Tuesday, 24 November 2015

Alternate Best Actor 1962: Montgomery Clift in Freud

Montgomery Clift did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Sigmund Freud in Freud.

Freud tells the story of Sigmund Freud attempting to define his theories on the human mind, in which John Huston takes a somewhat strange approach to depict, as the proceedings have this edge of other worldly horror quality to them, although that might partially be because parts of the film's score would later be used in Alien.

Montgomery Clift gives his penultimate performance in a film here, and where his apparent damaged state often coincided with the nature of his characters after his accident, this is not exactly the case for Sigmund Freud, who is stable for the most part. Nevertheless Clift does seem right for the role, not that he wholly hides himself so to speak, but his work finds a way for these attributes to actually seem fitting to Freud's character in the film. Now Freud for the most part is a confident and healthy enough man who wishes to explore his own theories about illnesses that stem from the mind rather than the body, despite the scientific community giving little credence to these views, so the film is mainly about Freud's attempt to try to find the truth of the human mind through various test cases though the main focuses on a troubled young woman Cecily (Susannah York). Now Clift does not exactly try to reflect an exact copy of the real Freud, but his work instead tries to uncover the mind of such a man which seems rather fitting. Clift is able to position though Freud as a sort of soulful man in the way he interacts with his patients, even early on, and whenever he attempts to describe his beliefs.

Clift portrays very well this certain understated yet palatable passion in Freud to attempt to tap into whatever it is that exactly makes the mind work, as well what exactly the mind can reveal to discover past pains. Clift internalizes this incredibly well and in turn helps dial the film back a bit as Huston's direction sometimes does become a bit bombastic. Clift's performance often is reactionary and Clift never fails to make use of these reactions. Clift finds in Freud the right fascination as he brings this excitement in Freud at any given moment, particularly when it seems they might uncover something wholly new to the world in regards to the human psyche. This constant inquisitive nature of the man is very well realized by Clift's portrayal, but importantly Clift avoids making Freud become some sort of man who simply is interested in the suffering of others. Clift instead brings a powerful vein of empathy in his work as in his reactions there is not that distance of a scientist observing nature. Clift instead creates the sense of a man genuinely caring for these people's inner torments, and Clift helps amplify the intense emotions of any scene by showing Freud's own emotional exhaustion at delving into such dark places that are only found within the subconscious.

Although the film is called Freud, it rarely narrows in the man himself. There are a few scenes between him and his wife though they are only brief. To Clift's credit he is good in these scenes because he presents Freud in a less intense fashion, showing that the man is not always captured by his work. Oddly enough the more personal story almost seems to go to Freud's colleague played by Larry Parks. Freud's own psychological problem is found in the film through his troubled reaction to the death of his father. This element of the film is not deeply developed though, and even the conclusion is left on a quick silent note near the end of the film. Clift though is excellent in the brief scenes that cover this as he brings about such a haunting quality in his depiction that effectively represents Freud's own inner turmoil quite well. Even that quick final moment is actually a great moment for Clift because he does not simplify it as an easy fix, showing a bit of solace in Freud along with still a searing grief in reflecting on the relationship with his father once more. The majority of the film squarely keeps to Freud psychoanalyzing others, especially Cecily which the film uses as its dramatic climax as he seems to uncover exactly what troubles her so deeply. Clift makes this often passive act though so compelling to watch by making Freud's method never lose that personal connection in the moment, and in a way develops his technique by becoming specifically active in certain moments. This is a very strong performance by Clift as he artfully elevates the material while carefully avoiding its pitfalls. His portrait of Freud is an engaging one not through mannerisms or a form of imitation, but rather by finding the core that was the key to the emotional motivation of the man. 

79 comments:

Michael McCarthy said...

Totally satisfied with this rating, though it looks like you're gonna like Mifune more.

1. Mason
2. Courtenay
3. Mitchum
4. Mifune
5. Clift

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Louis: On a totally unrelated note, what are your thoughts on Norma Shearer?

RatedRStar said...

Clift always gave 100 percent, that's a sign of a truly legendary performer and another reason why I love him so much, I constantly feel sad at the mere mention of Montgomery Clift, in this film Clift actually looks quite great and healthy.

Louis what are your chances of Clifts final role appearing on this blog, because in The Defector, he looks so damaged that it is very hard to watch and it might be worth a look to see him one last time.

Oskar Werner is another actor who died so heartbreakingly, if you look at Werner in his final interview and even in Voyage of the Damned he looks so poorly =(.

Luke Higham said...

Michael McCarthy: Your thoughts on Jacob Tremblay in Room.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Ratings and thoughts on:
Ann Sheridan, Humphrey Bogart and George Bancroft in Angels With Dirty Faces
Jocelyn Brando in The Big Heat
Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi in The Raven
Bela Lugosi in The Invisible Ray and The Wolfman

Luke Higham said...

Everyone: What do you make of the early reactions to The Revenant.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Well, I see the critical backlash to Birdman is still in effect. Will probably be an Oscar contender whilst being divisive like Birdman.

JackiBoyz said...

So far I have not seen anything, where are these reactions?

Luke Higham said...

Jackiboyz: It was an academy screening and you'll be able to find multiple sources on Google news.

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2015/nov/23/the-revenant-leo-dicaprio-thriller-reactions-oscar-potential-alejandro-gonzalez-inarritu

Anonymous said...

Luke: Seems like The Revenant might turn out to be a masterpiece after all.

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: Like Robert, I do think it's gonna be divisive, but I'm confident that Louis will really like it at the very least. The only minor concern I have is that Hardy's not getting a huge amount of buzz and it could very well hurt his chances of getting nominated, though I'm quite sure that he's fantastic, regardless of that.

Michael McCarthy said...

Luke: Tremblay really is our guide through the film and his voiceover narration is actually pretty excellent in that it conveys how simplified the the chaotic world around him in the way that only a five year old would perceive it. In the very beginning Tremblay is good at showing how his very unconventional living conditions are nothing more than routine for him as that's all he has ever known, but once Ma begins to tell him the truth about the world Tremblay is terrific in realizing the alienation that Jack feels. The interesting thing is he doesn't play it as something completely devastating, but rather something that he reacts intensely to at first and then starts to accept fairly quickly, because above all else he does love and trust his Ma. Once Jack is finally exposed to the real world, Tremblay is incredible in realizing the state of shock Jack goes into, as seeing how enormous the world is compared to Room is so different from what he knows that he can barely function at first. His getting used to the world is appropriately gradual, and he portrays this emotional journey as being every bit as stressful and frightening as his experiences living in and escaping Room. Aside from that, all of his reactions are just completely natural feeling in the way that so few child actors can pull off.

Louis Morgan said...

I saw Creed.

Anonymous:

I really need to see more of her but from what I've seen she really is quite capable of being great though perhaps just a little unwieldy as she can become a tad too melodramatic at times.

RatedRStar:

Certainly possible as swansongs are interesting to look at.

Anonymous:

Brief thoughts as I unfortunately had them deleted twice.

Sheridan - 3.5(Good in bringing the right warmth in her scenes with Cagney, while having a darker edge suggesting what motivates her towards such men.)

Bogart - 3.5(A good weasel and it is fun seeing him in such a role)

Bancroft - (Just fine as the rough boss type)

Brando - 2.5(She's fine, but she does not get to do anything past being the supportive wife)

Karloff - 3(A little hard to believe him as an American gangster, but he succeeds in being quite moving at the end of the film)

Lugosi - 3.5(A hoot to behold here, he's way over the top to be sure, but in a good way. I particularly love his pure jubilation when speaking of his love for torture)

Lugosi - The Invisible Ray - 3(The opposite of the Raven as he is fairly low key though good in a simpler role)

The Wolfman - (Just a cameo, he's fine but basically gets to make a haunted face then quickly dies)

mcofra7 said...

What did you think of Creed? Apparently it's supposed to be quite good, which is surprising considering that it is a spin-off.

Louis Morgan said...

Creed is a film I liked, though perhaps I did not love it as much as some have, I certainly liked it I want to make that clear. It works as a pseudo retelling of the original through the variation having to live up to a name, rather than making his name. I prefer that original film, though I really liked the biggest additional element which was keeping Rocky in the mix and Stallone is well......I guess that'll have to wait.

Ryan Coogler's direction is solid though I think a couple of his flairs did not feel wholly natural to the story, though some of them did work rather well. Now one thing that is absent is Carl Weathers. It's something that I found has been lacking in many boxing films of late, including Rocky Balboa is the opponent just is not interesting, and it takes away a bit of the impact of the final fight.

Now Rocky III and IV made the opponents have an impact by having them just so over the top. The original two Rocky's though had something special with Weathers who made Apollo more than just a thin hurdle to over come he was a man. There are even scenes to attempt to give the opponent here a similair depth, but the performance, unlike Weathers in the original, central to them fails to capitalize on the opportunity making the film suffer a bit. Honestly I should re-think Weathers's rating.

Back to Creed though which is the rousing inspirational film you want, with quite the emotional punch (pun intended sure why not) in certain scenes. Again I don't think it bests the original, nor do I necessarily think it is the best Rocky sequel, but it's a pretty good film.

Calvin Law said...

Thoughts and ratings on the cast of Creed? Also your top 10 films for 1991.

Michael Patison said...

Louis: Ratings on 6-10 for 1928 Lead and all of 1928 Supporting

Robert MacFarlane said...

I saw Creed as well, and actually loved it. Funny you mention Coogler's flourishes, because that was my big issue with Fruitvale Station and I thought they worked a LOT better here.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Give me a bit more time just to ruminate on Jordan's performance.

Thompson - 3(She's good, having nice chemistry with Jordan, and does well within the limits of her mostly supportive role, with the emphasis on the supportive)

Rashad - 3(Basically the same goes for her)

Bellew - 2(Again just does not make any impact beyond just being a standard thug sort)

McTavish - 2.5(He tries to bring a bit more out of the opponent side of things, but it still does not amount to much)

1991 Top Ten:

1. Barton Fink
2. JFK
3. The Silence of the Lambs
4. Beauty and the Beast
5. Thelma and Louise
6. Boyz N The Hood
7. Defending Your Life
8. Bill and Ted's Bogus Journey
9. The Addams Family
10. Terminator 2

Michael Patison:

Bancroft - 4
Barrymore - 3.5
Silvain - 3.5
Torrence - 3.5
Stone - 3
E. Stone - 3
McGuire - 3
Roach - 3

Robert:

I'd agree with that as I found them very distracting in Fruitvale station, less so here as I said some of them work quite well.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I'd also hold off on Jordan in case the Academy goes big for the film.

Anonymous said...

John Smith:

Guys, how would you cast Five Easy Pieces for the 2010's?

Director: David Gordon Green

Bobby:Joaquin Phoenix
Rayette: Brie Larson
Catherine: Carey Mulligan
Elton: Dwight Yoakam
Paritia: Sally Hawkins
Carl: Woody Allen
Nicholas: Max Von Sydow Or Erland Josephson

Anonymous said...

John Smith: Phoenix as Bobby is a great choice.

Luke Higham said...

99 Homes
Garfield - 4
Shannon - 4/4.5
Dern - 3.5

Robert MacFarlane said...

I'd go lower for Shannon. Found him less interesting as the film went on.

Anonymous said...

Luke and Robert, what would be yor picks for Five Easy Pieces for the 2010'2

Robert MacFarlane said...

Never saw it, can't comment.

Anonymous said...

You should see it, it is in my opinion the greatest movie ever made.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Who would be your cast and director for:
Witness (1930's and 1940's version)
Primal Fear (1950's version)
The Big Heat, Crossfire, Woman in the Window and Scarlet Street (2010's version)

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Does anyone know what rating Louis gave Bette Davis in Now, Voyager?

Also...

Louis: Besides Marie Antoinette, A Free Soul, and Romeo and Juliet, what Norma Shearer movies have you seen? If you have not seen any, I would definitely suggest The Women (1939). Also Do you think Marie Antoinette was her best performance?

Anonymous said...

ruthiehenshallfan99: He gave Davis a 4,5.

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Anonymous: Thank you!

Anonymous said...

ruthiehenshallfan99: You're welcome. :)

Anonymous said...

Louis: Since Peck and Niven were too old for The Guns of Navarone (even though they did a good job), who would you have cast instead them?

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Witness 30's directed by John Ford

Detective Book: Clark Gable
Rachel Lapp: Rosalind Russell
Samuel Lapp: Freddie Bartholomew
Eli Lapp: H.B. Warner
Daniel Hochleitner: John Qualen
Lt. McPhee: Raymond Massey
Chief Schaeffer: Otto Kruger

40's directed by Fritz Lang:

Detective Book: Robert Mitchum
Rachel Lapp: Joan Fontaine
Samuel Lapp: Dean Stockwell
Eli Lapp: Lewis Stone
Daniel Hochleitner: Michael Rennie
Lt. McPhee: John Carradine
Chief Schaeffer: Walter Brennan

Primal Fear 1950's directed by Sidney Lumet

Martin Vail: Robert Ryan
Janet Venable: Lauren Bacall
Aaron: Dennis Hopper

2010's versions of:

The Big Heat directed by Michael Mann:

Det Bannion: Russell Crowe
Debby Marsh: Mia Kirshner
Vince Stone: Jeremy Renner

Crossfire directed by William Friedkin:

Finlay: Brendan Gleeson
Keeley: Joel Edgerton
Montgomery: Matthew McConaughey
Ginny: Natalie Dormer
Samuels: Stanley Tucci

Woman in the Window directed by the Coen Brothers:

Professor Wanley: James Woods
Alice Reed: Emily Blunt
Heidt: Josh Brolin

Scarlet Street directed by Michael R. Roskam:

Christopher Cross: Richard Jenkins
Kitty Match: Jessica Chastain
Johnny Price: Mattias Schoenaerts

ruthiehenshallfan99:

I believe that's it, and yes to the second question.

Anonymous:

How about Robert Shaw for Peck's part (since he played the part in the sequel anyways), and Richard Attenborough for Niven's.

Anonymous said...

Louis: This will be one final premake question:
Who would be your cast and director for Witness in the 50's, 60's and 70's?

Calvin Law said...

Anonymous: for Five Easy Pieces in the 2010s I would have Andrew Garfield in Jack Nicholson's role.

Luke Higham said...

Calvin: I'm seeing Bridge Of Spies tonight.

Anonymous said...

Luke: Have fun. You'll love Rylance a lot, I'm sure.

John Smith said...

Calvin: That is actually a great choice (:

Calvin Law said...

Luke: Enjoy. Not seeing anything till Carol next week, not really in the mood for any film at all though hm

John: Thanks!

Robert MacFarlane said...

I'm depressed because Macbeth and Carol might not even come to my area any time soon, and those are the two movies I was looking forward to the most.

Calvin Law said...

Robert: That sucks. I think you'd like Macbeth; I'm on the other hand envious that you've seen Spotlight and Creed. What did you think of Stallone and Jordan?

My American friend told me that of those two films, she thinks Ruffalo and Tucci are more deserving of nominations than Keaton, that McAdams is a shoo-in for Best Supporting Actress nomination, and that Sly could well be a contender.

Calvin Law said...

Also: re-watched Black Mass yesterday. Unsure whether to bump Depp up or down my rankings. On one hand was even more disconcerted and even terrified by his portrayal this time round. On the other hand found a few moments overly mannered that I'd ignored before. Seriously considering bumping Edgerton up to a 5 though.

Michael McCarthy said...

Calvin: Tucci is definitely not getting the credit he deserves, but I'd say Keaton was easily stronger than Ruffalo. Ruffalo's vocal inflections and overall twitchiness were a little distracting sometimes. He's not without his strong moments though. McAdams was good but I don't see her getting nominated unless she's able to really ride the film's hype. Crudup, Schreiber and some of the bit part actors were also really good.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Yeah, I'm liking Ruffalo less and less the more I think about him.

Calvin Law said...

Michael: What would your ratings for the cast be? Shame Ruffalo's mannerisms don't seem to have worked as well this time round. I've heard people compare Schreiber to Jason Robards in All the President's Men which in my view is a very good thing.

John Smith said...

Bonus Review:

Saif Ali Kahn/Omkara

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Louis: What would your Top 5 Worst Best Picture nomination lineups be (the films nominated that year)? And may I have the ratings for the films as well?

Luke Higham said...

Ruthiehenshallfan99: 2008 should be on that list.

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Luke: I have been looking back at the past comments for a while. And yes, he repeatedly mentioned that 2008 had one of the worst.

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Luke: 1955 might be on there since he apparently did not care for Picnic or LIAMTT.

Michael McCarthy said...

Keaton: 5
Ruffalo: 4
McAdams: 4
James: 3.5
Schreiber: 4 (verging on 4.5)
Tucci: 4
Crudup: 4.5
Slattery: 3.5
Sheridan: 3.5
Huff: 3
Creighton: 3.5
Guilfoyle: 3.5

Anonymous said...

Luke: Hey, if you're still awake, I'll reveal more stuff about metalman091. He loves Taylor and Harrison in Cleopatra, and of course hates Burton in it. In a way, he truly is the Anti-Louis Morgan.

Michael Patison said...

Louis: Is Chaplin still a 3 for The Circus? I know he still is on the 1928 Lead page but wanted to make sure the drop from 9 to 10 is a 4 to a 3.

Anonymous said...

Michael: Yes, Chaplin's still a 3.

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Anonymous: In metalman's defense, I like all three performances.

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Does anyone know Louis's ratings for Anna Paquin in The Piano , Uma Thurman in the first Kill Bill, Merle Oberon in The Private Life of Henry VIII, Charlotte Rampling in the Verdict, Ellen Burstyn in The Exorcist, and Kate Hudson in almost famous?

Anonymous said...

ruthiehenshallfan99: I couldn't find Louis' rating for Thurman in the first Kill Bill, Oberon is a 4, Rampling and Burstyn are 4,5's and Hudson is a 2.

Luke Higham said...

Ruthiehenshallfan99: Thurman's a 4.5.

Anonymous said...

Luke: Who do you think will be reviewed next?

Luke Higham said...

Anonymous: Werner.

Anonymous said...

Luke: I would like for Louis to watch Tokyo Story (directed by Yasujiro Ozu, another one of the Japanese greats). It features a great performance from Setsuko Hara.

Anonymous said...

Luke:...I don't know if you've seen this film, but I did and it's a great one.

John Smith said...

Bonus Reviews:

Johand Widerberg/Under The Sun
Rolf Lassgård/Under The Sun

Anonymous said...

Louis: So when is the next review coming?

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

So I recently watched It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World. Not sure how to rate the cast, but I loved it. Especially Dick Shawn. This scene was hysterical to me. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wX12Xk9WFjw


What is everyone's thoughts on the movie?

Anonymous said...

ruthiehenshallfan99 I find it somewhat enjoyable.

Anonymous said...

*:

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

50's directed by John Sturges:

Detective Book: William Holden
Rachel Lapp: Janet Leigh
Samuel Lapp: Brandon deWilde
Eli Lapp: Sam Jaffe
Daniel Hochleitner: Tim Holt
Lt. McPhee: Sterling Hayden
Chief Schaeffer: Millard Mitchell

60's directed by Sam Peckinpah:

Detective Book: Charles Bronson
Rachel Lapp: Lee Remick
Samuel Lapp: Kurt Russell
Eli Lapp: Ed Begley
Daniel Hochleitner: Max von Sydow
Lt. McPhee: Warren Oates
Chief Schaeffer: Gig Young

70's directed by William Friedkin:

Detective Book: Steve McQueen
Rachel Lapp: Marisa Berenson
Samuel Lapp: Jackie Earle Haley
Eli Lapp: Lee J. Cobb
Daniel Hochleitner: Lance Henriksen
Lt. McPhee: Bruce Dern
Chief Schaeffer: Cliff Robertson

ruthiehenshallfan99:

1. 2008:

Slumdog Millionaire - 2
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button - 2
Frost/Nixon - 3
Milk - 2.5
The Reader - 2

2. 1958:

Gigi - 1
Auntie Mame - 2
Cat on a Hot Tin Roof - 3
The Defiant Ones - 3.5
Separate Tables - 2.5

3. 2004:

Million Dollar Baby - 1.5
The Aviator - 3
Finding Neverland - 2.5
Ray - 2
Sideways - 4.5

4. 2005:

Crash - 1.5
Brokeback Mountain - 2.5
Capote - 2.5
Good Night, and Good Luck - 4
Munich - 4

5. 1988:

Rain Man - 2.5
The Accidental Tourist - 3.5
Dangerous Liasons - 3.5
Mississippi Burning - 4
Working Girl - 2

Anonymous said...

Louis: What are your thoughts on Twelve O'Clock High and Battleground as movies in general? And what rating would you give them respectively?

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Louis: what are your thoughts on Gigi and ratings and thoughts on the cast.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Seen any new films recently, If so, can I have your thoughts on the film/s and ratings & thoughts on the cast/s.

Calvin Law said...

Thoughts on Capote as a film? Surprised by the low rating.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I'm surprised Mississippi Burning is so high. I always thought it was a cheap B-thriller with racist undertones.

Luke Higham said...

Louis: Your Top 5 Best Picture Lineups of all time with ratings. 1928-2007.

Anonymous said...

I'm honestly surprised Million Dollar Baby is rated lower than Ray. I've watched both, and MDB is certainly much more tolerable than Ray, which contains one of the worst Oscar winning performances of all time.

JackiBoyz said...

Louis: I am quite surprised by your thoughts on Capote also.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Twelve O'Clock High - 2.5(The problems with Twelve O'Clock High are a bit strange because it does have good things about it particularly in terms of trying to show the actual loss and damage that comes from war. It has two major problems though the first being the footage of the flight sequence are not dramatic in the least. This sounds strange considering it is actual footage from World War II, but it fails to connect the characters, partially due to the differing quality from the actual film, never becoming more than what it is. On that note though the film was poorly cast, not necessarily in terms of the performances, but just that it's difficult tell who's who outside of Peck and Jagger. This really hurts the film when they name a casualty, and you have no idea who they're talking about)

Battleground - 5(Battleground is a great war film once again proving William Wellman as one of the most underrated directors of all time. It's amazing to learn that the film was wholly shot on a sound stage as the film absolutely makes you believe you're seeing men stuck in the cold forests during the battle of bulge. The atmosphere of the film is palatable as it creates an actual sense of the wear of battle. This goes onto the depictions of the soldiers which are not the common types you usually see at the time, but instead depicted as very vulnerable men. I love the detail of the film gives to the degradation of the men physically and mentally as all the men are just about broken by the end of it. Wellman creates some extremely memorable scenes particularly one firefight which is so well done as he makes confusion seem precise rather than messy, and a scene where light is used so eloquently it really shows how much can be done with Black and White photography. One extremely minor quibble is that some of the actors just over announce their lines a bit, not to the point that it hurts the film because the performances are fine otherwise)

ruthiehenshallfan99:

Gigi - (A dreadful combination in order to make a terrible musical. I don't care for the songs which are either obnoxious or forgettable. I did not care for the acting which I found to be quite charmless. The film I found just to be plain ugly with its overuse of color in particular, then the story succeeds in being boring and creepy as well)

Calvin:

Actually it should have been a 3.5.

Luke:

I have nothing.

Robert:

If you're looking for an intelligent rumination on the subject, look somewhere else, I found it works purely as a B-movie thriller.

Anonymous:

I find Million Dollar Baby far less tolerable, as I found Ray mostly just forgettable, where I find more things about Million Dollar Baby actively grating.

Luke:

Give some time to work on the list.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke

1. 1975:

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest - 5
Barry Lyndon - 4
Dog Day Afternoon - 5
Jaws - 5
Nashville - 5

2. 1959:

Ben-Hur - 5
Anatomy of a Murder - 5
The Diary of Anne Frank - 4.5
The Nun's Story - 4.5
Room at the Top - 4.5

3. 1993:

Schindler's List - 5
The Fugitive - 4.5
In The Name of the Father - 5
The Piano - 4.5
The Remains of the Day - 3.5

4. 1976:

Rocky - 5
All The President's Men - 5
Bound For Glory - 4
Network - 5
Taxi Driver - 3.5

5. 1984:

Amadeus - 5
The Killing Fields - 5
A Passage to India - 3.5
Places in the Heart - 3.5
A Soldier's Story - 3.5