Wednesday, 2 September 2015

Alternate Best Supporting Actor 1976: Chief Dan George in The Outlaw Josey Wales

Chief Dan George did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying Lone Watie in The Outlaw Josey Wales.

Chief Dan George received his only Oscar nomination for portraying a comically inclined though straightforward Native American chief in Little Big Man. His role in The Outlaw Josey Wales is a bit even less traditional as seen in George's first appearance which comes after the titular Outlaw (Clint Eastwood) is well on the run, and has just lost his young sidekick and runs into Chief Dan George as Cherokee in rather unusual dress considering that he is topped with a stovepipe hat, and wearing a suit both which are purposefully imitating Abraham Lincoln's attire. At first George manages to be so enjoyably pathetic in his portrayal of Lone's attempt to corner Wales himself, particularly his surprise when he sees that Josey has quickly gotten the best of him. George ends up being quite moving though in just a matter of seconds as his face falls into a certain defeat. It's a particularly sad defeat though in that there is such a strong resignation that George suggests that it is not just a man being mad he was caught of guard, or even scared that he might be killed,rather it is the fact that is just is yet another time in which a white man has sneaked up on him.

After Josey indicates that basically he's not going to kill the old man Lone continues to tell his personal story as a Cherokee which has mostly involved one defeat after another over the years. George is incredible in Lone's little monologue as he never leaves it on a single note. George actually begins as though the whole thing is one big joke over the years as he describes being kicked from one place to another. When he refers to the death of his family from the trail of tears though there is a brief though palatable sorrow and hatred in his voice just for that moment. He continues on his life of misfortune and tells Josey of how it was that he found himself clothed in the way he was, which was basically for a show for the government. George brings just a quiet exasperation as he tells the odd story of the patronizing secretary of the interior, though he throws in just a bit of sarcastic show of pride when reciting the words of the man towards Lone, and his fellow natives who had come to Washington. Then there seems just a hint of actual perseverance and determination as he informs Josey that he chose to wage war on the Union due to the meeting, only to artfully end on one more comic note in his reaction as he sees Josey has fallen asleep from his story.

That's simply George's introductory scene, but it sets well what he'll bring to the film with his presence. That monologue could have been just a simple depressing story, but it's fantastic just how much character George gives just through that one monologue. He's great in his very next scene as he shows such an attempt at an honest pride when he's believed he's snuck up on Josey, unfortunately for him someone else sneaks up on him, and George's "aw shucks" reaction is just hilarious. Thankfully for the film Lone decides to go along with Josey on his adventure to escape to Mexico, and becomes his sidekick for the trip. George is great in every scene in which he appears as Wales's sidekick as well as almost his promoter of sorts. George is wonderful the way he enliven every scene just in his appearance as interacts so astutely with Eastwood's performance. In one way being the far more eager fellow than the technically rather somber Wales, and George is terrific the way he shows that old Lone Watie gets such a thrill out of Josey apply his trade so to speak. I particularly love one sequence in which he basically narrates Josey's preparation in front of a group of thugs, and George brings so much humor, astonishment and even some intensity as Lone calls out Josey's moves.

Although George is marvelous at being a secondary hero for the film, George does not leave it there and creates a very interesting character of Lone Waite past simply being a fun fellow adventurer, although he certainly is that. George's is quite fascinating in the way once he goes on the adventure with Wales he seems to find himself as as a proper Cherokee again. What's so splendid is the way George does not do the more typical Indian cliches of mysteriously knowing the way of the land in the way what animals mean or how to properly track someone. George takes the mystery out of it, but in a memorable way. George plays it as a given that a native American should be able to do all these things, but he says it in such a delightful down to earth fashion as though he's aware of any legends treating them simply as a fact that he needs to live up to. George is very endearing as he shows this as the way Lone is once again accepting who he should be, and tries to live up to his causes of old. The way George slowly renews the confidence of the old man is brilliantly done. The film does not specifically stop for him, after all he is not even the central character, and the film is one almost in constant movement, but George manages to naturally as well powerfully transition his character from basically a worn out old husk of a man, to once again a life filled warrior. This is a great performance by Chief Dan George as he makes so much out of the role that in lesser hand could have been maybe just too goofy, or simply too sad. George manages to balance both out flawlessly giving both a very funny and rather moving portrait of this Cherokee who endeavors to persevere.

100 comments:

Anonymous said...

Ratings and thoughts on:
Myrna Loy in The Thin Man and the Great Ziegfeld
Millard Mitchell and Karl Malden in The Gunfighter
Robert Mitchum, James Caan and John Wayne in El Dorado
Dan Duryea, Stephen McNally and Shelley Winters in Winchester 73
Laurence Olivier in Dracula
Janet Leigh in The Naked Spur

Calvin Law said...

Thank you for bumping Norman Lloyd up to a 3.5 for Saboteur, Louis :D

luke higham said...

Calvin: I've read your Bond Casting/Race post and there are rumours that Tom Hardy's the frontrunner for the role.

Calvin Law said...

Luke: As much as I love Hardy...I can't see him committing to Bond. He's almost too big a star now to feasibly become the next Bond, who more often than not is an established actor who's primed for stardom. Same with Fassbender, who actually would've been perfect for the role had Craig not been around/not accepted the role.

Personally, I have no idea who it's going to be. I would say Cavill, as he's a good actor and fits the role, but he's also Superman which would be a bit problematic.

I didn't mention him since he doesn't seem to be in the running, but Tom Hiddleston, would not be a bad choice either.

I really like Elba, but do prefer Cavill and Chiwetel Ejiofor over him.

luke higham said...

Calvin: Personally, for a change, I would prefer Ejiofor or even Elba.
Cavill would potentially be amazing, if he took the Connery approach.
I don't want Hardy stuck to that franchise for up to 10 years, though I wouldn't mind if he took on a much older incarnation of the character, whenever he's at that Neeson/Badass Action Hero stage.
Right now though, I want Hardy to continue on giving 5 star performances. :)

Anonymous said...

Even though I like variety, I still find a black James Bond odd.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: He could be adopted.

Anonymous said...

Luke: I'm sure he could, but still, it's odd.

Robert MacFarlane said...

It's not really that odd to me. They reinvented James Bond as a blonde while replacing suaveness for brooding depression, they can reinvent him as black.

Calvin Law said...

Agreed, Robert. Don't even need to make him adopted or anything. Just treat him like any other Bond so far as backstory (or lack thereof) is concerned.

Anonymous said...

Bonus Lead 1937
Gary Cooper and Fredric March in Nothing Sacred
Bonus Lead 1949
Gary Cooper in The Fountainhead

Robert MacFarlane said...

The reviews are in for some of the Venice Film Festival contenders. Looks like Spotlight and Beasts of No Nation are ones to keep our eyes on, and by extension Keaton and Elba respectively.

luke higham said...

Robert: That's great news, especially for Elba. :)

luke higham said...

Robert: I hope Black Mass is received very well tomorrow.

Anonymous said...

If Keaton gives a 5 star performance in Spotlight, same with Hardy in The Revenant, then I'll have a hard time choosing my winner.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: For Me, I would add Elba and Rylance to that as well.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: You know what, I'm gonna call it right now. This is gonna be the best year ever for Supporting performances and that includes the Women as well.

Anonymous said...

Luke: Well, it could be. Let's see if the great actor known for giving the worst performance in his career in a science fiction movie that is tied with his performance in a thriller movie made by a great American actor that used to give great performances can give a better performance than the one he gave a year ago.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: He sure was awful in The Good Shepherd, though I'm optimistic that he'll give a career best in The Danish Girl.

Anonymous said...

The Danish Girl is going to be either good or okay due to Hooper's direction. Redmayne could possibly be better here than in the Theory of Everything. I'm hoping DiCaprio to win (I like him as an actor, but just to shut everyone up).

luke higham said...

Anonymous: I fucking agree, I can't stand his fanboys going on year after year after year about him being entitled to an academy award. They say he should've won in '93 which really gets on my nerves. I like Leo very much as an actor, but I'm sick to death of it.

Anonymous said...

Luke: He'll eventually win one someday when he's 90 years old.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: FUCKKKKKKKKKKK! NOOOOOOOOOOOO! My Eyes, It Burns.

Anonymous said...

Luke: I'm just kidding, LOL!
Anyway, if you had the ability to time travel, what movie set would you like to visit?

Anonymous said...

I've just seen Paper Towns, and I liked it more than I expected. It was kind of cheesy in parts and there are some slightly annoying small things, but overall it was a pretty good and engaging movie. It was much more deep and moving than The Fault in Our Stars despite being much subtler. Particularly I was impressed by Delevingne who was extremely charismatic yet she never failed to show the inner desperation and bitterness in Margo.
Ratings:
Wolff - 3
Delevingne - 4.5
Abrams - 3
Smith - 3
Sage - 3
Sinclair - 2.5

luke higham said...

Anonymous: I know you weren't serious about it. :)

In terms of movie sets/shooting locations or even being in that film's world, I'd go with Lord Of The Rings, Branagh's Hamlet, Zeffirelli's Romeo And Juliet, A Man For All Seasons, Lawrence Of Arabia, Ben-Hur, Alien, The Omen (Seen it more times than any other horror film), The Devils, The Exorcist, The Wicker Man, Star Wars, Gladiator, Kingdom Of Heaven, Blade Runner, Highlander, Excalibur and Indiana Jones 1 & 3.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: Mustn't forget Potter and Narnia. :)

luke higham said...

Anonymous: Lastly, Amadeus and Barry Lyndon. :)

Anonymous said...

Luke: I would like to visit King Kong's set in 1933, just to see the special effects team working on those extremely difficult special effects shots and combine those with the live-action footage. Ben-Hur (1925 and 1959) would be a huge delight to see. That naval battle in the 1925 film was shot with 48 cameras from what I've heard. Metropolis (1927), The Good, the Bad and The Ugly, all of Kubrick's films, Lawrence of Arabia, A Man For All Seasons, Once Upon A Time in the West...horror films like The Thing...etc. Man, it would be a delight! And which actors would you like to meet if you had the same ability?

Michael McCarthy said...

I'd like this to be a strong year for supporting actors too, but it kinda looks to me like Elba is another case of category fraud for Beasts of No Nation.

luke higham said...

Michael McCarthy: I've seen reviews that pretty much say that most scenes are from Attah's POV.

Anonymous: James Mason.

Anonymous said...

Luke: Let's see if Mr. Depp can give the greatest performance of his career with Black Mass.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: Though I've given him flak in the current stage of his career, I really, really want him to give his best performance, as well as actually getting a 5 for the first time.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Word is in on Legend. Most are praising Hardy (though some confirmed Michael's suspicion of Ronald being painted in broad strokes). The film itself is getting a resounding "meh".

Louis Morgan said...

In regards to Bond I hope its not Tom Hardy because I'd rather just see him continue his present course. I do think he could pull off Bond quite easily though. As he would be quite capable as the grittier Craig/Dalton type, but as Inception showed he would be quite capable as the Connery/Brosnan style as well.

Anonymous:

I covered Loy in After The Thin Man, I think and I basically echo my thoughts once again.

Ziegfeld - 3(She really does not have much of a part as the makers clearly did not want to offend the real Billie Burke in any way. Loy is just there to be sweet and charming which she is, but she's not really given anything to do past that)

Mitchell - 2.5(I quite like his final scene where he admonishes the young gunfighter, but otherwise he does not leave too much of an impression)

Malden - 2.5(Not much of a role. He does his best with what he has though)

Covered Mitchum in 67 lead results.

Wayne - 3(Felt Wayne brought a little more in his original iteration as basically the same character in Rio Bravo. This time I feel he's rather overshadowed by Mitchum, though he's still fine in his usual way)

Caan - 3(An upgrade of Ricky Martin in basically the same role as Caan brings something with his mere presence. His role is that of a fairly simple sidekick, but Caan does the best he can to make his role at least somewhat memorable. Like Wayne he's also overshadowed by Mitchum.)

McNally - 2.5(Again seeing Robert Ryan in The Naked Spur does his predecessors no favors. McNally a decent enough heel for the film. He's pretty too the point but brings enough of a menace to the role. It still would be easy to see how Ryan could have given the part a far greater complexity)

Duryea - 2.5(Duryea tends to be good at bringing a certain enjoyable slime to these sort of roles, and this is a decent enough example of that)

Winters - 3.5(The role isn't much but Winters tends to give a lot of character to roles even when there is not that much character in them to begin with. That's the case here as she brings her usual life to the role, making more of an impact for the character than it would have otherwise)

Leigh - (She gives a fine performance with a character that is a bit of a challenge given the way her character so often switches gears. Leigh makes these feel natural by effectively realizing the right naivety and goodness about her character that would make her open to Ryan's character's tricks, but also understanding of Stewart's character's plight)

Robert:

After Beasts's reaction it seems like Supporting might be anyone's game still. Not that the reactions towards Elba haven't been positive, but it looks like there might not be a Simmons/Waltz/Leto this year.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I'm thinking Elba might go lead.

luke higham said...

Robert: In terms of placement, it's a double edged sword at the moment. In Regards to Legend, it's slightly disapponting to hear, though having read most of the reviews, Hardy is great at the very least with some mixed on his performance as Ronnie.

Anonymous said...

Louis what are your thoughts on these films;

Escape from Alcatraz
Freaks
The Old Dark House
Rain
Grand Hotel
The Mummy (1932)
Block Heads
Terror By Night
Hells House
Dinner at Eight

Anonymous said...

Louis: Wait, you didn't give the rating for Leigh. What's the rating? Also, who would be your cast and director for a premake of Thelma and Louise in the 30's, 50's and 70's?

Calvin Law said...

Luke: It's a shame to hear some of the negative reviews as well, but there have been some incredibly positive ones as well, at least regarding Hardy's performance.

luke higham said...

Calvin: I'm still confident that Louis' gonna like him a lot, the issue is whether his approach to Ronnie, will work for him or not.

Anonymous said...

What a shame that Legend has been getting negative reviews. Hardy's performance will make it watchable, anyway.

Anonymous said...

*is getting

Calvin Law said...

Also to be fair, had DiCaprio won in 1993 I don't think I'd have minded at all, Jones was a mediocre winner, I thought Fiennes and Malkovich were brilliant villains, and Potslewaithe would've been my personal choice. But DiCaprio was very good in his own right too; he really captured all the very particular attributes of an autistic child and was quite moving.

Anonymous said...

Calvin: I wouldn't have minded if he won in 1993 or 2004. 2006 was the year where the so-called great actor known as Forest Whitaker gave one of the best performances, but I preferred DiCaprio in The Departed (even if he wasn't nominated for that).

Calvin Law said...

Anonymous: I would not have given him the win in 2004 because firstly, Cheadle gave a magnificent performance in Hotel Rwanda, and there were countless worthy unnominated performances (Bacon, Giamatti, Bardem, Murray, and particularly Ganz and Carrey). 2006 I thought Whitaker was heads and shoulders above everyone else, DiCaprio was alright but I actually preferred O'Toole to him. My win for that year is Bale, though.

2013 is another year I would not have minded him winning. Great as Matt McConaughey was, DiCaprio was brilliant too (my #3 for the year).

Calvin Law said...

I also thought DiCaprio was good in The Departed, but he wouldn't even make my top 5 for that year (Bale, Muhe, Watanabe, Whitaker, Owen).

Anonymous said...

Calvin: I know I said this before, but if you really think Sergeant York is the only time where Gary Cooper gave a bad performance, then you haven't seen The Westerner. In that part where York's friend is killed by a grenade and he asks rather kindly who did such a thing, it seemed to me that Cooper was afraid of raising his voice that people would think he was overacting in that scene. But you're a very big fan of stoic performances.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I'm actually very big on DiCaprio in The Departed. It's really the only time he's 100% worked as a dramatic actor. He uses the sort of jittery fussiness that plagued him in other roles as a weapon to create a portrait of someone about to lose their damn minds. It helps he seems to embrace the flaws of Billy Costigan and put them in the forefront as opposed to running away from them like, say, Revolutionary Road.

Michael McCarthy said...

I still think his performances in Catch Me If You Can and The Aviator should be downgraded to 4's.

Anonymous said...

Michael: I'm not expecting Louis to downgrade those performances down to 4's. In my opinion, those performances just have the right rating.

Matt Mustin said...

Catch Me If You Can is one of my favourites, actually.

Michael McCarthy said...

I never got the love for Catch Me If You Can. It always felt like a very aimless, lopsided film to me. I actually don't think there was anything wrong with Leo's performance but the film muted his impact for me. As for The Aviator, the more I think about it the more actory I think DiCaprio was in it. Even the scene of the arraignment looks to me like shameless showboating from him now.

Calvin Law said...

Agree about The Aviator. Disagree about Catch Me if You Can, which I quite love, but each to his own.

I think he should probably be upgraded to a 4 for Shutter Island, personally, although I can definitely see why Louis has reservations about it.

Louis Morgan said...

In regards to Legend the reactions seemed more middling than directly negative, even though it sounds like the film is more of a vehicle for Hardy's performance (which I'm okay with actually). I expected his Ronnie half to be divisive.

Anonymous:

Escape from Alcatraz - (The procedure of the escape is handled in a tense and fun fashion. It surprisingly gathers a bit of Shawshank vibe in between the lines which it fosters fairly well too. Not a masterpiece but a cracking good escape picture)

Freaks - (Browning's direction is in top form as he creates quite a unique and atmospheric portrait of this world. The final sequence is masterfully done. That being said the acting is amateurish for the most part, although understandably so. It's very intriguing film no matter what though as it quietly undercuts his freak show premise, but looking them as human beings first)

The Old Dark House - (It needs to be said What a cast. They don't really disappoint, and nor does James Whale direction which again adds so much to his horror films. It balances its comedic and horror qualities rather well, and is an enjoyable treat of a film)

Rain - (Its about as melodramatic as a film comes, and just does not quite earn its excessively hard notes as a story like this needs to)

Grand Hotel - (A great film, no, but a bit of old Hollywood mix of drama and fun, sure why not. The stories are all decent and intermingled well enough being amplified well by the rather strong female duo of Crawford and Garbo along with the Barrymore brothers representing the men. I'd say what holds it back from a greatness though is Edmund Goulding's direction isn't particularly inspired.)

The Mummy (1932) - (There's some fun to be had from Karloff's villainy, as usual, but the film itself is pretty forgettable as the classic monster movies go. To be honest I preferred the remake)

Block Heads - (Classic Laurel and Hardy. Usually there's a bit more of a story to be had in terms of variety from the duo, but this one focuses squarely on the gags which is fine since they manage to consistently hit their marks for the duration of the film)

Terror By Night - (It's just an okay mystery in that I did not mind watching it, but there's not much going on with the supporting cast which leaves Rathbone and Bruce not quite enough to work with)

Hells House - (Actually there is something there in it in its depiction of the titular house's environment, but it has too many of the rust marks from the filmmaking of the period which holds it back from being anything too remarkable)

Dinner at Eight - (Essentially the superior version of Grand Hotel thanks in part to George Cukor's far more vibrant and assured direction. Again the stories are all pretty effective in either their dramatic or comedic purposes. The same is for the performances with rather moving work from the Barrymore brothers once again and rather amusing performances from Marie Dressler and Jean Harlow)

Anonymous:

4

Thelma and Louise (1930's directed by George Cukor):

Thelma: Carole Lombard
Louise: Barbara Stanwyck
Slocumb: Thomas Mitchell

Thelma and Louise (1950's directed by George Stevens):

Thelma: Marilyn Monroe
Louise: Shelley Winters
Slocumb: Lee J. Cobb

Thelma and Louise (1970's directed by William Friedkin):

Thelma: Ellen Burstyn
Louise: Faye Dunaway
Slocumb: Jason Robards

Calvin Law said...

Louis: are there any actors or actresses whose work in general you're thinking of revisiting, for example I remember you mentioning that you would give some of Leslie Howard's work another shot, and something along the same lines with Deborah Kerr.

houndtang said...

what are you going to do when you finish the alternative actors?

Calvin Law said...

Also to Anonymous earlier: Well I do like Cooper, Peck's stoicism in certain roles, but then again my top 10 favourite actors and actresses are mostly not that stoic (James Stewart, Trevor Howard, James Cagney, Tom Courtenay, Deborah Kerr, Barbara Stanwyck, to name but a few)

luke higham said...

Calvin: DiCaprio was very good in WEGG, but Fiennes was extraordinary and Postlethwaite was fantastic as well.

As I've said, I like DiCaprio a great deal, but his fans are just annoying.

luke higham said...

Houndtang: Bonus Rounds.

Calvin: Louis' previous comment on Legend, has taken some weight off my shoulders.

luke higham said...

*In regards to Hardy.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Black Mass reviews are in from Venice. Both Depp and the film are getting a lot of praise.

luke higham said...

Robert: Thank God!. :)

Calvin Law said...

Luke: Don't worry his fans irk me quite a bit too, I have to admit so do (some) Fassbender fans.

Good to hear about Black Mass. None of the reviews seem to have anything bad to say about the makeup or direction which were my only two real concerns. By all accounts it's a comeback for Depp.

luke higham said...
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luke higham said...

Calvin: Fair enough. I'm a huge Fassbender fan but I'm not desperate for him to win an Academy Award, as I get enough satisfaction from Louis' reviews.

Calvin Law said...

Oh I want him to win at some point too, it's just that I'm not fond of people who go on and on about him being supposedly, the most snubbed actor ever, I mean it's not like he's Deborah Kerr, Claude Rains, Donald Sutherland, Gary Oldman etc.

Calvin Law said...

He's a very good actor, just think the hype sometimes isn't very helpful.

luke higham said...

Calvin: Whatever you feel is best, mate. :) It won't bother me or anyone else on this blog.

luke higham said...
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luke higham said...
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luke higham said...
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luke higham said...

Calvin: Plus, I've never been the nitpicky type, which is probably why I appreciate this generation of acting talent so much (Hardy, Foster, Fassbender, McConaughey, DiCaprio, Phoenix, Gyllenhaal, Isaac, Bale, D. Gleeson, Cotillard, Mulligan and Vikander Etc).

Calvin Law said...

Just saw While We're Young. A decent enough little comedy, though certainly a bit of a step down from Frances Ha; the film doesn't suffer from it, but Greta Gerwig's presence is missed.

Stiller: 3 (I could definitely go up as he was decent enough at just being this grounded, downtrodden figure to follow tthough the film, I just felt something was missing)
Watts: 4 (easily the MVP, kind of like her performance in Huckabees in the sense that she's having a great deal of fun in the role, albeit with more of an intelligent, cynical bent)
Seyfried: 3 (good but a bit underused)
Driver: 3.5 (he really does have good screen presence, doesn't do anything particularly innovative with his hipster figure but he's funny enough)

Anonymous said...

I didn't know Fassbender fans were annoying when it comes to him not winning an Oscar. I'm sure Fassy will win one someday.
If Black Mass is getting great reviews then Depp is going to be great for sure.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: Who do you want to win an oscar more?. DiCaprio or Depp.
I want DiCaprio to win, to shut his fans up, but then, I want Depp to win because he could very easily go back to being shit again.

Anonymous said...

I would love to see DiCaprio win (because I like him well enough) but then again, if Depp can give a great 5 star performance, then he would also be worthy of a win. By the way, I don't see how losing the Oscar would make Depp return to be shit again. An actor that doesn't win an Oscar doesn't stop him from being consistent.
How many bonus reviews do you think Louis will do, by the way? Some number?

luke higham said...

Anonymous: I personally don't think it's gonna be a prolonged comeback from Depp, let's not forget, he turned down The Grand Budapest Hotel because of a contract dispute.

In terms of reviews, it all depends on the quality of the nominees for both categories and Louis' only ever gonna go up to 10.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: I hope to be proven wrong though. :)

Anonymous said...

So he'll do 10 bonus reviews in both categories in some particular year, right?

luke higham said...

Anonymous: I misinterpreted your comment, he said he'll do 5 if a year's strong enough and more, depending on the number of requests.

Anonymous said...

Depending on the number of requests? Okay then. I would like him to review Spencer Tracy and Gary Cooper in their films he hasn't seen yet. And of course, Brando in his 50's films Louis hasn't seen yet.

Anonymous said...

Luke: But I'm sure you already know that I requested them.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: I don't mind, There are performances that Louis really wants to see and analyse.

Anonymous said...

Luke: I can't wait to see Louis thoughts on Tracy's Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

Calvin Law said...

I am hoping that he'll review the following performances:

Trevor Howard in Outcast of the Islands (my next request)
Michael Redgrave in The Browning Version
Trevor Howard in Charge of the Light Brigade
Tatsuya Nakadai in Ran
David Bowie in The Man Who Fell to Earth
Ralph Richardson in The Sound Barrier
James Stewart in The Glenn Miller Story
Robert Shaw in The Caretaker
Joseph Gordon-Levitt in 50/50
Canada Lee in Cry, the Beloved Country (and potentially Jones and Harris for 1995 too)
Robert Shaw in The Caretaker
Daniel Day-Lewis in My Beautiful Launderette
Terrence Stamp in A Song for Marion
Tom Courtenay in Quartet
Toby Jones in that intriguing film Luke mentioned a while ago

Calvin Law said...

Also, Damian Lewis in Keane, Ben Whishaw in Perfume, Paddy Considine in A Room For Romeo Brass.

luke higham said...

Calvin: Berberian Sound Studio. :)

I don't think there's any point giving a list, since I've written down the ones I want multiple times.

Anonymous said...

I would like to see a bonus review of Shaw in Battle of the Bulge, The Hireling and Custer of the West.

luke higham said...

The Lobster Trailer
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z069ldsumxA

Anonymous said...

Louis, ratings and thoughts on:
Joan Bennett in Woman in the Window and Scarlet Street
Grace Kelly in High Noon, Dial M For Murder, To Catch A Thief and High Society
Crosby and Sinatra in High Society
George Cole in The Green Boy
Also, what do you think of Greer Garson as an actress?

Anonymous said...

Oh, and what did you think of Harrison in Doctor Dolittle, McQueen in Bullitt and Thomas Crown Affair (same with Dunaway)?

Anonymous said...

Louis what are your thoughts on these films?

Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo
They Were Expendable
Death in Venice
Comes A Horseman
The Blue Angel
Abraham Lincoln
The Big Trail
Reaching For The Moon

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Anonymous: I just want to add that I think Greer is very underrated and often forgotten, much like Kathleen Byron and Luise Rainer.

Anonymous said...

ruthiehenshallfan99: I've heard that some people find Garson's acting dated or something like that. Luise Rainer is forgotten because she didn't do anything noteworthy after winning two Oscars.

Robert MacFarlane said...

The Danish Girl is getting mixed reviews, but knowing AMPAS it's still in the race.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Hold on, more positive reviews are coming in.

Anonymous said...

Louis: So, when's the next review coming?

Louis Morgan said...

Black Mass reviews suggest Depp could get in, although I doubt that he'll win simply due to the nature of the film.

The Danish Girl suggests that Vinkander could win, and that Redmayne is probably in though it sounds unlikely that he'll pull a Hanks/Tracy.

Calvin:

An actor as a whole, not really, but there are some individual performances I feel I should reexamine.

Anonymous:

Bennett in Woman in the Window - 2.5(The better fitting of the two roles I think in that the role is a bit simpler and requires less from her. She's still fairly dull and uninteresting though. She just lacks the needed charisma to lead the film, and is severely overshadowed by Duryea and Robinson)

Scarlet Street - 2(She's even more underwhelming here as she fails to play the duplicitous nature in any sort of effective fashion. And once again is overshadowed by her two co-stars)

Kelly - High Noon - 2(She feels rather miscast and fails to make much of an impact in the role. Although to be fair to her I do kinda hate her whole plot line in the film as it always feels a bit lacking since there feels like such a disconnect between husband and wife. Although part of that is due to her and Cooper having no chemistry)

Dial M For Murder - 3(The film belongs to Ray Milland and when he's not onscreen John Williams. She's okay in being just sort of there for the most part. I certainly don't mind her performance, and she serves what needs to be served)

To Catch A Thief - 2.5(This film never gets over feeling like an excuse for a vacation. Kelly does not help this as there isn't anything lively or special to make anything out of the breezy tone)

High Society - 2.5(Well it shows what Katherine Hepburn does in the same role, but what she did Kelly does not do. She just amounts to a pretty face which is not all there is to her character. Although I do prefer her over her co-stars)

Crosby - 2(Well he's not Cary Grant here, and well I hate to say it but he's frankly comes off as a bit lame here)

Sinatra - 2(He's no Jimmy Stewart, and that's far from my favorite Stewart performance. And along with Crosby everything about his work comes off as far more corny than realizing any sort of fun)

Covered Cole in the 56 results.

Garson - (I have to admit not being much of a fan of hers. Not that I really actively dislike her work or anything. She can occasionally be charming, though I think she had a problem weaving charm with any sort of dramatic purpose since she either played it with warmth and charm or oddly a cold distance. This is best shown in Random Harvest where the first half she's all charm and warmth, then the second she's cold and almost lifeless)

I believe I covered Harrison and McQueen before.

Thomas Crown Affair - 3(McQueen still has some cool to be seen, but this film I don't think is the best use of that. This is not a case of him going for anything else really either. The film itself I do think is far too thin for a heist picture and mostly seemed made for Dunaway and McQueen to create as much innuendo as possible. I do like his chemistry with her though)

Dunaway - 3.5(She brings a bit more out of her character and is effective in creating the sense of an actual emotional attachment to the story. Of course the majority is looking at McQueen in a sexually suggestive way, which she does well)

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous

Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo - (Very well made war film with the special effects being rather well done. It's always interesting to note that the aerial sequences in this feel so much more effective than the authentic aerial sequences from Twelve O'Clock High. The characters and such are fairly typical but well done within that sort, all soldiers have to be good, type of requirement)

They Were Expendable - (A well made war film as well, this time about Pt Boats. Much like Thirty Seconds really there is not anything atypical about it, but it shows exactly how a more standard film of this nature should be done)

Death in Venice - (A film like this I'd say is either one in which you'll fall into its wavelength or you won't. I can't say I quite managed to. Visually speaking it remains captivating to a point, but I never found myself brought into the emotional elements of the story)

Comes A Horseman - (A very low key western, maybe excessively so. It attempts to give some altered life to the big rancher trying to steal land plot. I can't quite say it succeeds in doing so. It feels as though at times it will be more traditional, then suddenly tries to go for a realism in the actual working of the ranch. It just fails to find the needed balance. The performances are uniformly fine, particularly Richard Farnsworth, though I feel it needed to focus a little more on character given its choice to be so ambivalent towards the plot)

The Blue Angel - (Can't quite say it effortlessly combines the tragic and comedic elements of the story. It does not quite fail in either regard either. It's imbalanced to be sure and the tone does feel inconsistent rather than gradually changing. It does not cause the film to collapse in that the two sides are still reasonably well done though at odds)

Abraham Lincoln - (It's one that feels to pristine for its good as it basically ticks off various events for Lincoln, showing us the man without really allowing us to know him past the most glossy of personal moments. It's not terrible, but even as a visualized newspaper biography the film fails to bring enough life to any of the important events it depicts)

The Big Trail - (The revolutionary, though in a before its time sort of way, are pretty spectacular at times, but can't hide that not so modern storytelling and acting that try to hold the film up past that. The widescreen visuals are the films only notable thing, even though Wayne is fine as pre-John Wayne John Wayne though only just fine)