Tuesday, 21 November 2017

Alternate Best Actor 2010: Mads Mikkelsen in Valhalla Rising

Mads Mikkelsen did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying One-Eye in Valhalla Rising.

Valhalla Rising follows a silent warrior who follows with a group of soldiers in a crusade that leads them to an unknown land.

Valhalla Rising is film that seems to encourage polarizing reactions from those who watch with its minimalist, contemplative style. The only point of any agreement should come from the film's striking technical elements particularly its cinematography, although these are perhaps just a little diminished by the bizarre choice to use terrible and very distracting Photoshop blood splatter effects, especially given the amount of practical effects already utilized. The rest though will be how one takes to the stark story, and storytelling methods that features intense yet cold emotions. This is perhaps best personified through the central character of One-Eye played by Mads Mikkelsen. Mikkelsen has not a single line in the entire film, as his One-Eye is a man of actions only. This is from the outset of the film where we see him used by a chieftain for fights to the death in between being locked in a cage. Now often a silent performance does not mean unemotional however even here One-Eye is purposefully made to be an enigmatic character, and somewhat distant in his rather mystical presence within the film. That is right down to his moniker and physical attribute that alludes to Odin the Norse god, which extends as far as One-Eye having the power to foresee the future.

This performance is not exactly the usual type of challenge these performances are since part of the intention of the character is to be a bit impenetrable particularly against the other characters who wear their emotions far more openly and broadly. Mikkelsen's One-Eye is suppose to be set as a stone in a way, a man above and beyond those around him in someway. Mikkelsen's work is not particularly emotional, and really his character is rather static once again acting in contrast to those around him. Mikkelsen's portrayal falls largely upon his own presence which is remarkable in its own right. There is something naturally compelling about Mikkelsen to the point that even when he's not saying anything verbally or non-verbally for that matter, there is something striking in Mikkelsen's very being. Mikkelsen becomes an impressive conduit of interest throughout the film, as he does compel one to watch One-Eye even though he gives very little to explain the man. What truly defines Mikkelsen's performance is what is it that he brings within this almost set condition of One-Eye that defines the character throughout the film.

Mikkelsen's presence is worthy of the demi-god, or just simply god within the story. Mikkelsen brings that natural intensity of his, particularly through that incisive single eye of his here that indeed seems to see beyond all those around him. There is a mercilessness about this, yet not exactly an evil that Mikkelsen portrays. Mikkelsen for much of the film doesn't depict One-Eye as good or as evil, but something that simply is. Mikkelsen is able to capture a being who acts upon some will greater than the normal man even in the way he kills Mikkelsen portrays with this exactness not of a skilled warrior rather as a deity dispensing his judgment. Mikkelsen nor the film desires more from the character than this exact state which continues as he joins a crusade to the unknown. Mikkelsen acts as the only point of stability in the journey although even then this is in a purposefully cold and distant fashion. One-Eye even as he has visions of a certain doom does not wither from this, rather treats this as his inevitable fate. The only slight break we are granted is in his final moments where he awaits this fate with a boy who gave him food in captivity, and he acted as protector to on their journey to the unknown. Mikkelsen still portrays this true to the state of One-Eye as in simple comforting pat there is the only warmth to be found anywhere within the film. Mikkelsen even depicts this though as part of the otherworldly nature still even in the human act, it is still seemingly a pardon towards the boy from a god. This performance is exactly as it should be in this specific realization of the omnipotent One-Eye, to be more emotional, would be dishonest to the role. Mikkelsen delivers all that he is able within the confines, and is far more compelling than most actors would be in the role. He is however still subservient towards the overarching vision which leaves him in that exact distant state that is still only as absorbing as the film allows him to be.

117 comments:

Charles Heiston said...

Did not expect as low of a rating

Louis: Thoughts & ratings on the cast

Louis Morgan said...

Charles:

Lewis and Stewart - 3.5(All of the performances of the same vein in the film, other than Mikkelsen, in that they are very distant, yet with a definitive intensity in their emotions however off-putting in how desperate it feels. Lewis and Stewart are the most effective in terms of realizing this state that is there to make a certain non-empathetic impact, as we witness their turmoil more than feel it exactly.)

Stevenson - 3.5(The only other really different performance though also static in portraying only this quiet attachment to Mikkelsen's One-Eye. Stevenson's whole performance is as this human need for some protection in these interactions, though with just a modicum of something more in these most intimate, yet still remote interactions.)

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the wheelchair scene in Kiss of Death.

Henry W said...

Would Montgomery Clift and Orson Welles be your guys choice for a American remake of The Master as the characters of Freddy Quell (Clift) and Lancaster Dodd (Welles) in the early 1950s?

Also, with reference to his work in Manchester by the Sea and Gone Baby Gone, would Affleck be a good fit for the roles of Brando or Clift in the 1950s?

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your thoughts on 'Jai Ho' from Slumdog Millionaire.

Henry: Clift and Welles definitely would have been amazing in Phoenix and Hoffman's roles.

Calvin Law said...

Saw Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool. Pretty sappy though I liked it, like a better version of My Week With Marilyn.

Bening - 4/4.5
Bell - 4.5
Walters - 3
Redgrave - 2.5
Cranham, Graham, Best - 2.5

Omar Franini said...

Calvin: Thoughts on Bening and Bell?

Calvin Law said...

Omar:

Bening - her Gloria Grahame impression takes a while getting used to and her performance in the 'present' scenes are initially a bit limited. She's delightful though in portraying the spontaneity and charm of the fading actress and has such great chemistry with Bell, as well as suggesting the insecurities. What I most loved though was when everything came together in the end and Bening gives such a powerful portrayal of a heartbroken soul.

Bell - altogether fantastic and Eddie Redmayne should take some pointers. His role is all about being charming and endearing, and he more than fulfils that. He also brings such power to his frustrations, love and heartbreak over Bening, again their chemistry is great, and this might be a career-best.

Bryan L. said...

Everyone: Is it just me or does anyone feel that Emma Stone has a more classic Hollywood look while Jennifer Lawrence is more contemporary? They look from different eras in pictures where they both show up haha.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: I agree with the points you made in the review and I'm happy enough with the rating you gave him, though I personally would go slightly higher. I think he's at his most badass here and that's probably why I liked him as much as I did. I'm however glad that you didn't go under a 4 and my run of requests without a 3.5 or under goes on. :)

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Have you seen You Don't Know Jack with Al Pacino yet.

Louis Morgan said...

Well I had to go quite the distance, but I got see Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri, it was worth it.

Anonymous:

The most remembered scene of that film and really the best scene of the film since it is all about Widmark. This is interesting in that it is almost a turn in the villainy one was allowed to see on film given the extreme nature of the act for the time. We get a full psychotic lunatic realized with joyful glee quite effectively I'll admit.

Tahmeed:

Like many of the things I don't care all that much about it, although this is one where there are parts of the song but A.R. Rahman just kind of throws everything into it, which isn't a great thing especially since there are no real natural rhythm to the transitions. It's like five songs pressed together I sort of like two of them, however every single use of "Jai ho" itself whether part of the chorus in solo verse form I find wholly ear grating kind of even diminishing the good parts, for me.

Luke:

No.

Calvin Law said...

YES. I'm glad you loved it. I'm guessing you're holding off on Rockwell but hopefully Harrelson as well for the timebeing?

Thoughts on the film and cast? I hope you enjoyed Landry Jones, Dinklage and well, pretty much everyone as much as me.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Well I need to let the film settle in a bit more for more expanded thoughts overall, as well as on the cast, but I'll just say for now it met my expectations, even in some ways I didn't expect. Saving Harrelson (and not just for the time being), and Rockwell (who I feel has perhaps inadvertently destroyed Will Poulter's Oscar nomination chances).

McDormand - 5
Hawkes - 3.5
Dinklage - 4
Cornish - 2
Weaving - 3
Jones - 3.5
Hedges - 3.5
Ivanek - 3
Martin - 2
Peters - 3

Anonymous said...

Louis thoughts on the Independent Spirit Awards nominations?

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

They had ONE job, and they failed to do it.

Calvin Law said...

In a perfect world I'd love to see Poulter and Rockwell get nominated together but I'm afraid you're probably right. Surprised you disliked Martin that much, I thought she was effective, but I do agree Cornish had a thankless role.

Henry W said...

Calvin and Louis: Thoughts on Poulter?

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

The problem for me with Martin was I thought she rather distracting given that she gave just about the same exact performance as she does as Mrs. Mac in It's Always Sunny(where I find her hilarious).

Calvin Law said...

Louis: That's fair. Need to re-watch those episodes now.

Henry: Hopefully Louis is still saving him. I'm going to leave my extended thoughts to a future blog post I can link you to.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your cast and director for a 1960's Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri.

Calvin Law said...

I'd like to nominate Shelley Winters and Warren Oates as Mildred and Dixon.

Louis Morgan said...

Henry:

I'm still saving Poulter.

Calvin:

I will admit I imagine I probably would have had no such issue if I'd never seen It's Always Sunny.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Three Billboards 1960's Directed By Billy Wilder:

Mildred Hayes: Claire Trevor (Winters would be ideal for the 70's)
Sheriff Willoughby: Burt Lancaster
Officer Dixon: Robert Mitchum (Oates would also be ideal for the 70's)
Charlie: Robert Ryan
James: Michael Dunn
Anne: Claire Bloom
Red: Sal Mineo
Robbie: Brandon deWilde
Mother Dixon: Agnes Moorehead

Robert MacFarlane said...

Tell me when you see Novitiate, Louis. I’m curious to how you’ll find its themes about faith compared to Silence. It’s covers much different ground, but at the same time there’s a lot of overlap. I’m also curious if you’ll like the ensemble as much as I did, because outside of Leo I found the cast excellent.

Anonymous said...

Louis: your top 20 frances mcdormand acting moments

Michael McCarthy said...

This was a good performance, but I don't really get why so many people view this as a masterclass by Mikkelsen. On the other hand, Affleck has been staying with me surprisingly well, considering how cringey his film was. He could probably take this.

I thought my elation for Three Billboards would ease slightly, but honestly it's still easily my favorite of the year. Martin McDonagh's stuff just does something for me I guess. And I know what you mean when you say that it was satisfying in unexpected ways Louis, it ended up being a lot less Tongue in Cheek then I was expecting but in a way that really worked.

In terms of my ratings, is probably go a little higher on Jones, Cornish, and Ivanek and a little lower on Hedges.

Louis Morgan said...

Robert:

I'll certainly let you know, hopefully it plays near me sometime soon.

Anonymous:

Will do....soon.

Michael:

Actually thinking about it I'd probably move Ivanek to a 3.5 as his interactions with Rockwell were pretty hilarious, I love that he's McDonagh's mainstay.

Henry W said...

Louis and you guys: Top ten "minimalist" performances of all time?

John Smith said...

Henry W:

1.Jack Nicholson/Fibe Easy Pieces
2.Kevin Vaz/Play
3.Naserudin Shah/Sparsh
4.Tommy Bergren/Raven's End
5.Adam Driver/Paterson
6.Kristen Stewart/Adventure Land
7.Barbara Hershey/Hannah And Her Sisters
8.Liv and erland/Scenes from a marriage
9.Ullman/ The Emmigrants & The New Land
10.Tom Hardy/Locke

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Your top 5 favorite YouTube channels. Mine are-
Epic Rap Battles of History
The Nostalgia Critic
Screen Junkies (for Honest Trailers)
The School of Life
Film Theory

Calvin Law said...

Henry:

John Hurt, The Elephant Man
Charles Bronson, Once Upon a Time in the West
Rooney Mara, Carol
Ryan Gosling, Drive
Tom Hardy, Locke
Casey Affleck, Manchester by the Sea

Off the top of my head, depending on what one means by 'minimalist'

Calvin Law said...

Louis: thoughts on Amy Shiels in Twin Peaks?

Mitchell Murray said...

Some others to add to the list:

Gary Oldman (Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy)
Peter Fonda (Ulee's Gold)
Eastwood at his best (Unforgiven namely)

Luke Higham said...

My Lead Actor prediction.

1. Min-Sik
2. Duvall
3. Byung-Hun
4. Eisenberg
5. Gosling
6. McGregor
7. Clooney
8. Ahmed
9. Serkis
10. Sheen
11. Affleck

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Luke: Hope Louis actually does upgrade Byung-Hun and Eisenberg, although I'm certain about Eisenberg.

Luke Higham said...

Tahmeed: Eisenberg's definitely happening. Byung-Hun could go up and if he did, I put him ahead of Eisenberg. His and Min-Sik's performances work extremely well together in my view.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Henry:
Robert Duvall, Tender Mercies
Ryan Gosling, Drive
Gary Oldman, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy
Al Pacino, The Godfather
Laurence Olivier, Rebecca (although that one overtly emotional scene is fantastically earned)
Casey Affleck, Manchester by the Sea

Luke Higham said...

Mark Rylance in Wolf Hall

Robert MacFarlane said...

Henry W:

Holly Hunter in The Piano

That’s it. I can’t even make a full ten. You can’t top that one.

Anonymous said...

Gregory Peck in To Kill a Mockingbird is one of the best minimalistic performances I've ever seen.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your Top Ten Tracks from the Harry Potter films and your thoughts on #10-6.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your ranking on the lead performances of Refn films?

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: I'll give it a try.

1. Hardy - Bronson
2. Gosling - Drive
3. Pansringarm - Only God Forgives
4. Turturro - Fear X
5. Fanning - The Neon Demon
6. Mikkelsen - Valhalla Rising
7. Gosling - Only God Forgives

Calvin Law said...

Seeing a preview of The Disaster Artist in an hour's time.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Could I have your ratings later and thoughts on The Brothers Franco. :)

Luke Higham said...

And what are your rating predictions for The Last Jedi cast.

Calvin Law said...

Luke: Sure. :)

Hamill: 4.5/5
Fisher: 4
Driver: 4.5
Ridley: 4/4.5
Boyega: 4
Isaac: 4
Serkis: 2.5
Nyong'o: 2.5
Gleeson: 3 (he's a goner)
Christie: 3
Tran: 3
Dern: 3
Del Toro: 3.5

Anonymous said...

It'd be cool if Hamill got a 5.

Luke Higham said...

Hamill - 5
Fisher - 3.5
Driver - 4.5/5
Ridley - 4.5
Boyega - 4 (Won't play as big a part as he did in the first film)
Isaac - 4 (I hope they'll give him more to do)
Serkis - 3
Nyong'o - 3
Christie - 3
Tran - 3
Dern - 3
Del Toro - 3.5

Luke Higham said...

Gleeson - 3

Bryan L. said...

I'll give mine

Hamill-5 (I believe he will deliver.)
Driver-4.5 (Though a 5 isn't out of the question.)
Ridley-4.5
Boyega-3.5
Gleeson-3
Isaac-4
Dern-3
Del toro-3.5

A 3 for everyone else

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Are there any more Lead or even Supporting saves that you've decided not to keep. If so, can I have your thoughts on them.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: I personally would like to get your thoughts on Evans and Reilly, since I doubt they'll make the final 10 slots.

Calvin Law said...

The Disaster Artist was just thoroughly great. It really nails the hilarity and insanity of Wiseau's project, but more surprisingly I really felt moved and invested in the emotional backdrop that made the ending particularly powerful in its own way. Franco as a director proves to be more than adept in balancing the tone of the film, dealing with its central figure in an affectionate fashion without trying to sugarcoat his darker side. On that note as a performer I'll leave my thoughts till later but it's easily his best cinematic performance.

Franco of the Dave variety - 3.5 (now he doesn't really try any sort of overt Greg Sestero impression, but he's effective as 'Mark' and in just being the young actor filled with vibrant energy, enough to be enveloped into the madness of Wiseau but just enough awareness to be shocked at some of his more ludicrous antics. What really makes his performance work is his chemistry with his offscreen brother, you really believe in their friendship, their troubles, and makes the ending of the film surprisingly affecting)

Rogen and Scheer - 3.5, 3 (the former is an enjoyable straight man to Franco of the James variety, while the latter provides the right amount of indignation to the lunacy of the production. Bonus points for Rogen providing his comedic routine in a way that doesn't feel distracting at all given his previous collaborations with Franco)

Graynor, Hutcherson, Weaver, Raphael, Fielder, Efron - 3 (all do more than admirable jobs with their recreations of their counterparts, especially Efron and Hutcherson who are a hoot in their 'where's the money' scene. I wouldn't have minded a bit more time dedicated to them outside of the production of the film but they're all entertaining)

Brie - 2.5 (a mere plot device and she has very little to work with, but she's fine)

All the cameos and very bit parts are good, particularly Apatow, Odenkirk, Buress/Mantzoukas.

Bryan L. said...

Calvin: I'm glad to hear that :) I like Seth Rogen more in straight man roles where someone else wilds out.

Everyone: Thoughts on this cast for a 2010s female remake of Unforgiven?

Munny- Sissy Spacek
Daggett- Frances McDormand (Think Fargo, but the opposite)
Logan- Tess Harper
English Bob- Helen Mirren
The Schofield Kid- Karen Gillan
Beauchamp- Sienna Miller

Bryan L. said...

Wait, Teresa Palmer instead of Karen Gillan haha.

Michael McCarthy said...

What about Alfre Woodard as Logan? Also McDormand would be an awesome Daggett, but maybe someone who was more known as an action hero would be more suited to play Munny, like Sigourney Weaver.

Bryan L. said...

Michael: Sigourney Weaver would be a great choice as well. I thought of Spacek because I think she seems a bit more "Western" than Weaver but I definitely see your point about a former action hero taking on the part of Munny haha.

Bryan L. said...

Michael: Woodward as Logan would also be great.

2000s Heat, directed by Joe Carnahan

Hanna-Liam Neeson
McCauley-Viggo Mortensen
Shiherlis- Joaquin Phoenix
Cheritto- Jeremy Renner (in an early film role)
Nate- Jeff Bridges

Anonymous said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the Incredibles scene where Edna shows Helen the suits.

Omar Franini said...

Louis: Before you finish 2010, could you watch Les Petit Mouchoirs? It's like the french The Big Chill; Cotillard is terrific in it, an easy 5 for me and my runner-up in supporting behind Manville.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Could either Tom Berenger or Willem Dafoe go up to a 5 for Platoon.

Henry W said...

Saw Phantom Thread with a dozen movie crirtics in a private screening in London. I won’t give a score out of fear of breaching the review embargo which lasts until December 7, but what I will say is that when that embargo is lifted, expect some laudatory from a number of publications, including for DDL and maybe Krieps performances. I think you guys will enjoy very much.

RatedRStar said...

Henry W: That is good to hear =D lucky you.

I am not really convinced that Krieps will get nominated regardless of how praised she gets, I mean, does she really get in over Streep, Stone, Hawkins, Robbie, Ronan, McDormand and Chastain, I would love to see a brand new star but I feel this might be too tricky for her.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Is your top 5 for Lead Actress:
1. McDormand
2. Stone
3. Hawkins (Maudie)
4. Keen
5. Kidman

Matt Mustin said...

By the way, did anyone else watch Star Trek Discovery? I absolutely loved it, although the Klingon stuff is less interesting than the stuff involving the crew. Pretty much the entire cast is great, although I think the MVP for me was actually Rainn Wilson, despite being in only two episodes so far.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Saw Lady Bird and LOVED it.

Alex Marqués said...

Robert: I'm looking forward to that film. Are Ronan and Metcalf as good as the reviews claim?

Matt Mustin said...

Also, Louis, what's your thoughts on Hal Sparks in Spider-Man 2, Richard Roxburgh in Van Helsing and Jay Baruchel in Million Dollar Baby?

Louis Morgan said...

Well giving a bit more time to Three Billboards, I can say that I absolutely love the film and look forward to watching the film again. As I mentioned before the film wasn't exactly as I expected it to be, I thought it was going to be a darkly comic revenge thriller, but that's not the film. Although the film has some hilarious moments throughout, that really isn't intention. It is very funny whenever it wants to be, as with In Bruges it feels wholly natural to the film as a whole, however this is McDonagh's least comedic film. It is instead a powerful mediation on loss, through technically the lens of the sort of "quirky" small town type film though of course in a manner fitting McDonagh. What McDonagh accomplishes isn't to make a story of those who are right or wrong, but rather something far more complicated and frankly poignant in showing those trying to come with terms with what they've done or haven't been able to do. Also I think McDonagh doesn't really get enough credit as a director. He takes sort of the Billy Wilder approach to direction, and I think effectively so. In that he never forces you to notice what he is doing yet brings exactly what his scenes need, and when does tip his hand a bit its brilliant e.g. "Raglan Road".

McDormand - (Well I thought this was a match made in heaven and indeed it was. McDormand as proven in her Oscar winning work is extremely adept in capturing a darkly comic tone, however this with a very different bent. McDormand is indeed often hilarious instead of being so chipper being decidedly not so. Her very coarse vicious tongue lashings to others are most often comic gold, however McDormand balances this even with portraying some real outrage within the character. That's not her only definition as she weaves this tapestry of the woman trying to deal with her grief. In that she brings such a real intensity to the anger at the crimes, and those she sees as failing to do it. There is also though the sheer palatable sadness combined with even a sense of guilt that is incredibly heartbreaking as McDormand so naturally reveals her moments of real tenderness within the loss. McDormand never makes them conflicting rather the natural whole of a woman struggling and failing to deal with her loss. Every action of Mildred's McDormand makes sense of in her amazing performance.)

Louis Morgan said...

Hawkes - (He's a pretty good, for a lack of a better word prick, in every regard. Hawkes though I do think properly balances the role in that he isn't always at a 11. He nicely brings in...not really a gentler side, but rather just the side of a man who constantly was fighting with his wife. There is the right casualness he brings to the confrontation showing it's been going for years. He also does importantly find at least just a minor, very minor, sense of grief in his own character.)

Dinklage - (Probably one of the most purely comic characters though Dinklage isn't a joke by any means, and I have to say I was glad to see a non-tortured Dinklage here. Dinklage brings the right type of earnest energy, and does well to present his guy as one of the few rather simply nice guys in the film, without complication. At the same time though he is hilarious in bringing just such a strong degree in awkwardness in every one of his attempts to be even slightly romantic.)

Cornish - (Mostly she's just there but I found she overcooked her scene with McDormand just a touch, not really detrimental
however an easy weak link to me.)

Weaving - (Simply, however simply funny I found in doing a proper ditz routine.)

Jones - (His best performance by far, so far, as his mumbly approach was finally a perfect fit for the constantly over his head billboard owner. Jones is always slightly just not quite there, and with just the right degree of attempted yet wholly failed confidence. His best scene though is his last one where I found him incredibly moving actually in revealing just a real decency, bringing such a genuine warmth.)

Hedges - (Very similair to his Oscar nominated turn however without the frozen chicken scene. Once again he portrays grief quite well, and finds the right chemistry with McDormand. In that he does find enough of a underlying warmth even while earning a certain animosity that he attaches properly to that grief.)

Ivanek - (Once again a perfect fit for McDonagh's world and dialogue.)

Peters - (Very straight forward role though effectively so as a straight man against everyone else.)

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

McDormand:

1. Second interview with Jerry - Fargo
2. The doe - Three Billboards
3. Buying the Billboards - Three Billboards
4. Beautiful Day - Fargo
5. The Fire - Three Billboards
6. Meeting with Mike - Fargo
7. Awkward dinner - Three Billboards
8. Ending - Fargo
9. Blood - Three Billboards
10. Ending - Three Billboards
11. Crime Scene - Fargo
12. Her ideas to catch him - Three Billboards
13. "Nothing's over you dumb bitch" - Three Billboards
14. Arby's - Fargo
15. Confronting Dixon - Three Billboards
16. Catching Grimsrud - Fargo
17. bad customer - Three Billboards
18. First Interview with Jerry - Fargo
19. Flashback - Three Billboards
20. "Funny looking how?" - Fargo

Tahmeed:

I wouldn't really qualify any as favorites.

Berenger is very likely.

Omar:

Will do.

Calvin:

Covered Shiels in 92 supporting re-results.

Anonymous:

Luke got the right order.

Luke:

Evans - Beauty and the Beast - 4(Well having re-watched the film once it truly is disposable beyond belief, and Evans is the best part however even that diminished a bit on re-watch. Evans still brings the right comedic energy and boisterous to the role. He also nicely does portray an actual arc to Gaston, and a change from the original. He effectively does portray slowly a more sinister bent in the role that he shows becoming more extreme the longer he is denied what he wants. Also his singing is a major plus.)

Elliott - The Hero - 4.5(The more I think about the film the more I hate it with just how predictable every element of it was. Elliott, as he did with Grandma, though does elevate some sub par material best he can. Although the writing makes everything a bit phony Elliott brings the needed honesty to every moment, and his portrayal of the old man trying to redeem himself is moving just because of him. Elliott just refuses to make a single moment false no matter how obvious the scenes are, particularly his failed audition scene. Elliott though in that scene absolutely delivered giving even the worst scene as conceived at least something worthwhile.)

Louis Morgan said...

Matt:

Sparks - (Intolerable cameo, I guess? I really like Spider-man 2 but this scene just is an extended indulgence of attempted comedy that just doesn't work. It just goes on for far too long due to Sparks is horrible hamming it up, that could be okay if he was actually funny however he is not.)

Roxburgh - (Scenery chewing at the most extreme. Now as Dracula you are allowed a bit of flamboyance however he takes it to a maximum level of ridiculousness. Extreme ridiculous yet not even slightly entertaining is what is so strange. His ham is off-putting rather than enjoyable at any point, as it just runs together in a strange way that makes him both over the top and bland which is always the worst combination.)

Baruchel - (Well he went full simple jack here, and I would like an explanation for why he is in this film. Now Baruchel is awful really in almost everything anyways. This is at his worst given that he is tonally broken from the rest of the film to such an extreme in his "comedic" tomfoolery, which has no place in the film. Again though he could at least be funny, but he's not. It's just a terrible display of bad acting going for some bad comedy.)

Luke:

That would be my ranking.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Alex: Yeah, Metcalf in particular.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Question for anyone: Is there any particular actor or actress you'd like to see in Fargo Season 4?

Calvin Law said...

Robert: I'll give you 5.

Jon Hamm
Daniel Kaluuya
Christian Slater
Ruth Negga
Steven Yeun

Robert MacFarlane said...

Calvin: Some actors I think would work well with the show's style

Lakeith Stanfield
Greta Gerwig
Sam Rockwell
Jay R. Ferguson
Ellen Wong (seriously, just keep casting Scott Pilgrim alumni)

Louis Morgan said...

Robert:

If there's a season 4 I'd rather see another period piece, maybe one set around the founding of the Fargo area with Nikolaj Coster-waldau as a recent immigrant turned lawman, or maybe go 1950's with Bradley Cooper as a younger version of Ted Danson's Hank Larsson.

Henry W said...

Louis and you guys: best cinematography of the year that you have seen so far?

Louis Morgan said...

Henry:

Blade Runner

Mitchell Murray said...

(Louis) Thoughts on McDormand's oscar nominated supporting performances?

Louis Morgan said...

Mitchell:

I've given those thoughts in the past, and I like them all. The absence of any scenes from those performances on my list stems only from the strength of her performances in Billboards and Fargo.

Mitchell Murray said...

Admittedly, McDormand isn't an actress I've seen that much of, aside from her iconic Fargo performance which I adore quite a bit. I want to say shes a strong actress from what I've seen but I definitely should see her other roles to be sure.

Mitchell Murray said...

On another note, the buzz around "The Shape Of Water" seems to be picking up. I'm excited for the movie and loving how Sally Hawkins is having a banner year with it and "Maudie". I know best actress seems ridiculously crowded at the moment, but I wouldn't count her out.

Louis Morgan said...

My hesitation with predicting Hawkins is the genre bias, which even the seeming lock of Amy Adams couldn't overcome. It can be done, but in a stacked year the "safer" more traditional academy friendly performances usually win out. Also I ponder if we might be overestimating Shape of Water ever so slightly, particularly those saying del Toro is overdue for a win given that Pan's Labyrinth is his only film that has made a blip on the Academy radar, even then he didn't get in for director, and the film lost Foreign Language Film (rightfully so).

Mitchell Murray said...

Yah you hit the nail on the head admittedly. That genre bias has been prevalent pretty much since the oscars began, since for every Signourney Weaver that makes the cut you also someone like Charlize Theron, who wound up getting sidelined supposedly by the more awards baity Lawrence/Rampling. I have my hopes, though, because if I'm allowed to say so there has been amazing boost for best actress in the last couple of years. I think the quality and versatility of leading performances were seeing now is remarkable, and even those who miss out still fall into that pattern like Amy Adams. By the looks of it, 2017 could be to best actress what 2016 was to best actor.

Michael McCarthy said...

I think Hawkins has an edge over Adams in Arrival though, because even though Arrival was universally claimed, Adams's role wasn't especially showy. Hawkins on the other hand is in a very Oscar-friendly role, if you look at it outside the context of the film's genre.

Matt Mustin said...

Michael: I don't know, I mean, Adams had a pretty emotionally heavy role and they love that.

Mitchell Murray said...

Now I'm not exactly sure when the voting took place, but I don't think I'd be unreasonable in saying Streep's Trump speech had a hand in eventually knocking Adams out of the race.

Louis Morgan said...

Michael:

Well I'd say it's sorta Oscar friendly in that there have been two, almost three, mute performances that have won in actress, however it isn't a general rule that mute performances get nominated, nor is it a detriment however, although again those were not in sci-fi films. If this was a weaker year, she probably would make it with ease, this year though I think anything can happen...well Streep's probably safe.

Mitchell:

Eh, I'd probably say Negga knocked out Adams not Streep, Streep never really has to fight for her spost.

Mitchell Murray said...

Well at least it would be far easier to accept Negga doing it than Streep, considering she actually turned in a noteworthy performance.

Louis Morgan said...

*spots

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Well, given my exams start from tomorrow, I probably won't be on here till the 3rd. I hope Louis covers 1980 or 1983 soon.

Anonymous said...

Luke Higham

Tahmeed: 1965 is the next year and 1980 will be the next one from the 80s.

RatedRStar said...

Tahmeed: Good luck =D =D.


Ohh if 1980 is soon I am very interested in how Louis will view Al Pacino in Cruising, will it be team Siskel and Ebert or team Kermode??? =D.

Calvin Law said...

Saw Paddington 2 and Justice League, thought the former was really delightful, and the latter a real mess but not without merit.

Whishaw - 4
Bonneville - 3.5
Hawkins - 4
Gleeson - 4
Walters - 3
Broadbent - 3
Capaldi - 3
Grant - 4
Harris and Joslin - 3
Neil and Taylor - 3
Conti - 3

Affleck - 2
Gadot - 2.5
Miller - 3
Cavill - 2.5
Mamoa - 3
Fisher - 2.5/3

Calvin Law said...

*3 for Gadot and a 2.5 for Mamoa

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Finally have a day off tomorrow so I'll be seeing Paddington 2. I heard Grant was great. I'm probably gonna leave Justice League until just before the Aquaman film is released.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Is there any possibility of Hardy going up to a 4 for Dunkirk.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Louis: Any chance on Rush or Bale going in the rankings for 2010?

Anonymous said...

If 1965 is really the next year, then I'm looking forward to see what Louis thinks of Orson Welles in Chimes at Midnight.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Gaston and The Mob Song scenes from Beauty And The Beast (2017).

Luke Higham said...

My Supporting Actor Suggestions

Armie Hammer - The Social Network
Cillian Murphy - Inception
Trond Nilssen - King Of Devil's Island
Liu Kai Chi - The Stool Pigeon
Michael Lonsdale - Of Gods And Men

Alt. Colin Farrell - The Way Back

Omar Franini said...

Luke: i would also suggest Peter Wight and David Bradley for Another Year.

Luke Higham said...

Omar: Thanks, I'll add them alongside Farrell.

Michael McCarthy said...

I have no interest in judging someone else's tastes, but anything higher than a 3.5 for Hardy would be baffling to me.

Also to answer your previous question Robert, although I haven't seen the Fargo series, I've always wanted to see Michael Palin in a Coen Brother's project.

Luke Higham said...

Michael: I re-watched it recently and I've grown to like his work even more than I thought I would. He's a weak 4, though perhaps I am being biased since Hardy's probably my favourite actor working at the moment.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: I'm completely fine with Hardy remaining at a 3.5.

Luke Higham said...

Michael McCarthy: Your rating and thoughts on Affleck in The Killer Inside Me.

Robert MacFarlane said...

As the biggest Hardy skeptic on the blog, I... actually have been thinking about him Dunkirk a lot lately. A 4 would be justified.

Calvin Law said...

Hardy is excellent, but I'd actually much rather see Styles get bumped up to a 4.

Calvin Law said...

Robert: for me it's been the ensemble cast of Get Out that's been on my mind recently. I really hope Stanfield, and Marcus Henderson will end up as 3.5's and Howrey and Gabriel 4's.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Calvin: Agreed.

Bryan L. said...

I wouldn't mind watching Dunkirk again in order to fully rate the performances :D

2010s Lord of War

Yuri Orlov- Leonardo DiCaprio
Vitaly- Paul Dano (think Swiss Army Man)
Jack Valentine- Bradley Cooper
Simeon- Rutger Hauer




Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Probably not, however again I do think the impact he makes with so little is quite impressive.

Gaston - (Vocals on point as his bringing a needed real sense of fun within their own performances, something lacking from other songs that is very much needed for what is suppose to be an entertaining musical. Although they do over blow just a touch with the dance sequence it is still very enjoyable, though the revised lyrics don't hold a candle to the original.)

Mob Song - (Perhaps the only scene that I simply do prefer in this version for the real intensity that Evans brings to the scene, with the addition of La Fou questioning him that provides the most depth to any aspect of the remake. Also Evans's is singing once again is superb both technically and delivering the needed power to the emotion of the song.)

Robert:

Well they are there in lead, though I could put Rush back in supporting. If you meant could they up? yes.

Michael McCarthy said...

Luke: 4.5ish for Affleck. Like with Robert Ford, he's great at infusing every word and action with a very unbalanced energy, but he makes this role slightly different by giving his character a very false charisma that anyone who really got to know him would be able to see. The dynamic he creates with his female co-stars is properly hollow and lustful (even though I hated most of those scenes) and he goes a step further by keeping alive the history of the character, enabling the audience to see how this particular psychopath was created.