Thursday, 2 November 2017

Alternate Best Actor 1988: Results

5. Daniel Day-Lewis in The Unbearable Lightness of Being - Day-Lewis plays an often indifferent character however he still strikes up very effective chemistry with both of his female co-stars and stands out well in any moments of real urgency for his character.

Best Scene: Throwing the paper away.
4. Michael Caine in Dirty Rotten Scoundrels - Caine along with his co-star Steve Martin gives a delightful turn that is particularly enjoyable in tandem with Martin's more wacky turn.

Best Scene: A cure.
3. Michael Keaton in Clean and Sober - Keaton elevates and energizes his film giving an effective and affecting portrayal of an addict slowly coming to terms with his problem.

Best Scene: Final speech.
2. Willem Dafoe in The Last Temptation of Christ - Dafoe gives a great atypical approach to his depiction of Jesus giving a powerful depiction of Jesus as the messiah but also the man dealing with facing his destiny and sacrifice.

Best Scene: Asking for the cross.
1. John Neville in The Adventures of Baron Munchausen - Perhaps a surprise winner however I loved everything about this performance. Every second Neville's work is entertaining and a sheer delight in his larger than life performance. Every moment of it is a risk, and every risk pays off in this wildly endearing turn.

Best Scene: Battle with the Turks.
Updated Overall

Next Year: 1988 Supporting

61 comments:

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your Female Lead and Supporting Top Tens of 1988 with ratings and other 4+ performances.

Ratings and thoughts on the rest of the leading performances you saw.

Luke Higham said...

And thoughts on Grave Of The Fireflies and My Neighbour Totoro. Happy to see the former as your favourite of 1988.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: And Child's Play.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Is Bogosian a 4.5.

Luke Higham said...

Finally, my suggestions are:
Pete Postlethwaite - Distant Voices, Still Lives
M. Emmet Walsh - Clean And Sober
Eric Idle - The Adventures Of Baron Munchausen
Harvey Keitel - The Last Temptation Of Christ
Jacky Cheung - As Tears Go By

Scott Gingold said...

Andre Gregory and Harry Dean Stanton, The Last Temptation of Christ
Robert Downey Jr., 1969
Christopher Walken, Biloxi Blues
David Strathain, Dominick and Eugene
Alan King, Memories of Me

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Louis: Thoughts on the use of Amelita Galli-Curci's rendition of Home Sweet Home in Grave of the Fireflies.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Thoughts on Akira (if you've seen it) and the performances of Mitsuo Iwata, Nozomu Sasaki and Mami Koyama in that film.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I heard great things about Isaach De Bankolé in Chocolat, so I would like to see him reviewed. Also, one of Keaton in Beetlejuice if he's been upgraded.

Vanna Long said...

Hello, been lurking here a little while, my picks are

Bernard-Pierre Donnadieu in The Vanishing
John Lone in The Moderns
Divine in Hairspray

Charles Heiston said...

I love seeing Neville win the line-up.

Gregory, Stanton, & Keital - The Last Temptation of Christ
Robert Downey Jr. - 1969
M. Emmet Walsh - Clean And Sober
Eric Idle - The Adventures Of Baron Munchausen
Jacky Cheung - As Tears Go By

Matt Mustin said...

He gave his thoughts on Stanton in Last Temptation.

Omar Franini said...

Louis: your thoughts on Meryl Streep in Cry in the Dark, Shirley MacLaine in Madame Sousatzka and Gena Rowlands in Another Woman, Isabelle Huppert in Une Affaire de Femmes, Carmen Maura in Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, Isabelle Adjani in Camille Claudel and Barbare Hershey in A World Apart if you have seen them.

Alex Marqués said...


Bernard-Pierre Donnadieu in The Vanishing

RatedRStar said...

M. Emmet Walsh - Clean And Sober
Eric Idle - The Adventures Of Baron Munchausen
Jacky Cheung - As Tears Go By
John Lone in The Moderns
Bernard-Pierre Donnadieu in The Vanishing

RatedRStar said...

Louis what are your very very quick thoughts on

Frantic
Colors
Things Change
A Cry in the Dark
Tequila Sunrise
Dominick and Eugene

RatedRStar said...

Louis: I only know of Colors because it was one of the most recent Siskel & Ebert reviews that appeared on their site lol.

RatedRStar said...

Looks like MOTOE is getting what I thought it would...just ok reviews =D.

Anonymous said...

I really should check out Grave of the Fireflies.

I also now regret not recommending Vampire Hunter D to Louis for the 1985 bonus rounds.

Anonymous said...

Luke Higham

I'll make a change to mine.

Pete Postlwthwaire - Distant Voices, Still Lives
Harvey Keitel and Andre Gregory - The Last Temptation Of Christ
Bernard-Pierre Donnadieu - The Vanishing
John Lone - The Moderns
Jacky Cheung - As Tears Go By

Anonymous said...

*Postlethwaite

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thoughts on Weaver and Griffith in Working Girl and Jodie Foster in The Accused.

Calvin Law said...

Saw Murder on the Orient Express. Actually liked it, the source material is of course preposterous and tonally it drifts into pretty uncertain and problematic waters. The third act is a real mixed bag. But it's mostly fun, there's some nice little twists on the formula, and the cast is largely pretty solid. Also Branagh's ego doesn't actually come through that apparently. Not a great Christie adaptation since I wouldn't say it's quite a great Christie novel, but it's decent. Again, thoughts on anyone you'd like.

Branagh - 3.5
Cruz - 2.5
Dafoe - 3.5
Dench - 3
Depp - 2
Gad - 3
Jacobi - 3
Odom Jr. - 3/3.5
Pfeiffer - 3.5
Ridley - 2.5
Kenzari - 2.5
Colman - 3
Boynton - 2.5
Garcia-Rulfo - 2.5
Polunin - 2
Bateman - 3

Luke Higham said...

Branagh, Dafoe and Depp.

Omar Franini said...

Calvin: thoughts on Pfeiffer, Cruz and Dench?

Calvin Law said...

Luke:

Branagh - (not a Suchet or Ustinov or Finney, which is to say he carves his own path as the character. His accent is actually pretty good, and he's really endearing and fun as the cocky and confident Poirot. I would say the more dramatic intents of the character aren't the film's strongest points but he does decently with them, and his final speech is good, though not quite Finney or Suchet good)

Dafoe - (a lot of fun playing with a pretty ludicrous role, and merges the comical vulgarity and hidden depths of his character perfectly)

Depp - (hmmmm maybe I'll bump him up to a 2.5 there's nothing overly wrong with what he does here. He's a creepy gangster and that is kind of all that's needed for the role. There might have been more that could have been done and he's sort of just coasting on being weird and off-putting but there's not too much of him)

Omar:

Pfeiffer - (liked her a lot. Her showboating lusty older woman routine may be a bit standard but it's enjoyable, then when she delves deeper into the character I thought she was pretty effective)

Cruz - (kind of just there and a bit bland and on autopilot in a boring role, though she has a few good moments towards the end)

Dench - (basically Maggie Smith in Gosford Park with less material but she delivers in her key scene)

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Calvin: Your thoughts on Ridley and Gad

Calvin Law said...

Ruthiehenshallfan99:

Ridley - (pretty bland I have to say, she has a few good moments but is mostly overshadowed by Branagh and Odom Jr.. She's never bad though.)

Gad - (a moderately enjoyable turn as the nervous drunkard, I wouldn't say it's a great performance but he makes a good impression, and is pretty effective in his big scene)

Anonymous said...

Calvin: You liked Finney more than the 3 that he scored on this blog?

94dfk1 said...

Louis: Would Joaquin Phoenix be your pick for a 2000s Terry Malloy? Oh and your 2010s cast/director for The Departed?

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Thoughts on the following scenes-

The Box-Seven
"Mad as Hell"-Network
Ending-Bridge on the River Kwai
Reunion-Stranger Things 2
Interrogating the attorney- LA Confidential

Michael McCarthy said...

Hm, 1988 supporting...maybe Clancy Brown or Andy Robinson in Shoot to Kill?

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Lead:

1. Sigourney Weaver - Gorillas in the Mist - 5
2. Meryl Streep - A Cry in the Dark - 5
3. Glenn Close - Dangerous Liaisons
4. Susan Sarandon - Bull Durham
5. Lena Olin - The Unbearable Lightness of Being
6. Gena Rowlands - Another Woman - 4.5
7. Juliette Binoche - The Unbearable Lightness of Being
8. Christine Lahti - Running on Empty
9. Jamie Lee Curtis - A Fish Called Wanda
10. Carmen Maura - Women on the Verge - 4

And:

Sarah Pickering - Little Dorrit

Supporting:

1.Joan Greenwood - Little Dorrit - 4.5
2.Sarah Polley - The Adventures of Baron Munchausen
3.Maria Aitken - A Fish Called Wanda - 4.5
4.Genevieve Bujold - Dead Ringers
5.Emmanuelle Seigner - Frantic - 4.5
6.Catherine O'Hara - Beetlejuice
7.Kathleen Turner - Who Framed Roger Rabbit
8.Frances McDormand - Mississippi Burning
9.Uma Thurman - Dangerous Liaisons
10.Geena Davis - The Accidental Tourist

Mantegna - 4.5(Mantegna's performance ends up working towards a rather powerful conclusion though in a rather low key way. He has some very nice chemistry with Ameche in the way he slowly develops a certain affectionate pity towards genuine respect and concern. Mantegna's does well in conveying in every scene the slightly shifting attitude of his small time crook often in a very reactionary way towards Ameche's more mannered turn. Mantegna helps make Ameche's performance all the more endearing actually by portraying such earnest depiction of the change in his character's heart over the course of the film. Mantegna is particularly good in establishing the growing sense of unease not only due to his own situation but also his care for the old men. He builds this so wel towards the finale where he is altogether great in his realization of his character's emotional turmoil when he's asked to do something unthinkable.)

Ford - 4.5(This is terrific work from Ford essentially getting to do a Hitchcock wrong man performance, and in a rather expected way, for 80's Ford anyways, he excels here. Ford extremely easy to follow here though and captures so well the needed tone for the film as a good wrong man actor should. In that he reflects the tension yet he naturally segues into some more comedic moments when available without making them seem misjudged, especially since they are so often from the very cathartic anger Ford reveals when being fed up with the incompetence of others. Also required is he has some great chemistry with his random partner in Emmanuelle Seigner as they nicely bring the needed energy to the thriller. Ford though never loses the more dramatic crux of the film and is particularly great in any scene where he is forced to think about the state of his wife, and is rather heartbreaking in the scene where he calls his daughter.)

Louis Morgan said...

Duvall - 4.5(Duvall is just great here and offers some needed stability to Dennis Hopper's ambitious film, which never unfortunately struggles to live up to that ambition. Duvall though is always good in any scene that comes to him creating such a strong sense of the character's history not only in dealing with the troubles of the police force but in his way of dealing with the criminals. Duvall is incredible in everyone of his scenes with dealing with the gang members as he has such a striking confidence and control while barely even raising his voice. In addition his anti-chemistry with Penn is quite good as Duvall presents both the sense of frustration but also the attempt of the older cop trying to calm the rookie's more violent impulses.)

Ameche - 4.5(Another one of his performances to suggest just how annoying his Oscar win was I suppose. Ameche gives a very good performance here in creating a certain construction that working within it. To begin with he makes a natural realization of this older Italian man with limited speaking skills. He never falls into caricature but rather finds the right honesty within the simplicity of the character. Ameche never really breaks this mold yet subtly works within it to create the sense of what his character is going through even though its purposefully a low key turn. Ameche never forces this finding just in such well reasoned moments that resonate well, such as when he agrees to take a fall for the gangster, or in the moments where he creates an understanding with Mantegna's character.)

Gibson - 4(Gibson offers some needed stability to an often ponderous story creating at least some sense of what is suppose to be going in his own performance. He naturally offers his usual presence and charm however he goes further than that. He creates a strong undercurrent of the paranoia and sense of instability that conveys well the inherent motivation of the character throughout even though the role so often requires him to seem like he doesn't care. Gibson is able to create that "cool" but he also finds the desperate man within it.)

Neill - 4(He is very much the secondary lead to Streep's character who is given the stronger focus throughout however I liked what Neill's performance did within his side of the story. Where Streep portrays more of the frustrations within certainty Neill portrays it without that certainty. Neill is incredibly affecting by just showing the process of the poor confused man being beaten down and manipulated at every turn by the media's encroachment. All the while still always keeping the central loss at the core of his performance and is very moving in showing how the man is slowly broken particularly when they receive the initial verdict.)

Penn - 3.5(It almost feels as the understated Robert Duvall's sheer presence hones in Penn's excesses as there are plenty of points here for some over the top Penn ham yet he consistently resists the urge to do so. I will say though his big scene are nicely not too big for once here his best scenes are still his quiet ones. He's best in creating the more doubtful man beneath the tough guy cop routine he usually projects and has some very good moments in expressing this more openly in the scenes where Duvall's vet directly confronts him.)

Louis Morgan said...

Poitier - 3.5(Just Poitier charming the place up and so many scenes just seem set up for Poitier do to do his thing. He does that quite well and this is just an entertaining performance from him, and works well against Berenger's turn as well. I will say though the film somewhat fumbles its premise, but overall he and Berenger make up for the film's shortcomings.)

Berenger - 3.5(Acts as a good straight man to Poitier though with some pretty enjoyable scenes where he breaks that stoic quality though these come at the right time. In addition he brings the real urgency needed for the thriller by offering the right emotional intensity to his character's motivation.)

Russell - 3(His character just is a little too all over the place and perhaps Russell plays him too straight forward for all that. His character is suppose to be constantly playing games yet Russell really doesn't provide enough depth for that. He's okay in just playing the part on a emotional level, but in terms of really getting across what the character is doing his work comes up short.)

Liotta - 3(His character feels an afterthought as he is just barely lead. He certainly delivers on his side of the story as limited as it is, which is usually showing either frustrations towards Hulce, frustrations towards himself, or extreme anger at those who abuse Hulce. To Liotta's credit he's not one note, but he just isn't given the opportunity to properly develop his character's own struggle.)

Hulce - 2.5(He's not Sean Penn bad in this regard, and it's a good thing Penn played in Colors rather than this. Hulce however still feels like he's giving a performance as his mentally challenged character. It's not a terrible performance but it always feels like a performance still.)

Chowdry - 2.5(There's nothing wrong with his performance but he really doens't make much of an impact either way.)

Sarandon - 2.5(The best of the leads as he offers any sort of gravity to a killer doll movie, but eh that's not much.)

Dourif - 2(Dourif does creepy however him doing his campy creepy that seems to be his main source of income these days is very tiresome given that he has more talent than that. This is just Dourif on a single setting and sticking to it.)

Vincent - 1.5(Very lackluster child actor in almost every regard ever line reading sounds like he had just been fed the line.)

Louis Morgan said...

Grave of Fireflies - (Quick thoughts this is exactly what I'm looking for when it comes to animation. Beautiful animation yet it so successfully and so powerfully deals with its adult themes, and I mean truly adult. It's animation in a way is what makes the film even bearable to watch in a way yet it in no way diminishes the emotional resonance of the story. It's an absolutely haunting requiem in every respect, and a fascinating examination not of the punishment of war rather I feel the inability to escape by merely isolating one's self from it.)

Totoro - (Again also what I'm looking for with animation actually, and by the perfect companion piece to Grave, though I will say they made a colossal mistake by billing the two together in the wrong order. Totoro needs to be second not first. Totoro though I love as it is more directly you'd say a children's film however that does not mean it is juvenile, and has the confidence to succeed in itself without a reliance on cheap one liner jokes that infects so many modern animated films. Totoro is a pure joy, it has humor that comes naturally from the character and situation, yet more than anything it has the confidence to appreciate the glorious wonders of its story often with quiet.)

ruthiehenshallfan99:

Well in terms of its use that song is one of the most haunting moments in that film. It so poignantly though connects to the idea of home to what it means within the story and to the lost of the characters.

Omar:

MacLaine - 3(I couldn't quite tell if she was at times trying an accent or not, or she was sorta doing it. Whatever this performance is entirely a decent as sort of the slightly kooky music teacher. MacLaine knows how to cut some ham, and there's a bit of it here however it works well enough for the role of the overt character, I've come across a few such music teachers myself. Her performance though is a bit static though because of the film itself which feels largely aimless despite things technically happening yet there is never anything of importance nor is it compelling in its normalcy. MacLaine fine as she is, but that's where it begins and ends.)

Maura - 4(This film I'll admit lost me the wackier it became and it started getting pretty farcical by the end. Maura acted as the closest thing to a stabilizer for me in that she at least brought something very genuine in the very subdued way she portrayed her character's underlying anguish towards her treatment throughout the film. She effectively keeps that as a constant and I liked the way she portrays her character as putting on the various facades of not caring. Maura creates the right layers there of just hiding herself, and this is an effective performance, even as it also got a little lost in the ridiculousness of the film after awhile.)

RatedRStar:

Frantic - (Polanski doing Hitchcock, a great fit I thought. Entertaining thriller.)

Colors - (Tries very hard to be many things at once, I appreciate the ambition but the film doesn't quite pull it off.)

Things Change - (Mamet doesn't always know what to do with silence, but when the dialogue starts the film shines. Makes for a fun, sometimes moving off-beat double character study.)

A Cry in the Dark - (Great atypical courtroom drama, really makes you feel for the family's personal struggle, but also does great job of creating the sense of the gossip and hysteria around the single event.)

Tequila Sunrise - (For every Chinatown I guess there's a Tequila Sunrise. The complex plot just seems to collapse in on itself since it never bothers to become compelling in its complexity since it struggles to properly establish its characters before or during the time it gets muddled in its plot.)

Dominick and Eugene - (Not exactly subtle and its manipulations are not all that well hidden. I will say for this type of melodrama it isn't terrible though.)

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thoughts on the other Female performances that you didn't give thoughts on including Weaver.

And Little Dorrit's 1987 via UK release, so Polley's your Supporting Actress winner.

Luke Higham said...

Thoughts on Weaver, Streep, Rowlands and Seigner.

Your ratings for Susan Sarandon and Catherine O'Hara.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: And I'm sure you're glad that you finally saw a five star performance from Meryl Streep.

Calvin Law said...

Ooh a 5 for Streep eh.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: I hope you'll get around to Camille Claudel, Une Affaire de Femmes, Working Girl (Re-Watch) and A World Apart during Supporting.

I'm sure you'll watch The Accused as well.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Thoughts on the following scenes-

The Box-Seven
"Mad as Hell"-Network
Ending-Bridge on the River Kwai
Reunion-Stranger Things 2
Interrogating the attorney- LA Confidential

Luke Higham said...

Louis: And Akira.

Omar Franini said...

Louis: ratings and thoughts on the rest of the cast of Another Woman. And what are your ratings for Pfeiffer and Thurman in Dangerous Liaisons, Davis and Turner in The Accidental Tourist?

Giuseppe Fadda said...

Actually I think Louis gave Pfeiffer a 3 for Dangerous Liaisons.

Luke Higham said...

Giuseppe: Sorry, I meant Thurman.

Luke Higham said...

Omar: Thurman's a 4 and I think Davis is a 3.5. Not sure about the others.

Luke Higham said...

And Pfeiffer's a 2.5 or 3.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your winners for 1988.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: If you're seeing Thor: Ragnarok tonight or later this weekend, could I have your thoughts on the film and the cast.

Louis Morgan said...

Omar:

Streep - (Best performance from her that I've seen and this is a role where her style works particularly well. Her accent is on point, something I never have a problem with anyways, however it isn't what defines her performance by any means. She's terrific her in establishing the specific nature of her character in the private and public world. She does not show two people but rather establishes her as the type of internalized person who opens up in private yet no in public. These two sides she realizes so well in portraying the intensity of her anguish towards the central loss. She meanwhile though is an effectively unpleasant witness in a way. Her courtroom scene is amazing in the way she lets us see in on the quieter form of that pain sort of hidden towards the public with her presentation of the vicious anger of her character through her frankly ridiculous treatment given the situation. She's great here creating the right empathy for her specific loss, yet she also shows how she would be hated by the public through so naturally realizes every side of this character.)

Luke:

Foster - 4(Her performance is technically a bit of a mixed bag. She is great in so many of her scenes particularly her testimony scene and the incredible hard to watch rape sequence. She lays on other scenes a bit thickly though usually when she's portraying the sort of background of her character. She just comes off as more caricature than character in those moments unfortunately, however the strength of her good scenes do make up for them.)

Weaver - (Weaver's performance is fascinating in the way it is almost a dissection of the inspirational figure performance even though it seems like the film wants it be so in way. In once this is an extremely charismatic performance by Weaver, and she makes her initial journey to the Apes compelling through merely following her as she interacts with the Apes. She creates that right sense of discovery and initially seems to create just a noble style of biopic lead, doing so well. As the film progresses and she begins taking her militaristic methods to defend the apes Weaver offers the right passion in her performance. She takes it further somewhat subverting that inspirational trope by slowly creating this gradual descent into her own form of extremism. It's marvelous as she is always sympathetic to a degree yet she brilliantly tests it since she makes this change so natural throughout.)

Seigner - (Found she managed to be incredibly endearing here in also so well fulfilling the unexpected cohort fitting to the wrong man story. Her chemistry with Ford is great but very unique as it is never strictly romantic. They though create this mutual agreement though Seigner brings well this real sense of fun into her performance. She proudly portrays the overt selfish intentions of the character, and the way she wears it manages to make it endearing rather than problematic frankly due to the lack of shame in her work.)

Rowlands - (Very much working within a Bergmanian framework for a performance though I wouldn't say her performance reaches the heights of some of those turns. Her work though succeeds in going for the similair style of an incredibly strong, and striking subdued emotionalism to her work. In every calm scene depicting one of her points of suffering or another, Rowlands reflects what that means beautifully yet does so in a subtle effective way at every turn.)

4.5's.

Anonymous:

I did see Akira which I thought was pretty good though I felt it perhaps tried to cover a little too much ground at times, for example the corporate/government element I felt was a little underdeveloped. What did work was the central story behind Tetsuo's journey, and the other children. I found the final flashback scene particularly powerful, and overall I liked the film a lot, even I guess I didn't quite love it.

Louis Morgan said...

Tahmeed:

The Box - (One of the all time great film endings I'd say, even with Pitt's not so great delivery, thankfully Freeman more than makes everything work, as does currently person non-grata. It's an outstanding scene for Fincher's direction as the whole film has been building towards this overwhelming dread and this is where it comes to a head so brutally and effectively. It is an acceptance of almost nihilism, although it is kept from being too much I feel through the hint of hope offered in Freeman's pleas. Everything about the scene is brilliantly constructed, although I have particular affection for the ending with the swat Captain "somebody call somebody".)

Mad As Hell - (Still used as a cathartic lashing out against society, although those who use it for such should consider that it is still the ravings of a mad man. Such downright spellbinding ravings of a mad man being a highlight of Finch's performance, but also Dunaway in her glee as the speech becomes viral.)

Ending - (The fact that this film being so spoiled doesn't diminish the ending speaks to its greatness since its not about what happens but how it all happens. As correctly noted in the perfect final lines of "Madness, Madness" we gets such a fascinating clash of everyone's madness together in all in one scene. Every clash reflects a certain degree of this madness in war that compels them in this symphony of destruction that is incredible.)

Reunion - (Ah yes I knew they'd make us wait, but the level of heartwarming pleasure was all the greater because of it. I love of it through just allowing the performances to handle it beautifully through those perfect reactions of Brown, and actually especially Wolfhard in his change of surprise to such a genuine smile.)

Interrogating the Attorney - (I love the scene, as I love all scenes in that film, particularly though in that we get to see what the two different men are capable of working fully in tandem with one another. It's extreme in the best of ways with Crowe beings so intense, and violent against Pearce's calm throughout the scene. Credit should also go to Ron Rifkin for his portrayal of crippling fear in the window moment.)

Matt Mustin said...

I think Gorillas in the Mist is actually pretty bad as a film, but I agree that Sigourney Weaver is amazing.

Louis Morgan said...

94dk1:

Yes in regards to Phoenix.

94dk1:

Departed 2010's Directed by Michael R. Roskam:

Billy Costigan: Matthias Schoenaerts
Colin Sullivan: Tom Hardy
Frank Costello: Joe Pesci
Frenchy: Jeffrey Dean Morgan
Queenan: William Hurt
Madolyn: Noomi Rapace
Dignam: Ben Foster
Ellerby: Aaron Eckhart

Matt:

I'd agree the film itself is not very good.

Luke Higham said...

I sincerely hope Spacey's career is over for good. Obviously, morally it's the right thing but also I want to remember him as a great actor and not continuously taint his legacy if he went on.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

1988 Wins:

Director: Robert Zemeckis - Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
Production Design: The Adventures of Baron Munchausen
Sound Editing: Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
Sound Mixing: Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
Score: Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
Editing: Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
Visual Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
Costume Design: Dangerous Liaisons
Cinematography: The Last Temptation of Christ
Makeup and Hairstyling: Beetlejuice
Best Adapted Screenplay: Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
Best Original Screenplay: A Fish Called Wanda

Robert MacFarlane said...

Saw Thor: Ragnarok. Enjoyed it more than the other MCU movie from this year.

Luke Higham said...

Robert: Your Ratings/Thoughts on the cast.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Luke - Without thinking about it too hard:

Hemsworth - 4
Hiddleston - 4
Thompson - 4
Goldblum - 3.5
Ruffalo - 3.5
Urban - 4
Blanchett - 3 (Great camp approach, but not enough time to truly milk it)
Hopkins - 2.5
The cameos at the play - 3

Anonymous said...

Just fyi, Donnadieu in The Vanishing and De Bankole are really lead, but I hope you still watch em for the lead ranking.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Review Donnadieu if he's a five.