the blue of water. I love the contrast he achieves of the water against the purposeful harshness of the greys surrounding the water tube. It is a gorgeous looking film, and it only speaks to the strength of the two films above it that this is third.

Given Burno Delbonnel's talent in general, and the general look of a Joe Wright film he was obviously working with a certain expected template. That template one could say is perhaps a little overdone in just how every scene is lit in an overly showy fashion, however that is very much a complaint that usually depends a bit on how well you like the film. Every scene is shot as though it is going to be the last shot of the film, and to be fair Delbonnel certainly does this with considerable aplomb. I'd say the film would've been better off with different approach, but I'd say Delbonnel did a fine job with what he was working with. If this was a genre horror film, about something else, this probably would be considered brilliantly shot.

I covered Mudbound's cinematography elsewhere.

Louis Morgan said...

Editing:

1. Dunkirk
2. Baby Driver
3. I, Tonya
4. The Shape of Water
5. Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Shame about the Phantom Thread miss again. Great editing there.

Dunkirk's editing is one of the film's many highlights. In it's a combination of the three stories from three different perspectives slowly converging the editing was especially essential to make this not only feel cohesive but natural as the three are cut together as this complex tapestry that reveals the overall event as one. It not only needs to do that but it needs to keep the film from losing its urgency and to maintain its pace, while also matching Hans Zimmer's ticking clock score. I'm not sure who did what there first, but either way someone did something rather impressive. The editing though is a ticking clock at it successfully achieves such a dynamic rhythm like a brilliant orchestral piece that goes from one section to another before blending the entire work together into something truly remarkable.

Baby Driver is another film defined by the editing, and again as with the sound work all of Edgar Wright's films are well edited so it's great to see one of them being rewarded. It's terrific dynamic editing that puts every action sequence, or non-action but still musical sequence, together in such a fluid fashion. It successfully achieves this musical action film idea which is a notable ambition in itself. There are lulls in the story, but actually the editing tries to smooth them over best it can. These scenes are all required plot wise and it just seems like the editors were trying to get through them best they could particularly the overlong epilogue. Impressive work all around.

I've gone over this before but to reiterate, I, Tonya rips off the master Thelma Schoonmaker, but does a fantastic job of it. Meanwhile Schoonmaker was off editing The Snowman...

The Shape of Water is rather low key film in terms of editing, but definitely well edited. It too has a certain musical quality to it, well overtly musical in one instance, but is a bit more unassuming in its methods. It's great work as well, particularly the montages of the eggs and Elisa's daily routine, and is fourth place in a terrific lineup.

Three Billboards definitely is the "best picture" hopeful editing nominee. Not that it is a poorly edited film by any means, but it just is a mostly serviceable one in that regard, at least one compared to the other nominees.

Psifonian said...

1. Harrelson
2. Dafoe
3. Rockwell
4. Plummer
5. Jenkins

Louis Morgan said...

Adapted Screenplay:

1. Logan
2. The Disaster Artist
3. Call Me By Your Name
4. Molly's Game
5. Moundbound

Shame about Blade Runner.

I will say I don't think any of these are great screenplays, at least from what we see onscreen. Logan has a few missteps in it does over do the salty dialogue early on particularly for Professor X. I also don't think they needed a few over complications later on in the plot. Where it excels though is in the three central characters and so effectively realizing their dynamic between one another. It cleverly capitalizes on some of the past films, and I have to say the Professor's deathly seizures was quite the stroke of inspiration. The father/son, father/daughter relationship is where the screenplay excels and succeeds completely in making those moments between the three characters something truly special particularly for what is technically a super hero film.

The Disaster's Artist's screenplay is far more consistent but I do feel Logan has higher highs. I could go either way in terms of my exact preference though. On one end one could argue this is a simplistic adaptation of a richer novel. That is true. It doesn't completely capture what the Room means, and what Wiseau means. It works though in altering that narrative to become refined as this story of a most unusual friendship. In that context it works well in just having an entertaining but still emotional confined version of a most unusual tale. Is there some masterpiece adaptation of the Disaster Artist possible? I'd say yes. Is this it? No. Is it good though? I'd say yes.

I'm not sure how much of James Ivory's adaptation of Call Me By Your Name remained, as it felt far more influenced by Guadagnino's directorial style, than what one usually finds in a James Ivory adaptation. Ivory doesn't mind a few silences, but he certainly grants more rich dialogue than we find in this film. Guadagnino focuses on those long stares though perhaps utilizing the screenplay less than what was written, maybe not, but I have a feeling. The idea to simplify the story, I believe was Ivory's, was an interesting one and probably the right one. I don't think the film, nor it seems the screenplay, quite achieves its higher ambitions though, but again it does work in sort of a less "important" fashion.

Molly's Game has some good qualities mostly in terms of its Sorkinese and its breakdown of the pre-trial aspect of Molly's life are well done. The film though struggles and falls into problematic territory though when it attempts to moralize her. This is both in terms of creating this story of regret then also championing her for not naming names or having people beaten for their debts. You know I have to say simply not having people beaten isn't quite as admirable as the film makes it out to be, it's called normal human decency. It gets very sloppy when Sorkin tries to balance the two sides of his story, and fumbles. He probably should have left it as a mainly amoral tale.

Mudbound is bizarrely standard melodramatic affair for the most part that falters in really achieving any real emotion in its text. This is despite its attempts at a Malickian oversight through the narrations that are sadly a little mawkish. There seems a great deal of potential in any facet of the story yet it settles for a very standard approach within every thread of its story.

Calvin Law said...

1. Rockwell
2. Harrelson
3. Dafoe
4. Jenkins
5. Plummer

RatedRStar said...

Calvin Law: Patrick Stewart =D hehe lol

Calvin Law said...

It was a long shot anyway haha.

Calvin Law said...

Luke: holy fuck I just noticed that Kobe Bryant nod. Might be a bit odd of me but that might be the happiest surprise for me, I miss his presence :(

RatedRStar said...

Calvin: That was your vodka shot nomination, take a shot if he gets nominated haha =D

I wonder what would have happened at the ceremony if James Franco was nominated, what reaction would he have got during his clip?

RatedRStar said...

Boss Baby getting nominated made me laugh so hard lol =D.

Calvin Law said...

Yeah I don't think he's going to be turning up at all. I will say that, Washington's performance unseen, I'm extremely happy with the other four nominees.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Well, at least we'll get 10 alternate reviews. I hope Bale makes a last minute inclusion.

Louis Morgan said...

Original Screenplay:

1. Get Out
2. Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri
3. Lady Bird
4. The Big Sick
5. The Shape of Water

Shame about Phantom Thread once again, and I, Tonya.

Get Out's screenplay is by far its greatest asset. Although I have reservations towards the film overall those reservations are amplified by Jordan Peele's direction, a bit of the film's editing and a single performance. I could see those scenes working with less of a sketch comedy direction, and less of a sketch comedy performance. The structure of the screenplay is brilliant as everything works towards the twist though without giving it away too soon, with so many great minor details within it whether it be cotton picking, the running dad, or all of the family's actions before the reveal. It works as a horror film but with a strong emotional component through the brilliant inclusion of the sunken place. What's most remarkable in its success is in terms of its racial subtext, that doesn't feel overblown, but rather makes the already successful horror film all the more remarkable. It never wags the dog, but rather is a natural part of an already successful film.

I've gone over my affection for Three Billboards in detail before, but I thought I'd denote my minor issues that keep it from the top stop. Those mostly being it is not nearly as masterfully told as McDonagh's previous film In Bruges, as there are minor hiccups in there as Dinklage's and Cornish's character could have been a little more developed, and though I in no way dislike the Chief letters they feel slightly more attuned to something from McDonagh's stage background. Still love it, but it's not a flawless screenplay.

Lady Bird is perhaps praised a bit beyond where I would go in that it is not truly original in its topics it covers or even some of its execution of them. The girl going off from her usual friends and doing her own thing until a sexual or near sexual encounter was featured in this, Easy A, and Edge of Seventeen. The wacky adopted brother featured in this and Easy A, the contentious mother/daughter relationship featured in this and Edge of Seventeen. It definitely is working with many previously established tropes of the genre but it is a fine example of them for the most part. It thankfully avoids the usual caricatures, finds some genuine humor throughout, and establishes believable relationships. I don't think it quite successfully builds itself to its conclusion, where the whole NY sequence seems like half a thought, but overall it's a nice entry into its genre.

The Big Sick is quite great in its examination of its central character, and his most unusual situation involving his parents and his girlfriend's parents. I find it less so with the broad caricatures found in his comedy club friends. The rather rote moments, that are unsurprisingly not accurate to the true story, such as the mother taking on a racist at the comedy club, or Nanjiani having an emotional breakdown naturally...of course....during his most important performance. All that is pretty weak, but what does work is quite great even if overall it is uneven as written.

Now The Shape of Water's placement might seem odd given I obviously have it much higher on my top ten list. Well that is because this screenplay, a 60's set remake of Splash, was a disaster waiting to happen. It is the purity and success of Guillermo Del Toro's overall vision as a director that makes it all work. As written it is downright ridiculous, and completely bereft of subtlety. I frankly don't think Del Toro is capable of subtlety to be honest. This exact screenplay in anyone else's hands probably would have lead to an atrocious film. Del Toro though makes it work by just how refined and true to his vision he makes it. He embraces everything in just the right way to make it all work, even though it really shouldn't.

Calvin Law said...

Would you rank the screenplay for Three Billboards over Seven Psychopaths? Also a McDonagh script not being your favourite out of the nominees, twist worthy of Shaymalan.

Agree on The Shape of Water too, definitely a bit of an odd choice.

Michael McCarthy said...

Honestly if Franco had been nominated I think Three Billboards would be a shoe-in for Best Picture. As it is, Three Billboards is now the most easy target for backlash, and McDonagh's snub makes me worried for his chances.

Harrelson's nomination does make me think that the film was still a favorite among voters though, so maybe it can keep that momentum. I could totally imagine Three Billboards getting Best Pic and then Gerwig getting Best Director.

Bryan L said...

DENZEL?! ARE YOU SERIOUS? I have to watch J. Roman Israel, Esq. now, and I wasn't planning to.

I'm surprised that McDonagh didn't get in, however, I'm content with PTA getting in instead.

Calvin Law said...

There's almost certainly going to be a split in winner/director.

Bryan L said...

1. Rockwell
2. Harrison
3. Dafoe
4. Jenkins
5. Plummer

Matthew Cofrancesco said...

1. Rockwell
2. Harrelson
3. Dafoe
4. Plummer
5. Jenkins

Louis Morgan said...

Supporting Actress:

1. Manville - Phantom Thread
2. Janney - I, Tonya
3. Laurie Metcalf - Lady Bird
4. Octavia Spencer - The Shape of Water
5. Mary J. Blige - Mudbound

Manville's nomination kind of counterbalances Blige's inclusion to make this a pretty strong lineup. A stronger one was possible given the contenders in play, but my favorite supporting actress performance of the year made it so I'm happy. I'd love for her to upset at BAFTA.

Actress:

1. Frances McDormand & Margot Robbie
3. Sally Hawkins
4. Saoirse Ronan
5. Meryl Streep

Not an actual tie, I just want to watch Three Billboards again before I decide. Also Streep could move past Ronan with a re-watch of the Post. Great lineup though, I was worried for a moment with those below the line Victoria and Abdul nominations.

Bryan L said...

Best Actress is stacked as hell this year, and I'll be glad if any of them win except for Streep, who I still thought delivered a great performance.

Calvin Law said...

I have to say as much as I loved Hawkins and I'm sure I'll love Ronan and Robbie, McDormand will be a tough one to bear for me.

Calvin Law said...

Also, woah, Darkest Hour got nominated in 6 categories. I'll defend the makeup and of course Oldman but the rest, meh.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Warren Beatty and Nick Nolte as actors.

Louis Morgan said...

Director:

1. Paul Thomas Anderson - Phantom Thread
2. Christopher Nolan - Dunkirk
3. Guillermo Del Toro - The Shape of Water
4. Jordan Peele - Get Out
5. Greta Gerwig - Lady Bird

Shame no Denis Villeneuve, then this lineup would have been legendary.

Well you have three veteran auteurs at the top their game. Nolan and Del Toro both delivering their best directed films, and you could make an argument for Anderson's film as well. All achieve their three distinct and different visions with such almost flawless precision. All three with such unique and ambitious efforts and all three crafting such successes. Down the line in all three films you see such attention to detail that all play into their remarkable storytelling. Nolan with his accomplishment in creating this atmospheric near silent war film, Del Toro in his gran sweeping romantic melodrama by way of the creature from the Black Lagoon, and Anderson in his dynamic and vivid interpersonal tale. All three use music so brilliantly, especially Anderson, all three use production design so brilliantly, especially Anderson, all three use every quality within film so brilliantly, especially Anderson. Each delivered one of the greatest directorial achievements of the decade, and I don't mind if any one of those three win, though I would love that Anderson upset.

Then there is a first timer and near first timer in Peele and Gerwig. For me their work is definite step down, but again that's nothing to be ashamed of. Peele makes the occasional misstep in his use of tone, but his overall success with the horror related scenes as well as the sense of satire is remarkable. Gerwig does fine work for the most part, again that ending sequence is pretty shaky, the directing included, but overall has a nice deft hand. Her direction of the comedic scenes in particular is admirable as she wisely avoids drawing them out past their ideal point. Her direction overall isn't excessively noteworthy, but definitely solid work.

Mitchell Murray said...

I'll be reviewing actress soon but I just want to say now - this is the first time in a long time I can see any one of them being my favourite. Not since, say, 2010 or 2016 have I been this enthusiastic about the category.

Louis Morgan said...

Picture:

1. Phantom Thread
2. Dunkirk
3. Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri
4. The Shape of Water
5. Get Out
6. Lady Bird
7. Call Me By Your Name
8. The Post
9. Darkest Hour

I'm pretty happy with this lineup and these nominations overall. Obviously would've preferred Blade Runner to make it in more places as well as I, Tonya, but given the unexpected love for Phantom Thread I can't be too upset.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Will you be giving thoughts on the non-saved performances later on today.

Mitchell Murray said...

(Louis) Would you say this is a stronger or weaker best picture field than last year? I may actually prefer these 9 nominees collectively given my indifference towards Hidden Figures, though last year did give us greater heights in many regards.

JackiBoyz said...

1. Rockwell
2. Harrelson
3. Dafoe
4. Jenkins
5. Plummer

Will Lady Bird be the big loser at the Oscars this year? I reckon the Shape of Water, Darkest Hour, Blade Runner, Three Billboards, Phantom Thread and Dunkirk will win an Oscar.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

A few of them, yes.

Mitchell:

Well this year 4 of my personal top ten made it, three of them in my top give, last year 4 of my personal top ten made it, two of them in my top five. So slight edge to 2017.

In terms of the beloved film that I don't adore last year had Manchester By The Sea, this year had Call Me By Your Name. So uh maybe slight edge to 2017, haven't re-watched the latter yet.

In terms of the somewhat generic "crowd pleasers" I probably preferred Lion and Hidden Figures to Darkest Hour and The Post, though not by some large margin. So slight edge to 2016.

Then there was Moonlight in 2016 that made it in my top 20 but not top ten. Whereas this year there was Get Out and Lady Bird so slight edge to 2017.

And then there's Fences which has no comparable film this year.

And for extra I prefer Phantom Thread overall if you combined the two lists, so 2017 wins, but not by any extreme margin.

Anonymous said...

Blade Runner still did somewhat well for a box office flop lol 5 nominations.

Louis Morgan said...

Jackiboyz:

Possibly yes, Original Screenplay is going to be quite the race since I'm pretty sure McDonagh got Afflecked based on Three Billboards making it into editing, and everywhere else it a had chance in.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

I think I'd probably put Billboards over Psychopaths, which also isn't quite as refined as In Bruges, but few screenplays are.

Luke Higham said...

Actually, this will likely be the highest ranked supporting lineup to date.

2014 - A 5 and four 4.5s

2017 - Each will be a 4.5 at least with 2, perhaps 3 getting 5s.

BRAZINTERMA Prêmio Fictício said...

1 - Rockwell
2 - Harrelson
3 - Plummer
4 - Dafoe
5 - Jenkins

jamieteller1610 said...

My own scores:

5. Harrelson - 3.5
4. Plummer - 4
3. Dafoe - 4
2. Jenkins - 4
1. Rockwell 4/4.5

My own #1 is Barry Keoghan.

Techno said...

1 - Harrelson
2 - Rockwell
3 - Dafoe
4 - Plummer
5 - Jenkins

Louis Morgan said...

Gyllenhaal - 4.5(I rather like Gyllenhaal performance here actually and I would not have minded if he had contended a bit more. Gyllenhaal delivers well in the role by properly emphasizing both the less savory and the inspirational qualities of the character. Gyllenhaal reveals a man who is definite screw up and successfully shows really the breezy attitude that not only gets him trouble but also leads him to not seek a proper recovery. His scenes with Maslany are great as they so naturally reveal this really broken relationship. In that as much as they show a genuine love between the two they also reveal such a compromised affection though. The base affection is true, but there is a real bitterness as well. Gyllenhaal nicely doesn't over do the inspirational moments rather earning them by revealing the emotional and physical pain that keeps the man constantly down before he ever attempts to recover from his injuries.)

Hanks - 2.5(Well he's no Jason Robards, not even close. I will admit Jason Robards had the advantage of simply being Ben Bradley's doppelganger, unless Bradley took on Robards's mannerisms later in life. Anyway though Jason Robards felt like you were meeting a man, Hanks feels like Tom Hanks trying off his best Jason Robards impression and not doing all that well. His growly voice and stances feel very much ACTED at every point as if it were an impression. It doesn't help matters that his whole physical attempt to recreate Bradley/Robards makes it look as though he is always severely constipated. Hanks is best when he goes all natural, an overly mannered Hanks is not a good Hanks.)

Emi Grant said...

Ok, here we go:
1. Rockwell
2. Harrelson
3. Plummer
4. Dafoe
5. Jenkins

Matt Mustin said...

1. Rockwell
2. Harrelson
3. Jankins (I hope you appreciate this performance as much as I do)
4. Dafoe
5. Plummer

John Smith said...

Louis, your thoughts and rating on maslany in 'Stronger

Louis Morgan said...

Check Charlton Heston in Major Dundee

BRAZINTERMA Prêmio Fictício said...

2017 - ALTERNATE BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
- Michael Stuhlbarg in Call me by Your Name
- Benny Safdie in Good Time
- Harrison Ford in Blade Runner 2049
- Patrick Stewart in Logan
- Bob Odenkirk in The Post
- David Lynch, Ron Livingston or Tom Skerritt in Lucky

BRAZINTERMA Prêmio Fictício said...

I forgot the names: Kenneth Branagh, Mark Rylance or Cillian Murphy in Dunkirk

Robson Nakazato said...

1. Rockwell
2. Dafoe
3. Harrelson
4. Jenkins
5. Plummer