Tuesday, 5 December 2017

Alternate Best Supporting Actor 2010: Armie Hammer in The Social Network

Armie Hammer did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss in The Social Network.

The idea of playing identical twins seems to be a challenge an actor may relish. This often though is used two give two wildly different if not dramatically opposed performances. The most interesting portrayals of twins are not so extreme, just as identical twins in real life tend to not be Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Armie Hammer takes this more realistic approach in his portrayal of the Winklevosses or as titled by Jesse Eisenberg's Mark Zuckerberg the Winklevii. On a cursory glance the two men do appear to be almost exactly the same. They are both notable physical specimens that is further emphasized with an excessively upright posture from Hammer fitting for a pair of Olympiad level rowers. Their diction seemingly stemming from a sliver spoon deep in both of their throats. Hammer, who already has a rather refined articulation, seems to go just a little broader than even his normal accent to reinforce the background of the men, but also their nature. Hammer has the twins speak as men whose voices are usually heard, but perhaps more importantly as men who expect themselves to be heard.

The two are proper representations of privilege in every sense, and there is an inherent danger in playing such a type of character, particularly in an Aaron Sorkin screenplay, to veer towards caricature if the actor is not careful. This is not due to underdevelopment of characters in Sorkin's writing rather in his dialogue which is as treacherous as it is rich given its often flamboyant nature. There is almost this idea of Sorkinese which in the wrong hands can easily sound ridiculous and overwritten if not delivered properly. Hammer has a particular challenge there then in that he's already depicting an often simplified type of character with dialogue that could potentially exacerbate this. Hammer wholly avoids this while also making Sorkin's dialogue sing like few other actors have. Hammer in both performances is a master of every little colorful flourish by so effectively realizing the style of both men as natural to these words, and just delivering the lines so well. Hammer perhaps gives the funniest performance, or performances, in the film by making the most out of every line while also by having just the right type of fun with these very particular sort of men.

Now as amusing as Hammer is when pondering between the Winklevi if Zuckerberg offended one of their girlfriends or scoff at the the Prince of Monaco he's careful not to become two caricatures walking around. This is perhaps best seen through the ways he does distinguish the two twins from one another in nuanced and pivotal ways that actually helps to take them beyond simple figures of entitlement. Hammer portrays Cameron and Tyler differently in their personal styles that attaches to their personal belief in their use of that entitlement, however that isn't to say that is all there is to them or to Hammer's performance. Hammer presents Cameron as a man who very much believes, yet deludes himself, in sort of this honor that comes from his position that requires a certain attitude beyond even the mannerisms he has inherited along with his brother. Hammer shows Cameron as a man ready for every party, every general meeting or otherwise in the future in the way he speaks with such certainty towards his beliefs. Hammer grants this a touch of naivety even foolishness however not dishonestly through the character. There is some fun to be had at this expense, but this is part of the beauty of Hammer's performance. He allows you to have fun watching their plight, but he doesn't make them some sort of villain. They are still people.

On this point you can look at the way he depicts Cameron in two contrasting scenes. The first being one of his very best scenes where the two brothers go to lob a formal complaint about Zuckerberg to the president of Harvard. Hammer is downright hilarious in portraying Cameron's genuine disbelief at the president being completely unimpressed by his candor, and part of what makes this funny is how earnestly Hammer delivers every moment as a self-expressed "gentleman of Harvard". This can be contrasted against the series of court deposition scenes where we see a similair earnest disbelief in Hammer, however he garners a real sympathy when reacting to Zuckerberg's words of extreme disregard for the brothers. Now this is interesting as he iw distinguishing that against his portrayal of Tyler who has fewer pretensions over his position that Hammer realizes in subtle yet brilliant ways. Right in the disposition scenes for example it isn't the disbelief of a proper gentleman that he portrays rather fervent anger of someone ticked off who feels he was screwed out of a billion dollars. This idea Hammer directs throughout his work as Tyler that effectively differentiates between the two twins. In every moment of Cameron's assurance of proper manners of privilege, Hammer offers a terrific contrast through the more blunt of the two men who has no shame in using his wealth but also has no delusions around it either. One of my favorite deliveries of his in the film is " I broke your 335-year old doorknob" after tearing off one of Harvard's valued furnishings, that perfectly exemplifies Tyler's attitude towards frankly sentiments of his own class. This is a great pair of performances by Armie Hammer as he excels as a combination of the two yet makes them distinct. He never falls to any pitfalls in playing twins and most importantly succeeds in crafting two entertaining characters yet still humanizes them perhaps beyond what is even their intended purpose within the story.

72 comments:

Michael McCarthy said...

Has Garfield gone up to a 4.5 by any chance?

Louis Morgan said...

Nein! I felt the exact same way about his performance this time around. I did appreciate Timberlake a bit more, though I still feel he falters a bit in portraying Parker's paranoia.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Great work from him, and he's never even come close to topping it. Hoping he's as good as the reviews say he is in Call Me By Your Name, though the critics I trust the most tell me Stuhlbarg is the one who should be nominated for it.

Calvin Law said...

Stuhlbarg's got the best scene though I'd still say Hammer is greater overall. I have a feeling though that Stuhlbarg will more likely get in due to lack of category ambiguity and Chalamet 'overshadowing' him.

Really liked this review.

Calvin Law said...

Also, who'd you have picked to play Sean Parker? I could see someone like B.J. Novak pulling it off, for some reason.

Bryan L. said...

Calvin: BJ Novak would've been a great choice, since he would go on to play a similar character in The Founder and I could picture him doing Sorkinese justice haha.

Louis Morgan said...

On a side note on Hammer I will say this was one where I question my original ranking given I described this as a part he was "born to play" but I have a feeling it was probably, wrongly, due to his original followups of J. Edgar and the parts of Mirror, Mirror that I saw. This was before Free Fire where he was MVP, or even The Man From UNCLE where he was quite good. I'm glad he seems to be going in the right direction now, even with Nocturnal Animals last year but then again there wasn't much he could do with a character that seemed share the initials of Hunky Man on purpose.

Calvin:

Even if he's not perfect all the way around to me I do feel Timberlake's front man presence kind of makes up for it, so I really wouldn't have wanted it recast.

Robert MacFarlane said...

As much as I hated Nocturnal Animals, he was one of the few cast members who didn't really bother me. Like, not great or anything, but not as actively troubling as, say, Linney.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

His and Eisenberg's performances grow in every viewing for me. One of my favorite reaction shots in the film is Cameron's heartbroken expression after Zuckerberg accuses him of lying. It's amazing how sympathetic Hammer made them while not denying the pomposity.
Also yeah, I've always appreciated Timberlake's work here. The only scene I felt he faltered was in Garfield's final scene, where he sounded a bit too robotic for me.

Mitchell Murray said...

I won't lie in revealing my love for "The Social Network" - I think its a true gem thats so skillfully calibrated in almost every aspect. And really the entire male cast is solid..

Garfield seems to have benefited the most here considering what he's done recently, and I think his performance still holds up; if not for his depth then for his passion. Timberlake is far from a great actor but there is something interesting about his casting here, in that he has the one role thats perfectly suited to his personality. I also think this is Eisenberg's finest hour since he honestly holds the whole picture together. Both men have never been better, and its also clearly Hammer's best work for the moment.

Anonymous said...

Louis: your top 10 jonathan banks and giancarlo esposito acting moments

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the cinematography of Rebecca, The Song of Bernadette and Laura.

RatedRStar said...

Time for my winning requests, they are

Danny Kaye - Wonder Man
Danny Kaye - The Court Jester
Martin Short - Innerspace

Calvin Law said...

Ah, I see Phoenix is back to #1 of 2012 now.

Luke Higham said...

I'm fine with it, obviously I wanted Mikkelsen to get the win but the decision couldn't have been easy Louis. I hope Mads will get it one day.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your top ten most anticipated films of 2018.

In no particular order.

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote
Radegund
Avengers: Infinity War
Annihilation
Isle Of Dogs
You Were Never Really Here
Incredibles 2
Boy Erased
First Man
Outlaw King

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the rowing scene from The Social Network.

Anonymous said...

Is "You Were Never Really Here" going to get involved in next years Oscar season perhaps?

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Banks:

1. "Can you live with it"
2. "I should've gone all the way"
3. Taking Walter into the Laundry
4. Final confrontation with Walter
5. Leaving his granddaughter
6. Fighting Tuco
7. Hank interrogates Mike
8. Breaking down the rules
9. Meeting Walter the first time
10. Taking a half measure

Esposito:

1. The Pool
2. Killing the cartel
3. Final meeting with Hector
4. A Man provides for his family
5. Visiting Gale
6. Police interview
7. Visiting Hector the first time
8. Box cutter
9. Gus's Threat to Walter
10. First confrontation with Walter

Anonymous:

Rebecca - (Some of the very best black and white cinematography, and perhaps the very best in terms of realizes sort of the Gothic horror style. It actually takes a little more subtle approach in this regard making it all the more dynamic in its moments of contrast between the light and the dark which create such a vibrancy through that and the grays. It's a stunning film simply to look and really any scene with Mrs. Danvers is a highlight with that use of her as this piercing silhouette.)

The Song of Bernadette - (Also one of the best shot films of the 40's. It is just a well shot film in terms of composition, and notable for the time in making the outdoor shots dynamic with a more intimate scale. What is so brilliant though is the use of lighting for each characters. The glowing warm light of the woman in Bernadette's vision is incredible. This works in contrast to sister Marie Therese that has a similarly intense lighting yet here uses it to create unpleasant shadows on her face illustrating a false piousness. This is against as well the way Jones is light that is the right blend of the purity of the woman of the vision, though with the right earthly grace. It's outstanding work.)

Laura - (Well as I mentioned about The Maltese Falcon being example of very good noir cinematography, here is an example of exceptionally great noir cinematography. Like Falcon it isn't all that showy it's just exceedingly great in every regard. Like Rebecca it doesn't go for obvious extremes in its lighting rather it goes for this in a more fluid way that is rather gorgeous to say the least. Every choice simply is brilliant, particularly just that flawless way the portrait of Laura is lit, and even when it is simpler in a way it is still incredible amplifying the noir style so well.)

Luke:

Isle of Dogs
Radegund
The Man Who Killed Don Quixote
Galveston
First Man
Boy Erased
Kursk
Mute
The Predator
In-Rang

Perhaps the most overt scene in terms of why David Fincher should have won the Oscar. The scene as written probably could have been a whole lot of nothing, just a simple plot point, and Fincher makes it one of the most dynamic moments in the entire film. Honestly Fincher probably could have made a whole film about competitive rowing given how invigorating he makes the sport look. This is amplified by one of the best moments in the score as well that being the brilliant arrangement of Grieg's In the Hall of the Mountain King, just an example of the underappreciated art of arrangement.

Anonymous:

Probably not, as its US release is very early in the year.

Anonymous said...

Louis thoughts on the critics choice nominations?

Luke Higham said...

Forgot about Kursk. I'll take out Avengers.

Calvin Law said...

Two big projects for Schoenaerts, hopefully it'll help him break out for good (and Foster for Galveston).

Calvin Law said...

I'm a bit dubious about Mute and to an extent, The Predator. But I'm anticipating the rest very much.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Again one that means something but not a lot particularly with their amount of nominees. For example Viggo Mortensen didn't get a nomination last year despite their expanded lineup.

Best Picture:

Shame Blade Runner couldn't get this, very minor, boost. I must say while I liked the Big Sick, I don't feel it should make top ten list. I greatly prefer Get Out between the two Box office boosted "surprise" contenders. Kudos though for Dunkirk, Three Billboards recognition.

Actor:

Well take five of these and you probably have the best actor lineup, though I will hold out hope that Stanton is the Mortensen of the year. Also notable is Day-Lewis's nomination despite Phantom Thread missing out on screenplay, picture, director and the actresses. I have a feeling he got in sight unseen for many voters.

Actress:

Miss or Stone, otherwise these are the contenders, I could see Stone coming back with SAG though.

Supporting Actor:

Major boost for Stewart, I don't think it will translate, but still good for him. The preferred member of Call Me By Your Name is still in the air, and Jenkins potentially helped himself by not showing up with Shannon. Meanwhile Rockwell and Dafoe stay the mainstays. Miss for Rylance however I could see him coming back with the industry awards. The category also may be wide enough that we could get contrasting lineups with just Dafoe and Rockwell as the two who are in each. We'll find out next week.

Supporting Actress:

Wish I understood Blige's support, if an unknown character actress gave the same exact performance I don't think they'd be making any mark. Possibly take five of these though I think Manville is still up to play, major miss for Leo who needed this sort of nomination given the size of her film.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

I wouldn't be too dubious on Mute, I think if anything Warcraft perhaps showed that videogame movies don't care who directed them, they're still just not going to work.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Also on the tv side of things the lack of Kyle MacLachlan is garbage.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: yeah that sucks. On the bright side Sight and Sound loved TP so much that they had the balls to list it as their #2 favourite film of the year.

Calvin Law said...

Also didn't The Big Sick kind of underperform at the box-office? I mean it made money, but not Get Out-level money.

Luke Higham said...

So happy with Stewart's nomination and MacLachlan's snub is utter bollocks.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

No it made 55 million on a 5 million budget.

Alex Marqués said...

Well, at least MEW got her deserved nom for Fargo.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: damn, no idea how I didn't realize that. Also on Mute, you're right I guess, and Warcraft wasn't that bad.

Love Stewart's nom too.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your reasons why you're looking forward to the ten films you listed and what about Incredibles 2, Avengers: Infinity War, Outlaw King and Annihilation.

Luke Higham said...

And You Were Never Really Here.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Isle of Dogs - (Looks like some fun Wes Anderson wackiness in its purest form.)

Radegund - (The real story has a great deal of potential, and Malick's claim of working with a more structured narrative gives me hope of a return to Badlands form.)

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote - (Have to be interested for the sake of the madness that it has taken to get the film made, and the idea behind the film seems ripe for Gilliam's form of madness. In addition coming off The Zero Theorem is all the more encouraging.)

Galveston - (Foster in a lead role is enough for me, the nature of the role, though within his type, could be something special. Also while I haven't seen Laurent's other films, they've been well received so it will be interesting to see what she does with this.)

First Man - (Up for whatever Chazelle does and it'll be interesting to see what he does with this. Plus Gosling seems like he'll be a good fit for Armstrong.)

Boy Erased - (Although the Gift wasn't perfect I'm very much interested to see where Edgerton goes from here particularly with this material.)

Kursk - (Vinterberg plus Schoenaerts, with this true story could be something great.)

Mute - (I'm all for another mind bending thriller from Jones. Although I never saw Warcraft, I quite liked both Moon and Source Code so hopefully this will be seen as a return to form.)

The Predator - (I have to say I'm intrigued by the idea of Shane Black returning to his roots, and I have liked all of his films. Hopefully it will be a very atypical and memorable take in the horror genre. The cast already seems quite promising with Jacob Tremblay, Sterling K. Brown, Alfie Allen, and Keegan-Michael Key hopefully they won't be wasted.)

In-Rang - (Korean film by Kim Jee-woon so I'm in even though I know nothing about it.)

Incredibles 2 - (I'll admit I would preferred if there indeed had been a time jump, but I'm sure it will be good.)

Avengers - (The Russo brothers seem to know what they're doing so I'm definitely interested in it, I just like to keep my excitement low for superhero films in general these days that way they can offer more of a surprise if they're great.)

Outlaw King - (I'll admit I'm a bit sour with the severe downgrading of Ben Foster to Aaron Taylor-Johnson, although the addition of Stephen Dillane as Longshanks is most intriguing. Nonetheless I'm looking forward to Pine in the role,that original production image at least promises some good costumes, and Bruce's story is a great one.)

Annihilation - (Portman in the lead role gives me some trepidation though I am hopeful with Garland. I hope he finds his way with larger scale sci-fi and finally can deliver a truly great third act.)

You Were Never Really There - (Well I consider it technically 2017 anyways since it has had public releases. I am interested in though, mostly for Phoenix's performance though since I did not really care for We Need to Talk About Kevin.)

Bryan L. said...

Louis: I'm actually looking forward to Radegund for the same reason as you haha. And Schoenaerts, whose work I've been seeing lately. Anyways, your 2000s cast for Free Fire?

Louis Morgan said...

Bryan:

Justine: Rachel McAdams
Vernon: Gary Oldman
Ord: Damian Lewis
Chris: John Lynch
Harry: Toby Kebbell
Stevo: Paddy Considine
Martin: Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje
Frank: Ciaran Hinds

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Have you seen either You Don't Know Jack or Macbeth (Patrick Stewart) yet.

Alex Marqués said...

Louis: When you do 2014, you should watch Melanie Laurent's Respire, the directing and performances are terrific.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

I've seen You Don't Know Jack.

Alex:

I will do so.

Luke Higham said...

Your ratings and thoughts on the cast.

RatedRStar said...

Overall though on paper it looks like the acting categories will have good nominees regardless who misses so that is something great, since I am pretty sure all the Best Actor contenders except Hanks who I am worried about will get good reviews.

Calvin Law said...

Hanks has been getting good reviews though a worrying point is that a lot of them compare him to Robards in a somewhat unfavourable fashion. A few good mentions for Odenkirk too.

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Thanks. I also had Rachel McAdams as Justine and Ciaran Hinds as Frank but was drawing blanks on the others.

Matt Mustin said...

Does anyone know what Louis' thoughts are for Michael Madsen in Sin City? I know he's given them before but I don't know where.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the final fight scene between LaMotta and Robinson in Raging Bull.

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Your thoughts on both of the bar scenes with Spider and Tommy in Goodfellas?

Calvin Law said...

So looks like Ryan Reynolds is playing Pikachu. You know, this is such a bizzare-sounding prospect that I'm kind of interested.

Mitchell Murray said...

Finally saw "Stronger", and I thought it was a pretty decent. I didn't love it per say but I was invested in the story all the way through.

Gyllenhaal - 4 (I'm so glad he's on the right track now since this is his best performance since Nightcrawler. Gyllenhaal though really does make Jeff a likable guy by playing to the charisma he should in his early movies, and by adding a convincing dramatic heft to his more intense scenes. He's quite good here and if he gets nominated I won't be immediately against it)

Maslany - 4 (I have less to say about her performance because she's a little side lined, but I thought Maslany was fine too. I bought her chemistry with Gyllenhaal and her depiction of Erin's grief and frustration)

Richardson - 3 (Accent isn't the best but I really have nothing against her otherwise)

Calvin Law said...

Mitchell: some of the accents were really iffy eh? I really liked both Gyllenhaal and Maslany and honestly the film could've only benefited more by having more scenes focused on just them. I kind of wish Maslany would be getting more awards attention but oh well.

What was your favourite scene of Gyllenhaal's? I'd say his outburst scene in the car was pretty superb.

Mitchell Murray said...

His final argument with Maslany is terrific just in the way Gyllenhaal unleashes a cathartic fury inside Jeff, before immediately regretting it. I also quite liked his final reaction since its a really bittersweet moment.. Gyllenhaal shows an optimism in Jeff but also a deep sadness that will never truly leave.

Michael McCarthy said...

I thought Richardson was awful in Stronger. Like bottom five of the year bad.

Mitchell Murray said...

Yesh..I didn't think she was that bad.

Anonymous said...

Is Jake Gyllenhaal pretty likely for a bonus review if he fails to get Oscar nominated (again)?

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: Depends on how Louis feels about him yet I feel he's gonna miss out even with an extended lineup. He's been getting 4s and 4.5s but no 5s which makes it more doubtful.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your top 10 performances in William Wyler films.

Calvin Law said...

I feel he won't make an extended lineup. He's excellent but there's been plenty other greater lead performances this year.

Luke Higham said...

Also, along with Thomas Jane in 1922, Psifonian's recommendation of Bruce Greenwood in Gerald's Game could make the lineup as well.

I hope the nominees are:
Oldman
Day-Lewis
Stanton
Franco
Chalamet

Anonymous said...

I can't believe Detective Pikachu is a thing.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Pacino - 5(Bizarre that just the following year in his cinematic output he'd be talking about his dunkacino, as this performance suggests quite the divide between his cinematic and televisual work. This is an outstanding performance that suggests he hasn't lost anything given it could stand right up there with his very best work from the best. It helps that Pacino reigns himself in to give a wholly captivating turn here. What is so remarkable though this is even a mannered performance yet Pacino doesn't overdo them rather making them wholly natural in the way he realizes the idiosyncratic man Kevorkian was. They only ever amplify his work which is only part of this great performance. Pacino is terrific in the way he is able to show him equal parts insufferable, and charming. In the way Pacino realizes so well the way of the man who can get his point across yet also can get lost within his passions as well. That passion that Pacino powerfully realizes in every moment but especially the scene where he speaks about his mother. That scene is one of Pacino's all time best. As much as Pacino gives understanding though he also does find the right way in portraying the way that passion perhaps takes him too far in certain direction by so effectively creating the right sense of a level of blindness created by his fervent belief in his passions. Pacino is rather mesmerizing in one way or another in any given scene and I love that he properly makes Kevorkian as a polarizing complex figure through his performance more so than I feel the film itself does.)

Goodman - 3.5(For much of the film this is Goodman doing particularly basic Goodman supporting friend turn, to almost an extreme extent. He does this well though to be sure bringing the right chemistry with Pacino as well as some needed natural humor to the role. He also is quite good in his one major scene where his character refuses to stick by his friend, and Goodman is great in so calmly delivering moment reinforcing the friendship while setting passionately the personal limit.)

Vaccarro - 3.5(I liked her chemistry with Pacino that suggested the right history between the two siblings. Her role though is somewhat limited past this mostly to be supportive yet randomly angry at her brother for his single minded perspective at times. She makes this sort of ball of energy though quite natural to the character.)

Sarandon - 3.5(I will say seeing more and more of her later work she does have kind of a setting she goes to, and while this isn't bad it just never feels like she's trying anything new with her performances. It is always a touch static. This is the case here however it works for the part, and she's pretty great in her emotional final scene.)

Louis Morgan said...

Huston - 2.5(He hams it up a touch even for a showoff politician/lawyer. In addition he never seems to decide whether the character is earnest or not making him just go back and forth depending on the scene. This could work, but he doesn't make this any sort of natural inconsistency either.)

Matt:

Not sure but to reiterate Madsen acts like he's reading off cue cards with the energy of a stand-in who doesn't care in the slightest.

Anonymous:

More than anything the scene is an example of the sheer brilliance of Scorsese as a director. Creating one of the most intense boxing fights ever depicted on a fictional film evoking a film like the Set-Up brilliantly yet taking it a bit further. The closeups of Sugar Ray and Lamotta before the final pummeling is brilliant creating such an intensity with almost still images. In addition though De Niro is great in the scene and it is such an effective realization of Lamotta's sorry state. That being the one thing he can take pride in is he's still walking despite all his beat downs and all his failings.

Bryan L.:

Both are amazing mostly low key scenes that really illustrate the film so well. In that one sense we get such an authentic feeling with the actually enjoyable camaraderie between the men as they break each other balls, and Tommy goes off on Spider. You're allowed to have fun with the guys, and really you almost can stay having fun with just a bit of unease the first time Tommy accidentally shoots him. That shooting less of an overt psychopath, and more of your pal who should never have a gun. The second time though it's great in bluntly hitting you with the truth of the men in that for a moment you think you are just having fun with the cathartic hit of Spider telling Tommy off, then you are hit back with the blunt reality of the world with Tommy's overreaction and frankly the other men's underwhelming reaction.

Calvin:

Well it's from the director of Shark Tale so I feel this is a disaster waiting to happen particularly with this casting. It screams of a executive going "Hey whoooos popular? Weees need someone for this pokemens picture, pokemens go's losing popularity I hear, at least that's what my kid tells me on the days I see him, what's everybody like. I got it that Deadpool guy right people love him right now. Get him!"

Anonymous:

1. Olivia de Havilland - The Heiress
2. Terence Stamp - The Collector
3. Harold Russell - The Best Years of Our Lives
4. Edward Arnold - Come and Get It
5. Stephen Boyd - Ben-Hur
6. Ralph Richardson - The Heiress
7. Walter Brennan - The Westerner
8. Laurence Olivier - Wuthering Heights
9. Samantha Eggar - The Collector
10. Burl Ives - The Big Country

Bryan L. said...

Louis: Thanks. And that Pokémon Go meeting does seem pretty accurate haha

Phantom Thread is off to a good start on RT.

RatedRStar said...

Who here played Pokemon Go? I will admit I played it for a month but there is just so little to it that it just wasnt worth it.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Saw Paddington 2. Loved it. :)

Anonymous said...

Louis: Which film do you think has the best cinematography: Laura or Double Indemnity.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Laura, both are very well shot though.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Is Kingsley's review coming tonight or tomorrow.

Calvin Law said...

Glad you loved it too Luke!

Louis: thoughts on QT taking on Star Trek next? The weirdest thing I find about it is that he's not writing the screenplay.

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

RatedRStar: I still have the app. Haven't touched it for a long time.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your cast and director for a 1950's Three Bilboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Now writing the screenplay seems quite strange, though I'd imagine he'd have something to do with the writing at some point. I thin it could be interesting to see what it results in since he seems like someone with probably an appreciation for the original series. Tarantino tends to excel with adapting his style with different genre aesthetic based on Kill Bill, Basterds and his westerns so I'd be quite interested to see him do Sci-Fi.

Anonymous:

Three Billboards 1950's directed by Alexander Mackendrick:

Mildred Hayes: Irene Dunne
Sheriff Willoughby: Melvyn Douglas
Officer Dixon: Tony Curtis
Charlie Hayes: Wallace Ford
James: Angelo Rossitto
Robbie Hayes: Dean Stockwell
Red Welby: Vic Morrow

Calvin Law said...

I've just thought up some other good ones:

2000s Bong Joon-ho version

Mildred: Kim Hye-ja
Willoughby: Choi Min-sik
Dixon: Song Kang-ho
Desk Sergeant: Kim Roi-ha
Robbie: Uhm Tae-goo
Red: Hwang Jung-min

1980s Wim Wenders version

Mildred: Patricia Neal
Willoughby: Harry Dean Stanton
Dixon: Christopher Lloyd
Charlie: Dean Stockwell
James: Danny Devito
Robbie: Alex Winter
Red: Crispin Glover

1990s David Lynch version (too easy I guess)
Mildred: Anne Bancroft
Willoughby: Don S. Davis
Dixon: Brad Dourif
Charlie: Robert Duvall
James: Michael J. Anderson
Robbie: James Marshall
Red: David Patrick Kelly