Thursday, 13 August 2015

Alternate Best Supporting Actor 1959: Results

5. Orson Welles in Compulsion - Welles gives a rather understated yet very effective portrayal of his passionate lawyer.

Best Scene: Wilk's final words to the killers.
4. James Mason in North By Northwest - Mason gives a wonderfully suave and effortlessly menacing depiction of a villain with class.

Best Scene: The auction.
3. Laurence Olivier in The Devil's Disciple - Olivier gives one of his most entertaining performance as his humorous and incisive portrayal of a soldier who's a true gentleman above all. 

Best Scene: The Trial
2. Stephen Boyd in Ben-Hur -  Although Boyd is great at being a smug and despicable villain, he creates a far more memorable portrayal through giving a greater depth to what motivates this man.

Best Scene: Messala after the race.
1. Joseph Schildkraut in The Diary of Anne Frank - I'll admit this is another year where I could easily switch one way or the other between the top two. At the moment though my win goes to Schildkraut's incredible work which so well realizes the warmth and optimism of his character making his final depiction of a broken man truly heartbreaking.

Best Scene: The Ending.
Overall Rank:
  1. Joseph Schildkraut in The Diary of Anne Frank
  2. Stephen Boyd in Ben-Hur
  3. George C. Scott in Anatomy of a Murder
  4. Laurence Olivier in The Devil's Disciple
  5. James Mason in North By Northwest
  6. Orson Welles in Compulsion
  7. Ben Gazzara in Anatomy of a Murder
  8. Jimmy O'Dea in Darby O'Gill and the Little People
  9. Martin Landau in North By Northwest
  10. Peter Sellers in I'm All Right Jack
  11. Peter Finch in The Nun's Story
  12. Burl Ives in Our Man in Havana
  13. Dean Martin in Rio Bravo
  14. Albert Rémy in The 400 Blows
  15. Hugh Griffith in Ben-Hur
  16. Arthur O'Connell in Anatomy of a Murder
  17. Robert Vaughn in The Young Philadelphians
  18. Richard Attenborough in I'm All Right Jack
  19. Kunie Tanaka in The Human Condition II: Road to Eternity
  20. Lou Jacobi in The Diary of Anne Frank
  21. Finlay Currie in Ben-Hur 
  22. E.G. Marshall in Compulsion
  23. Tony Randall in Pillow Talk
  24. Noel Coward in Our Man in Havana
  25. Donald Wolfit in Room At the Top 
  26. Andre Morrell in The Hound of the Baskervilles
  27. So Yamamura in The Human Condition I: No Greater Love
  28. Ed Wynn in The Diary of Anne Frank
  29. Anthony Quinn in Warlock 
  30. Jack Hawkins in Ben-Hur 
  31. Ernie Kovacs in Our Man in Havana
  32. Joe E. Brown in Some Like It Hot
  33. Christopher Lee in The Hound of the Baskervilles
  34. Terry-Thomas in I'm All Right Jack 
  35. Murray Hamilton in Anatomy of a Murder 
  36. Arthur O'Connell in Operation Petticoat 
  37. Keiji Sada in The Human Condition II: Road to Eternity
  38. Sean Connery in Darby O'Gill and the Little People
  39. Miles Malleson in I'm All Right Jack
  40. Walter Brennan in Rio Bravo
  41. Sam Jaffe in Ben-Hur
  42. John Williams in The Young Philadelphians
  43. Frank Thring in Ben-Hur
  44. Kieron Moore in Darby O'Gill and the Little People
  45. Leo G. Carroll in North By Northwest 
  46. Denis O'Dea in Darby O'Gill and the Little People
  47. Ward Bond in Rio Bravo 
  48. Dean Martin in Career
  49. Billy Dee Williams in The Last Angry Man
  50. Bill Thompson in Sleeping Beauty 
  51. Donald Pleasence in Look Back in Anger 
  52. Ralph Richardson in Our Man in Havana
  53. Donald Houston in Room At the Top
  54. Jack MacGowran in Darby O'Gill and the Little People
  55. Bill Shirley in Sleeping Beauty
  56. Adam West in The Young Philadelphians
  57. Harry Andrews in The Devil's Disciple 
  58. Brian Keith in The Young Philadelphians 
  59. Frank Gorshin in Warlock 
  60. Gary Raymond in Look Back in Anger
  61. Thayer Davis in Journey to the Center of the Earth
  62. Geoffrey Keen in The Scapegoat
  63. Orson Bean in Anatomy of a Murder
  64. Richard Deacon in The Young Philadelphians
  65. Peter Bull in The Scapegoat
  66. Nick Adams in Pillow Talk
  67. Joseph N. Welch in Anatomy of a Murder 
  68. George Raft in Some Like It Hot
  69. Frank McHugh in Career
  70. Pat Boone in Journey to the Center of the Earth
  71. Dick Sargent in Operation Petticoat  
  72. Dan O'Herlihy in Imitation of Life
  73. Luther Adler in The Last Angry Man
  74. Dean Jagger in The Nun's Story
  75. Richard Beymer in The Diary of Anne Frank 
  76. Robert Strauss in 4-D Man
  77. Douglas Spencer in The Diary of Anne Frank
  78. Robert Middleton in Career 
  79. John Gavin in The Imitation of Life
  80. Edgar Stehli in 4-D Man 
  81. Martin Milner in Compulsion 
  82. Ricky Nelson in Rio Bravo
  83. Peter Ronson in Journey to the Center of the Earth
  84. Criswell in Plan 9 From Outer Space
  85. Carl Anthony in Plan 9 From Outer Space
  86. Paul Marco in Plan 9 From Outer Space
  87. Tom Keene in Plan 9 From Outer Space
  88. Tor Johnson in Plan 9 From Outer Space
  89. Lyle Talbot in Plan 9 From Outer Space
  90. John Breckinridge in Plan From Outer Space
Next Year: 1976 Lead

71 comments:

luke higham said...

Joseph Schildkraut Wins haha. :)

Hepburn's a five. Yay. :)

Gregory Peck - The Omen
John Wayne -- The Shootist
Giancarlo Giannini - L'Innocente
Robert Redford - All The President's Men
Dustin Hoffman - Marathon Man

Anonymous said...

Wow, Schildkraut won.
1976 Best Actor
John Wayne- The Shootist
Gregory Peck- The Omen
Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman- All the President's Men
Dustin Hoffman in Marathon Man
I'm expecting a 5 for Wayne, 4 for Peck, 4,5's for Redford and Hoffman (Both films)

luke higham said...

Louis: Ratings And Thoughts on Gazzara, O'Dea, Sellers, Finch, Remy, Attenborough and the cast of Plan 9 From Outer Space.

luke higham said...

Louis: Where would you place Hepburn in 1959 Female Lead. 1st, 2nd or 3rd.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: A 4 is fine by me for Peck, though I do have high hopes for Whitelaw.

Psifonian said...

Eastwood, The Outlaw Josey Wales
Carradine, Bound for Glory
Gazzara, Killing of a Chinese Bookie
Hoffman, Marathon Man
Wayne, The Shootist

Anonymous said...

Louis: Can you repost your ratings for:
Grace Kelly in The Country Girl
Sandra Bullock in The Blind Side
Natalie Portman in Black Swan
Hilary Swank in Million Dollar Baby and Boys Don't Cry

Anonymous said...

Louis: Cast and director for:
Network (2010's)
Drive (1950's)
Bullitt (1920's and 1930's Pre-Code)
The Graduate (2010's)

Calvin Law said...

Thoughts and ratings for:

Dean Martin in Rio Bravo
Lou Jacobi in The Diary of Anne Frank
Anthony Quinn in Warlock
Joe E. Brown in Some Like It Hot
Christopher Lee in The Hound of the Baskervilles
Murray Hamilton in Anatomy of a Murder
Sean Connery in Darby O'Gill and the Little People

Calvin Law said...

David Bowie in The Man Who Fell to Earth
Ben Gazzara in Killing of a Chinese Bookie
Robert Redford in All the President's Men
Gregory Peck in The Omen

luke higham said...

Louis: I'll switch Giannini with David Bowie in The Man Who Fell To Earth.

Calvin Law said...

I really don't see what the big deal is about Hoffman, as far as I'm concerned Olivier completely ate him up and overshadowed him for that whole film.

Also I think Louis will give Peck a 4.5, it's a great reactive performance which is just the sort Louis loves.

luke higham said...

Calvin: I hope you're right. :)

Anonymous said...

Calvin: Well, anything can happen with Louis Morgan, Calvin. Hoffman can likely get a 4,5. By the way, is Bowie that good?

Anonymous said...

Luke & Calvin: We'll just have to wait to see.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: :)

Anonymous said...

*and

Scott Gingold said...

Walter Matthau, Bad News Bears
Bruce Dern, Family Plot
Mel Brooks, Silent Movie
Gene Wilder, Silver Streak
Woody Allen, The Front

RatedRStar said...

John Wayne - The Shootist
Robert Redford - All The Presidents Men
Sean Connery - Robin And Marian
Gregory Peck - The Omen
Clint Eastwood - The Outlaw Josey Wales

Calvin Law said...

Anonymous: Bowie is brilliant but in a very unusual sort of way. He's already intangibly a very supernatural looking being so the most terrific part of his performance is how he's trying to fit in with the rest of the world. He makes this space oddity (no pun intended) feel absolutely naturalistic and makes you emphasise deeply with his plight. He's my win for the year.

By the way just to scrape into the retroactive castings,

Network (2010's)
Howard Beale: James Woods
Max Schumacher: Richard Jenkins
Frank Hackett: Billy Crudup
Diana Christensen: Cate Blanchett
Arthur Jensen: Michael Shannon
Louise Schumacher: Julie Walters

Directed by Jeff Nichols

luke higham said...

RatedRStar, Calvin and Anonymous: I really wish Louis could do 10 for '76, but oh well. :)

Anonymous said...

Calvin: Wow! Gotta check it out!

Calvin Law said...

Bowie is a great actor. Check out Merry Christmas Mr Lawrence as well, he's terrific there too.

10 for 76 would be a bit much methinks, I think Louis is gonna go for:

Redford
Hoffman
Peck
Wayne
Eastwood

Which I'm fine with...I guess.

Anonymous said...

Eastwood could get a 5. He could likely win overall, I think.

luke higham said...

Calvin: Okay, maybe not 10, but with the 5 I gave, I would like to see reviews also for Connery and Eastwood.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Just finished Far From the Madding Crowd. My ratings:

Mulligan: 4.5
Schoenaerts: 4.5
Sheen: 4.5
Sturridge: 1

Matt Mustin said...

John Wayne in The Shootist
Robert Redford in All The President's Men
David Bowie in The Man Who Fell to Earth
Sean Connery in Robin and Marian
Clint Eastwood in The Outlaw Josey Wales

Calvin Law said...

Robert: Did you like the film or did Sturridge ruin it for you.

Glad you liked Sheen, Mulligan and Schoenaerts.

Calvin Law said...

I hope Finch still wins the overall.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Uh, the film was... okay, I guess? Workmanlike direction, uninformative camera, pacing-blind editing didn't help. The Mulligan-Shoenarts-Sheen trio buoyed it quite a bit, but JESUS was Sturridge a catastrophe.

Calvin Law said...

I'm watching The Man from UNCLE tomorrow. Here's hoping Guy Ritchie finds his stride once more.

Calvin Law said...

Although I'm not really a huge fan of Ritchie, for Henry Cavill's career's sake, PLEASE be a success.

luke higham said...

Calvin: Seeing it as well, though according to the reviews, It's just gonna be fine.

Michael McCarthy said...

The five I want to see reviewed most are:

David Bowie-The Man Who Fell to Earth
John Wayne-The Shootist
Dustin Hoffman-Marathon Man (Yes Olivier was terrific but I think this is really underrated work)
Robert Redford-All the President's Men
Jean Gabin-Holy Year (His final film)

Some other suggestions:

Gregory Peck-The Omen
Clint Eastwood-The Outlaw Josey Wales
David Carradine-Bound for Glory (who I think may have been requested a while back?)
Cliff Robertson-Obsession
Alain Delon-Mr. Klein

luke higham said...

Michael: He was suggested, not requested. :)

Matt Mustin said...

Oh, I forgot about Carradine.

Anonymous said...

Louis what are your thoughts on these films?

Sorry, Wrong Number
Heidi
Sabotage
The Young Lions
Patterns
The Thief
The Parallax View
The Bounty

luke higham said...

If Louis's only doing 5 for the year, then the lineup's gonna be.

Wayne
Bowie
Carradine
Eastwood
Peck

Anonymous said...

I'm so happy that Audrey Hepburn is now a 5 for The Nun's Story. I think it's one of the best performances ever, a true asterpiece of subtlety. She's truly poignant and unforgettable. I also really love her in general as an actress.
Louis, what is your rating for Ben Gazzara in Anatomy of a Murder? He really was quite great. And did you pretty much make up your mind about Signoret in Room at the Top? I know she used to be supporting for you but then you put her in lead, is she now a firm lead for you?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous: Don't you think that's too much?
Luke: We don't even know if Bowie and Carradine are going to be reviewed or not. Eastwood is a likely chance.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: It's just a prediction. :)

Calvin Law said...

Please review Redford though Louis. I'd rather you save like Bowie for the bonus rounds, since I think he is really great in All the Presidents Men.

GM said...

Time to give De Niro back his five. o/


Alain Delon - Mr. Klein
Ben Gazzara - The Killing of a Chinese Bookie
Hanns Zischler - Kings of the Road
Rudiger Vogler - Kings of the Road
Nino Manfredi - Ugly, Dirty and Bad
David Carradine - Bound for Glory

Anonymous said...

GM: While De Niro's a 5 for me in Taxi Driver, I'm not expecting Louis to upgrade him from a 4,5 to a 5.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: Me neither.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: Don't know about you, but I think Gyllenhaal's performance in Nightcrawler is one of the reasons why he went down to a 4.5.

Anonymous said...

Luke: I don't think that's the case. Louis said it was because of the hype of De Niro's performance why he downgraded him to a 4,5. Apparently, he didn't knew that there was so much hype over In A Lonely Place.

RatedRStar said...

I came across a film recently (I havent watched it yet) that was very much loved by someone on this blog, Outcast of the Islands is the film, I would like to know who loved it and why?

luke higham said...

Anonymous: I had that same view when he downgraded him, but I do feel that Gyllenhaal contributed to that in a way.

luke higham said...

RatedRStar: It was Calvin.

Michael Patison said...

David Bowie in The Man Who Fell from Earth
David Carradine in Bound for Glory
Clint Eastwood in The Outlaw Josey Wales
Ben Gazzara in The Killing of a Chinese Bookie
Gregory Peck in The Omen
Anthony Quinn in The Message
Robert Redford in All the President's Men
John Wayne in The Shootist

I've obviously included a more than usual. There are the expected ones, but I also included Bowie because, even though I haven't seen the film, I think he's such a fascinating actor and person. Also, Quinn is in there because, while I expect (haven't yet seen it unfortunately) the film is more about either atmosphere or grandeur, I still think the whole idea of attempting to portray the Prophet while keeping to Islamic doctrine is fascinating.

RatedRStar said...

Seems like 1976 will be an easy bonus year to find more actor nominees =D.

Michael Patison said...

I just noticed. What about Manlove! How can Manlove not be in the overall!?

luke higham said...

Michael: There's gonna be a Wiseau Bonus Round, so he might save him for a ranking then. :)

Anonymous said...

Speaking of all of this request for Bowie to be reviewed, I would easily give him a 4,5 in the Prestige. Same with Denis Menouchet in Inglorious Basterds. He may have little screentime, but he's easily a 4,5 for me.

Anonymous said...

Ben Gazzara - The Killing of a Chinese Bookie
Clint Eastwood - The Outlaw Josey Wales
Giancarlo Giannini - L'Innocente
Jacques Perrin - Il Deserto dei Tartari (which has LOTS of notable supporting actors, like Trintignant, Sydow, Noiret, Rey, Rabal and Gassman)
Roman Polanski - Le Locataire

Michael Patison said...

Luke: Thanks for the reminder as I actually had forgotten, but seeing as Louis has now said how many Wiseaus he would give Manlove and also wrote a ((very) short) review of him while doing the actually nominated 1959 lineup way back when, I'm still wondering where Manlove is.

luke higham said...

Michael: Louis's first ever review was Manlove, back at the beginning of 2010.

luke higham said...

Michael: And I think he's last.

Michael McCarthy said...

Oh, I just thought of one other suggestion for a review, Jack Nicholson in The Missouri Breaks.

Anonymous said...

Michael: Louis hasn't seen The Missouri Breaks. I think that he should see it, would like to see his thoughts on Brando's performance.

Michael McCarthy said...

I never assumed he had, he hasn't covered the year yet...

Calvin Law said...

WATCH OUTCAST OF THE ISLANDS RATEDRSTAR, TREVOR HOWARD IS GOING TO BE MY NEXT REQUEST :D I've been putting it off for too long

Michael Patison said...

Luke: Indeed it was. I had recalled reading it once and searched it and misunderstood the intro to the review.

Calvin Law said...

RatedRStar: It's a beautifully rendered film, directed with aplomb by Carol Reed that captures the original terse and tense atmosphere of the novel beautifully. There's even a tinge of black humour to it all stemming from just how bleak and messed up this universe of Reed/Joseph Conrad's is, elevated by a wonderful script and some fine supporting turns by Ralph Richardson, Robert Morley and Wendy Hiller. Each and every character adds a bit to the film's atmosphere, but at the centre of it all Howard is fantastically charming and fanatically off-putting. Paradox much? But when you see the film you'll get what I mean; a minor reservation I have with the film is that it's conclusion is fairly brisk and a bit rushed.But the power of Howard's final performance, some of the greatest of any actor, helps to make up for this.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

Gazzara - 4.5(It's an interesting character in that even though we're following Stewart's character to get this guy off, he's clearly guilty since he definitely committed the crime. Gazzara's is great because he essentially plays the man as guilty to the point that he definitely was not insane at the time of the killing either. Gazzara shows a cool enough facade at times, but there's always an underlying intensity to him, a clear temper, that when it comes out it feels like his natural state. Even though it never says it Gazzara's performance suggests that the film hardly has a good ending)

O'Dea - 4.5(A true king of the leprechauns. Although O'Dea is a lot of fun in portraying the whole magical qualities of the character, what I like so much is that he does not make King Brian a cartoon. There's such a clever mischievousness that he conveys in his performance portraying quite the devious joy whenever he gets one over on Darby. He and Sharpe have fantastic chemistry as the two make particularly endearing friendly rivals. Also like Sharpe when the film takes its darker turn O'Dea is surprisingly moving particularly in his last scene with Sharpe in the death coach.)

Sellers - 4(Sellers is consistently amusing in portraying the excessively proper Union head who perhaps his lines a little too well remembered for his own good. Sellers is a lot of fun portraying the tomfoolery of a man who acts as though he knows what he's doing but really doesn't have much of a clue)

Finch - 4(Finch is very good in bringing the rough quality needed for his character that he properly suggests comes more from the exasperation of his work than an actual unfeeling. He's very good in his scenes with Hepburn as he does not make them traditionally romantic which would be wrong, rather he correctly positions the cynical doctor as someone who pushes people in the direction he believed they were meant to go)

Remy - 4(His performance is an effective one as he brings out a much stronger consistency and warmth with his character that contrasts well against the boy's mother. In addition though he keeps just this certain unsaid distance about though in his work that acts well as a reminder that he's not the boy's biological father)

Attenborough - 4(Not the best role he's ever been given, but since it's Ricahrd Attenborough he makes something out of it. Attenborough is a good straight man of sorts although he brings this almost certain menace with in this that works quite well)

Criswell - (This performance will effect you in the future, now let us reward the innocent let us punish the guilty and remember that faithful day where Criswell delivered random weird narration, and gave an equally odd intro and epilogue)

Anthony, Marco, Keene, Talbot - (I am reading lines with emotion right well he kinda forgot)

Johnson - (He sure has to breath a lot for a zombie. Before that though he sure is hard to read, well by that I mean understand, he's very hard to understand)

Breckinridge - (The pinnacle of I don't care in the least of this performance)

Hepburn would still be third for me.

Anonymous:

Just google search with actoroscar.blogspot.com with the performance and they'll probably show up.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Hmm I'll agree with Calvin although I might opt for McConaughey as Hackett.

Drive (1950's directed by Orson Welles)

The Driver: Montgomery Clift
Irene: Elizabeth Taylor
Shannon: Clark Gable
Bernie Rose: Orson Welles
Nino: Lee Marvin
Blanche: Marilyn Monroe

Bullitt (1920's directed by Lewis Milestone)

Bulitt: Richard Barthelmess
Chalmers: Williams Powell
Cathy: Jean Harlow

Bullitt (1930's directed by William Wellman)

Bulitt: James Cagney
Chalmers: Melvyn Douglas
Cathy: Jean Harlow

The Graduate (2010's)

Ben: Miles Teller
Elaine Robinson: Emma Stone
Mrs. Robinson: Cate Blanchett
Mr. Robinson: Richard Jenkins

Calvin:

Martin - 4(Martin is quite an enjoyable drunk, that was his whole stage persona after all, but what's interesting is that there is a great deal of pathos about this in his performance. His little journey to a sobriety ends up being surprisingly moving and I'd say it is the highlight of the film)

Quinn - 3.5(Quinn's role is somewhat brief but he gives a good performance as he makes himself the tough western hero only to slowly peel it away to reveal that maybe that's just a thug after all)

Brown - 3.5(Like everyone else in the film he's fine, but I don't love em)

Lee - 3.5(Weird to see him not play a villain but it's interesting to see him in such a role. I suppose that's a give away though but Lee actually plays it straight as an honest man which works since it makes you suspect him of something anyways since he's played by Christopher Lee)

Hamilton - 3.5(Hamilton as usual offers some fine support as he really makes his character feel like a genuine guy. Brief role, but he rises above the call of duty)

Connery - 3.5(Purely charming performance from Connery, and he's appropriately charming here).

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Sorry, Wrong Number - (The story worked better as a radio piece as the whole thing feels far too expansive with all the flashbacks, and extra scenes which completely diminishes the effective central idea of a invalid hearing about a murder. That tension is lost through the threads the film decides to weaves, and wastes a good concept)

Heidi - (Corn on the cob big time, but hey it certainly is quite sweet to be sure. Plus I will say Hersholt manages to offer give the film a bit more depth whenever he shows up thanks to his performance)

Sabotage - (A weaker Hitchcock in that it's almost a failed attempt to show the film from the villain's point of view, something he'd do far better early on. This is in part because that character, and his relationship with his wife is never that interesting. Then the main thriller sequences are poorly thought out particularly the bus bomb, which Hitchcock himself admitted was a mistake since technically we were just waiting out a death. It has some ideas that clearly he would handle far better in his later films, but does not add up into a satisfactory film in this case)

The Young Lions -(Kinda just a mess that never becomes the emotional powerhouse that the film is trying so hard to be. The Brando material is almost laughable at times, it does not help by how he looks in the film, and gives a curiously dull depiction of the life of a Nazi. There is some material in Clift's story, but it certainly feels like a lesser retread of From Here to Eternity then Martin's story is just kinda there)

Patterns - (A very interesting film actually because it does not quite paint the corporate world as black and white even though it does portray it as quite cutthroat. The story has more depth to it than that though it gives sympathy for the spent executive, it does not make the boss a straw man, and it's quite intriguing that it bothers to give that character's views credence. The direction is a little mundane, but the strength of the writing and acting makes up for it)

The Thief - (The soundtrack tries very hard to ruin the film, but thankfully it doesn't quite manage it, comes closer than I would like though. James Caan though is a very good lead and Robert Prosky is a great villain. The action set pieces are quite memorable, while it keeps an emotional core with the family element of Caan's character)

The Parallax View - (The first two third are pretty outstanding as it creates such an atmospheric sense of paranoia, and fear while being quite captivating as the story moves along. Once he starts to discover the organization I feel the film becomes a little less engaging, but it does end memorably)

The Bounty - (Olivier, Day-Lewis, Gibson, Hopkins, Neeson, quite the cast to say the least. It's a film nearing greatness, that might have been achieved from say Peter Weir or David Lean, but it never quite attains it. There's just a bit to be desired in the realization of the life of the ship that never comes to life quite as much as it should. Having said that this version of the depiction of the well told story is quite fascinating. It does not just switch the roles of Bligh and Christian though rather giving depth to both personalities, and giving an honest sense of both men while making neither one simply a hero and simply a villain)

Anonymous:

Signoret is lead still though I won't say firmly still

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Louis: Since this is for 1959 in general, what were your thoughts on Mary Costa in Sleeping Beauty. Personally, I adore her. And if you want, Ilene Woods in Cinderella (a personal favorite), and Adriana Caselotti in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (yet another favorite).

Louis Morgan said...

I find Costa has a natural sweetness in her voice that works well for Aurora, though I've always found it odd how both she and Philip completely stop speaking in the second half.

Woods voice work is very good actually in that again she has that sweetness though I feel in her voice there is this certain resilience about it as well that reflects well her mistreatment over the years.

Caselotti is one where I could see how some might dislike her voice due to her uniqueness to say the least. I rather like it thought as it makes Snow White stand out in a certain way on her own, despite really not being much of a character when compared against The Queen and the Dwarves.

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Louis: I definitely agree with you! To be honest,I thought that Mary was always British. Imagine my surprise when I first her in an interview. And I found it odd that they stopped speaking too.

Ilene is one of my favorite voice actors. She probably is my favorite. She has so much honesty in her voice and a certain timelessness as well. These aspects translate over to her singing as well!

Adriana is another favorite, but not on the same level as Ilene. She is very sweet and like a mother, but I feel like both Cinderella and Snow White are like mothers.