Thursday, 9 November 2017

Alternate Best Supporting Actor 1988: John Lone in The Moderns

John Lone did not receive an Oscar nomination, despite being nominated for an Independent Spirit Award, for portraying Bertram Stone in The Moderns.

The Moderns, like Choose Me the other film from Alan Rudolph that I have seen, takes a very atypical, though rather intriguing I found, approach in quietly examining its characters, their relationships and the environment they live in. This time the focus being on a group of people in Paris art scene during the mid 1920's.

John Lone's career is a particularly frustrating one to examine with his brief skirting with stardom after his early work in the eighties that culminated in his performance in the best picture winning The Last Emperor. His career continued though oddly quickly faded to smaller supporting roles to the point that he has now not appeared in any film in ten years. Where is John Lone? Does anyone know? I wish he'd come back. Anyway Lone's career loss is a true shame given his talent and notably is one of the few Asian actors to achieve a real notoriety outside of martial arts based films. With this role he even makes the important transition to playing a role without even an element related to his ethnicity, as the role of Bertram Stone was not written for an Asian actor. It just required a talented one given that it is the traditionally difficult role of the other man. This other man role is a little bit different though as though Lone's Stone's wife is Rachel (Linda Fiorentino), she is also married to our lead the artist Nick (Keith Carradine), this is unbeknownst to Stone obviously. This leads to a different type of dynamic in general since Nick isn't trying to win over the man's wife, rather he just trying to decipher if his wife is coming back to him.

Nonetheless this is a challenging role as it is easy to make this character very ridiculous very quickly, and the caricature within the characters. Thankfully that is not the case due to Lone's considerable talent. Now from the start Lone makes a notable impact through his mere presence, as Stone is initially described as a friend of Houdini's, a businessman, and possibly a murderer, I love the way Stone carries this sense of danger with him. In his eyes and his exact manner he stands out against everyone else in the French cafe. He's not of the artistic bent instead there is this innate harshness that Lone exudes, a definite almost maniacal edge needed for a ruthless businessman. There is a bit of an extra flair that only an actor like Lone would bring. He takes it a bit further by creating this sense of knowing towards Stone's knowledge that people see him in dangerous. In turn there is just this certain degree of cheekiness that it particularly effective in creating the sense of Stone's position in this role. Lone shows a man who knows he isn't like those around him, and part of him does enjoy this simply in terms of enjoying the fear they have for him. In his initial confrontations with Nick, I love the way that Lone portrays Stone as loving the way he pushes around Nick, particularly in their one sided boxing match, as a man who is aware of his power without any shame in using it.

Now that would be kind of enough, as Lone is already great as the other man as the villain, but there is more to his performance than that. Stone in the film is trying to use his acquired wealth to buy himself into the art scene. This idea is key to Lone's performance, and his motivation for this is only truly explained through Lone's performance. What we see in Lone is a man who has gotten just about everything he wants although with the wish to keep his wife. Lone in this regard creates a very subtle desperation that he attaches to Stones's attempts to join the artistic movement by buying it out. In turn Lone's performance makes this part of the man's wish to retain his wife through becoming a proper part of the world. Lone's terrific in the way he does this wholly in his own work, and in such a quiet way that slowly builds throughout the film which culminates when Stone buys some masterpieces from Nick and his art dealer friend. This is denied from him when they are said to be fakes by the art crowd, to which leads Stone to destroy the paintings. This is downright amazing scene for Lone. On when end he reveals the ruthless businessman as he goes about stabbing and burning the paintings.

There is also to the sheer venom towards the art crowd that has rejected him. Lone's outstanding as he doesn't even raise his voice yet there is such a palatable intensity in his hatred towards them. This is only part of it though as that straight hatred is important as Lone shows that he doesn't care about the art crowd, but he does care about the rejection since it also means his wife will reject him. This is found that in the viciousness of his intensity there is there is a more vulnerable desperation as Lone plays it as though the only thing holding Stone together is the hate. It's incredible as I found Lone actually rather affecting by reveal such a genuine pain within the man violent demeanor. Lone naturally leads to the final confrontation where he finally loses his front to reveal the wretched man beneath of it. Lone makes it genuine, and even offers a bit of sympathy for the fiend in his final moments mastering one of the trickiest types of roles. Now before I can end this review I do have to mention Lone's final scene that while has no relevance to his arc it is a bit of mad brilliance in Lone's physical performance. The moment consists of performing an escape trick in a strange circumstance and Lone captures through the insane glee he brings in the moment as man who is on some other plain of existence. This is a great performance by John Lone and yet another reminder why he needs to come back to us.

80 comments:

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

He could go up to #2 for this, I think. I loved him in The Last Emperor, I'll check this out after my exams.

Louis: Your ratings and thoughts in the rest of the cast.

94dfk1 said...

Louis: Would you have James Badge Dale reprise his role as Barrigan in your 2010s version of The Departed? Schoenaerts and Hardy aren't too far off from Dicaprio and Damon when it comes to age so I'd figure Dale could still play that role today.

94dfk1 said...

Louis: BTW I saw your 90s cast for the movie and Tom Cruise would've
NAILED Colin Sullivan's last scene, since that character would've been perfect for him back then and that he could've indeed drawn more complex emotions to his last scene.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on these Dredd scenes:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mb4f1xpSu-I
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kl_sRb0uQ7A
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=szZaN1ptVw4

Luke Higham said...

I think Lone will finish 4th.

Deiner said...

Louis: Off-topic, have you given your thoughts and ratings on the rest of the cast of The Beguiled (1971)? Because I could only find Page and Hartman's.

Anonymous said...

Louis, have you seen Whale Rider.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis : Your thoughts on the following award show speeches-
David Harbour - SAG Awards
Matthew McConaughey - Oscar speech
Laurence Olivier - BAFTA Speech for 'Oh What a Lovely War'

RatedRStar said...

If somebody had told me in 2002 when I first watched Rush Hour 2, this Ricky Tan fella will be a really great actor when you grow older lol I would have laughed, he truly is great, yes we should start a search on John Lone immediately.

Roy Cheung is in a similar position, he did a film, then did a runner and hasn't been seen since he was arrested for drugs in 2014, I reckon Lone either just retired or went into the theatre.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on:
The Mission:
Gabriel's Oboe
Climb/Falls/The Mission
On Earth As It Is In Heaven

and Schindler's List Theme.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Even Louis C.K. has owned up to sexual assault allegations.
Yeah, the fine line between admiration for one's work and disgust at their actions is becoming really blurred for me.

Luke Higham said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Luke Higham said...

Tahmeed: You just hope they'll never get work in the industry ever again.

And it's gonna take a long time, if ever for many to see one's work in a positive light again.

On an unrelated note, as someone who enjoyed watching wrestling when I was younger, it took me a year to go back watching Chris Benoit matches again after the double murder suicide. As a fan of his, I was gutted but looking at the bigger picture, his brain was completely fucked up and lost his mind in the process. So I can still appreciate and enjoy the performer that he was and from what I can gather, he was a decent human being until that fateful moment.

Anonymous said...

I'll never understand why people still watch the Pokemon anime.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Thameed: It's definitely much harder to separate the work from the artist from Louis C.K. considering how much of his show now feels like a retroactive confession. His now-canceled "I Love You Daddy" sounds skin-crawling in all its implications. I recommend reading Matt Zoller-Seitz's review for a more clear picture of it: https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/i-love-you-daddy-2017

Honestly the older I get, the more I realize separating art from the artist is easier than done. It's true, horrible people can make great and important art. But at the same time we have to be conscious of who is truly benefiting when we consume that art. I realized that today when I saw Murder on the Orient Express and it dawned on me that wife-beater Johnny Depp might have a gross revenue. From now on I'm going to be far more careful on which films I pay to see. I'm no longer going to give Woody Allen, Mel Gibson, Casey Affleck, or anyone else in that group my time if it means furthering careers that should be over. If it's free? Perhaps I'll watch it, maybe even like it and grudgingly admit their talent. But they won't get a cent from me.

It also is making me reconsider certain performances or films I've loved in the past. Something like, say, Spacey in Se7en I would still admire, but I have to now consider if the homoerotic subtext that I once found so rich in L.A. Confidential with Jack Vincennes feels like secret omen. Everything between Jack and the gay actor he outed in the film breeds a new subtext in light of recent revelations. Perhaps I can still love his work in it as much as I used to, but I REALLY have to think about it.

Matt Mustin said...

Robert: This is a complicated question, but do you still consider Casey Affleck's work in Assassination of Jesse James one of your favourite performacnces?

Robert MacFarlane said...

Matt: I do. Grudgingly and with shame. Just like how Chinatown is one of my favorite films. It's definitely inconsistent on my part. I don't mean to sound moralizing with any of this, so forgive me for any hypocrisy on my part.

Matt Mustin said...

Robert: No no, I just ask because I struggle with the same questions sometimes. Especially now with Kevin Spacey. Someone who's name I can't remember made the point that it's harder when it's an actor as opposed to a director or writer because every time you revisit their work, you're staring right in their face.

Robert MacFarlane said...

There are a few names that are going to come out soon that we be ready for. I won't say any now, but be warned; There will be far more upsetting names to read than Brett Ratner.

Matt Mustin said...

Oh, I'm sure.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I'm also really trying to temper any sort of schadenfreude that may come from seeing people like Ratner who have been gross assholes their entire careers get accused. It feels... disrespectful to the victims.

Louis Morgan said...

I will get to all other requested thoughts soon, as well as comment on having seen Murder on the Orient Express. I wanted to address the artist/art situation, best I can. To avoid the work, or not support is wholly understandable, and I will not decry anyone for doing so. I will say though to essentially purge yourself of any connection to misdeed is perhaps an impossible effort. It is unlikely one can ensure every product you enjoy is from ethical people, or were procured in an ethical way. It is unlikely you can even hold your very existence, the certain freedom you may enjoy, was not itself procured through a lack of morality at one time, despite not being of your own personal making. To purge yourself wholly of this would require one to essentially live in Antarctica, using only products you yourself invented, and eating food you farmed yourself, therefore impossible.

Louis Morgan said...

Now having said that I support all legitimate actions that can be taken, such as the Plummer recasting, to attempt to diminish and destroy this behavior whenever possible.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: I personally agree with you and I do support everyone else's feelings and opinions on the matter.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on MOTOE and the cast.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Luis: I realize that. It's undeniably a nuanced issue that I can never truly get a grasp on concerning my own feelings. I'll just say, for the time being, I'll try to avoid these things in the cases where I know for a fact where an Allen or a Gibson are benefiting from my participation. Again, this is specifically to do with me paying to see their work. Truth be told, I could see myself breaking this anyway. Ugh. This whole thing is making me answer questions I avoided for too long.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I don;at know about Louis, but I actually enjoyed the new Orient Express. It starts off awkwardly, but I got into its groove by the time they were on the train. Pfeiffer was my favorite of the cast, but Branagh was nicely restrained when he could easily hammed it up, and Gad really surprised me.

Louis Morgan said...

Robert:

I understand your position, and I'd support anyone who takes it.

Mitchell Murray said...

I'm a little late but so be it. The art/artist argument is a sticky wicket, and I agree with Louis that its almost a fools errand to fully distance yourself from a certain film maker/actor. No matter what, I will try to separate my views of an performer's personal life from their raw talent, though I will also do my best to avoid funding their careers if possible.

Mitchell Murray said...

Case in point, Casey Affleck is a bastard for what he's allegedly done, but I won't deny the strength of his two oscar nominations.

Calvin Law said...

Pfeiffer was my favourite too, and I think everyone's made very good points. Personally? I try to distance it and usually it works, but honestly, it's hard at times.

Louis Morgan said...

Tahmeed:

Carradine - 4.5(I think it must be said that Carradine must be the most underrated leading actor since all of his leading turns seem to be in under seen films. I really liked Carradine's performance here. As with his other leading performance he offers a really unique type of lead with his unassuming charm and style. Carradine goes further though here though in that I thought he succeeded in making his character Nick really likable who could have been insufferable in another's hands. Carradine though with his charm, but also his certain lack of pretense in his depiction of the artist makes Nick really easy to follow through his journey in the art world as well as dealing with all the complicated people around him. Carradine has the right touch here as he delivers in all the more emotional moments, yet captures the correct lower key tone for the film.)

Fiorentino - 3.5(I would say the film could have benefited from just a bit more of her character to allow Fiorentino to flesh her out just a bit more. She does do well with what she has though in portraying both the lusty passionate side of the character that seems to define her worst decisions, while still offering a certain substance the vulnerability she portrays beneath that. I also did rather like her chemistry with Lone which is based around that lust, while with Carradine it is that quieter seemingly better side.)

Shawn - 3.5(An enjoyable bit of Wallace Shawn doing his usual thing here. I think someone else might have brought more pathos to the man's plight however Shawn sort of irreverent take also works.)

O'Connor - 3.5(This is an effective take on Hamingway as he focuses very much on the pathos of the man though with a certain glib humor in portraying his reactions to other people's reactions to him. He is very good though in suggesting the history of the writer in his performance, and where the man would go in the future.)

Bujold - 3.5(I guess I just like Bujold in general as I really liked her pretty straight forward supportive warmth she brought here, though with this definite toughness in every interaction as well.)

Chaplin - 4(She's horrible in the best way possible and creates the sense of the vapid ego of the character brilliantly. I especially the horrible smugness of her performance in the scene where she basically breaks Lone's Stone.)

Louis Morgan said...

94dk1:

Sure.

Anonymous:

The first scene is good set piece with the action that bring such an exact brutality, and such an imaginative use of the various weaponry which is found throughout the film. They manage to make it believable that Dredd would be successful despite being outnumbered. I also love though that central dynamic between the rookie and Dredd that manages add to the scene without becoming a distraction, while providing a real substance in what is required of the judge at the end of the scene.

Great sort of fist pump moment for the film and just goes to show you it is not about the line but how you say it. When Stallone says "I am the law" it was silly, but when Urban says it, it's amazing. I also actually do love Headey's "yeah sure" reaction in the moment.

Another great action set piece, and a reason I love the film is that it manages to not be repetitive despite its nature. It successfully ups the ante with the Judges vs judges fight. It also does manage to do a bit of natural world building in the dialogue between the judges. My only complaint would be the "talking villain in the final moment", but hey I've seen far worse uses of the cliche.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

This is all really complicated for me. Kevin Spacey and Casey Affleck have both given (in my opinion) all time great performances. But the other day, I tried rewatching L.A. Confidential, and I just.... couldn't. Even if it's one of my favorite films ever, it still dawned on me that I might have been, in some way, contributing to the exoneration of dreadful, awful people.

And I'd agree with Matt for it being harder with actors. Weinstein, in spite of producing all of Tarantino's films, wouldn't be as tangibly linked with my memory of those otherwise great works. But he deserves to burn for the shit he's done.

Mitchell Murray said...

(Calvin) Its always been difficult to separate art from artist, but I don't think I'm alone in thinking today's political climate has amplified it considerably. In any case, my wish is that I remain as objective as possible in viewing any actor's work.

Calvin Law said...

I honestly thought Headey was one of the best things about Dredd. Granted I don't watch GOT so seeing her as a nasty villain was probably more fresh, but she really got under my skin.

Calvin Law said...

Mitchell: Definitely, it makes one more aware than ever. For example, love James Woods as an actor but after some of his outlandishly dumb comments recently I'm glad he's not doing anything soon.

Mitchell Murray said...

I begrudgingly admit to not seeing any thing of Woods, but I understand your statement via my admiration for Affleck's work.

Calvin Law said...

Also the Spacey performance that's most troubling in retrospect now for me would be Baby Driver, actually, in a weird and uncomfortable way.

Louis Morgan said...

Deiner:

Harris - 3.5(I will say as much as I have problems with the remake I did prefer Fanning's sort of humorous take on the character, while wholly getting across what she needed to find here. Harris brings the lustful style of the character as well though but just makes less of an impact overall.)

Mercer - 4(A character that should have not been missing, since the whole idea of making the women of the film into role model characters would be as bizarre as making McBurney a role model character. Everyone is flawed in someway. Mercer is terrific in her role in she brings this incisiveness to the side showing the innate, most powerful understanding her character has of who the man really is, however it is only her status that prevents that from creating a real warning. Mercer's so effectively realizes that dynamic that should be in this civil war set story.)

Ferdin - 4(She's actually rather haunting throughout the film in showing the slow loss of any innocence and natural understanding of the little girl to the sort of hollow executioner she ends up becoming by the end of the film.)

Thomas, Drier, Mattick - 3(All are good in just adding to the atmosphere and the sense of the community with the school. If I re-watched the film they could potentially go up a bit.)

Anonymous:

I have.

Tahmeed:

Harbour - (If one is going to go full firebrand this is the way you do it. Though I will say Ryder definitely commits quite a bit of interference.)

McConaughey - (I know people hate this speech but I understand what he meant. He was perhaps muddled, but he was just trying to say you should look up to the person you can be in the future, rather than just thinking that you yourself as you are is so great.)

Olivier - (This is how you do a seemingly unprepared speech brilliantly, in an incredibly entertaining way yet still graciously. Olivier is so hilarious and witty here "it's great encouragement for me to receive this award at this early stage of my career". He doesn't diminish anything yet has the right type of fun with it.)

Mitchell Murray said...

In other news, anyone have thoughts on the trailer for "The Post"?

Anonymous said...

Luke Higham

Louis: Your thoughts on Keisha Castle-Hughes in Whale Rider.

Mitchell: I'm not impressed.

Mitchell Murray said...

(Anonymous) Looks pretty standard, don't it? And on the off chance that Streep gets nominated for the movie, it will at least promise to be a less flamboyant and calculating performance than Florence Foster Jenkins.

Matt Mustin said...

Mitchell: I don't think her getting nominated is an off-chance so much as it is a certainty.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Gabriel's Oboe - (There is an audacity behind the piece in that it alleges that it can calm a violent heart, and create a connection between such differing people. Well the song , since it is one of the greatest ever written supports this audacity. There is such sheer gentle beauty in that calming and inspiring melody brought to such splendor with the oboe, and further supplemented by the light strings. It is a sublime piece, one of pure simple splendor.)

Climb/Falls/The Mission - (Every piece in the score though is over this profound achievement that is a height among a musical career filled with them. Climb, The Mission, Falls essentially arrangements of each other seemingly there to capture that splendor with such delicate grace. Morricone's brilliance is here in the sheer simplicity that evokes such a power that that few scores can even aspire to grasp in the slightest.)

On Earth As It Is In Heaven - (Again a composition that can be placed among the greatest of all time, even including the work of the classical composers. Morricone's work here is astonishing in wholly earning its heavenly moniker in such a spellbinding tapestry of the voices, the orchestra, the drums, and the oboe once again. This has sometimes been used often been used as essentially the song of cinema, or the song for any evocation of something truly greater for a reason. Morricone's work reaches that height.)

Schindler's List - (One of Williams's greatest pieces showing his ability beyond the heroic theme. As this is the most haunting use of strings since the Adagio for Strings. There is such a power in every note, creating this sense of poignant loss only in the deeply moving melody.)

Mitchell Murray said...

(Matt) well.. yah. I was trying to avoid saying it, but with Streep anything's possible. Its a damn shame too because honestly, when was the last truly extraordinary Streep performance? I might go with Doubt, maybe even Adaptation.

Louis Morgan said...

In regards to Murder on the Orient Express, I enjoyed it, as I usually do for Branagh's films, the only one of his I really hate is the dumpster fire that is Sleuth. It takes a bit to get going, maybe it should have started on the train even. Also I would say the twists almost seem there to throw off readers of the book or people who have seen the original adaptation. I'm not sure they were needed, but I didn't mind them either. For the most part it is an enjoyable old fashioned mystery as with a certain grand scale as you'd expect from Branagh.

Branagh - 4(I'd put him over his direct competition of Finney, still haven't seen Suchet at all, though Ustinov's still my favorite. Branagh though is surprisingly subdued here, and I will admit when first hearing about the project I was expecting full ham Branagh for the detective. He restrains himself well though. Like Ustinov I find he brings the right lightness to the detective, against Finney's seemingly constantly constipated Poirot. Branagh brings the right amount of humor, yet he also does find a real substance as well. I liked the emotional heft Branagh brought to the detective particularly later on, and I though it was quite great in the revelation scene by bringing such a powerful anguish in dealing with the moral quandaries of the finale. Where Finney just seem slightly troubled by the idea, I liked how Branagh brought a real intensity to that conflict.)

Pfeiffer - 4(Terrific work, that makes me actually second guess Lauren Bacall's performance just a bit. Like Bacall in most of the film she's just fairly entertaining as the worldly woman. Pfeiffer though adds to the greater strength of this film's conclusion that offers something far more emotional than the pretty cold take in the Lumet film. A large part of this comes from Pfeiffer's performance that delivers so much more towards what happens.)

Bateman - 1.5(Was Michael Maloney not available for Branagh's whipping boy. By that I mean I think Branagh might bring along a super ham to make his own acting seem subtle by comparison. Anyway that was not needed here to begin with since Branagh was subtle, meanwhile Bateman just overcooks his whole sleazy deal here. He might have been a funny sidekick if he just dialed it back a bit, but he goes way too far.)

Cruz - 3(Though not exactly the same character essentially the Oscar winning role from the first film. I thought Cruz was decent here though in projecting the overt innocence that is indeed a little hard to buy, while at least suggesting the pathos behind this fairly effectively.)

Gad - 3.5(He's actually acquitting himself rather well when he gets to go a bit more dramatic, as he did in Beauty and The Beast he does so again. I actually found he made a greater impact than Perkins did in the role. He brings the right shady nervousness without overplaying it, then in his own confession scene of sorts he really delivers in bringing the emotional desperation of the man.)

Louis Morgan said...

Jacobi - 3(I preferred the witty take of Gielgud overall, however I did think Jacobi acquitted himself in taking a completely alternative approach though in revealing just the venom within the veneer.)

Dafoe - 3(Would've liked more of him as I did find him rather enjoyable in his fairly limited screentime in making perhaps the most entertaining potential suspect.)

Odom - 2.5(Transition from stage to screen doesn't always work and I will say he doesn't necessarily quite "pop" so to speak. He's not bad at all though, but I just wanted a bit more oomph from his key scenes.)

Ridley - 3(Meanwhile she I did feel brought enough of that oomph in her moment, though overall she's mostly more than just fine in creating the duplicitous manner in her way of capturing this sort of bitter curiosity in her interactions with Poirot.)

Colman - 3(Wish she had more to do since she manages to make an impact with only a few lines, and really she seems a performer tailor made for an Agatha Christie character.)

Dench - 3(Denching it up to be sure, it works for the role, and this is a decent enough example of it.)

Boyton - 2.5(Too minor of a character for her to really pull off the state of her character in time in a way in that it just seems too much too quickly.)

Polunin - (I'm going to just say it seems this character is deadly boring no matter what since he's boring here as he was when the usually at least somewhat entertaining Michael York played him.)

Garcia-Rulfo - (Can't tell if he's really a good actor or not since like the Magnificent Seven he was barely used.)

Mitchell:

At this point this film would have to be like under 30% bad on rotten tomatoes for voters to even give her nomination even a second thought. I hope she's worthy though since this is becoming a great year for lead actresses.

Luke:

Castle-Hughes - 3(Although she has since proven herself to be rather terrible in Game of Thrones here...she's entirely fine if not all that impressive. More than anything I felt she managed to come off as natural onscreen, I never felt more than that from here. She never really expressed the character beyond what was expressed for her already by the other actors. She does well, but I really did not find her performance all that remarkable.

Calvin Law said...

I liked Odom a lot more than you did, and Ridley a lot less, but otherwise pretty much agree.

Calvin Law said...

What did you think of the cinematography Louis?

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

I will say on Branagh's end, technically out of the genuine cinematography, he slightly overdid it with the stylistic shot choices. The cinematography though overall I thought achieved his overall intention, his usual intention when not directing that dumpster fire anyways, which is for that very clean, pristine grand look. The cinematography I found captured that rather well, particularly the outdoor shots around the train.

Matt Mustin said...

Louis: What about Depp? Unless your saving him?

Louis Morgan said...

Matt:

Definitely not.

2 - (I found Widmark left a stronger impression frankly, and his impression wasn't that big either. Depp isn't awful or anything but its basically just a very watered down version of his Whitey Bulger reduced to a mostly one note character. The role is limited anyways, however I do think another actor could have brought a greater sense paranoia needed for the role, and found a bit more substance within those limitations.)

Matt Mustin said...

Louis what are your thoughts on Idris Elba as an actor?

Vanna Long said...

John Lone is great, knew I should have put him in first. Year of the Dragon is my favorite performance of his though.

Henry W said...

I know its kinda late to be contributing now but the thing I find really interesting about the whole art vs artist debate, is that its usually the really spectacular artists getting into trouble, like their ego allows them to commit such bullshit actions. I think about the Affleck scenario and his two Oscar noms. I can absolutely support his Assassination of Jesse James nom, since that's an all time level performance, plus he was a humble guy back then and it was before he harassed two women, heck even his Manchester nom (and win) is excellent, but he got it 7 years after he did the dirty deed. A similar argument can be made with Marlon Brando. His Streetcar, On the Waterfront, Viva Zapata etc etc days were when his ego was relatively normal were spectacular. Go to his Last Tango in Paris days when he overestimated his abilities as an artist and his ego was over inflated and gave over inflated performances, he freaking rapes a lady, and he lands a nom for it. It's a tough debate. I definitely watch artists with a poor past work with more hesitation for sure nowadays. What do you guys think of this point?

Henry W said...

Also, Gary Oldman is a fucking sensational actor, yet he allegedly beat up his ex wife. Was ego a problem with him as well?

RatedRStar said...

I heard Gary Oldman was suffered from alcoholism and that often goes hand in hand with domestic abuse and an ego, William Hurt was similar in that he suffered from alcoholism and his was definately ego, he abused Marlee Matlin after she won her Oscar, which he presented to her, insane.

RatedRStar said...

There are so many actors that have been accused of abusing women and children

https://medium.com/@beth_winegarner/weinstein-isnt-the-only-one-screen-celebs-who-abuse-women-or-children-c5732e15cf92

Shocked to see Michael Fassbender was accused of it.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Any chance to upgrade Urban to a 4 for his performance in Dredd?

Anonymous said...

Louis: What do you think of the original idea of Krusty being Homer?

Louis Morgan said...

Henry W:

Oldman's single accusation was dealt with in the courts where they sided with him.

Matt:

I'd honestly need to see his television work to fully say, as the only time I'd say he had a great role, from what I've seen was Beasts, where he was indeed very good. Otherwise I've been looking for the actor that is usually described, and I am going to assume exists through those television performances.

Anonymous:

A horrible idea, right along with Marge as a rabbit idea that suggests Groening perhaps lucked out a bit with all the other creative minds around the series stopping such terrible ideas from going through.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: When it comes to listening to music, what are your 3 favourite musical instruments.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your top ten rock bands/music groups. Mine would be-

Queen
The Beatles
The Police
The Smiths
Journey
Oasis
Guns N Roses
Linkin Park
Pink Floyd
Green Day

Luke Higham said...

Tahmeed: I'm a lot more subjective with my taste in music than with film so,

Queen
The Beatles
Metallica
AC/DC
Led Zeppelin
Slade
Muse
ABBA
The Rolling Stones
The Who

I haven't listened to Journey apart from Don't Stop Believing which put me off of them, because of the constant airplay it had thanks to Glee.

And I love Wonderwall, but I have a love/hate relationship with Oasis.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Luke: That's understandable, Oasis is quite divisive nowadays for many. And I love 'Wonderwall' but that's not even my favorite song by them.
I love what I've heard by The Rolling Stones, but I do need to hear more of them.

Luke Higham said...

What is your favourite Oasis song, Tahmeed.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Luke: 'Don't Look Back in Anger' . In my opinion, it has one of the most dynamic and brilliant choruses I've ever heard, with the vocals and instrumentation working so beautifully in tandem to create a memorable impression.

Luke Higham said...

Tahmeed: Love it as well. :)

Calvin Law said...

Yeah Oasis kind of suck/are awesome to equal degrees. For me:

Queen
Bon Jovi
Michael Learns to Rock
The Beatles
Linkin Park
Green Park
Paramore
Mumford and Suns
The Police
Abba

Calvin Law said...

Oh, and I kind of have a love-hate thing with The Smiths, Oasis, and Backstreet Boys.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Calvin: I've only heard 'Take Me To Your Heart' and '25 Minutes' by MLTR, and loved them both. Sucks that they aren't as well known as they should be.

Calvin Law said...

Tahmeed: 'That's Why You Go Away' and 'Paint My Love' are two of my all-time favourites and love those two as well. They're really popular in Asia because the lyrics are so catchy and simple to learn for non-native speakers.

Alex Marqués said...

Louis: You definitely should check out The Wire, he gives a phenomenal performance in that show.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your top 20 film compositions of all-time.

Robert MacFarlane said...

CHVRCHES
Paramore
Green Day
The Who
Queen
The Beatles
fun.
The Naked and Famous
Of Monster and Men
Bastille

Calvin Law said...

Louis: what do you think of this 60s Kurosawa Breaking Bad?

Walter: Takashi Shimura
Skyler: Machiko Kyō
Jesse: Tatsuya Nakadai
Hank: Minoru Chiaki
Marie: Mitsuko Mito
Saul: Toshiro Mifune
Gus Fring: Masayuki Mori
Mike: Chishū Ryū
Todd: Isao Kimura
Jane: Miki Odagiri
Lydia: Kyōko Kagawa
Gomez: Isao Numasaki
Tuco: Yūnosuke Itō
Hector: Kokuten Kôdô

If it was in the 60s Mifune could probably be Walter and Shimura, Hector, and Tsutomo Yamazki could probably play either Jesse or Todd in the 60s.

Bryan L. said...

Saw Our Kind of Traitor the other night. I quite liked it.

Lewis- 5 (Can't wait to see more of him in films, as I thought he definitely brought a unique presence to a type of character that has been done many times before. Was especially great in his last scene.)
Skarsgard-4.5 (Entertaining early on but also makes you feel for him later as he should, especially since Skarsgard has a voice and presence of someone who can be difficult to trust.)
McGregor and Harris-3 (Their characters are bland, but they do what they can.)

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Will you be watching Band Of Brothers during 2001 or after the bonus rounds.

And are there any individual pieces from the Titanic soundtrack that you do like.

Louis Morgan said...

Tahmeed:

The Beatles
Queen
The Rolling Stones
The Four Seasons
Led Zeppelin
Steppenwolf
The Byrds
The Kinks
Journey
Flight of the Conchords

Calvin:

I'd Mifune would definitely be White for the 60's. I'd probably actually put Chiaki as Saul, Shimura as Gus, Kenjiro Ishiyama from High and Low as Mike, Tsutomu Yamazaki as Jesse, Takeshi Kato as Hank then. Love the choice of Mori as Gus though.

Luke:

Give me some time to fashion that list.

Maybe.

Not really in regards to Titanic.