Sunday, 7 January 2018

Alternate Best Supporting Actor 1965: Results

5. Donald Pleasence in The Greatest Story Ever Told - Pleasence makes a large impact in a few brief moments by granting such an unnerving gentleness to his otherworldly evil.

Best Scene: In the cave.
4. Claude Rains in The Greatest Story Ever Told - Rains gives a worthy swansong for his career through one last go with a performance that realizes a properly entertaining and oh so devious villain.

Best Scene: Fear then a smile.
3. Charlton Heston in The Greatest Story Ever Told - Heston gives his best biblical epic turn in a supporting role, by so effectively depicting the overwhelming even if somewhat mad strength of his John the Baptist's conviction. 

Best Scene: Confrontation with Herod.
2. Richard Harris in Major Dundee - Harris gives a marvelous turn that while being actively entertaining also realizes the more complex themes of the film through his vivid portrayal that gives understanding to this gentlemanly yet violent soldier and his specific code of honor.

Best Scene: The deserter.
1. Robert Shaw in Battle of the Bulge - In a year of incredible supporting turns Shaw offers yet another one. Shaw once again creates a truly menacing villain yet he goes further in capturing the complexity of the role by giving understanding, though not sympathy, to his pragmatic Nazi.

Best Scene: The battlefield is home.
Updated Overall

Next: I think I'll take a break before the Official Oscar nominations. However if everyone would like to recommend one film for me to watch from 2017, or a year I've covered in the bonus rounds already, or an animated, documentary or television film from any year. I'll watch them during the interim.

332 comments:

1 – 200 of 332   Newer›   Newest»
Omar Franini said...

Louis: your rating and thoughts on Stefania Sandrelli in I Knew Her Well?

Robert MacFarlane said...

Watch Happy Death Day for Jessica Rothe for a 2017 release.


Also, concerning the GG's: Whatever, I'm going to bed.

Mitchell Murray said...

I you can find them Louis, I would suggest "Personal Shopper" and "Last Flag Flying" if you haven't seen them already. The movie is rather divisive but i'm curious to see what you think of Kristen Stewart's performance in the former, since I think its her best work. And for nothing else, I'm interested in seeing your thoughts on Carell's work in the later along side his turn as Bobby Riggs.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Rating and thoughts on Burgess Meredith in Harm's Way.

Watch Malice from 1993. It's not really a good film, but watch it for Anne Bancroft's one-scene performance.

Michael McCarthy said...

For 2017, I highly recommend Loving Vincent.

For years already covered, I'm kicking myself for not recommending Heath Ledger in Lords of Dogtown for Supporting Actor 2005. It's a fairly standard skating movie, but Ledger is SO much fun in it.

And while we seem to be on a Richard Harris kick, maybe check out Man in the Wilderness from 1971. It's based on the same story as The Revenant.

Omar Franini said...

For 2017, i'd recommend A Fantastic Woman and Loveless, while for 1988 Camille Claudel (Adjani) and Story of Women (Huppert).

Bryan L. said...

For 2017, I'd recommend Ingrid Goes West, solely for Aubrey Plaza's performance.

I also vouch for Heath Ledger in Lords of Dogtown (2005).

Psifonian said...

2017: "Better Watch Out." Levi Miller should be in contention for your alternate write-ups, at the very least.

Anonymous said...

For 2017, I'd recommend Marjorie Prime, for Lois Smith, Genna Davis e Jon Hamm perfomances
And A Ghost Story, for Casey Affleck and Rooney Mara perfomances

jamieteller1610 said...

Since I assume you'll be watching The Killing of a Sacred Deer, I'll recommend Columbus with John Cho and Haley Lu Richardson. Beautiful film.

Matt Mustin said...

For 2017 I recommend Split, if you haven't seen it, for James McAvoy's performance.

Luke Higham said...

Your ratings and thoughts on Courtney in Operation Crossbow and James Mason in Lord Jim.

Thoughts on any other female performances with a 4 or higher and could you re-post your top tens again please.

Luke Higham said...

And Jean Sorel in Sandra.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Apart from the re-watch for Mean Streets, from 2005, Elizabeth I with Helen Mirren and Jeremy Irons and from 2012, The Hollow Crown (Richard II, Henry IV Parts I & II and Henry V).

Charles Heiston said...

I'm with Michael, Loving Vincent would be a very nice film to watch.

Luke Higham said...

Michael and Charles: That would be a very interesting film to examine and I'm curious about your recommendation of Jerome Flynn.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

I would suggest
Your Name (2016)
A Silent Voice (2016)

Both these animated films are in my top ten for 2016, with Your Name probably being my favorite of that year.

Luke Higham said...

Apart from Anime, the only animated films I really want your thoughts on are Chicken Run and Fantastic Mr. Fox but I'm patient enough for those when 2000 and 09 come around.

Luke Higham said...

And The Little Mermaid, Hercules, Tarzan, The Prince Of Egypt and Watership Down.

Louis: If we happen to have this situation next year then I'll most likely recommend Bloody Sunday, Boy A and Stuart: A Life Backwards but for now, Elizabeth I and The Hollow Crown.

Luke Higham said...

And thoughts on Christopher Lee in Dr. Terror's House Of Horrors.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the Golden Globe monologue.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: And Oprah Winfrey's acceptance speech.

Calvin Law said...

I'll say that one thing that bothered me in retrospect was no recognition for Sestero. He wrote the book after all.

Luke Higham said...

*Courtenay in Operation Crossbow

John Smith said...

Watch 'The Square' if it is available.

Luke Higham said...

Louis and Mitchell: Personal Shopper had its first theatrical release in Belgium & France in 2016.

Calvin Law said...

Citizen X from 1995 Louis :)

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Great choice. :)

Robert MacFarlane said...

Issey Ogata played Hirohito in a film called The Sun back in 2005, so you can add that to the list.

Deiner said...

Louis: Any of these
2013:
- Only Lovers Left Alive
- Short Term 12
- Stoker
- The Spectacular Now
2014:
- A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night
- Belle
- Clouds of Sils Maria
- Girlhood
- Maps to the Stars
- Obvious Child
- Predestination
- Queen
- Under the Skin
2015:
- A Bigger Splash
- Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter
- Mustang
- Suite Française
- Tangerine
2016:
- Personal Chopper
- The Love Witch
2017:
- A Fantastic Woman
- A Ghost Story
- Beatriz at Dinner
- BPM (Beats per Minute)
- Columbus
- Ingrid Goes West
- Lady Macbeth
- Princess Cyd

RatedRStar said...

I really liked Three Billboards, what didnt you like about it Robert?

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Could I have thoughts on any saves after the BAFTA nominations are announced tomorrow.

Louis Morgan said...

A thank you to everyone for all the recommendations.

Omar:

Sandrelli - 5(I thought this was quite an exceptional performance that to me played like an anti-La La Land, specially to Emma Stone's Mia in that film. I loved Sandrelli's performance here though as she created this marvelous balance within the extremes of the character keeping her from becoming not much more than a vapid caricature, like Julie Christie's Darling. Sandrelli does this by bringing a genuine charm within her work and to certain extent offers a certain endearing quality to the ambition even as she reveals quite obviously its negative facets. Sandrelli though doesn't personally wag her finger at her character which is important. Her own portrayal finds the right desperation in the ambition, and really this positive energy to that reflects the passion in this. She though shows the certain vapidness that is within this, particularly in her portrayal of her various relationships where she creates the sense of her problematic use of them. I have to say I found the ending particularly harrowing, in part because of its bluntness, but also because of Sandrelli's well rounded portrayal that while showing the very flawed person she is playing still revealed a person within it all.)

Anonymous:

Meredith - 3.5(I'm quite sure Meredith is always good and this is just another strong turn by him. Meredith role is somewhat limited, as the even more seasoned officer to Wayne's, but offers a real rich history within his largely exposition scenes. Even as his lines don't speak to anything more Meredith offers the right warmth towards Wayne suggesting a long friendship, but also brings the right exasperation within himself to suggest the man's long history with conflicts in general.)

Luke:

Courtenay - 4(A small role though largest enough to make me wish the film had been from Courtenay's perspective. In just a few minutes he captures a greater intensity, that the film loses once he leaves, in portraying the tension of the spy trying to ingratiate himself. He offers the right sympathy in so effectively internalizing the fear of these few moments, and ends up giving a very moving portrayal of man trying to keep it together under horrible circumstances. Just another testament to his great talent.)

Mason - 4(Just a good bit of evil from Mason as to be expected. He unfortunately doesn't appear until very late in the film, but steals the whole thing once he does. Mason's terrific in just bringing his usual deviousness but here with an extra dose of callousness as I love the way he presents his Gentleman Brown as someone well aware of just how dastardly he is. He embraces fully into making the last portion of the film the best by virtue of Mason's presence.)

Louis Morgan said...

Cardinale & Sorel - 4(The two of them are quite in playing this certain tight rope in their performance where they mine the depth of the character within their exact relationship. Much of the time they present a more surface general loving sibling relationship yet what they do beyond that is the most remarkable facet of their work. They find the complexity in this dynamic as the love seems a bit more than that at times, and far more problematic effectively building towards this mutual destruction between through this chemistry. When the revelation occurs it is natural and the two are both very good in the two opposed views with Sorel portraying more directly moving towards his character's feelings while Cadrinale depicts hers trying to contain it all the more.)

Masina - 4(Apparently there is a divide for Fellini at 8 1/2, where either you continue to love his films or you do not. Well I fall into the latter half here as with both Amacord this film I found it become this drawn out exercise. Masina, who gives a wholly reactionary though still lead performance, is still effective in her role. She doesn't say much however she is good in bringing something in every point of watching essentially the "spirits" and the way they influence. She naturally brings this growing confidence quietly in her work, and her performance delivers even if I found the film underwhelming.)

Lee - 3.5(The best part of a pretty underwhelming horror fest. Lee brings a level of entertainment in his own performance in actually a rather atypical role for himself. Lee is a little different type of flamboyant as his stuffy critic and is actually quite a lot of fun to watch in the role. He also makes the most dynamic moments with Cushing portraying well the ardent disbelief of the man to the gradually increasing unease as he faces the obstacles.)

Actress:

1. Elizabeth Hartman - A Patch of Blue
2. Stefania Sandrelli - I Knew Her Well
3. Samantha Eggar - The Collector
4. Julie Christie - Doctor Zhivago
5. Julie Andrews - The Sound of Music
6. Claudia Cardinale - I Knew Her Well
7. Giulietta Masina - Juliet of the Spirits
8. Hana Brejchova - Loves a Blonde - 4
9. Catherine Deneuve - Repulsion - 4
10. Carol Lynley - Bunny Lake is Missing

Supporting Actress:

1. Simone Signoret - Ship of Fools
2. Silvia Pinal - Simon of the Desert
3. Paola Pitagora - Fists in the Pocket
4. Shelley Winters - A Patch of Blue
5. Claire Bloom - The Spy Who Came in From the Cold
6. Kyoko Kagawa - Red Beard
7. Ida Kaminska - The Shop on Main Street
8. Geraldine Chaplin - Doctor Zhivago
9. Maggie Smith - Othello
10. Joyce Redman - Othello

Tahmeed:

The opening monologue was an improvement over giggles last year, but I will say Meyers's bland delivery just didn't do much for me. It made sense to keep the focus on the controversies of the industry however I wouldn't say it was the wittiest example of treading those dangerous waters, but at the very least he didn't drown.

Winfrey's speech, who I'll admit I've never found her film work to be overly impressive, was excellent. I do think there can be a wrong time or place for certain speeches at awards shows, however this was one that was completely earned given the direct effect on their industry. Winfrey delivered her speech powerfully, and important;y avoided any pitfalls like Streep's football/MMA comments last year.

Luke Higham said...

What're your ratings for the casts of Amarcord and Le Bonheur.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Neither film is about the acting other than the whole cast of each could be described as natural enough. No one stands out beyond that point, as both are examples of films with particularly strict technique by the directors. As they don't really play characters, but really a very generalized idea of people.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Will you be watching all of the recommendations at random or will you watch the non-2017 films first.

Louis Morgan said...

I'll be going one recommendation per commentator, though the order I'll be doing those will be random.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Well, you don't mind if you watch The Hollow Crown (2012) as my recommendation. I really want your opinion on Whishaw, Russell Beale, Irons and Hiddleston.

I can wait another year for Elizabeth I and at the moment, it's a bit difficult to find both parts online, so you may need to get the DVD.

RatedRStar said...

Louis: You have got so much stuff there that I think I shouldnt ask for anymore lol.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Another reason is that since there isn't that much from 2016 to watch, I'm hoping you'll watch the second cycle of Hollow Crown films with Benedict Cumberbatch.

Giuseppe Fadda said...

I’d suggest watching The Place, a pretty terrific Italian film.

BRAZINTERMA Prêmio Fictício said...

I have a recommendation: Brazilian movie Bingo. And please give the protagonist of the film Vladimir Brichta.

Anonymous said...

Louis: About Douglas getting a 3 for Harm's Way, do you think it's more of a misdirection than his fault?

Matthew Cofrancesco said...

Question for everyone: I’m trying to think of song choices in film that might be described as ironic, i.e. go against the content/style of the scene

For example, I have Layla in Goodfellas, Stuck in the Middle with You in Reservoir Dogs, Singin’ in the Rain in A Clockwork Orange, We'll Meet Again in Dr. Strangelove, and Jessie’s Girl in Boogie Nights so far




Bryan L. said...

Matthew: American Psycho "Its hip to be square!"
The ending of The Social Network

Louis: I know you're not a big fan of Danny Boyle but can I have your thoughts on Rentons withdrawal in his bedroom scene in Trainspotting? Oh and your cast for a 2010s Thelma and Louise?

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the cinematography of The African Queen.

Michael Patison said...

Louis: I'd recommend Hillsborough (2014). For me, it's the greatest documentary ever made, and I recommend it every chance I get.

Scott Gingold said...

My 2017 recommendation is Our Souls at Night, for Jane fonda and robert Redford.

Anonymous said...

In 2017 I recommend watch A Quiet Passion for Cynthia Nixon and Jennifer Ehle, To the Bone for Lily Collins, BPM (Beats Per Minute) for Nahuel Pérez Biscayart, Bingo: The King of the Mornings for Vladimir Brichta, Florence Pugh for Lady Macbeth, The Lovers for Debra Winger and Tracey Letts, God’s Own Country for Josh O'Connor and Son of Joseph for Mathieu Amalric

Luke Higham said...

Louis: From every night until the nominations are announced, could you give thoughts on the films you watched as well as the casts.

Calvin Law said...

Sat down and watched Book of Henry for good. Holy smokes that was quite something. I'd say it was offensive but honestly I think it was way too dumb/warped to even know it was being offensive.

Lieberher - 3 (sweet and you actually care for his character up to a point)
Tremblay - 3 (sweet)
Watts - 2 Wiseaus (the fuck)
Norris - 1.5 (poor guy)
Ziegler - 2.5 (felt sorry for her)
Silverman - 2 (eh)

Honestly though the main problem is those weird weird weird directing choices. Even the script which is awful, I feel like someone could have made something of it if they just decided to cut stuff out, or play it like a twisted satire.

Robert MacFarlane said...

RatedRStar: I really don't want to talk about why I dislike Three Billboards. It's just going to cause a lot of uncomfortable discussions here.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Other 2017 films to watch, Molly's Game, Their Finest, The Lost City Of Z, Film Stars Don't Die In Liverpool The Death Of Stalin and Wonder.

Mitchell Murray said...

(Robert) Can we assume then, for future reference, that its treatment of certain racial and sexual elements just didn't work for you?

Robert MacFarlane said...

Mitchell: Kind of, but not exactly. But that specific controversy is why I don't want to talk about it. I will say my criticism does go beyond iffy racial politics. I have just as many problems with McDonagh's inexplicably terrible direction.

Mitchell Murray said...

I guess this will just have to take up the year's "divisive movie slot", eh. There's always at least one.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

That time I'd lay the blame on Douglas himself, as he just doesn't take the character to a dark enough place from the outset relying too much on sort of general Douglas charm.

Bryan L:

It's a memorable scene to be sure, and that is one film where I feel Boyle's overt style does work for the subject matter. The withdrawal scene in particular since Boyle forces the viewer into the head space with his purposefully nauseating choices, and horrifying imagery.

Thelma: Jessica Chastain
Louise: Diane Lane
Detective Slocumb: Kevin Bacon
Jimmy: Sam Worthington
Darryl: Balthazar Getty
JD: Ben Barnes

Anonymous:

It is actually weaker effort from Jack Cardiff I'd say. It is even the weakest of his three efforts from that year which also included the Magic Box, and Pandora and the Flying Dutchman. It still is a fine looking film in terms of the use of colors as Cardiff seemed to understand how to bring forth the vibrancy of his colors like few DP's of the time. It's far less dynamic work than is usually the case for him, though I think this mostly comes from Huston to choose often very simple and basic shots that seemed limited for a Cardiff effort.

Anonymous said...

Louis: While the Oscar nominations are yet to be announced, who do you think will be the winners of their respective categories?

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Picture: Lady Bird
Director: Nolan
Actor: Oldman
Actress: Ronan
Supporting Actor: Dafoe (though I could switch to Rockwell soon)
Supporting Actress: Metcalf

Anonymous said...

In 2017 I recommend watch Girls Trip for Tiffany Hadish. Great perfomance.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Watch in 2017, Girls Trip for Tiffany Haddish (really great), The Wizard of Lies for Robert De Niro (tv movie), The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks (tv movie), Raw for Garance Marillier and Ella Rumpf, The Square, Marjorie Prime for Lois Smith and Thelma for Eili Harboe.

Matt Mustin said...

Louis, what are your thoughts on Christopher Plummer as a narrator?

Nguyễn Ngọc Toàn said...

Psifonian: You have my support here, "Better watch out" remains one of the most surprising movie for me this year. Really worth a look from Louis :)

Louis Morgan said...

In regards to the BAFTA noms:

Recognition for Villeneuve finally!!!!

Darkest Hour and Call Me By Your Name got the boosts they needed.

Although still no Hammer or Stuhlbarg, either will have to sneak in now.

They loved Three Billboards, they even nominated it in cinematography, which means as Bane would say "your backlash must be more severe" although sometimes public backlash doesn't quite make it into the industry.

Annette Bening enters into an overcrowded race. I guess Streep really might not be a thing for once. Still hard to believe it.

Also no Dench! Very surprising given BAFTA nominates her for just about everything, but I'm happy about it.

Plummer confirmed past the Globes.

Rockwell and Harrelson both got even stronger.

Day-Lewis arrived as expected. I don't think Jamie Bell will translate past this point.

Lesley Manville and Kristin Scott Thomas now are both potential spoilers.

I guess it is between Three Billboards, Dunkirk, The Shape of Water now since a film has not won Best Picture without at least a BAFTA nom since Million Dollar Baby. Although the SAG ensemble rule means Three Billboards will win best picture then. There was no narrow front runner field really this year though so I think the former streak can be broken.

Matt:

He's one of the all time greats in that regard.

RatedRStar said...

People have said some great things about Hugh Grant in Paddington 2 on this blog, so why is it I am still chuckling at his Best Supporting Actor nomination, I dont know why I am giggling at that nomination even though I havent seen the film. Its the thought in my head that Paddington 2 is an Oscar contender lol I know it obviously it isn't but it is still amusing to me for some reason lol.

I am sure Grant is probably great as people have said, I just dont know why I keep smiling at that thought lol.

RatedRStar said...

It reminds me of that smile I gave when I found out that Courage the Cowardly Dog received an Oscar Nomination lol =D.

Calvin Law said...

Annette Bening and Jamie Bell are delightful surprises, as is Grant.

Alex Marqués said...

No Lady Bird? That's a bit surprising.

Luke Higham said...

So happy about Grant's nomination. I actually think it was his best work.

Louis: Thoughts on any performances that you're no longer saving.

Mitchell Murray said...

Since the bafta nominations have been released now I'll post my final oscar predictions:

Actor:
Chalamet
Day-Lewis
Franco
Oldman
Washington or Kaluuya

Actress:
Hawkins
McDormand
Robbie
Ronan
Streep or Dench

Supporting Actor:
Dafoe
Harrelson or Hammer
Jenkins
Plummer
Rockwell

Supporting Actress:
Chau
Hunter
Janney
Metcalf
Spencer or Manville

Luke Higham said...

Guys, what ratings would you give to the casts of your recommendations.

Michael McCarthy: Your ratings and thoughts on the cast of Loving Vincent, Heath Ledger in Lords Of Dogtown and Harris & Huston in Man Of The Wilderness.

My ratings for The Hollow Crown:

Richard II:
Whishaw - 5
Kinnear - 4
Stewart - 4 (Nails his Sceptred Isle speech)
Suchet - 3.5
Purefoy - 3/3.5

Henry IV Parts I & 2:
Irons - 4.5
Hiddleston - 4
Beale - 4.5/5
Walters - 3.5

Henry V:
Hiddleston - 4.5
Wilson - 3/3.5
I can't remember John Hurt as The Chorus

The Hollow Crown is my personal preference, though my ratings for Elizabeth I are:
Mirren - 5
Irons - 4.5
Dancy - 4
Jones - 4
McDiarmid & Malahide - 3.5

Calvin Law said...

Luke:

Citizen X

Rea: 5
Sutherland: 5
DeMunn: 5
Von Sydow: 4
Ackland: 3.5
Wood: 3
Caramitru: 3
Staunton: 3

Bryan L. said...

Luke:

Ingrid Goes West

Plaza-4.5
Jackson Jr.-4
Olsen-3.5
Russell-3.5
Magnussen-3.5
Klementieff-2.5

Lords of Dogtown (Don't remember much)

Ledger-4
Angarano-3.5
Everyone else-3

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

There is room for a complete surprise I think so right now I'll still hold onto most except:

Mendelsohn - 4(My preferred cinematic George as I quite liked how handled the stammer, and would've loved to have seen him in the King's Speech. Even though his role is pretty limited here I liked the combination Mendelsohn brought with a certain overwhelmed shyness that defines the man though underlined with a proper regal quality as well as a certain earnestness of man who wants to do what is right. I really liked his chemistry with Oldman as he finds the right struggle as he portrays the way the King is both taken aback by Churchill yet slowly warm up to him.)

Anonymous said...

Louis what would be your final tv top fives for 2017?

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Well, finally caught up with Three Billboards. I loved it, and while I'm not sure if it's better than Seven Psychopaths, it's certainly my favorite of the year.
McDormand: 5
Rockwell: 5
Harrelson: 5
Jones: 3.5
Dinklage: 3.5
Hedges: 3
Hawkes: 3
Ivanek: 3.5

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Series:

1. Twin Peaks
2. Better Call Saul
3. Legion
4. It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia
5. Stranger Things

Actor:

1. Kyle MacLachlan - Twin Peaks
2. Bob Odenkirk - Better Call Saul
3. Dan Stevens - Legion
4. Jon Bernthal - The Punisher
5. Cillian Murphy - Peaky Blinders

Actress:

1. Mary Elizabeth Winstead - Fargo
2. Rhea Seehorn - Better Call Saul
3. Carrie Coon - Fargo
4. Susan Sarandon - Feud
5. Jessica Lange - Feud

Supporting Actor:

1. Michael McKean - Better Call Saul
2. Glenn Howerton - It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia
3. David Lynch - Twin Peaks
4. Miguel Ferrer - Twin Peaks
5. Robert Knepper/Jim Belushi - Twin Peaks

Supporting Actress:

1. Aubrey Plaza - Legion
2. Millie Bobby Brown - Stranger Things
3. Naomi Watts - Twin Peaks
4. Laura Dern - Twin Peaks
5. Grace Zabriskie - Twin Peaks

Calvin Law said...

Thoughts on Cillian Murphy in Peaky Blinders, and the show as a whole?

Michael McCarthy said...

Loving Vincent:

Booth: 4 (A strong performance that starts out as a sort of aimless young lout, which Booth brings the right sense of dispassion and apathy to. In his drunken scenes he manages to present an oafishness within Roulin without ever overplaying it. His performance becomes very interesting as the film goes on and he finds himself becoming more deeply involved in learning the secrets surrounding Van Gogh's death, as he basically attunes his performance to that of a lead in a noir film. It works because it allows Roulin to have a motivation that he never had before, and his performance contributes to the impact created at the end of the film when Roulin's efforts turn out to be fruitless.)

Flynn: 4.5 (Most of his performance as Gauchet is given in flashbacks, which he totally delivers in despite their limiting nature. In the scenes where he is meant to be the grieving friend Flynn is moving as he portrays a genuine sorrow over Vincent's death, underscored with a mysterious streak that presents he might be hiding something. In contrast, in the flashbacks where Gauchet is meant to be the mysterious potential murderer Flynn is coldly imposing in his physical portrayal, in a manner that doesn't rule out contempt for Van Gogh, but which still suggests there's something there other than hate. When we finally meet him firsthand, Flynn is excellent in peeling away the layers of Gauchet, making sense of all of the conflicting sides of him that we've seen in flashback and revealing the true nature of his role in Van Gogh's death.)

I'd need a rewatch for the rest of the cast, as on my initial viewing they all kind of blended together into the living painting of the film. I remember quite liking most all of them though, particularly Turner and Ronan.

Lords of Dogtown:

Ledger: 4.5 (By far the most memorable part of the film as his surfer/skater bro mannerisms are certainly broad, but still somehow very specific. He's wildly entertaining in every scene he's in, and I remember looking forward to whenever Skip would show up next when I first watched the film. Ledger actually goes a little further than this though in infusing a certain wisdom into Skip, that makes him believable as the kooky mentor to the skaters, and even kind of moving in parts.)

As for the rest of the cast, I actually remember Hirsch and Angarano being pretty good, but I think it's a testament to Ledger's performance that he's the only part of the movie I have a clear memory of.

I actually haven't watched Man in the Wilderness yet, I just thought it might be an interesting film that we'd overlooked before.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: When you mentioned that Mendelsohn's work was your favourite cinematic portrayal of George VI, does that mean you've watched Jared Harris's work in The Crown.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

I should preface I do enjoy the series a lot. Its production design, direction, song choices, acting (for the most part), period detail, characters (also for the most part) and dialogue all elevate to a very good show. I will say though its adherence to a certain formula though keeps it from becoming a truly great show, a formula basically also followed by Steven Knight's Taboo that makes that show seem very lazy. Blinders is the far superior show although there are time I just feel it doesn't quite go the step further to becoming something truly incredible, as all seasons follow a very similair blueprint, but the execution of each elevates that blueprint. One other note though is I find it odd how the series sort of odd way of handling its deaths, where it only really kills off its blandest supporting characters, or its very interesting villains.

Murphy - (As the Michael Corleone of the group Murphy thankfully doesn't go to far with that idea though he brings a similair cold precision to his performance that Pacino found in that role. Murphy makes that just face though in his performance that anchors the show incredibly well. He has that sort of subtle charisma that makes Tommy have the right type of power of personality that is just assumed by Murphy's approach. Murphy doesn't define this as his role though and is excellent in the way he plays with the idea of Tommy before and after the war. He uses this also very well in the idea of the presented Tommy against the real Tommy. In that in the public leader of the peaky blinders he offer this certain swagger that he plays with in effectively bringing more or less menace depending on the situation. Underneath that though Murphy creates the right sense of the anguish of the past as an inherent melancholy in his work that only seems to occasionally relents. Murphy plays around with this well by at times showing him building his power almost as a way to create a curtain the past, but also showing the way his damage from the war allows him to be such a cutthroat. Although season 3 I felt the formula showed itself most heavily, as well as severely wasted Paddy Considine, Murphy perhaps gave his best work as he took Tommy to his lowest point in the murder of the Italian scene brutally revealing the man's most extreme demons, though later showing him trying to build himself away from it after that point. Murphy is consistently good throughout the series and is another factor that elevates even some of the weaker elements of it.)

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your Thoughts on the cast of Peaky Blinders.

I can't wait for your thoughts on Hardy.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Another movie for a year you covered to watch: The original Roger Corman Little Shop of Horrors. It's just as funny and weird as the musical.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Cinematic as in theatrically released.

Well I'll start series by series, though my thoughts are for their comprehensive work.

McCrory - (Her performance is actually of a similair mind to Murphy's in portraying her own attempt to hold a certain dominance, which McCrory portrays effectively though like Murphy purposefully undercuts this. Well most in the later seasons, first season she's pretty consistent as just the supportive side character. McCrory though naturally changes that dynamic though in the later seasons where developments challenge her stance. McCrory uses this well to portray the vulnerabilities within her in two main ways the one in her desperate acts to try to be a mother, and the other portraying the certain moral struggle related to her beliefs. Although there are some sudden shifts in this she actually manages to create consistency within the behavior by always relating these moments to the underlying weaknesses in similair way Murphy does.)

Anderson - (Although there is perhaps just a slight curve in coming accustom to his performance I actually came to quite love his performance and Arthur is easily one of my favorite characters in the show. He deserves separate specific mention for his fantastic portrayal of essentially being the mascot for the Peaky Blinders, with his particularly memorable delivery of every "by way of the Peaky Blinders" he brings that proper boisterousness to his gangsters which works particularly well in tandem with Murphy's quieter performance. In addition Anderson offers a different portrayal of the ptsd in portraying it as part of his larger personality particularly in his character's rage. Anderson channels the right anguish in these moments showing it amplify the man's horrors which he can never hide all that well. Anderson equally is good in his own quiet moments that he depicts usually as these moments of drinker's clarity as he falls into a more overt somberness.)

Louis Morgan said...

Joe Cole - (I have to say John I found to be pretty uninteresting. As Arthur works in the Sonny type, and Tommy in the Michael type, Joe is no one. He's not Fredo, he's not Tom Hagen. He's sorta Arthur, but just without anything that makes Arthur stand out. Cole doesn't help things in giving sort of a bland "too cool for school" approach in the role. His performance never becomes much and I always wondered why Knight really needed him as he feels superfluous at best.)

Wallis - (The weakest major performance on the show, and I'd say she had potential with the character. Her performance that fails to carry any of the weight or needed intensity of her spy role in the first scene. Her work just feels severely lacking and not compelling at any point. Furthermore she completely changes her performance in the second and third season. Although her circumstances have changed Wallis doesn't even allude to any of her first season past with her portrayal of this.)

Rundle - (She has sort of has the same challenge as Wallis in that Ada's changes are made between seasons. She is kind of a new person in each season by what she's doing. Having said that Rundle, unlike Wallis, creates an internalized consistency. Although we don't see her depict the change itself her portrayal at least give a sense of where Ada has come from in each iteration. Whether that is the rebellious sister, the bitter sister, the understanding sister, or a co-conspirator. In each iteration she hits her marks without forgetting the previous part making the changes work even if they are off screen.)

Creed-Miles - (As sort of a standard BritISH gangster I don't think he really elevated the role beyond caricature. He still sort of does his job as such, but it is a good thing he has a short time as the villain as well as is really the secondary villain in his own season.)

Goldberg - (Have to say I did not mind his departure as his character became tiresome the moment he came onto screen. Goldberg I did not feel really moved out of the caricature of "angry activist". He just plays firmly into the type leaving his work very repetitive and particularly unsympathetic at every point, which I don't think needed to be the case.)

Neill - (One of my favorite performances by Neill, particularly in the second season. He makes for a great villain here and I love the way he differentiates the character in the two seasons. The first portraying more bluntly as a man with at least slight delusion of propriety in his manner. Neill plays around well with this in the first season in bringing an underlying deviousness at times but showing a more general conviction of man who seems like he may believe he is doing the right thing. He's actually even quite moving in portraying his own vulnerabilities near the end revealing just a bit of humanity in the man. He's great then though in the second season though in depicting the man with no illusions anymore and being a pure villain. He's great in this no holds barred approach bringing a real menace to the character by showing just how unabashed he is in his duplicitous nature at every step.)

Luke Higham said...

Louis: I was a bit confused. When you said your favourite cinematic portrayal of George, I had the impression that you saw Harris' TV work which is the best I've seen overall.

Louis Morgan said...

I haven't seen the Crown.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: That's OK.

Have you seen any 2017 releases lately.

Calvin Law said...

What about Adrian Brody? I've heard everything ranging from 'great' to 'godawful'.

Louis Morgan said...

Riley - (I quite liked her performance which was notable given her role as written has far less depth than Wallis's yet she finds far more with what she has. She never falls into the rich caricature, but rather discovers a real humanity within the role. I found her chemistry with Murphy in particular far more dynamic and I think it is unfortunate that they underutilized her in her return in season 4. She actually delivers a certain challenge in their scenes together as Riley brings such an effortless charisma and confidence to the role. She does the most with what she has and I wish we had gotten more of her.)

Considine - (The most wasted of the series' villains. Considine does everything he possibly can with the role in bringing such menace with such ease. His role though is severely underdeveloped in every way but Considine at least makes it compelling to a point just because of his performance.)

Taylor - (Again it is always notable to me how menacing he can be in a role, and he is once again. Taylor does the vicious anger so well once again and is a properly quick tempered gangster here. His best scenes though are the ones which he shares with Hardy as they manage to both allude to a long rivalry in both the underlying intensity they bring but also the certain humorousness in their interactions showing two men who perhaps know each other too well. I wish he had made appearances in the last two seasons, particularly the most recent one rather than just being mentioned.)

Siddig - (Also wasted at basically just a one note role. Siddig does bring variation within his simple role though making at least something out of the guy even though as written he seems as though he only ever thinks about one thing.)

Gillen - (You know I'm quite sure there is one Aidan Gillen performance that gives again and again, and it just matters whether or not it fits the character or the film. This only sort of fit it. As he seems overly devious at times when that isn't really the point of the character, and particularly underwhelms as the romantic love interest.)

Brody - (Well Calvin he is both great and terrible here. His physical silent work is very good in portraying a quiet violent determination in the character that effectively suggests his motivation for going after the Shelbys. The problem is Brody does an over the top Brando in The Godfather impression that always sounds like a Brando impression. It never feels natural in his performance and unfortunately makes him seem often like a cartoon.)

Give me a bit more time to write on Hardy, as that requires a few more thoughts on the whole. I will say here though it is one of my favorite Hardy performances.

Last Flag Flying
Loving Vincent

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thoughts on the films and casts.

I'm very pleased you loved Tom Hardy. :)

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Bradley Cooper as an actor, and past film roles you think he'd be a great fit for?

Augusto BSF said...

Guys, just pointing out something in terms of oscar predictions: if Kaluuya is snubbed, it'll break a pattern still unbroken - an actor, male or female, nominated in all major precursors (GG, BAFTA, SAG and Critic's Choice), with his or her movie nominated for best ensemble at SAG, has never missed (ok, it has: Elba. But one can easily blame the netflix bias for that one). So, it means that Kaluuya, McDormand, Ronan, Rockwell and Metcalf are the only ones 100% safe for nominations, based on this.

I say that because I see lots of people seeing Kaluuya as the weakest contender among the favourites, when it's actually the opposite.

Mitchell Murray said...

I will say Kaluuya also has the genre bias and his youth against him. Its not too often horror/comedy/socio commentaries are nominated at the oscars, and generally speaking lead actor tends to favor older men. For instance, Andrew Garfield was the youngest nominee last year at 33. Kaluuya is 28.

Calvin Law said...

Chalamet is 22 though. I don't think the age bias thing will be an issue. The genre bias might be - but Augusto gives me confidence.

If someone misses out, I actually think it could be Franco.

Mitchell Murray said...

Yah with the rash of harassment charges against him now..I can still see him getting in based on the popularity of the movie and his performance, but he's sure as hell not winning, not with the year and who he's up against.

Augusto BSF said...

Genre bias is a far lesser issue if you gets nominated everywhere you need, like Sandra Bullock and Rosamund Pike.

And yes, if there's someone to suffer with the age bias it's definetly Chalamet, who's 22, but plays a 17 yo teenager in the film, what only factors against him, because I doubt many voters, specially the older ones, are going to be aware of his actual age. That's why I have him at 5th place.

The point is: I've heard some people saying that Franco's performance seems like an extended SNL sketch, and it's a comedy with Seth Rogen and the person he portrays is not exactly widely famous, and definetly not praised, so, for now, and CMBYN being a stronger film with nominations, surrounded with grativas (hate that word), plus the #oscarsostraight, all of this favour Chalamet and puts Franco out. Although I wonder who would get in if both of them ends up being snubbed - hugely doubt Tom Hanks (always have, actually). So, I think it's probably Gyllenhaal.

At the actress side, Streep is the weakest one, with Chastain (based on the Molly's Game reception by the industry) just expecting someone to fall out.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: not that I'd expect you to have given it any thought but is Lieberher lead or supporting in Book of Henry, and is Watts co-lead or supporting.

Robert MacFarlane said...

By the way, I saw All the Money in the World yesterday, and I think you should give Duris a higher score, Louis.

Michael McCarthy said...

I agree with Robert on this one, Duris impressed me just as much as Plummer.

RatedRStar said...

To be honest, aside from Gary Oldman, I think a perfectly legitimate case could be made for any of the other best actor contenders to get snubbed, including Day-Lewis.

RatedRStar said...

That is what is exciting about the Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor lineups this year, BSA really only has Defoe and Rockwell locked in, BA just has Oldman locked in, anything could happen.

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar: I'm fine with predictability as long as the nominees are all strong like 2016 Leading Actor and could be the same again with Oldman, Day-Lewis, Kaluuya, Franco and Chalamet. But I'm usually more anxious than excited when the nominees are announced as there have been quite a few snubs that I really couldn't stomach.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Could you update the My Nominations post with your top ten for 1965 Lead Actor. You still have:
Stewart - Shenandoah
Poitier - A Patch Of Blue
Eastwood - For A Few Dollars More

You have only Welles in Chimes Of Midnight and Mifune in Samurai Assassin to put in.

Mitchell Murray said...

(Luke) What are some of the snubs you were most upset about? I don't want too obvious for some of my future posts but I will list a few names.

Michael Fassbender (Shame)
Joaquin Phoenix (Her)
Ryan Gosling (Blue Valentine)
Jim Carrey (Eternal Sunshine)
Leonardo DiCaprio (Catch Me If You Can/The Departed)

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Hardy - (This is a bit of brilliant madness from Hardy. I will say going into the series seeing Hardy playing a Orthodox Jewish cockney gangster was most intriguing and I was not disappointed by the results. Hardy brings such an unpredictability to the role that leaves him the most enigmatic and frankly compelling of Tommy's rivals throughout the series. Hardy is charismatic as usual however here he uses it so well here in creating the unusual dominance of his character which is to seem both imposing while being completely off the wall insane. I like Hardy brings this certain subtle bit of calculation in the ramblings of his Alfie Solomon as though in part it is a technique of the man to keep his opponents off kilter. That makes it so when he has his moments where he goes in for the strike especially surprising and brutally effective in realizing the vicious strength of the man. Again though this is also just an entertaining performance to watch as he does the ramblings of the man that go from slightly affable to rather chilling depending on the situation or mood. I love the way Hardy plays with the idea of whether or Alfie is being serious about something, and that is part of his methods. For example when he request the Italians get circumcised or when he demands that Tommy's men stay away from the Jewish women. Hardy never goes off the rails though keeping still the right since of sort of an internalized sanity in the man particularly in the scene where he directly confronts Tommy about his own actions, or his final scene from the most recent season. It's excellent work, and I only wish they had done a season where they had made Alfie the true antagonist for a whole season rather than being more of a pseudo side one in each season.)

I quite liked Last Flag Flying. I will say though I wish it had been a true sequel to The Last Detail rather than the strange sorta sequel they pulled. As the Vietnam elements seemed pretty standard, and it made the whole brig story for Larry strangely vague. Also it must be said the name of Sal Nealon is a severe downgrade from Billy "badass" Buddusky. I once again liked these characters though and frankly I probably preferred this to Last Detail somewhat due to Linklater's focus on the characters, rather than Hal "montage man" Ashby's approach to the material. I enjoyed spending time with these characters and found the film effectively funny in a very naturalistic way, and genuinely affecting at times.

Saving Carell and Fishburne for the moment, I will note I find that all three are leads.

Cranston - 3(I struggled with this performance throughout the film. It just seemed strange to do that Nicholson impression which was largely distracting, and you think with the name change he could have avoided that. Furthermore though he just doesn't capture that true ID that was Nicholson in the 70's. Cranston comes off as a guy trying to do or say anything he can without a filter, rather than someone with that genuine Wildman spirit. I think we don't really get another phase to the character either because it would have been interesting to see what Nicholson would have done with the role with an aged Buddusky, whereas Cranston kind of plays him as though he just hasn't changed at all over the years. In fact he's become frankly more overt in his behavior. The odd thing is though there were times I got use to him and was fine with him as well. There were other times though where I hated what he was doing completely. I think his chemistry with Carell and Fishburne is what gets him by in my mind, but he's definitely the weak link.)

Louis Morgan said...

Johnson - 3.5(He gives a good performance as he capture the young man sort of reflecting the influences around him, while still keeping a certain exactness of his spirit alluding to his own past. That is he brings that strictness of the military service however he plays around with it effectively in portraying an easier going side in his scenes with the three men. He though keeps the right undercurrent of his own stresses, and his own beliefs against theirs even as he interacts with them.)

Tyson - 3(She's more than fine as just sort of the genial older woman nostalgic for her son, but there isn't anything special about it. In fact I could say you could've removed the entire scene and the film might have even been better for it.)

Loving Vincent is great and I would love to see it upset Coco in animated feature. The film is fascinating just to look at in its beautiful realization of van Gogh's work in motion. It deserves a nomination for that accomplishment alone. I though found the film compelling as well though in its structure as sort of Citizen Vincent in which someone tries to find a denouement on the figure postmortem. I'll admit I find van Gogh to be already a fascinating figure, and the film's examination of his life through this mystery ends up becoming both engaging and rather moving attempt to decipher the man.

Saving Flynn.

Booth - 4(His performance is largely reactionary yet dynamic in the way in which reacts. He effectively goes from the guy who is rather indifferent to the story of Vincent, mainly doing it to appease his father, to slowly portraying the growing concern for the man. Booth's work naturally depicts this gradual realization in just listening to the stories as each tale, and different interpretation Booth shows the young man taking it in. He anchors the film well as basically the surrogate to the audience slowly depicting sort of our own investment into Vincent's story the more complicated the nature of his death becomes.)

O'Dowd - 3.5(I actually found his work pretty moving in portraying the quiet passion in the postman to perhaps deliver the final request for von Gogh's sake. His work portrays well the idea of the man being genuinely heartbroken over the man he honestly tried to help in a properly subtle fashion.)

Everyone else is effective at being sort of different spots on the spectrum of witnesses those more and less eager, those seemingly hiding something, while others being more blunt.

Augusto:

Well I think Kaluuya is getting nominated I however wouldn't contend that he is safer than Gary Oldman. As you mentioned Elba missed out with all those citations, and as much as there is a Netflix bias there are those aforementioned biases against Kaluuya. Again I think he's getting nominated. I agree Franco is starting to feel like the one who could come up short, but my last predictions are still my predictions.

Robert:

I agree. I started out with a strong 4 anyways, and have nothing but love for that performance.

Augusto BSF said...

Well, it was not for me, but I can't handle: Marion Cotillard in Rust and Bone and Javier Bardem in Skyfall.

Luke Higham said...

Mitchell: Well, I'm only doing 2007 onwards as that was when I started watching the announcement every year.

Off the top of my head:

2007: Joe Wright for Atonement (Far less so now than I was then, I still like the film to an extent but I always found Ronan's work more compelling than the romantic plot)

2008 & 10: Christopher Nolan for The Dark Knight and Inception

2011: Fassbender

2012: Bardem

2014: Gyllenhaal & Oyelowo

2016: Adams

Luke Higham said...

2013: Hanks

Luke Higham said...

Have you seen Coco yet or are you just fed up with Pixar/Disney winning all the time.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

I saw Coco awhile ago.

Calvin Law said...

Well I kind of both agree and disagree with you about Cranston Louis, it wasn't the most inspired performance, but I did think it worked to insofar as I thought he was kind of playing his usual zany self - he was at the screening I was at so that might've projected that opinion onto me.

Definitely agree Carell and Fishburne are good, though I preferred their other performances from this year, personally. I do think Carell is probably co-lead, not so sure about Fishburne but now you mention it there are a few scenes from his POV as well as equal importance in the scenes they all share.

Calvin Law said...

I'm seeing Coco next week and I'm actually quite looking forward. Will definitely check Loving Vincent out now, though.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your Thoughts on Coco and the cast.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: I hope Loving Vincent wins as well. I really am tired of Pixar and Disney dominating that category.

Calvin Law said...

My least favourite acting snubs in recent years would be:

Amy Adams, Arrival
Benicio del Toro, Sicario
Jake Gyllenhaal, Nightcrawler
Jean Louis-Trintignant, Amour

Luke Higham said...

And Del Toro for 2015 Supporting.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Have you also seen The Greatest Showman, if not, what's your opinion on 'This is Me'.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

I didn't think Cranston was uninspired, I'll give him credit for attempting to recapture what Nicholson did, which is certainly ambitious, I just don't think he pulled it off.

I will say I am a little surprised you prefer Fishburne in John Wick Part II though.

Luke:

Are you ready for my broken record Pixar review? Well here it comes. I will say part of criticism of Pixar is that it is made for kids, which is fine, but I, as an adult, am never going to love one of their films when those very juvenile elements are so blatant that I find detract from the overall film. Coco is a good pixar film in terms of its more ambitious elements the themes of family are well realized and quite moving, the music is used brilliantly, and the creation of the land of the dead is wonderful. Those parts I do think work in a more universal sense and is part of the made for everyone movie.

Then there are the kids movie parts. These are most egregiously within certain action movies that are just plain goofy particularly in the final scene where they fight the bad guy. These could be lifted out of any lame slapstick comedy. In addition the overall plot is again completely rote for Pixar, I mean there really is only one Pixar plot. Main character needs to get home, they go through a character arc, usually learn more about their companion while trying to get home, and then they get home. This one is almost exactly like UP actually in the path that involves seeking something special but finding that that special things isn't quite what is to be expected. This one also leads to the film's villain that frankly did not need to be in the film.

I do want Loving Vincent to win, not just because I prefer the film, not just because Pixar doesn't need to win every time, but also ambition in animation, since it's specially a category around that, should be part of it. Coco's CGI is good as always, but Loving Vincent accomplishment is something special.

Calvin Law said...

I imagine someone like Willem Dafoe might have been your preferred choice for Sal? And while I'm a fan of Pixar in general, I have to say that's kind of true.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: I completely agree with you.

Matt Mustin said...

Louis: I know I already recommended Split, but I'd also recommend you watch The Sunset Limited from 2011, which I know I've talked about before.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Dafoe, or Viggo Mortensen (because I'm quite sure he can do anything).

I'd say Mel Gibson, he'd really be a great choice as far as performance goes, but it might hit a little close to home for some for playing a guy without a filter who says things he shouldn't.

Luke:

Might as well wait on those thoughts until the nomination rundown on nomination Tuesday. Although I do think it could be snubbed.

Bryan L. said...

Calvin: I would've preferred del Toro to get in over Bale in supporting that year, since I think someone from Spotlight would've gotten in regardless (though I would've went with Keaton.)

Matt Mustin said...

Louis: Interesting you say that about Gibson, because I watched Blood Father recently (which I actually REALLY enjoyed) and that came off to me as Gibson himself attempting to atone just as much as the character he was playing. I mean, maybe I was just reading that into it, but it was pretty striking to me.

Mitchell Murray said...

(Bryan L.) As much as I genuinely love Spotlight, its a little sad that the weakest supporting male performance got in. I know McAdams got some flack but unlike Ruffalo she seemed to understand the tone of the film.

Louis Morgan said...

Matt:

No I'd say that is probably true, as you can easily interpret the same thing from The Beaver as well.

Matt Mustin said...

Mitchell Murray: The main reason Ruffalo sticks out so much in Spotlight is because every other actor, including the ones in very small roles, had such an absolutely perfect grasp on the material.

Mitchell Murray said...

(Matt) Louis is spot on in his review honestly since Ruffalo really was too mannered for his own good.

I'm at least glad McAdams was recognized (Though if I were voting I may have gone Elizabeth Banks for Love And Mercy), since her performance epitomizes everything the film was going for.

Calvin Law said...

I wasn't crazy about Ruffalo, but I actually preferred him slightly over Bale for that year.

Mitchell Murray said...

(Calvin) To be honest any 2015 supporting nominee that wasn't Stallone, Hardy or Rylance was kind of spotty. In an ideal line up Del Toro would have been added, then maybe Keaton or Carell.

Robert MacFarlane said...

McAdams’ performance in Spotlight is my choice for Supporting Actress that year. She got better on every viewing.

Mitchell Murray said...

My ranking would be something like this.

5/4) McAdams and Vikander (Honestly these two switch by the day)
3) Lee
2) Winslet
1) Mara

Michael McCarthy said...

As far as my two cents on Coco: It's a good movie. I totally loved the music, and I think it's got some of the best visuals of any Pixar movie. Unlike Louis, the scene with the "fight" with the villain during the performance at the end was one of the best of the film, I thought it was wonderfully inventive.

My main problem with it was that it only took about 20 minutes into the film for me to predict every twist that the film had in store, especially since the story puts a lot of emphasis on its various reveals. I'm also really done with the trope in modern mainstream animated films where every villain is revealed through a twist, because it often invalidates everything we're shown about that character up until that point.

Loving Vincent might be in my top 10 for the year, so I'd love if it won Best Animated Feature. Having said that, it hasn't got a shot in hell over Coco. That category pretty much always goes for mainstream appeal, and as a bonus Coco has won a lot of goodwill for its all-LatinX cast.

Anonymous said...

Did anyone see the Stephen Colbert interview with James Franco? does anybody reckon the sexual accusations against him could cost him an nomination?

Matt Mustin said...

Anonymous: I mean, Casey Affleck *won* last year, so it's hard to say.

Mitchell Murray said...

I think he could still get in, but there's no way in hell he's winning.

Marcus Wozniak said...

Louis: Rating and thoughts on Brenda Fricker in Home Alone 2.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Have you seen any non-2017 films recently.

RatedRStar said...

Currently watching Paddington 2, really really enjoying it, you know its good when Brendan Gleesons introductory "yesss" make me giggle lol.

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar: Could I have your ratings once you've finished it.

Louis Morgan said...

Marcus:

Fricker - 3(She's no Roberts Blossom to which her character shamelessly repeats. She just doesn't really have the same emotional impact to her work, but that's really lacking within the material. It's still a warmth filled and rather sweet performance nonetheless. I have to say though as the warmhearted stranger in that film I prefer Eddie Bracken.)

Luke Higham said...

Any more 2017 viewings Louis.

Louis Morgan said...

On the DGA noms:

Prediction wise Del Toro, Nolan, Gerwig, Peele and McDonagh all feel like they should repeat for Oscar nominations. There just doesn't seem like an obvious alternative. I will say preference wise I'm fine with the line up, obviously could go for Villeneuve being there, but I didn't think he'd be nominated anyways.

On a side note the first-time feature nominations though had one ridiculous oversight. No John Carroll Lynch in favor of Taylor Sheridan for Wind River, which wasn't his first film.

Luke Higham said...

At least I can relax easy now with Nolan getting in.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Happy Death Day

Well Nolan's never had a problem getting in at DGA, however I do think he's finally going to make it to Oscar this time.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the film and cast.

Luke Higham said...

I hope to get your thoughts on The Hollow Crown this weekend.

Luke Higham said...

What are your Critics Choice predictions.

Louis Morgan said...

Side note on DGA that I somehow didn't notice yesterday which was that David Lynch was completely snubbed on the tv side. That's ridiculous.

Luke:

I had plenty of fun with the film. It doesn't take its concept to any unexpected heights but it does provide the entertainment one would hope from Slasher Groundhog Day.

Rothe - 4.5(What really makes the film work though is Rothe's performance. I have to admit I was side eying Robert's recommendation when the film first started as Rothe gives a purposefully generic bad slasher first victim performance. That was obviously intentional though as what she does is use that start as a way to develop her character and grow it out of trope. Using that basis actually is part of the fun in a way as she goes, well what if the first victim got a second a chance? And we get to see her actually develop the role, and she does so brilliantly. She makes the growth of her character very natural in each leap and does a job that can be compared with Tom Cruise and Bill Murray's work using the same idea. She too matches the potential there. This is also just a very charismatic performance as Rothe has such sharp understanding of the film's tone as she knows just when to bring a more overtly comic moment in her performance, but is able to segues into a more dramatic moment without seeming off. It's lovely work that carries the film so effectively, and really elevates it on the whole.)

Everyone else I felt served their purpose though since they have to stick to their initial sort of slasher stereotypes due to the nature of the narrative.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Picture: Get Out
Director: Nolan
Actor: Oldman
Actress: Hawkins
Supporting Actor: Dafoe
Supporting Actress: Metcalf
Young Actor: Brooklyn Prince (really should be Dafne Keen)
Ensemble: The Post
Original: Lady Bird
Adapted: Call Me By Your Name
Cinematography: Blade Runner
Production Design: Shape of Water
Editing: Dunkirk
Costume Design: Beauty and the Beast
Hair and Makeup: Darkest Hour
Visual Effects: Blade Runner
Animation: Coco
Score: The Shape of Water
Song: "Remember Me" - Coco
Foreign: A Fantastic Woman

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the trial scenes in JFK.

RatedRStar said...

Luke:
Whishaw - 4
Hawkins - 4/4.5
Bonneville - 4
Gleeson - 4/4.5
Walters - 3.5
Broadbent - 2.5/3
Grant - 4/4.5
Harris and Joslin - 2.5/3
Staunton - 3
Neighbours and prisoners - 3, they were all amusing
Conti - 3/3.5.

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar: Your thoughts on Whishaw, Hawkins, Bonneville. Gleeson and Grant.

Would you prefer if Louis watched Paddington 2 for the bonus rounds. I'd rather he saw the original first and I would like reviews for Brendan and Hugh.

Alex Marqués said...

Louis: you should watch Terri (2011) for John C. Reilly's performance.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the 'In The Garden Of Eden' hymn scene from The Simpsons.

Matt Mustin said...

Luke: "Wait a minute, this sounds like rock and/or roll."

Anonymous said...

Louis: Rating and thoughts on Dana Delany in Tombstone.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

They are absolutely brilliant and highlight of Stone's audacious direction of the film. It launches essentially tirade of, what is mostly nonsense, but makes it absolutely captivating through its flawless editing, incisive writing, and Costner's performance. Costner isn't great throughout the film, his opening reaction particular, but he is outstanding in the courtroom sequence. He not only delivers every line with such certainty such urgency, but also brings an emotional heft adding a real weight in terms of the result of the trial. It's one of the very best courtroom sequences of any film.

In da Garden of Eden is simply a hilarious sequence from the Weird Alion parody, to the the crowd becoming spent through the length of the song, the organist and the aforementioned unforgettable response by Reverend Lovejoy.

Alex:

I'll keep it in mind.

Anonymous:

Delany - 2(Again she seems far more talented a voice actress as her performance here leaves quite a lot to be desired. She never really engages with the material past a most surface level. Her chemistry with Russell is fairly lacking, despite his best efforts, Doc and Wyatt share far better chemistry. Even more so here big moments, like Billy Zane's last scene, are quite lacking to say the least. Again though it is largely her physical performance that never quite seems attuned to what should be conveyed onscreen, though usually how she delivers her lines is quite good. The combination though of the two is a strange thing.)

Matt Mustin said...

I think Janney's gonna be our Supporting Actress winner. She just won another one.

Louis Morgan said...

Well we've yet to see a true industry award, however I am surprised by the results in both categories, given Dafoe and Metcalf clearly reigned with the critic associations in general. Rockwell and Janney certainly are starting to gain the needed momentum.

Robert MacFarlane said...

*sigh* Does it HAVE to be between the fish-fucking movie and the fake woke movie about racist cops for Best Picture?

Matt Mustin said...

Robert: So far as I can tell, your main problem with The Shape of Water is the premise itself?

Louis Morgan said...

Robert:

Although I have no problems with either of those films winning, I will say in The Shape of Water's situation, I'm not sure it will translate with older voters. Right now Del Toro and the film have only won with the critics.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Matt: It's just too much to get over. I mean, it's what it's about. The broad stokes social commentary subplots don't help, but ultimately it's a love story that isn't even that well-developed. Sure, it's gorgeous to look at, but it's just too dumb and vacuous for me to ever embrace.

Matt Mustin said...

Robert: I mean, I get that, but did you not know that's what it would be about going in?

Robert MacFarlane said...

I'm praying Lady Bird is the compromise "consensus" pick for Picture at the end of the day like Spotlight was. I can sleep easier.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Matt: I was already skeptical going in even with the raves. I assumed that the presentation and/or writing would justify it, but no, I never took to it.

Matt Mustin said...

Robert: I still think Lady Bird's winning.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I'm sorry I'm such a downer this awards season.

Michael McCarthy said...

I actually thought that the post-Globe backlash would ruin Three Billboards' chances and solidify Lady Bird as the winner, but I think the allegations against James Franco have overshadowed that.

Robert MacFarlane said...

@Michael: Well, they voted around the same time. It's not as if the voters had time to react.

Michael McCarthy said...

@Robert Yes, but if Franco gets nominated people are going to be angry. Those stories are probably still gonna overshadow the Three Billboards backlash.

Bryan L. said...

Louis: How do you think DiCaprio would've fared in these recent roles? Each of these films having been made in the 2000s instead

Sebastian Wilder
Young Brian Wilson
Desmond Doss




Calvin Law said...

This is very sgrange, I love Rockwell in Three Billboards and I adore the film, but in a weird way I'm kind of rooting for Dafoe instead. I rank Rockwell higher on my rankings, but somehow I just want Willem to win, might just the 'overdue' factor, but maybe it's what his character represents in the film. I dunno it's weird, I'm still happy for Rockwell and any recognition Three Billboards gets, but it's vastly different to last year when the frontrunner was easily my favourite out of the contenders in Best Supporting Actor.

Anonymous said...

Louis: I also recommend watching Vampire Hunter D, a Japanese anime film from 1985. Oh, and also your thoughts on Charles Durning as an actor.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your cast for a 2010's 12 Angry Men.

Louis Morgan said...

Bryan:

Sebastian - (Could've potentially knocked this one out as in the right circumstance he could have brought out his strongest bit of charm as long as that is what he focused on. Having said that I could have also seen him focusing too hard on the few dramatic moments taking away from the levity needed for the character, but really he probably would be good in the role.)

Wilson - (I think this would have brought him to his worst tendencies and he would've focused only on the character's traumas without really finding the nuance in the role as Dano did.)

Doss - (Doss was so idiosyncratic it is hard to say first what he would've done in this role, and what he would do to try to bring him to life. I would say maybe it would work, but I can't really picture the performance.)

Anonymous:

Charles Durning was simply a wonderful character actor who gave consistently good performances throughout his career in a variety of roles. I will say he probably has two of the strangest Oscar nominations for an actor with two, but that's nothing against him. Durning was always good even in minor roles, sometimes making something special out of a minor role like in Dog Day Afternoon which is a great example of a great actor making something out of really nothing. Durning throughout though was always making something whether in a comedic or dramatic role, and was a welcome presence in any film.

Calvin:

Funny thing about Rockwell is he's just about 50 himself, but still looks like he's around 35.

Anonymous:

Foreman: Colin Hanks
2: Paul Dano
3: Josh Brolin
4: Cillian Murphy
5: Rami Malek
6: Nick Offerman
7: Aaron Paul
8: Don Cheadle
9: John Lithgow
10: James Spader
11: Payman Maadi
12: Donald Glover

Luke Higham said...

If Del Toro wins DGA, then he has it in the bag, but Nolan should win the BAFTA.

Gary Oldman will have a clean sweep.

Calvin Law said...

That 12 Angry Men cast is inspired, especially Offerman and Cheadle.

Calvin Law said...

Just saw Darkest Hour and I'll admit it hit the good ol sweet spot, kind of like Bridge of Spies in that regard. Oldman was astounding. Also does anyone else think Dillane looks a lot like a skeevier Mark Rylance?

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: I once said to Louis, that I would've loved to see Dillane and Rylance play brothers in a film.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: You do need to see Game Of Thrones, one of these days. Dillane's amazing as Stannis Baratheon.

Calvin Law said...

I liked him in the role, the tic and that sleazy glare may have been a bit much at points but I admired him giving a bit of nuance and understanding to Halifax's position.

Louis what were your rating and thoughts on Samuel West? I thought he was quite good too.

Michael McCarthy said...

I love Brolin, Cheadle and Offerman from that list. I could also see Demian Bucharest as 11, and for 7 I bet Ed Helms could be very interesting if he gave a toned down performance.

Michael McCarthy said...

I meant Demian Bichir, I don't know why it autocorrected.

Calvin Law said...

I think Jason Bateman could also be great in the role of Juror #4

Michael: Demian Bucharest sounds like a cool villain name :)

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Ben Whishaw as an actor and out of the younger actors (Including Styles) from the Dunkirk cast, who do you see having the most potential.

And do you need to rewatch the Wallace and Gromit shorts again to consider putting them on your top ten animated short films list.

Calvin Law said...

My money's on Lowden.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: And thoughts on Anne Bancroft in Malice.

Luke Higham said...

And Isabelle Adjani in Camille Claudel.

Luke Higham said...

Lastly, gonna have to wait until Tuesday I reckon for thoughts on The Hollow Crown.

Giuseppe Fadda said...

Also, rating and thoughts on Kidman in Malice.

Omar Franini said...

Louis: rating and thoughts on Depardieu in Camille Claudel?

Calvin Law said...

Saw Loving Vincent. I think I quite liked it more than loved it, the story was interesting but I just never felt that invested in it. Animation was spectacular though, definitely deserving of some sort of award, and Flynn is a performance worth saving (should also note this is the first time I've ever seen Douglas Booth onscreen without the urge to throw a punch at his blandnesss, he was really good here actually).

Calvin Law said...

Louis: your thoughts on Thandie Newton as an actress.

Michael McCarthy said...

Calvin: That's more or less how I felt about it after I first saw it. The more I thought about it though, the more I loved how uniquely it navigates its false-noir plot.

Charles Heiston said...

I saw the Darkest Hour, will take me a bit to give exact thoughts on it, but on first view i think Oldman was great. I'm not crazy about the film itself but we'll see how it sits with me.

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