Sunday, 3 January 2016

Alternate Best Actor 1962: James Stewart and John Wayne in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance

James Stewart did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Ransom Stoddard in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance is perhaps John Ford's best western about two men's whose lives are intertwined by one vicious outlaw.

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance is perhaps Ford's most introspective western as it is no way about merely the good people defeating the bad elements in the west. After all we know right from the title that the outlaw Liberty Valance (Lee Marvin) is going to die. Although the basis for much of the story alludes to this confrontation is seems far more interested in the examination of the historical interpretation of the event. The film actually begins only reinforces the inevitable all the more as we appear to meet the titular man as he arrives in the town where the event took place, now a much older, and very successful United States Senator. Oddly enough these scenes have Stewart actually nearer to his actual age, than the scenes set in the past. In these scenes though Stewart reflects a man who has been created from a life of rich reward. He truly is the politician he was meant to become now as Stewart carries himself with certain grandeur about himself, and that anytime in which he speaks to people, who are not old friends, he does it with strong voice which has clearly made more than a few important speeches in its time. He appears to the great man the local press wishes him to be, though when mentioning why Ransom has returned to the town, the politician begins to fade away.

We then jump back to the past when Ransom first arrived in the west where the first thing that happens to him is he is robbed and beaten by Liberty Valance and his gang. It is quite incredible actually that Stewart somehow manages to not show his age with his performance, despite obviously looking older Stewart in no way seems like a man of over fifty playing the part. Stewart in the first scene successfully calls back to the early phase of his career bringing that similair sort of energy to his performance as he attempts to deal with Liberty. Stewart brings that sort of youthful passion, found in say his performance in Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, as he espouses his outrage out of Liberty's behavior which leaves him from an inch of his life. Ransom is saved by a local Tom Doniphon played by John Wayne. I guess I'm legally required at this point that Wayne was also not nominated for his performance in this film. Anyway with The Quiet Man and The Searchers I covered performances by Wayne where he was a bit out of his comfort zone, or at least his type. The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance on the outset seem in Wayne's comfort zone, after all parodies and imitations of Wayne always use the line "pilgrim", even though this is the only film where he really said it.

Now Wayne's performance here is very intriguing example of Wayne's onscreen persona, because actually of the limited view we are given to Doniphon in the film. Now this raises a point of order whether or not Wayne is actually co-lead with Stewart, or in fact supporting. I'll admit this is a case where if one were to decide on either choice I would not disagree with them. After all there is only really one major scene where he is alone without Stewart, though many of the scenes where he is with Stewart he is given equal importance. I'll just say it's up for an actual debate, but for the moment I'll have in him in lead. The position in the film Wayne takes though enables for Wayne to actually give one of his most assured performances in the traditional Wayne style. If one were to ask the appeal of Wayne onscreen it would be best to point to this performance. Wayne is terrific as he is just in his element here and in turn makes Doniphon a man who is absolutely in his. Wayne's command of the screen here is truly effortless as he makes Doniphon the great man that everyone already believes him to be as the film begins. Wayne carries himself so precisely here in that you completely believe the status given to him, and like Stewart someone overrides the fact that he's too old for the part.   

Stewart is not to be forgotten though with his performance as Ransom as Stewart so effectively depicts Ransom's attempt to get a grasp on the nature of life in the west. Stewart brings a bit of that aw shucks enthusiasm here in the scenes where Ransom attempts to offer what he believes that he can offer that being his knowledge of the law and education. Stewart depicts this with a likable earnestness though also alludes to Ransom's naivety in terms of the situation he happens to be in. The ideas of the east are clearly well kept in Ransom, and Stewart brings an appropriate straight forward quality to the man as he points out a law that should put Liberty Valance behind bars, the problem is no one cares the local Marshall included. This makes Ransom the constant victim of abuse from Liberty in particular, but also others due to his manner that does not fit to the exact limits of masculinity expected in the west. Stewart is very good in providing a gradual emotional breakdown of sorts in Ransom as he stands for himself his own way though is repeatedly beaten down and disrespected nonetheless. This partially even comes from Doniphon himself as the two are connected mainly by two things.

The first being Liberty Valance as Ransom is consistently ridiculed by him, and brings Doniphon into the mix as well. There is a great scene between Stewart, Wayne, as well as Lee Marvin when Liberty trips Ransom on his way to deliver a steak dinner to Doniphon leading to a face off. Wayne is exceptional in bringing such palatable  intensity as Doniphon stares down Valance and makes it believable that even Liberty could back off from the stare. Although the two are in such a showdown of powerful personalities that leaves Ransom. Stewart is not lost in the scene, but manages his own place brilliantly in depicting Ransom's outrage at both men for seeming so eager for violence. Stewart's intensity is the equal of both his co-stars, but he makes it on a different wave length of them as though it is impossible for him to connect to this sort of duel. Due to this Doniphon attempts to educate Ransom on this, somewhat harshly at times. Stewart and Wayne are pitch perfect together as they find such a clear divide between the two as they are very different men, yet within that they are convincing in developing the unsaid understanding between the two that is pivotal for the film.

Now their other connection concerns a mutual love interest Hallie (Vera Miles). Hallie is treated simply as a certainty by Doniphon, but Ransom calls this into question. I don't know if anyone other than Stewart could make Ransom's "stealing" of Hallie from Doniphon work as well as it does. Stewart's charm is so natural that he makes his interactions with Miles, to not have an even slightly problematic intent. Stewart makes it that Ransom manages to win her over, but does not even for a moment intend to do so, he just happens to. Of course these two connections ultimately come to a head when Liberty attempts to stop statehood, supported by Ransom to the point he is made a delegate to an important conference, through any violent means necessary. This leads to Ransom confronting Liberty in a duel. Stewart is amazing in the scene as he portrays a definite fear as he takes the fateful steps towards Liberty, but also a tremendous determination as he faces down the man. It appears he kills Liberty, and is hailed a hero by most. Stewart is fantastic as he portrays an overwhelming guilt in Ransom, showing a man who believes he's betrayed himself by using violence to stop problems. He is shaken out of this daze though by Doniphon. Wayne is equally strong as he shows a man perhaps even more haunted by something as he reveals he in fact saved Ransom by shooting Liberty from a distance. The result which lead Doniphon to destroy his own home, which he prepared for his life with Hallie. Wayne is heartbreaking in this scene, as he loses the qualities of that persona revealing a far more sensitive man honestly torn apart by the sacrifice he made. The sacrifice being that Doniphon murdered Liberty to save Ransom because knew Hallie loved him, and in turn lost her himself. The film then comes back to Ransom many years later successful due to the lie, while Doniphon is dead, alone, and having fallen into obscurity. Stewart is outstanding in proving such a poignant yet somber moment, as he presents Ransom without a hint of the politician. Stewart instead portrays a man almost defeated knowing that his life was not only made by a lie, but also that it was at the cost of the happiness of another. Both give two of their best performances Stewart in his portrait of a normal man made into a legend, Wayne in his portrait of a legend made into a man.

80 comments:

Calvin Law said...

Such a wonderful film. Will you be saving Marvin? And thoughts and ratings on the rest of the cast.

Calvin Law said...

Also, I personally think this and The Quiet Man are Wayne's best performances. Never cared much for The Searchers and I think he's very good but not amazing in The Shootist.

Calvin Law said...

Finally: reading about the behind the scenes ongoings of this film is fascinating. It's good that a masterpiece came out of it because it appears it was one tough shoot for everyone involved, especially Wayne and Ford.

Michael McCarthy said...

Love this movie. I wish you'd mentioned Wayne's reaction after being punched by Stewart, I think that's my favorite reaction I've ever seen him give in a film.

Anonymous said...

Louis have you thought about seeing How The West Was Won? because I have heard some good things about Stewart in that as well and as an epic in general.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Are you watching anything new this week.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Did you watch the first episode of War And Peace with Paul Dano.

Calvin Law said...

Luke: Nope. I really need to get round to it. And the book itself, too; I always feel bad I haven't read/finished either that, or Anna Karenina.

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Calvin: Those are very long books, but I would like to read those one day, along with reading Gone with the Wind. Which adaptations of those books have you seen (I believe you said you have seen Gone with the Wind)?

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: My Fives for 2015.
Lead Actor: McKellen, DiCaprio, Attah, Damon, Hardy, Segel, Mendelsohn, Tremblay and Depp.
Lead Actress: Mara, Ronan, Blanchett, Larson, Mulligan (FFTMC) and Theron.
Supporting Actor: Rylance, Del Toro, Hardy, Elba, Jenkins, Hoult, Goggins, Jackson and Stallone.
Supporting Actress: Leigh and Vikander.

Anonymous said...

Luke: Oops, forgot Attah and Tremblay.

Calvin Law said...

Ruthiehenshallfan99:

Gone With the Wind (1939)
Gable: 5
Leigh: 5
Howard: 4
De Havilland: 4.5
McDaniel: 4.5
Mitchell: 4

Anna Karenina (1935)
Garbo: 4
Rathbone: 3
March: 2
Owen: 2.5

Anna Karenina (1948)
Leigh: 3.5
Richardson: 4.5
Moore: 2.5
Dempster: 2.5

Anna Karenina (2012)
Knightley: 4
Law: 4
Johnson: 1
Macfayden: 3
MacDonald: 2.5
Gleeson: 4
Vikander: 3.5

Anonymous said...

Wasn't expecting Wayne to get a 5.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Ratings and thoughts on:
Jean Simmons, Carroll Baker, Charles Bickford, Charlton Heston, Chuck Connors and Alfonso Bedoya in The Big Country
John Carradine in The Hurricane and The Last Hurrah
Raymond Massey in The Hurricane, The Scarlet Pimpernel and Fire Over England

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: Didn't you give Cotillard a 5 in Macbeth.

Anonymous said...

Luke: Oh yes, I did! Thank you for reminding me. :)

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: Is she Lead or Supporting for you.

Anonymous said...

Luke: I'd say Lead.

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Calvin: Here are mine

Gone with the Wind
Leigh: 5
Gable: 5
de Havilland: 5
Howard: 4.5
McDaniel: 5
Mitchell: 4

Anna Karenina (1948)
Leigh: 5
Richardson: 4.5
Moore: 2.5
Dempster: 2.5
Howes: 3

That's it. But I would like to see the other two (especially the Greta Garbo version), along with the 1956 and 1967/68 War and Peace films. And I would like to see the new version as well.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Have you made your decision on Larson's rating for Room.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

You better believe it Dude.

Miles - 3.5(Miles is never that compelling of a performer but I do find she he acquits rather well here. She well in providing the needed warmth in the past scenes, but is close to being quite great in the bookend scenes. She finds a poignancy in her work as she reflects complexity of the decision Hallie made, in the scenes where she is forced to remember Doniphon.)

O'Brien - 3.5(He might be a bit much, but I actually found his whole drunken act here fairly endearing. Now his drunk act isn't quite as good as say Thomas Mitchell's, but he still manages to be fairly entertaining without going too far)

Devine - 3(In the past scenes he's doing his usual comic oaf routine, but I found him to be quite moving in the bookends as a man quietly filled with regret.)

Carradine - 3(Not much of him but perfectly cast as a firebrand speaker)

Strode - 3.5(Always want more of Strode in any given film as he tends to do a lot with the little he is given. That's the case here. His actually speaking lines are sparse, but he manages to be very affecting in his silent reactions in some pivotal moments with Wayne)

Anonymous:

I've seen parts of it to begin with, but I'll probably watch the whole thing before I finish supporting.

Anonymous:

Simmons - 2.5(Simmons has a natural charm, but the role is a razor thin, "good girl", which she does not rise above.)

Baker - 2.5(Basically the same as Simmons but replace the within quotes with bad girl)

Bickford - 1.5(A performance that severely hurts the film itself because of how bland and without charisma his work is. He is just wooden in all his interactions and just plays the whole thing as though he is slightly annoyed at all times. In their major scene together Ives eats him alive)

Heston - 2.5(Heston is not terrible, he also suffers that his character is basically a one note thug. He's actually not bad at this, nor his more emotional moments at the end, the problem is the film comes to these points in a very rushed fashion)

Connors - 3(He's one note for most of it as just the brash ruffian, though not bad at it. When he's with Ives though he does improve, and manages to effectively convey the history between the two beyond the limits of what the film tells us)

Bedoya - 2(He was better when he was asking about Badges. Anyway this is just a one note, slightly slow Mexican stereotype character. Bedoya doesn't overcome this)

Carradine - 3(A nice bit of classic villainy from him. There's not much of him, but he's good whenever he's onscreen particularly the scene of his incredible glee as bluntly announces his intention to torture the film's hero)

The Last Hurrah - 2.5(Given too little to do, but in Carradine form he adds at least something nonetheless)

Massey - The Hurricane - 3.5(He's rather good here in giving an actual depth in portraying his character's personal conflict throughout the film. The film doesn't really focus on it yet Massey is quite good in conveying the emotional turmoil of being torn between his personal feelings and his duty)

The Scarlet Pimpernel - 4(A good performance as he gives a bit more substance to his role than just that of mustache twirling. He manages to express a modicum of conflict in his portrayal, as though he's personally impressed by Pimpernel, while most certainly still acting a proper worthy adversary)

Fire Over England - 3(He does not have a lot here, except one pretty good moment where he interrogates Olivier's character. His delivery of "And?" carries just the right menace to it)

Luke:

Haven't re-watched it, but I'll probably end up on the positive side of things. The more I reflect on the film, the less I care for its final act, nonetheless my hesitations in regards to her character's later scenes I think are probably problematic due to the writing and direction (though I would need a re-watch to be sure).

Anonymous said...

Louis: Do you feel that the film adaptation of Arsenic and Old Lace might have been much more interesting with Karloff reprising his role?

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:


Well the idea of Karloff and Lorre acting off one another with that material is too hard to resist, so I'll have to say yes. Even though I don't think Massey was a bad replacement, and I like the film.

Anonymous said...

Louis: What are your thoughts on Cop Land as a film overall? And what rating would you give it?

Calvin Law said...

I predict that Mitchum will get a 5 and Werner a 4.5, and that the ranking will be:

1. O'Toole
2. Nakadai
3. Mason
4. Lemmon
5. Peck
6. Stewart
7. Courtenay
8. Wayne
9. Mitchum
10. Mifune
11. McGoohan
12. Harvey
13. Clift
14. Werner

Luke Higham said...

BAFTA Rising Star
John Boyega (My Pick)
Taron Egerton
Dakota Johnson
Brie Larson
Bel Powley
Snubbed: Daisy Ridley

Calvin Law said...

Robert will be happy with the Bel Powley nomination :)

Ridley should've gotten in over Johnson, and I'm not lambasting her work in Fifry Shades of Grey at all (I've seen the film, yes). She was good with what she was given, but it wasn't much to start with. She was decent in Black Mass too, but again, nothing special.

Boyega would be my pick too, though I have to say, still need to see Powley.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: Since it is a public vote, I think it's either gonna be Boyega or Egerton.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I'm totally fine with Johnson, I like her a lot. No, Egerton and his punchable face is the one that annoys the shit out of me.

Calvin Law said...

Hehe, guess we're really at odds in this respect then. I thought he was excellent in Legend...but I do see what you mean about his face, since the whole point of his character in Legend was that he was great mates with Ron Kray, which made him at the same time charismatic in his own way, but also as you say, punchable and annoying.

Anonymous said...

Calvin: I'd say Mason is going to be second in the ranking.

Luke Higham said...

BAFTA Nomination Predictions

Best Film
Beasts Of No Nation
Carol
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
Spotlight

Best Director
Haynes
Inarritu
McCarthy
Miller
Scott

Best Actor
Damon
DiCaprio
Fassbender
Hardy (Legend)
Redmayne

Best Actress
Blanchett
Larson
Mara
Rampling
Ronan

Best Supporting Actor
Bale
Elba
Hardy
Rylance
Tremblay

Best Supporting Actress
McAdams
Mirren
Vikander (The Danish Girl)
Vikander (Ex Machina)
Winslet

British Film
45 Years
Amy
Brooklyn
Ex Machina
The Lobster

Animated Film
Anomalisa
Inside Out
Shaun The Sheep Movie

Calvin Law said...

Any chance for McKellen to get in, you reckon?

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: He still has a chance, as well as Del Toro in Supporting.

Louis Morgan said...

By the way PGA Nominees:

The Big Short
Brooklyn
Bridges of Spies
Ex Machina
Mad Max: Fury road
The Martian
The Revenant
Sicario
Spotlight
Straight Outta Compton

Anonymous:

I'd probably give the film a 3.5. It's got a great concept to follow, but it ends up as only being a good film. It never feels like it bothers to fully develop the ideas around the institution of the town, and I don't feel it makes a great use of much of its cast. It actually works best away from that interesting though underused concept and instead just in the emotional journey of Stallone's character who is stuck in a world of indifference.

Louis Morgan said...

I'd guess that the standard two that will miss out at the Oscars will be Ex Machina and Mad Max(Sticking with the reverse psychology). With the potential single replacement being Carol (only if BAFTA loves it).

Calvin Law said...

What do you reckon are Del Toro's chances of getting nominated at this point? Also curious as to why you listed McKellen and Caine as potential Best Actor nominees since they've gotten literally no recognition elsewhere.

Luke Higham said...

Louis:
Your BAFTA Nomination Predictions.

Best Film
Best Director
Best Actor
Best Actress
Best Supporting Actor
Best Supporting Actress
British Film
Animated Film

Calvin Law said...

Hope Carol is a shoo-in for every award. Although I have to say I might re-watch Brooklyn and The Martian to see how close they might be to my #1 of the year.

Louis Morgan said...

Best Film:

Carol
The Revenant
Spotlight
The Martian
Brooklyn

Best Director

Haynes
Inarritu
McCarthy
Scott
Miller

Best Actor

DiCaprio
Redmayne
Fassbender
Hardy
Courtenay

Best Actress

Mara
Blanchett
Ronan
Rampling
Smith

Best Supporting Actor

Elba
Rylance
Hardy
Bale
Isaac

Best Supporting Actress

Vikander (The Danish Girl)
Vikander (Ex Machina)
Winslet
Walters
McAdams

British Film

45 Years
Ex Machina
Brooklyn
The Lobster
Legend
The Lady in the Van

Animated Film

Inside Out
Shaun The Sheep Movie
The Good Dinosaur

Luke Higham said...

Louis: What is your Harry Potter Cast, if made in the 1990s. That includes the main trio.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Alternatively, any casting choices of the adults you would have changed? Because Michael McCarthy's suggestion of Christian Bale as Sirius has kind of cemented him as my head-canon Sirius.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Who's your choice for the BAFTA Rising Star Award.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Well here's my best for the main three:

Harry: James McAvoy
Hermione: Rebecca Hall
Ron: Eddie Redmayne

As for the rest much of them would have still worked in their roles, and in certain cases it's hard to find better casting, Timothy Spall as Peter Pettigrew for example. Richard Harris also theoretically could have finished his run as Dumbledore.

I suppose I'd go with Boyega.

Robert:

I have to say the series was rather well cast to being with. Though the previously mentioned Jeremy Irons as Snape would have been interesting, and I do ponder someone else as the replacement for Dumbledore (since I've always felt Gambon was quite shaky in his first two films).

Anonymous said...

Louis: What do you think of Gentleman's Agreement as a film? And what rating do you give it?

Alex PP said...

Louis what are your thoughts on these films (ratings too)? sorry there are a few.

The Last Hurrah
Night Of The Iguana
Kill!
How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying
Django (you didnt seem to pleased with Neros work)
The Pumpkin Eater
Who is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe
The Dam Busters
The Man From Laramie
Bend Of The River
The Blob

Calvin Law said...

What about Domhnall Gleeson as 90's Ron?

Also:

Tim Roth as Snape (this could've gone either way)
Hugh Laurie as Gilderoy Lockhart
Miranda Richardson as Bellatrix Lestrange

moviefilm said...

To Harry Potter, here are a few that come to mind:
Susan Sarandon as Mrs Weasley
Helen Mirren as Dolores Umbridge
Kevin Spacey as Voldemort
Gary Sinise as Lupin
Joe Pesci as Moody
Julia Roberts as Nymphadora Tonks
Jessica Lange as Trealawney
Jim Carrey as Quirel
Michael Clarke Duncan as Hagrid (would love to see that one)

Robert MacFarlane said...

Please tell me those are joke choices.

Calvin Law said...

Does anyone have a list of all the remaining requests Louis has? I know I've requested Robert Duvall in TKAM, Ralph Richardson in The Four Feathers, and (for bonus rounds) Anthony Quayle in Ice Cold in Alex, but just curious what the other ones are.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin:
Mine are:
Jon Finch in Macbeth
Oliver Reed in The Devils
Malcolm McDowell in Caligula
Ghassan Massoud in Kingdom Of Heaven
Mads Mikkelsen in A Royal Affair
Geza Rohrig in Son Of Saul

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: And Peter Mullan in Tyrannosaur & Michael Smiley in Kill List.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I think the only two I had were Bradley Whitford in The Cabin in the Woods and Daniel Henshall in Snowtown.

RatedRStar said...

Louis do you reckon it would be a good idea to add a page, similar to your "my nominations" page, but it would called " winning requests" because it gets asked quite often what winning requests have been made and it would easy for others to then see what has been suggested instead of people asking you as it happens quite often.

I also think you could the same with the " what are your thoughts on this film" it would make it easier and you wouldn't have to constantly repeat your thoughts.

RatedRStar said...

Snowtown is terrible, there I said it lol.

Calvin Law said...

Luke: Of the performances you mentioned I've only seen Finch, Mullan, and Massoud, who I both really liked. And I NEED to see Mikkelsen in A Royal Affair, soon.

I personally liked Snowtown a great deal as I thought it was a much better example than Macbeth of Justin Kurzel's style, it's a fairly rough watch but I thought it was very compelling nevertheless. Didn't take to The Cabin in the Woods, though I would say Whitford was my favourite thing about it.

Calvin Law said...

Robert: What are your thoughts on Benicio del Toro in 21 Grams? Was thinking about his performance earlier today and I must say I've just realised how good he is in that, and how surprised I was to read Louis' review of him. I recall reading that it was one of the performances you disagreed with him about.

In the Heart of the Sea was pretty dreadful, actually. I thought the fact that I found Gleeson and Whishaw's scenes to be the best part of the film showcased some potential for a different film, one focused upon Melville's writing of Moby Dick, and his interactions with the haunted figure of Gleeson's character.

Louis Morgan said...

AlexPP:

RatedRStar has a good idea there, and I think I'll dust off old Deserving Performances. I'll reformat it into a database for my quick thoughts on films anyone happens to request. I'll start with those you just listed now.

RatedRStar:

I'll also add that requests page here soon, as I don't have access to my list right at this second.

Calvin:

That's a great choice for Ron, much better than mine.

You know there's a problem with In The Heart of the Sea when the verbal telling of the story is more interesting than the visual depiction of it.

Robert MacFarlane said...

@Calvin: The film's MVP. Found him extremely harrowing. It's been years, though. Need to revisit.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: For Film Thoughts
Harry Potter 1-4
The Lord Of The Rings Trilogy

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your top ten worst performances of 2015.

And is Anomalisa showing near you.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Lastly, are you gonna see The Revenant on Friday.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Will you be making an Actor Thoughts Blog?

RatedRStar said...

Anonymous: Yes he has started lol.

RatedRStar said...

Actually ignore that lol I didnt quite read that properly lol.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

I'll see The Revenant sometime before the Golden Globes, I'll let you know when I do. I believe Anomlisa is, so I might be seeing that as well.

1. Virginia Madsen - Joy
2. Tom Sturridge - Far From The Madding Crowd
3. BD Wong - Jurassic World
4. Joel Kinnamen - Run All Night
5. David Dastmalchian - Ant-Man
6. Vincent D'Onofrio - Jurassic World
7. David James Elliot - Trumbo
8. Austin Stowell - Bridge of Spies
9. Emily Browning - Legend
10. Miguel Gomez - Southpaw

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

I'll still answer those here.

mcofra7 said...

My requests: Gordon-Levitt in Mysterious Skin, Sean Gullette in Pi

Michael McCarthy said...

I'm glad you seem to have come to agree with me on how awful Dastmalchian was in Ant-Man, but I have to say I thought Dean O'Gorman was leagues worse than David James Elliot in Trumbo.

RatedRStar said...

Also can I ask, how do you do a Kirk Douglas impression, I mean Wayne seems easy enough but Douglas lol haha =D.

Robert MacFarlane said...

My least favorites are Sturridge, Katherine Waterston in Steve Jobs, Lili Simmons in Bone Tomahawk, and Sean Harris in Rogue Nation.

Louis Morgan said...

RatedRStar:

Old Frank (The Riddler) Gorshin did a killer one.

Robert MacFarlane said...

My dad always talks about what a perfect impressionist Gorshin was.

Calvin Law said...

I actually liked Dastmalchian in Ant-Man. Although maybe it was because I liked the comic relief trio in Ant-Man a lot more than most people on here seem to.

Sturridge seems to be the unanimous agreement. Wong and D'Onofrio weren't very good too so I should probably put them on my top 10 worst list instead of Stowell who was bad but not that detrimental to the film.

On a separate note, quite tempted to recommend Jupiter Ascending to you Louis to witness Redmayne give a HORRENDOUSLY bad performance.

Robert: Finally someone who agrees with me that Waterston was overwrought and plain poor. Makes me appreciate her work in Inherent Vice so much more.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I'll say that Waterston has the worst written character to play, but the soap opera line delivery and that weird bug-eyed thing she was doing made it all the more worse.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Ratings and thoughts on:
Rod Steiger and James Coburn in Duck, You Sucker!
Jennifer Jones in The Man in the Grey Flannel Suit (Peck as well) and Love is a Many-Splendored Thing
James Garner, Ricardo Montalban and Miyoshi Umeki in Sayonara

Michael McCarthy said...

Calvin: Did it not bother you at all that Dastmalchian's character in Ant-Man was a one-dimensional ethnic stereotype?

Also for worst performances of the year, I'd like to throw in the entire cast of Me & Earl & the Dying Girl sans Olivia Cooke.

RatedRStar said...

I just saw the Gorshin doing Kirk Douglas and Burt Lancaster and it was great lol =D.

Calvin Law said...

Michael: Hm...I thought the three comic characters were all kind of ethnic stereotypes. But would agree that Dastmalchian's character was probably the most obvious example due to the way he was written. I thought he performed it well enough.

With regards to Me & Earl, I think I'm starting to sway towards your opinion on the film which really hasn't stayed with me. Still like Cooke a great deal though.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Steiger - 3(Steiger's whole Mexican mannerisms, and accent really are way over the top which make his performance stand out in a poor fashion. He always seems like he's playing dress up, but he does have good emotional moment here and there. The problem is one can't help but wonder how Eli Wallach (the original choice) would have been in the same role)

Coburn - 4.5(Like his Australian accent in The Great Escape, he has an Irish accent that isn't exactly good. The thing is here Coburn still just kinda makes it his own that it works. Past that though Coburn is a great badass as one would expect him to be. He goes past that though giving a surprisingly heartbreaking performance in the scenes that reveal the character's past)

Jones - 2(Painfully miscast and bland in Love is a Many Splendored Thing. I barely remember her in The Man in The Grey Flanneled Suit, and I did not watch the film very long ago)

Garner's just kind of there.

Montalban - 2(Perhaps Cumberbatch as Kahn was a revenge of sorts for this. He's not believable as a Japanese man, and his whole delivery in his main scene is quite awkward)

Umeki - 2(I've never cared for this performance as I've always found her to just be kind of there, but she's in it more than Garner so I have to write something. Even in her big emotional moment with Buttons feels as though her performance seems detached from the scene itself)