Thursday, 3 March 2016

Alternate Best Actor 1939

And the Nominees Were Not:

Charles Laughton in The Hunchback of Notre Dame

Conrad Veidt in The Spy in Black

Henry Fonda in Young Mr. Lincoln

James Cagney in The Roaring Twenties

Basil Rathbone in The Hound of Baskervilles

85 comments:

GM said...

1. Laughton
2. Veidt
3. Cagney
4. Fonda
5. Rathbone

Maciej said...

1.Laughton
2.Fonda
3.Cagney
4.Veidt
5.Rathbone

RatedRStar said...

This was probably the best idea for 5 instead of 10 because that means the bonus rounds will be easier to fill.

1. Laughton
2. Veidt
3. Cagney
4. Fonda
5. Rathbone

RatedRStar said...

Also probably best to avoid some of the ten review years for now since it has been 2 months since the last 5 man review lol.

I am glad Downey Jr was suggested for Less than Zero as I originally had him in my 87 list and now im glad he is locked in.

Calvin Law said...

1. Laughton
2. Cagney
3. Fonda
4. Veidt
5. Rathbone

Alex Marqués said...

Which will be the first year of the bonus rounds?

Anonymous said...

Alex: It should be a surprise =D =D.

tahmeed chowdhury said...

1) Laughton
2) Veidt
3) Rathbone
4) Cagney
5) Fonda

JackiBoyz said...

1. Laughton
2. Cagney
3. Veidt
4. Fonda
5. Rathbone

Calvin Law said...

Is Downey Jr. co-lead or supporting in Less than Zero?

Anonymous said...

He looks like he could be either and it wouldn't be wrong from looking it up.

Robert MacFarlane said...

1. Laughton
2. Veidt
3. Cagney
4. Rathbone
5. Fonda

Luke Higham said...

1. Laughton
2. Veidt
3. Cagney
4. Rathbone
5. Fonda

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your rating & thoughts on John Wayne in Stagecoach and Your Female Lead/Supporting top 5s and other 4+ performances for 1930 and 1931.

Anonymous said...

1. Laughton
2. Veidt
3. Cagney
4. Rathbone
5. Fonda

Anonymous said...

Louis: What are your overall thoughts on George Sanders, Victor McLaglen, Charles Coburn, Barry Fitzgerald and Herbert Marshall as actors?

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your thoughts on Christopher Nolan, Paul Thomas Anderson, Alejandro G. Inarritu, Alfonso Cuaron, Wes Anderson and Edgar Wright as directors.

Michael McCarthy said...

1. Charles Laughton
2. Conrad Veidt
3. James Cagney
4. Basil Rathbone
5. Henry Fonda

Michael Patison said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar: Have you completed your 1987-1994 spreadsheet.

RatedRStar said...

Luke: Not quite although I will put it up soon even if some aren't finished, I would put it up now but my PC is being repaired currently so I'm on phone so tomorrow most likely.

On my list I had Robert Downey in supporting, I could put him in lead and it would also b fine either but I put him in supporting on the list because there's more contenders for lead 1987 than supporting so makes sense.

Luke Higham said...

RatedRStar: I would suggest Willem Dafoe for The Last Temptation Of Christ and Massoud, Norton, Siddig, Thewlis, Irons and Gleeson in Kingdom Of Heaven for 2005 Supporting. (A cast review, perhaps)

mcofra7 said...

I forgot about Dafoe. He would be a great choice.

Anonymous said...

Louis, I noticed you now like The Crying Game. Where does it rank in your top 10 for 92? Also, who do you prefer Rea or Davidson?

RatedRStar said...

Luke: Dafoe is a guaranteed 88 review I think, I quickly marked him down when I started the sheet.

RatedRStar said...

I love The Crying Game, it has some of the best dialogue ever.

Tony Slattery: That a tart So Pats got a Tart

Stephen Rea: Shes not a tart

Tony Slattery: No of course not shes a lady

Stephen Rea: No shes not that either

Great dialogue =D

Anonymous said...

Louis: What are your ratings and thoughts for these movies:
It's A Wonderful Life
The Best Years of Our Lives
Twelve O'Clock High
Battleground (1949)
The Yearling

Michael Patison said...

1. Charles Laughton
2. Conrad Veidt
3. James Cagney
4. Henry Fonda
5. Basil Rathbone

RatedRStar said...

Luke: In terms of Kingdom of Heaven I did have 3 of the cast on the sheet but I guess I could put the Kingdom Of Heaven cast instead.

1987 - 1994 spreadsheet, of course suggestions are welcomed, especially for the years that I am struggling with, also still not sure if Bruce Willis is lead or supporting for In Country.

http://snag.gy/cNmGj.jpg

Robert MacFarlane said...

Why Paul McGann over Richard E. Grant?

RatedRStar said...

Robert: I knew someone would say that lol, um, no reason from a better or worse perspective, its just sometimes I dont always like to miss performances and having two nominees from the same film can sometimes mean that other performances/films are missed, whereas if I chose one person from 5 different films, it means the chances of Louis missing some others lessen because it still means he will still see Grant , I may take Berenger out and put Grant in of course, its not a final list remember =D.

RatedRStar said...

And yes I know I have put 4 nominees from the same film for 90 but thats because its a weaker year with less contenders lol.

RatedRStar said...

Robert: What about the rest of the sheet =D, you like?

Robert MacFarlane said...

Grant is the one everyone talks about from that movie.

RatedRStar said...

Robert: I might put him back in then lol haha HAPPY, if Grant is your only complaint with the sheet then I feel proud of the sheet so far lol.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Another complaint then: lack of foreign performances. It shouldn't be that hard to find some.

RatedRStar said...

Anthony Wong, Chow Yun Fat, Leslie Cheung, Jean Louis Trintignant, Roy Cheung, Javier Bardem, Benoit Regent and Jacky Cheung are all foreign language lol, how many do you want lol =D hehe.

RatedRStar said...

=D maybe 92 supporting has plenty, ill happily take them lol.

RatedRStar said...

Robert: Anything else lol.

RatedRStar said...

Ah lack of Foreign language nominees that arent Hong Kong could be a good one lol.

JackiBoyz said...

RatedRStar: Is Al Pacino any good in Sea Of Love?

RatedRStar said...

JackiBoyz: Yes.

moviefilm said...

1) Henry Fonda
2) Charles Laughton
3) Conrad Veidt
4) James Cagney
5) Basil Rathbone

Calvin Law said...

Have to agree with Robert. Not that McGann's bad ir anything in Withnail, but it really is Richard E. Grant's show. He's actually fairly close to being my win for that year.

Calvin Law said...

Also McGregor >>>>>>>>>>> Ecclestone in Shallow Grave.

Calvin Law said...

Also not sure if McConaughey is worth a review for Dazed and Confused, though I eas the guy who requested Duvall in TKAM so maybe I can't talk lol

RatedRStar said...

Calvin: Yes because Duvall got such a bad score didnt he xD LOL 4.5. A lot of the performances on the sheet I havent actually seen, especially numerous supporting performances, I just happened to check about, see reviews, see people that said "oh this guy should have been nominated"

As for Eccelston I felt he had more of a interesting character that had numerous changes throughout the film as he goes from shy, slightly paranoid to completely desperate like when he starts sawing, and then to completely creepy killer.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your rating & thoughts on The Room (2003).

Luke Higham said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Luke Higham said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Luke Higham said...

Louis: Ratings & Thoughts on:
Gladiator
Troy
Schindler's List
Where Eagle's Dare
Saving Private Ryan
The Phantom Menace
Attack Of The Clones
Revenge Of The Sith

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Lastly, A Man For All Seasons (1966).

Luke Higham said...

Louis: If there was a sequel to Master And Commander: The Far Side Of The World and Russell Crowe didn't return, who would you cast as Jack Aubrey.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Wayne - 4.5(The best early work that I've seen from him, and I think it's an interesting performance to see given how quickly he became the mature western hero. In fact I think he had already played that sort of role even before this film. This is one role that actually allowed him to embrace youth for once. Wayne holds onto that in creating a pretty effective portrait of the intensity of a reckless youth as he creates the real drive for revenge, while having much less of the usual confidence common to a Wayne role, but in a good way. I also particularly like his chemistry with Trevor as they really work well together)

1930:

Actress:

Marlene Dietrich - The Blue Angel
Claudette Colbert - The Big Pond - 3.5
Bebe Daniels - Reaching for the Moon
Jean Arthur - Danger Lights - 3
Mary Duncan - City Girl - 3

Supporting Actress:

Jean Arthur - The Silver Horde - 3
Beryl Mercer - All Quiet on the Western Front - 3
Jean Harlow - Hell's Angels - 3
Leila Hyams - The Bishop Murder Case - 3
Marguerite Churchill - The Big Trail - 3

1931:

Actress:

Barbara Stanwyck - Night Nurse
Norma Shearer - A Free Soul - 3
Janet Gaynor - Delicious - 3

Supporting Actress:

Miriam Hopkins - Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
Jean Harlow - The Public Enemy
Virginia Cherill - City Lights - 3.5
Joan Blondell - Night Nurse - 3.5
Mae Clark - The Public Enemy
(I'm probably being generous with some of those)

Anonymous:

George Sanders - (Sanders is a very consistent performer as I've yet to see a bad performance from him. At the very least he's good and adds at least something with his presence. Whenever he has a part to really sink his teeth into he was always great though, really great)

Victor McLaglen - (I suppose he had the perchance to go big when he wanted to but even then he usually did it well as he could be quite the entertaining lout when he wanted to be. He's certainly an underrated performer now as within his hulking brute frame he really had the capability of revealing some honest emotional depth to his characters.)

Coburn - (Coburn underrated as the period goes as whenever he had a chance with a part, as in more than just a few random unimportant lines, he really delivered with them especially whenever it called upon the lighter side of his screen presence which offered an abundance of warmth. He did not always stand out in those lesser roles, but when he had a good role, he was good.)

Fitzgerald - (Now Fitzgerald was able to stand out no matter the role or the quality of the film for that matter. There was something just so naturally endearing about him as he bring such life to his material. In all of his substantial roles he knocked it out of the park, yet with his smaller roles he still managed to make a bit of an impression at the very least. He also managed to move out of his comfort zone nicely when he had the chance like in The Naked City for example)

Marshall - (Kind of the Paul Scofield of his period. In that Marshall just someone who exuded respect and dignity, which like Scofield worked really well when playing a Nazi. Also like Scofield though he did not rely on that to make his character work. He went further finding what was within that respectful frame. From what I've seen he always gave honest, and when the material allowed for it, powerful performances.)

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Christopher Nolan - ( The descriptions of him being a film architect are apt I think. He makes sure all are secure with exposition to be sure, but also a compelling story element. He builds up throughout the film to pierce the sky by the end. Nolan is most definitely a daring director as he goes for grand visions like few others. These grand visions of course have become a bit unwieldy as of his last two films where there are genuinely pointless or at least nonsensical strands. Forgetting those last two films though Nolan's visions have been rather awe inspiring and exciting to say the least. The Kubrick comparisons, in terms of their clinical style, are understandable though I would say Nolan always allows there to be the moments for the actors to bring out the emotions to the films without enforcing it as severely out himself. He's a great director who is going somewhat in the wrong direction currently. I hope Dunkirk he pulls back on the bloat a bit, and it will be interesting to see if he's tackling a different story for him. All of Nolan's other films have been about the supernatural in the natural. A superhero but the most grounded of them all, magicians, dream thieves, and of course dealing with ideas that seem supernatural but are natural like space time distortion, anterograde amnesia, and the midnight sun.)


Paul Thomas Anderson - (Paul Thomas Anderson has had a rather fascinating career path as he went at first wearing his inspiration clearly, yet did so effectively well crafting his own personal style at the same time. Hard Eight, Martin Scorsese, Magnolia and Boogie Nights, Robert Altman, There Will Be Blood, John Huston, then with The Master and most recently Inherent Vice he has become pure unadulterated Anderson. He's becoming a true master of cinema, no pun intended, and I think we'll see those attempting to be Andersonesque.)

Alejandro G. Inarritu - (Though I've supported his last two endeavors, particularly Birdman, I'd say in both Inarritu is a great director for the most part though is his own worst enemy as a writer. Whenever the writing of one of his films goes heavy handed he seems to play into as director amplifying to an absurd extent. He also lacks any humor as a director it seems to an extreme point leaving it to either the screenplay (Birdman) or a performance (Tom Hardy) to provide it. Now he certainly is capable of a grand vision and with a solid enough basis in terms of the screenplay he's able to accomplish something special.)

Louis Morgan said...

Alfonso Cuaron - (Evidently a bit of a David Lean sort, which I assume one would take as high praise. That being the overriding quality in his films are the exuberance of the direction. That's whether its the intimate story of Y Tu Mam Tambien, the dystopian vision of Children of Men, the grandeur of space in Gravity, or even finding his own voice within an already created universe. Though he has his trademarks they never seem indulgent and he hides himself well simply within exceptional storytelling.)

Wes Anderson - (Anderson has been on a pretty straight course in creating his personal style. Bottle Rocket was already on that course in terms of the writing already but visually as well, right from the work uniforms at the end. It's basically his attempt at his style just without a budget. Rushmore though offered an odd middle ground where it seems Anderson was unsure if he was going to fully embrace his style, it also happens to be the only film of his I really don't care for. After that though he's gone to embrace his style in every frame with every bit of primary color he can possible show us. I'll admit he does force one to either take or leave him, but hey I for one will take anything he dishes out)

Edgar Wright - (The most underrated of these talented gentleman though he may be the greatest pure comedy director of all time as far as I can tell. He does something that only a rare soul can make work which is he found a way to make action funny. Wright's a visual master and a particularly kinetic one as his films never stop, in the best way possible. Now I'll admit we've only scratched the surface with Wright with the Cornetto trilogy and Scott Pilgrim, and I can't wait to see where he goes next)

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

I never disliked the Crying Game exactly, but writing about it made me look at that I more of had problems with what I believed it was suppose to be than what it really was.

Rea without question who I really should reexamine entirely. Davidson is good but I do think people give him a little too much credit for the twist.

1. Unforgiven
2. The Player
3. The Crying Game
4. Glengarry Glen Ross
5. My Cousin Vinny
6. Bram Stoker's Dracula
7. Hardboiled
8. Alien 3
9. The Muppets Christmas Carol
10 Reservoir Dogs

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Noted.

Do you have to recast him though? I'm pretty sure he's into a sequel, and honestly I hate the idea of recasting him there, he was such a good fit.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Have to admit that after seeing Redmayne in TDG, a performance like Davidson's looks masterclass in comparison. Actually, starting to realize just HOW ahead of his time Chris Sarandon's performance in Dog Day Afternoon really is.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: I too know that he's interested, and would love to see him return. :)

For the film thoughts blog, could you also rate Mini-Series and TV Shows Per Season.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: I saw your comment on Calvin's 15 great political films list and I would like to know your top 15 Oscar decisions that you liked/loved, whereas the majority hated them.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Who would you have chosen for Power's role in The Razor's Edge?

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: I deleted 3 comments earlier and it says they were all removed by a blog administrator instead of myself, the author and they weren't even offensive in the slightest.

Anonymous said...

Luke: Well, I don't understand how that makes any sense.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke: Couldn't tell you what that's all about on my end either.

As for your second question I could do so.

Any who if we're talking about all time here's ten:

Chariots of Fire winning Best Picture
Art Carney winning Best Actor
Braveheart/Mel Gibson's wins
Mark Rylance's Best Supporting Actor
Marisa Tomei winning Best Supporting Actress (Though I think many have come around)
Jack Lemmon winning Best Actor
Alan Arkin's Best Supporting Actor win
Charlton Heston's Best Actor Win
Rocky's Best Picture Win
James Coburn's Best Supporting Actor win (Though that's one were I really don't think many have seen it who just call it a veteran award)

Anonymous:

Dana Andrews, Ray Milland or Kirk Douglas I think would have worked well.

Anonymous said...

Louis: If Cagney had accepted Carney's role in Harry and Tonto and won the Oscar over Pacino and Nicholson, do you think people would have complained over his win?

Luke Higham said...

Louis: For the film thoughts blog, your ratings and thoughts on Game Of Thrones Seasons 1-5. I think Season 5 may've gone down to a 4 for you, but we shall see.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

I'd say perhaps less so, but still somewhat. Most actors, even beloved ones, if they win when they're older for somewhat obscure film it is branded a veteran win. The funny is Carney wasn't even that old when he when won. Unfortunately Carney gets that extra bit of disrespect, the same Rylance is getting now, of the "Who's that?".

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Will do.

Anonymous said...

Louis: When you first came across Separate Tables, were you surprised that Niven got the Oscar?

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Well I say I knew he won the Oscar for it before I saw it so couldn't be surprised by the fact. I've never found that win that odd even ignoring the quality of the performance one way or the other.

Anonymous said...

Louis: I think some people are surprised by his Oscar win because they don't think Niven was much of an actor.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Was Douglas close to a 5 with Champion?

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Could Simon Pegg go up to a 5 for Shaun Of The Dead.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Yes and I should give it a re-watch.

Luke:

Maybe actually.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Are there any other performances you think you might up from a 4.5 to a 5?

Louis Morgan said...

Bruce Dern - The Cowboys
Alan Arkin - Wait Until Dark
Boris Karloff - The Criminal Code
Boris Karloff - Bride of Frankenstein
Edward G. Robinson - The Sea Wolf
Roger Livesey - The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp
Mercel Herrand - Children of Paradise
Dana Andrews - The Best Years of Our Lives
James Cagney - White Heat
Charles Bronson - Once Upon a Time in The West
Bruce Dern - Silent Running
Sean Connery - The Offence

Luke Higham said...

Louis: And Russell Crowe in Master and Commander.

Anonymous said...

Louis: What about Ryan in The Naked Spur? While Stewart is great, Ryan is the best thing of the film.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Erhrm I suggest you go look at 53 supporting results.

Anonymous said...

Louis: So what do you think the 1951 version of Death of a Salesman needed to be a better film? Cobb instead of March?

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Cobb would have helped I think, but what it really needed was a better direction.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Perhaps Kazan would have been a better choice.

Louis Morgan said...

He probably would have been.

Michael Keaton said...

5 - Rathbone
4 - Fonda
3 - Cagney
2 - Laughton
1 - Veidt