Saturday, 27 May 2017

Alternate Best Actor 1968: Toshiro Mifune and Lee Marvin in Hell in the Pacific

Toshiro Mifune and Lee Marvin did not receive Oscar nominations for portraying the Japanese Captain and the American pilot respectively in Hell in the Pacific.

Hell in the Pacific is an effective film, other than its needlessly bleak ending, about an American and a Japanese soldier during World War II being stuck on a desert island together.

The film features quite the starring pair with Mifune and Marvin, both real life veterans of World War II themselves, and thrusts them into a somewhat atypical film at least for the period. The film begins with both men already on the island, and with each man lacking the ability to speak the other man's language. The film opens with the two basically discovering each other where a battle of sorts takes place, though mostly for the collected fresh water on the island. The film though it was made by an English language production company and crew it technically isn't really an English language film per se. Both men speak and only really speak in their language. There is no preference made within the film, and there is no preference made in terms of who is the true lead so to speak. It is a very interesting set up since in a way it sets us with sort of two one man shows at once, though they do interact even that is very much internalized within the performances of each man for much of the film.

We have Lee Marvin perhaps one of the most "man's man" of the sixties as the American pilot and Marvin is sort of known for his particularly easygoing performance style even when playing technically intense characters. Marvin though is sort of the guy who just wears any hard edges so well within himself that it seems often like he does not need to try too much in that regard. That seems to free him up in a way to give perhaps a performance not always expected of the standard soldier which works very well here as the marooned man. Marvin establishes his role well in terms of the time that has likely been spent even before we meet the two men on the island. In that Marvin realizes the idea that the American has been here awhile right in his performance which lacks that outward intensity at times though he instead replaces that with this bit of insanity. Now this is not true insanity that Marvin shows but rather just the sort of partial madness inflicted on a guy who has been alone talking to himself for some time. In Marvin's delivery when he talks to himself there is a casual quality as though he's been doing for a while now to the point he doesn't give it even a second thought since he's been on the island for so long.

Then there is Toshiro Mifune, who despite being my favorite actor is not an actor who I have actively looked for his English language work. This mainly because, despite learning all the lines, he was often overdubbed poorly though since Mifune's voice is very distinct hearing anything else coming out of his mouth just seems wrong. Thankfully there is none of that nonsense here since Mifune speaks mostly in Japanese with just a few scant words in English in his real voice still. Mifune offers to begin with a more intense performance than Marvin, which is obviously something Mifune thrives with. Mifune's approach though is very much fitting to the Japanese man though given the different codes offered by their military with Mifune's character technically instructed to kill Marvin's character by the soldier's code. Mifune's approach fits that idea offering that killer instruction within his performance though he carefully mutes it ever so slightly. Mifune also portrays importantly the wear of the island in his performance as well. Mifune handles it as perhaps the second man to come though by depicting this underlying uncertainty in his physical portrayal of the Japanese Captain's manner. He has a certain fear in his intensity, as he shows the man looking for any surprises while trying to figure out his situation on the island.

The initial "battle" is very well played by both actors in that neither depict this as this cunning scheme by either man in order to get an advantage over the other. There is something more about it in both show there to be this desperation in every strike they take, and both portray that the men are as confused as when they attack as when they defend. Neither portray any hatred really in these early scenes but rather a defensive suspicion of sorts as they each make their moves against the other though usually only getting the upper hand for a moment. The two are great in the way they portray this seeking for connection even in these early stage such as in there technically most intense confrontation when they come for a duel of sorts the Japanese with a makeshift wooden samurai sword and the American with a knife. Marvin and Mifune both do well to depict a nervousness and confusion in their eyes as they reveal the men not wanting to fight to the death, while also showing that they don't know exactly what else to do either. They continue on the fighting even past this point but in the right awkward fashion. Mifune showing it as the Japanese soldier never really having an exact passion in capturing the American, just doing his perceived duty, while Marvin shows the American making a literal game out of it times almost joking around fitting to the somewhat aloof state he established that the American is in.

They eventually stop trying to best each other and begin attempting to deal with their situation of being on the desert island. The two though begin separated in this task and we are granted a bit more of each actor giving their own rendition of Castaway, just Wilson happens to be an actual person. Now in this rendition the two both thrive since they are both incredibly magnetic performers though in different ways. Marvin again continues to excel as the man who has kind of lost his mind as he brings such natural humor to the man pondering over his situation, and trying to decipher and work with his other "friend". Marvin does some talking, but often as mumbling though which wholly suits the role of the man who is more than a little lost both mentally and physically. Mifune on the other hand though conveys a greater resolve in the Japanese soldier, though is also comical in his own way as juxtaposed against Marvin's performance. Mifune though captures almost this rigorous devotion as the Japanese man attempts to prepare for his situation through this quietude of a man almost in meditation, only occasionally broken in his often amusing befuddled reactions towards whatever Marvin might be doing at a given moment. I have particular affection for Mifune's studious and calm re-raking of some sand after Marvin steps in it.

The two do begin to work together in order to make a raft to escape together and the actors work in creating the right type of chemistry with one another. The right type because there is always a certain disconnect in the verbal aspect which Marvin and Mifune portray fitting to two people who can't quite even say hello with each other to begin with, and their vocabulary doesn't improve all that much as the story progresses either. They work well in creating the physical interactions, that do actual create a chemistry there. The two begin to slowly have in through the subtle physical gestures and facial ques to create a convincing connection between the two. What is most notable though in this is how Marvin and Mifune reveal this growing ease in each other presence, as the two pull back on some of the aspects of their performances that defined the men alone, Mifune losing his intensity, and Marvin actually becoming less aloof.  Both actors are remarkable though since they do end up saying so much without really saying much of anything just by making this friendship all in the unsaid, and mutual devotion that each show is focused upon helping each other get off the island. When they manage to escape the island it i inspiring not only in the accomplishment but through how believable Mifune and Marvin make the two enemies become allies. The film though reaches its unfortunate ending where the men come to another apparently deserted island. Although their good feelings continue at first they get reminders of the war, by finding an abandoned army base, and the conflict begins again. Both actors make this a painfully believable transition as well with Marvin showing the American falling back into his own world again, and Mifune is rather heart wrenching depiction of the Japanese soldiers anguish as he looks upon various images of destruction against the Japanese in a LIFE magazine. The connection is gone as Mifune shows the Japanese man falling into his own sorrows  and anger related to the war, while Marvin shows the American unable to find any useful words to bridge the gap. I'd say the film could have ended with the two at the moment and would have been fitting to both characters and the terrific performances of the lead. The film though throws in an arbitrary final moment that unfortunately undercuts rather than amplifies the rest of the film. Thankfully there is the rest of the film though which contains to very impressive performances by Mifune and Marvin who both give intriguing one man shows yet manage to transition naturally into a unique two man show that results in a powerful portrait of two enemies finding common ground.

85 comments:

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Thoughts on your #10-6 Return Of The King pieces.

Luke Higham said...

Louis, could you review McDowell and Sydow next. I think Bronson and Lancaster are easily getting fives.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Which new releases do you plan on watching until the end of June.

Charles Heiston said...

Mifune can't give a bad performance.

Michael McCarthy said...

I saw Alien: Covenant earlier tonight, and as someone who remembers being lukewarm at best on Prometheus when I saw it, I'm happy to say I enjoyed this one the whole way through pretty much. I honestly think it's being underrated.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Is it possible for the following performances to be upgraded-
Tom Hanks in Cast Away
Alec Guinness in Oliver Twist
Peter Sarsgaard in Shattered Glass
Kevin Bacon in Mystic River
Kevin Bacon in The Woodsman

Calvin Law said...

Damn, the ending to this was awful, what were they thinking? But I agree with you Louis, I found both actors didn't really do anything too 'new' with their characters, but still managed to be very effective and moving in their respective roles.

RatedRStar said...

Its amazing how many actors actually fought during world war 1 and 2. Art Carney and Charles Durning were even injured during it.

RatedRStar said...

I find the London Scottish Regiment stories of WW1 fascinating, since Ronald Colman, Claude Rains, Basil Rathbone and Herbert Marshall all were in it and all 4 were injured in some way.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

TJ Miller won't be back for Silicon Valley Season 5. FUUUUUUUUCK.

Luke Higham said...

Michael McCarthy: Your rating and thoughts on Fassbender.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Which version did you see? This movie has two endings depending on the American or European cut.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Shelob's Lair - (In terms of style it is a break from LOTR Shore, and we get a return to Cronenberg Shore, very effectively though and fitting to the horror style of Shelob's lair. Shore goes right back to it with the broken strings, and low brass so often shifting the constantly increasing tempo which as he did in his earlier work creates such unease and considerable tension.)

The White Tree - (Quite an effective piece as it begins in the Gondorian theme then transitions as almost this terrific traveling theme that is crafted as this vivid tapestry of themes that builds so beautifully until its "arrival".)

The Return of the King - (Mostly an arrangement of previous themes and motifs though weaved together in particularly long and often awe inspiring piece. The whole piece is a full capitalization of all that came before in terms of the score in all three previous films as it so poignantly returns to each piece and segues from one to another with such grace.)

Twilight and Shadow - (The classic Lord of the Rings soft choir voices piece for the film perhaps and another beautiful example of the style. This one though is particularly affecting though in its transition from the choir to the soft orchestra that seems this wonderful combination of a sorrow with hope.)

Ash and Smoke - (Though Denethor may be the weakest of the film as a whole he certainly has some good things around him including this score which perhaps inflicts more pathos into his downfall than is actually found in his character. This is terrific piece though in that it creates the sense of a madness of the mind in the slight alteration of the Mordor themes along with the theme of Gondon which builds into that terrific frenzy of strings mixing into the theme of madness until all is overpowered by it in the end.)

Wonder Woman if it's not panned.
Baby Driver
Okja
The Beguiled if it is released near me.
And possibly It Comes At Night.

Calvin:

I went and watched the alternate ending, the one Boorman apparently wanted, and it's far superior.

Tahmeed:

Hanks and Bacon for the Woodsman maybe.

That's unfortunate.

Robert:

The original release American cut, which has the darker arbitrary ending, which is very strange when it comes to producer meddling.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on your #5-1 Return Of The King pieces.

Out of those 5, It Comes At Night is the most interesting to me.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your rating for Ann-Margret in Magic.

94dfk1 said...

Louis: Your 2010s cast (or to be more accurate, pairing) for this film?

Luke Higham said...

Josh Brolin & Ken Watanabe

Calvin Law said...

Louis: your thoughts on the use of 'Hurdy Gurdy Man' in Zodiac.

Michael McCarthy said...

Luke: Lately I've been waiting about a week or so before I officially assign ratings, just because I've been tending to go back and forth for a lot of performances. I can tell you now that Fassbender is at the very least close to a 5 for me.

Psifonian said...

Joaquin Phoenix is now two for three with the big festival prizes. All he needs is Berlin.

So happy for him, Ramsay, Kruger and Ostlund.

Luke Higham said...

I'm surprised Coppola won for The Beguiled.

So pleased for Joaquin.

Has anyone ever won all 3. (Berlin, Cannes and Venice)

Robert MacFarlane said...

I'll say this concerning The Beguiled: It at least looks like a more interesting film than... well, anything Sofia Coppola has made. Plus it has a lot of people I like in it.

Robert MacFarlane said...

(God I fucking hate Lost in Translation. I don't even like Murray's impression of a sad basset hound.)

Luke Higham said...

Robert: I'll say this, I like The Virgin Suicides and I really like Marie Antoinette.

Luke Higham said...

Robert: Don't care for it either.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I haven't seen those yet. I did see Bling Ring and hoo boy did I hate that one as well.

Psifonian said...

Luke:

Only two men have won all three festivals: Jack Lemmon and Sean Penn.

Juliette Binoche has won all three for the ladies, and I think another one or two have, but only she comes to mind.

Only one director has won all three: Paul Thomas Anderson. As it goddamn should be.

Luke Higham said...

Robert: Unless you're really into 18th Century Period dramas, I'm not sure Marie Antoinette would work for you.

Psifonian said...

I'm also not the biggest Sofia fan, but I'm a massive fan of the Don Siegel version of [i]The Beguiled[/i] (side-note heads-up for all those who follow my montages/lineups: you will be seeing it appear in some future videos), but I am very curious to see a female take on the subject. And the production design looks exquisite. That's the only thing Coppola never skimps on.

Calvin Law said...

The awards race this year should prove to be a quite interesting.

Psifonian: I'm gonna hazard a guess and imagine a change in Supporting Actress is in order for you.

Psifonian said...

Calvin: No. That's the year of my #1 of all time in Supporting Actress (Cloris). But I am doing Runner-Up videos for the first time this year, plus (ultimately) a full-on album of my nominees and winners, like I did for Best Actor last year, for all acting categories + Direction.

Calvin Law said...

Ah, fair, fair. Will you go with 5 or 7 nominees then?

Psifonian said...

Lucky seven. Here's a sneak peek: https://scontent-atl3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/18739775_10155297447303426_8163509891472891163_n.jpg?oh=be7caf14d136120273b5d6fd55af6f22&oe=59BA2EB7

Luke Higham said...

Psifonian: Ullmann for both Hour Of The Wolf and Shame. :)

Psifonian said...

Ullmann is a mainstay in my lineups, even if I only give her one win.

Calvin Law said...

Yes, Hussey makes it!

Matt Mustin said...

Louis, what's your thoughts on the Batman The Animated Series episodes "It's Never Too Late" and "I've Got Batman in My Basement"

Charles Heiston said...

I saw The Virgin Suicides. It's as average as a film with that subject can get. I never knew what it was trying to be, a comedy or a serious film that made you think.

Luke Higham said...

Charles: What other S. Coppola films have you seen.

Charles Heiston said...

Luke: Lost in Translation. And that film was boring to me. The Beguiled seems interesting though.

RatedRStar said...

The Virgin Suicides I think is a decent enough film, I think the acting is pretty standard for the most part, although its actually suicide scenes, the fence one and the hanging in the cellar are pretty great, James Woods is pretty good also in it.

Luke Higham said...

Charles: You should give Marie Antoinette a try. If you don't like it, I doubt you'll like any of her other work up until now.

BTW, It's been 10 years since I saw The Virgin Suicides, so my opinion on it could change.

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar: I think we share the same opinion.

RatedRStar said...

I think Lost in Translation is basically supposed to be a rather lonely film, a film that sort of captures the loneliness and difficulties you get when going to another country, I actually liked Bill Murray well enough, I think from an acting point of view I think Scarlett is the problem, I just think her usual emotionless acting doesnt work for this type of film.

Charles Heiston said...

RatedRStar: From what i recall James Woods was good. As was Devito in his one scene.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Who would've been your choice to play Rooster Cogburn in True Grit (2010) or do you feel Bridges' was the right choice, but was underwhelming.

Calvin Law said...

I liked both leads in Lost in Translation and I don't mind the film that much, I just don't get the hype over it I suppose.

Luke: I reckon Kurt Russell could've killed it, or if the Coen Brothers were to really go out on a limb, collaborating with Nicolas Cage again would've been quite something (I'm still waiting for them to do that). Although I think Bridges was perfect myself, I completely understand why Louis found him underwhelming.

Anonymous said...

Luke: I like 18th-century history, but I can't say I liked Marie Antoinette. It felt bland to me.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: I completely understand anyone having major issues with the actors using their natural accents, the contemporary soundtrack or the style over substance approach yet it just worked for me personally. I do think it's her most accessible film to date.

Anonymous said...

Luke: Well, an Austrian accent is likely difficult to pull off.

Anonymous said...

Luke: I'm not really bothered with the actors using their natural accents, it's just that their performances are just nothing special.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I honestly thought Johansson showed more range than Murray did. The acting isn't my "problem" with Lost in Translation, though. Its condescending and smug sense of humor, icky age implications (she was *17* when they filmed), and racism all are what puts it on my shitlist. Not to mention it's boring as fuck.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: I think the acting's fine overall and I quite liked Dunst. Like with all of Coppola's films, you either like it or hate it and it's the only one that really worked for me.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Also, I have a hard time feeling sorry for two privelaged rich schmucks.

Calvin Law said...

Actually now that you mention it, there are quite a few racist undertones to it.

RatedRStar said...

If I were Louis, picking the official nominees for 2003, I probably would have gone for Bill Murray also, with Depp second.

RatedRStar said...

Personally for 2003 when it was Sean Penn Vs Bill Murray I was rooting for Murray to win, I think it was the first Oscar ceremony I ever watched and that was because of Lord Of The Rings.

Charles Heiston said...

2003 lead/supporting line-ups were horrible. I'd pick Law for lead and for supporting i'd pick Watanabe.

Luke Higham said...

Charles: I'd actually go Depp - Lead, Watanabe - Supporting.

Calvin Law said...

Depp would be an easy pick for me, then Watanabe.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Could Thewlis go up to a 4 for Prisoner Of Azkaban.

94dfk1 said...

Robert: Count me in as part of the "Lost in Translation is boring" camp.

https://youtu.be/aPzvKH8AVf0
Trailer for Logan Lucky is here

Robert MacFarlane said...

Depp is easily my win for Lead that year. I did like Law in Cold Mountain in spite of that movie being a raging avalanche of bullshit, though.

I actually love Del Toro of the Supporting Actor nominees, but I think he's co-lead. Robbins I liked, though he was a tad fussy. Don't remember the others that much except Honsou, who was the obvious weak link of his film. Sarsgaard, Crudup, and Astin all duke it out for my personal win.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I saw the Lucky Logan trailer earlier, and dear lord I love the look of Daniel Craig's performance.

Varun Neermul said...

Louis, your thoughts on the original 'Texas Chainsaw Massacre' movie. Also your thoughts on the to the film.

I loved the ending.

Anonymous said...

Varun: Louis hasn't seen that film.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

The Fields of Pelennor - (Well any piece that includes the Rohan theme is already going to be on my good side, but this is such an amazing piece even past its properly muted rendition of that. It's such an incredible piece as it creates the storm before the battle, building on the scant instruments, and the war drums to create such steady yet subtle build in which actually has to be described as epic. You don't even need to see the scene just hear the music and you can feel the calm, the speech, the charge and the battle waging. That's a great piece.)

The End of All Things - (Well a piece fitting to his dramatic intent as it delivers both the climax and the fallout. This is heard in the piece with the Dies Irae style choir in the introduction basically summing up the worst of the worst. That is then so perfectly taken over by the single voice that change everything, and begins the falling action. This changes though again to another choir though now in its theme create the feelings of uncertainty with such power)

Minas Tirith - (An outstanding piece that introduces the final major theme basically, this time Gondor's theme all the piece itself is not that right away as it begins with that terrific eerie low brass intro setting up the darkness on the way. It then proceeds towards the Gondor theme which is stunning in conveying this since of grandeur, slightly Ben-Huresque in a good way, though somewhat muted fitting to the incomplete kingdom.)

The Steward of Gondor - (Reminiscent a bit of Braveheart, in a very good way, in its beautiful use of the pan flute in creating its somber yet poignant theme for the Steward before segueing into To The Edge of Night which is such a minimalist and powerful piece.)

Louis Morgan said...

The Black Gate Opens - (Opens as musical call back to the black gate opening though now with the fellowship theme layed above it to give it a heroic bent, then leading to the call back to the Shire theme, simplified all the more to almost a solo of such beauty of the single quiet instrument until the final triumph of the Into the west instrumental. Such a perfect representation of the scene through the song with the undercurrent of the Mordor themes being drowned out by the heroic themes.)

4

Well he certainly wasn't miscast even if I didn't love what he did with the part. I do like Calvin's suggestions though.

Maybe.

Calvin:

The use of that is pretty much why I love film, as what is done there can only be accomplished in the medium. As it first underscores the murder first as a time establishing piece, natural to the moment, but also grants the song a chilling aftertaste. It leaves the impression of it on you and holds there until that brilliant final scene. The song plays in perfect tandem with Simpson's great performance as it recalls our own memory of that moment in the film but it creates the terrible effect of the killer through the sort broken nostalgia related to the song. It's part of what makes Zodiac, and Memories of the Murder for that matter, so remarkable as they both show that the serial killer murders creates the wounds and losses that are never truly lost or forgotten.

Matt:

It's Never too Late - (Is one of the better forgotten episodes I'd say. It's pretty standard but there is something moving still about the mob boss finding redemption. It's particularly notable since they manage to do it in such short time, yet they do find poignancy within the limits so its a good episode where Batman is essentially a supporting character.)

I've Got a Batman in The Basement - (This on the other hand is not a very good episode as Batman is basically a prop, and they decided to throw in an episode to some others kids show in a Batman TAS episode. Although it is pretty harmless in its goofiness its also not particularly good either with Penguin and his thugs being perhaps bit too incompetent if they can beat a few kids.)

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: Thoughts on Silicon Valley S04E06.

Calvin Law said...

Exactly my thoughts on the use of the song. Could I also have your thoughts on the train track scene, and the final scene of Memories of Murder?

Gus B. said...

Psifonian: aside Binoche (who was the fisrt lady to make it), only Julianne Moore has won the three festivals - Berlin with The Hours, Venice with Far From Heaven and Cannes with Maps to The Stars.

Interesting that, out of these four actors that won the three festivals, only one is european (Binoche), the other ones being americans.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Louis: What is the minimum rating a performance must earn from you to make you feel as if an Oscar nom/win is deserving? I have a feeling it's a 3.5/4.

Luke Higham said...

Tahmeed: I'd say a 4, Pre-2010s. In this decade however, a 4.5.

Tahmeed Chowdhury said...

Luke: I guess so too. This decade has been an overabundance of riches when it comes to great acting, any performance less than a 4.5 being nominated is quite infuriating.

Anonymous said...

Louis: I thought you'd be a lot harsher on I've Got Batman in My Basement. Your thoughts on the Lock-Up episode of Batman TAS.

Anonymous said...

So, apparently they're making a Silver Sable/Black Cat movie. A movie that will likely bomb at the box office.

94dfk1 said...

Saw War Machine on Saturday. Well-intentioned but it's execution and it's tone are inconsistent. Performances are alright.

Swindon- 3.5 (A good one-scene wonder, where she nervously but confidently stands up to Pitts character and questions what he's doing.)

Grace- 2.5 (His character is just there after being hinted at the beginning that he was going to be an important part of the movie. He could've brought more to the part to though.)

Michael Hall- 3 (Fine but nothing extraordinary.)

Kingsley-3.5 (Typical Kingsley, which isn't a bad thing. Quite funny in his couple of scenes with Pitt as he shows he's seen this type of movie before.)

Magaro-3.5 (The Jonah Hill to Pitts DiCaprio. Good as his right-hand man while properly showing that he is over his head at times.)

Hayes- 3 (Good example of the "Rah-rah. America!" type of soldier that are sometimes found in the military.)

Stanford- A strong 3.5 (One of the highlights for me as he shows a confused soldier who doesn't know what he's doing.)

Cohen, Poulter, Tilly, McNairy- 2.5

Need more time to formulate my thoughts on Pitt.

94dfk1 said...

*Stanfield

Charles Heiston said...

Louis: Could Burt Reynolds go up for Boogie Nights.

Luke Higham said...

Charles: I doubt it. He's 7 places behind Addy.

Charles Heiston said...

Luke: True. I'd give him a 4.5 though.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on the horse's head scene from The Godfather and Jennings death & The Hospital scene from The Omen.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Unless you have answered this before, could I have your updated top 10 acting moments of the 2010s.

Louis Morgan said...

Tahmeed:

A pretty hilarious episode. Jared continues to be great this season with his particularly intense presence, the phone duel between Gilfoyle and Dinesh was great. The Richard and Erlich material I felt wasn't quite as enjoyable but still pretty entertaining.

I'd say Luke's more or less right. It really depends on the individual year.

Anonymous:

Eh as episodes go with kids being added for no reason there are far worse.

Lock-up - (It's very weak episode and the concept itself makes little sense for the limits of the later episodes. In that Lock-up really should be more like the punisher, but since it's a kid show he's just meaner? than Batman I guess. Also making the villains all scared of him felt very out of character. It's also unfortunate in a lot of the later episodes the animation is kind of a cut below, though not truly bad.)

Charles:

No.

Luke:

Horse Head - (Brilliant sequence and really just a stand out moment for Coppola, and really John Marley's performance even if he might have had some extra help. It's a great fitting horror sequence that fits naturally into the film.)

Jennings - (Horrifying to be sure though there are a few time where perhaps Donner goes slightly too far in a few moments that one the slow motion only adds to the moment which is particularly effective in how jarring it is.)

Hospital - (Speaking of overdoing it just a tad I think he does overdo the edits with the fall but subtle build up is terrific particularly with the reveal of Whitelaw which is incredibly creepy.)

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Well you can just add the church scene in the Hunt to any prior list.

Calvin:

The tunnel scene is brilliant climax to be sure as it gives such a palatable emotional charge where it effectively switches the two roles in a believable way. Also that shot from within the tunnel is dynamite.

The drain scene is very much like Zodiac's ending as they evoke the same feeling in very different ways. The reflection on the time has this certain strange beauty to it yet is wholly chilling all the same.