Friday, 14 August 2015

Alternate Best Actor 1976

And the Nominees Were Not:

John Wayne in The Shootist

Clint Eastwood in The Outlaw Josey Wales

Robert Redford in All The President's Men

David Carradine in Bound For Glory

Gregory Peck in The Omen

131 comments:

Calvin Law said...

1. Wayne
2. Carradine
3. Eastwood
4. Redford
5. Peck

Although I'm hoping to be proven wrong as Redford and Peck are my favourites out of this lot (granted I haven't seen Carradine yet)

Robert MacFarlane said...

1. Wayne
2. Eastwood
3. Carradine
4. Peck
5. Redford

Psifonian said...

1. Eastwood
2. Carradine
3. Wayne
4. Redford
5. Peck

Anonymous said...

1. Eastwood
2. Wayne
3. Carradine
4. Redford
5. Peck

Michael McCarthy said...

1. John Wayne
2. Robert Redford
3. Clint Eastwood
4. David Carradine
5. Gregory Peck

So Louis, what are your rating and thoughts for Hoffman Marathon Man? Or are you planning on rewetting it soon for a more fresh perspective?

Anonymous said...

1. Eastwood
2. Wayne
3. Carradine
4. Redford
5. Peck

Calvin Law said...

Psifonian: What are your song choices for the Best Supporting Actress video? You are like my new DJ, man :)

GM said...

1. Eastwood
2. Carradine
3. Wayne
4. Redford
5. Peck

Anonymous said...

Louis sorry if it bothers you that I ask so much what you think of films but its just because I really don't know whether to watch them or not and like to get a second opinion =) what are your thoughts on these.

The Stranger (1946)
The Killers
The Naked City
Johnny Belinda
The Gunfighter
No Way Out (1950)
Panic On The Streets (1950)
Thief (1952)
Man in the Attic

Calvin Law said...

Just my two cents Anonymous, Louis will give much more detailed and insightful thoughts but I would recommend Johnny Belinda, and No Way Out very strongly.

JackiBoyz said...

1) John Wayne
2) Robert Redford
3) Clint Eastwood
4) Gregory Peck
5) David Carradine

RatedRStar said...

1. John Wayne
2. Robert Redford
3. Clint Eastwood
4. David Carradine
5. Gregory Peck

Maciej said...

1.Wayne
2.Eastwood
3.Redford
4.Carradine
5.Peck

luke higham said...

1. Wayne
2. Eastwood
3. Carradine
4. Redford
5. Peck

luke higham said...

Louis: You wrote down Whales instead of Wales. :)

moviefilm said...

1) David Carradine
2) Clint Eastwood
3) Gregory Peck
4) Robert Redford
5) John Wayne (don't the hype around him, he was fine here, still a bit too waynish)

moviefilm said...

*don't understand

Robert MacFarlane said...

@Pisfonian: Have you seen The Gift? I'm actually curious on your thoughts about it.

Michael Patison said...

Really pulling a rabbit out of the hat with this one:
1. Robert Redford
2. John Wayne
3. Clint Eastwood
4. David Carradine
5. Gregory Peck

Kind of disappointed not the see Gazzara here. But he'd be a great one for the bonus rounds if you haven't already seen the movie, Louis.

luke higham said...

Louis: Save Bowie and Gazzara for the bonus rounds. :)

Calvin Law said...

Saw Man from UNCLE. Fun enough watch, nothing groundbreaking and hardly flawless, Guy Ritchie's kinetic direction is as hit and miss as ever, but an entertaining enough ride with some terrific character dynamics, and one exceptional performance.

Cavill: 3.5 (very tempted to go up to a 4, he's incredibly charismatic and slick, he plays the suave spy with such conviction and yet adds a sparkling bit of tongue in cheek humour that's really quite enjoyable)

Hammer: 3 (his accent is fairly dodgy and overall he's very much overshadowed by Cavill, but he's a good enough straight man, is a fairly amusing deadpan presence, and manages to find chemistry with Cavill and...)

Vikander: 3/3.5 (a bit of a step down from her two exceptional leading roles? Well yeah that's putting it mildly but she's still good here. She has quite a thankless role but is still effortlessly charming and sweet, and I actually think she helps elevate Hammer in their scenes together with her charm)

Debicki: 4.5 (MVP by far. Technically speaking a fairly well-worn character trope but she's just so brilliant in it. Ever since seeing her brilliant performance in Gatsby I'd wondered how her incredible physical awareness and overflowing mystique of her talents would fare in a larger role and here she does not disappoint, in fact she surpassed the loftiest of my expectations. She's quirky, threatening, sexy, seductive, funny, and just an incredibly entertaining villain who's so fun to watch and yet strangely naturalistic and actually quite chilling in the third act. A re-watch could easily bump her up and as it stands she's my Best Supporting Actress for the year.)

Grant - 3 (quite liked him here actually, as he did his proper Brit routine with a hint of his old roguish charm, I'll admit I've grown less and less fond of Grant as an actor and public persona over the years so I'm pleased that he was good here. Small role but handles it well)

Psifonian said...

I haven't yet seen "The Gift," though I plan to at some point this weekend. Maybe tonight. Haven't decided. I like Bateman and Edgerton, though.

Calvin:

"Promontory (Main Theme)" ~ The Last of the Mohicans
"Mathilde's Theme" ~ A Very Long Engagement
"La Califfa" ~ The Lady Caliph
"Let Us Cross the River" ~ Gods and Generals

Calvin Law said...

Luke: your thoughts and ratings on the cast of The Great Gatsby? The 2013 version.

Maguire: 3.5 (he's actually pretty close to how I envisaged Nick while reading the book)
Dicaprio: 4.5
Mulligan: 4.5
Edgerton: 3
Fisher: 2
Clarke: 3/3.5
Bachchan: 3
Debicki: 4.5

Calvin Law said...

Thanks Psifonian! I really need to see Last of the Mohicans.

Calvin Law said...

Also Psifonian: what compelled you to put Samuel L Jackson ahead of Gary Oldman for 1994 lead? Category change or just rewatching one of them?

Calvin Law said...

I'm just curious because I actually made a similar change recently; Jackson over Robbins in The Shawshank Redemption.

luke higham said...

Calvin:
Maguire - 2.5 (Didn't like him at first but improved slightly on second viewing)
DiCaprio - 4
Mulligan - 3.5/4
Edgerton - 3.5
Clarke - 3
Debicki - 3.5 (Need a re-watch)

Psifonian said...

Calvin,

For the longest time, I had Jackson in supporting (where he would be my #3 to Landau and Whitmore), but upon revisiting "Pulp Fiction" for a Tarantino montage that I put on hold until "The Hateful Eight" comes out, I realized that Jackson is co-lead with Travolta and Willis. I'd have no problem if someone wanted to call it an ensemble of supporting players, except I feel that Willis doesn't support anyone, and he is so firmly lead in his own story that I felt I had to give due to Travolta and Jackson in the same way.

Calvin Law said...

I can definitely see your rationale there, since you could easily argue that the three actors lead very distinctly different mini films:

Vincent Vega's night gone wrong with Mia Wallace

Butch and the golden watch

Jules Winnfield and the path towards divine intervention

Anonymous said...

Louis: Can you repost your ratings for:
Grace Kelly in The Country Girl
Sandra Bullock in The Blind Side
Natalie Portman in Black Swan
Hilary Swank in Million Dollar Baby and Boys Don't Cry

luke higham said...

Anonymous: Kelly's less than a 4. He hasn't seen The Blind Side, Portman's a 2 & Swank's a 2.5 for the former and a 4.5 for the latter.

Anonymous said...

Luke: Oh, thanks. :)

luke higham said...

Anonymous: :)

Robert MacFarlane said...

@Psifonian: One last question. What did you think of this season of True Detective?

luke higham said...

Louis: Your Female Lead/Supporting Top 5s with other 4+ performances for 1970 and 1971.

Psifonian said...

Robert,

I'll just quote my brief write-up of the finale and the overall season (NOTE: There will be spoilers.):

Last year, Nic Pizzolatto caught heavy fire as plagiarism accusations swirled around the first season of True Detective, with people stating he'd stolen from Thomas Ligotti's work. While Ligotti himself pretty much handwaved it, people were quick to indict Pizzolatto's "homages" as theft. This year, with the finale of his second season, Pizzolatto once again wears his influences on his sleeve: this time, it's James Ellroy's White Jazz.

You could do a helluva lot worse than the Demon Dog for inspiration, but watching "Omega Station" last night was a major case of deja vu; almost every single plot point from the episode (and, in retrospect, a good chunk of the overall season) seemed cribbed from the fourth novel in Ellroy's L.A. Quartet. The gay cop suppressing his urges in light of an unforgiving system. The gangster trying to go legit who ends up back in his element. The kid of murdered parents who attacks a cop involved in their death with a kitchen knife. The list goes on.

Season 2 has been a roller-coaster ride of ups and downs. I didn't care much for the first episode, and indeed it took the Birdman to shotgun Ray before I was on board with the show. But what really bummed me out was that the show abandoned the atmospheric weirdness of the first season (part of that was Fukunaga leaving, I'm sure). The Birdman was bizarre, and when the show embraced that milieu, it was as good as it ever was. But this season has always felt like Pizzolatto tried to fuse it with The Shield, and those two just don't play well together.

Unlike most people (seemingly), I did enjoy last night's episode. Its sense of urgency and the way it juggled the various plotlines was pretty impeccable. Ray's plotline reminded me very much of something from The Shield: the desperation in seeing his kid one last time felt very Vic Mackey. The knowledge that he was indeed Chad's father was a nice revelation to have, a little sliver of light in all this darkness. It would've been too dark, von Trier-esque even, to have him revealed to not be his father on the heels of the message failing to send. To which I'll add, I'll never complain about my cell service again.

I liked McAdams's presence here as well, but I dunno, I feel like Bezzerides's story ended last week and that she basically hung around past her time. I did like her final scene, as that sliver of light expanded to a tiny ray (pun intended).

But as I've said before, the most engaging plot of Season 2 has also been the odd duck: Frank Semyon's gradual crumbling. It would make a fantastic movie on its own, and indeed I was watching it and thinking that Steven Knight would've ruled at directing Vaughn's scenes. Vaughn, to me, has been the most consistently great presence of the season. Flexing his muscles for the first time in decades by the look of it, the way he plays Frank as a guy running from his true nature and eventually realizing that it's the only thing that maintained his top-dog slot is impressive. I do hope that this wasn't a flash in the pan, and that Vaughn gets better roles from here on out. His final scene in the desert haunted me. Reilly was wasted throughout the entire season, but her final scenes with Frank (the real one and the imagined one) were excellent, and it's a shame Season 2 wasn't just about them, even if it would've abandoned the detective conceit. True Gangster, maybe?

All in all, Season 2 was very problematic (the "True Defective" gags write themselves), but I found myself engaged week after week ever since the Birdman. I just hope that Pizzolatto scales back next year. Two cops, one case, one director.

Anonymous said...

Louis, your thoughts and ratings on Shelley Winters in The Poseidon Adventure, Marilyn Monroe in Some Like It Hot, Fay Wray, Robert Armstrong and Bruce Cabot in King Kong.

luke higham said...

Anonymous:
Winters - 4 (She has a bit of a cliched role but Winters does her very best to be actually very endearing as the sweet motherly type. In addition she does her best to give some gravity to the more serious moments, and is quite good in her final scene where her character shows her worth)

Robert MacFarlane said...

I can't say I agree about Vaughn, whom I found to be embarrassing throughout the entire season. My problems with this season run deeper than just plotting and presentation, though.

luke higham said...

Calvin & RatedRStar: What ratings do you predict for this Lineup.

RatedRStar said...

Luke: 4.5 for everyone except Wayne who I reckons a 5.

luke higham said...

RatedRStar: Have you seen The Omen yet. If so, your thoughts on the film and ratings & thoughts on the cast. :)

Calvin Law said...

5's for Wayne and Carradine. 4.5's for all the rest. Redford could be a surprise 5 though.

Anonymous said...

Calvin: Can't see Redford getting a 5.

RatedRStar said...

Luke: Yes but it was a very long time, when I was in secondary school lol, a rewatch is needed at some point.

luke higham said...

Saw The Man From U.N.C.L.E., it was an enjoyable romp with good work all-round from the cast.
Ratings
Cavill - 4
Hammer - 3.5
Vikander - 3.5
Debicki - 4
Grant - 3

luke higham said...

Calvin: I'd actually be disappointed, if their wasn't a sequel. :)

Michael McCarthy said...

I just saw it too. I'd be down for a sequel but I gotta say I enjoyed the characters waaaay more than anything that was going on. I thought it was kinda disjointed, had some really rushed character intros, and frankly I think Ritchie could've put more style into it, it all felt kinda muted.

luke higham said...

Michael: I agree with you. The plot wasn't particularly interesting, whereas I liked the characters a great deal.

Anonymous said...

Luke: The Man From UNCLE must be interesting.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: I do recommend it. :)

Anonymous said...

Luke: Louis should see Man of the West with Cooper. Some people say that's Cooper's best performance.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: Hmm, Interesting. :)

Anyway, Goodnight. :)

Anonymous said...

Oh, goodbye, Luke. :)
By the way, Louis, had James Dean, Montgomery Clift and Jean Harlow lived, what potential roles could you see them in?

Louis Morgan said...

Michael: I may be giving it a re-watch.

Anonymous:

The Stranger - (The film has some style due to Welles's direction, but the whole story feels too much of a foregone conclusion. It probably would have been more interesting if it was not made so obvious that Welles's character was the spy to begin with, or if that was the case it would have been better to make a more interesting character. As it goes along it's not bad, and Welles makes something out of what there is in some scenes, particularly the climax to make it a decent film though its far from anything special)

The Killers - (The film probably could have had a bit less of Edmond O'Brien scenes, and focused more on Lancaster's story. As it is it has some very strong moments, especially the opening scene with the titular killers, and it is reasonably interesting throughout with a bit of atmosphere to go along with it, but it's never truly captivating.)

The Naked City - (It's one of those films from the period that purposefully tries to be as much of a documentary as possible in terms of style which means it somewhat light on character, and really only Barry Fitzgerald out of the actors quite makes up for that fact. Nevertheless it's a good enough procedural as it is bolstered by some great cinematography)

Johnny Belinda - (A unashamed heart tugger to be sure, but it really does work well as that sort of film. This is helped along well by the performance from all the Oscar nominated actors, and it really does well in terms of creating a sense of place of the community the film is set in.)

The Gunfighter - (Essentially the premake of The Shootist actually although with a younger gunfighter as the man who everyone seems to want to kill. Although it hits a few of the notes in a pretty basic way, thanks in part due to the child actors of the time, nevertheless it creates fairly interesting portrayal of the tension around the character quite well and manages to capture the danger in his world in an effective fashion, not to mention this is one Peck's better performances.)

No Way Out - (It's not the most subtle film thanks in great part due to Richard Widmark's one note character. Nevertheless it manages to be a moving and powerful parable in large part due to Sidney Poitier's honest performance.)

Panic On The Streets - (Again another almost docudrama style film and again it's light on character. This film I feel had the chance for it through the by play between the detective played by Richard Widmark and Paul Douglas. Nevertheless it builds tension fairly well, and ends up being a well made if somewhat standard thriller)

Thief - (An interesting experiment to do a film completely without dialogue and not as silent film. Ray Milland does his best, but the experiment just doesn't pay off)

Man in the Attic - (I've only seen this one and the 44 version of the Lodger, but out of the two watch the Lodger. It's more atmospheric and although Jack Palance is okay, he's no Laird Cregar)

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Monroe - 3.5(She's sultry, and enjoyable enough in portraying the ditzy drunk, though like everyone else in that I film I just don't love it as some do.)

Wray - 3(Her relationship with Kong has considerably less nuance than in the 2005 version, as she mostly is gripped with fear, which she does well enough. In addition she likable and charming enough in her other scenes, even though I don't think her performance adds up to all that much)

Armstrong - 3(I think the showman angel could have been played a bit more actually, but he still certainly gives enough life to the character as well as a certain shadiness that brings a bit of depth to the role)

Cabot - 2.5(I don't mind his performance even though he's not especially charismatic, but he serves the role well enough. Both he and Armstrong act fairly well around the special effects to help give them some weight)

Luke:

1970:

Actress:

Sarah Miles - Ryan's Daughter

(I need to see a lot for this year)

Supporting Actress:

Karen Black - Five Easy Pieces
Faye Dunaway - Little Big Man - 4
Helena Kallianiotes - Five easy Pieces - 3.5
Susan Sarandon - Joe - 3.5
Lee Remick Sometimes a Great Notion

1971:

Actress:

Jessica Walter - Play Misty For Me
Geraldine Page - The Beguiled
Ruth Gordon - Harold and Maude
Julie Christie - McCabe & Mrs. Miller
Glenda Jackson - Sunday Bloody Sunday

Also:

Susan George - Straw Dogs - 4.5

Supporting Actress:

Cloris Leachman - The Last Picture Show
Elizabeth Hartman - The Beguiled - 4.5
Eileen Brennan - The Last Picture Show - 4.5
Pat Haywood - 10 Rillington Place - 4
Julie Dawn Cole - Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory - 4

Also:

Norma Crane - Fiddler on the Roof - 4
Ellen Burstyn - The Last Picture Show
Diana Rigg - The Hospital - 4
Vivian Pickles - Harold and Maude - 4

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

James Dean - (Hard to say exactly and I wonder just how he would have been in Somebody Up There Likes Me since it was a traditional leading man sort of role quite different from his other three performances. It is impossible to know how he would have aged as an actor actually. I'll be honest, I could see him in a lot of Paul Newman roles like Brick, and Fast Eddie in particular)

Montgomery Clift - (Well unfortunately Clift is someone you can kind of see decay film by film as he's such a different man in Judgment at Nuremberg as he was in The Search. Saying he continued on, though still as he was, he likely would have continued to take on interesting roles since he did not seem to suffer from the same sort of ego that Brando had. Although you could see them trade roles in their early careers, I don't see Clift as a fit for really any of Brando's later performances. He instead seems more for very emotional character driven work. For an example maybe the lead in Save the Tiger.)

Jean Harlow - (I have a feeling her career unfortunately might have been derailed a bit by the code anyways as I don't see her in the more "proper" leading lady parts of the time, although I certainly could see her in some of the comedic roles similair to that of Claudette Colbert, and as well as femme fatale)

Anonymous said...

Louis: What if he never had that accident, then? Do you think we would never get his performance in Judgment at Nuremberg?

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

He likely would have set a different course entirely since it seems most in the industry probably noticed the change. Most of his roles after the accident, even when lead, where as very meek or timid characters opposed to the strong willed sorts he often played beforehand.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Do you think it's likely that Lon Chaney would have won an Oscar had he not died in 1930? And also, what are your thoughts on method acting?

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Unlikely simply in that Boris Karloff and his son who had some notable roles in non-horror films always still were seen as a "monster" actor first, this likely would have been the case for the elder Chaney as well.

In terms of method acting if it allows that given actor to give a great performance that's fine, just as it's fine that say someone like Laurence Olivier did not need it and did not even really believe in it.

Calvin Law said...

I think the greatest 'could've beens', in my opinion, were John Cazale, and Louis Wolheim. Although Gary Poulter recently really made me think, as someone on here mentioned, his potential to be the next Richard Farnsworth.

Anonymous said...

Louis: What is worse for you? Bad overacting or bad underacting?

Calvin Law said...

Louis: out of Al Pacino, Dustin Hoffman, James Caan, and Robert Redford, who do you think is most likely to next get an Oscar nomination?

Anonymous said...

Calvin: I think that Cazale would continue doing more supporting roles had he survived his battle with cancer.

Calvin Law said...

Yeah he probably wouldn't have broken out as a star, but he'd definitely have gotten several Oscar noms, maybe a win, I could envisage him as a Christopher Walken, Bruce Dern-esque sort.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Underacting since that's just usually boring. Overacting can easily be quite entertaining.

Calvin:

Laird Cregar's another one and of course Raul Julia.

Either Redford or Pacino as both seem potentially back in the game at the moment, though Redford's apparent indifference to the awards, as shown by All is Lost, I'd lean towards Pacino. I could see see Caan or Hoffman just being in the right film in the right year though, a la De Niro in Silver Linings.

Anonymous said...

Calvin: He would likely continue doing films with Pacino and would have married Meryl Streep as they were both engaged.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Robert Shaw as well.

Calvin Law said...

Yes Robert Shaw, I think, would've ended up with a career route like Anthony Hopkins; leading roles in the 1970s and 1980s in straight man roles, with several villanous supporting turns, then a 1990s Oscar nominated run. I also could've seen him doing a lot more Shakespeare and stage work.

Calvin Law said...

Cregar I think would've gone down the expected route of scene stealing supporting player. Julia on the other hand, I could easily see him as becoming a lare blooming leading man, for some reason.

Calvin Law said...

Or if not a leading man, maybe a television leading man, or a Shakesperean stalwart, he loved his Bard.

Michael McCarthy said...

One more question from me Louis, do you consider Oscar Isaac lead or supporting for Ex Machina?

Calvin Law said...

Louis, what are your thoughts and ratings for Christopher Lloyd in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, and Lance Henriksen in Dog Day Afternoon? Just realised they are (pleasantly) surprisingly high on the 1975 supporting list.

RatedRStar said...

I am currently watching After The Thin Man, oh its only been on a mere 11 minutes and I am in love =D, its so joyous =D.

luke higham said...

Your Female Lead/Supporting Top 5s with ratings for 1973 and 1974, with any other 4+ Performances.

luke higham said...

RatedRStar: What are your top 5 Best & Worst video games for 2015 so far and your thoughts on them.

RatedRStar said...

Best

1)The Witcher 3 (well acted, fun missions and plenty of compelling story, for me a perfect end to the trilogy)
2)Bloodborne (Gruelling but rewarding, it has great design, atmosphere and the best boss battles of the year)
3)Ori and the Blind Forest (moving story and with beautifully done puzzles and graphics)
4)Batman Arkham Knight (although the twist is obvious and the batmobile overused it is still good acting, good writing, the ending is fantastic as well and ends the series well)
5)Rocket League (simple but very fun and very addictive, with a surprising amount of skill required)

Worst

1)Battlefield Hardline (an expansion pack basically, and a really poor one with bad cliched story, and the small style mulitplayer just doesnt work)
2)The Order 1886 (The good acting and graphics hides the fact that the story is cliched, the gameplay is linear and slow, the game is too short as well)
3)Evolve (the chasing just gets so old after a while, the story and characters are nothing as well, the microtransactions are disgraceful)
4)Hatred (The controversy hides the fact that it is just such a dull shooter with no depth at all)
5)Game of Thrones (I feel this just doesnt work as a telltale game as the story feels rather routine and not very epic while the acting performances are surprisingly phoned in)

luke higham said...

Louis: Seen anything new recently.

luke higham said...

Michael: Isaac is Supporting for Louis, If he was Lead, he would've given his rating by now.

Calvin Law said...

Everyone's Best Actor/Best Supporting Actor choices from 1990 to 1999?

1990: Johnny Depp in Edward Scissorhands/Gary Oldman in State of Grace
1991: Anthony Hopkins in Silence of the Lambs (yes I put him in lead)/John Goodman in Barton Fink
1992: Stephen Rea in The Crying Game/Al Pacino in Glengarry Glen Ross (really need to re-watch Unforgiven as Hackman is a very close #2)
1993: Anthony Hopkins in Remains of the Day/Richard Jordan in Gettysburg
1994: Samuel L. Jackson in Pulp Fiction/Gary Oldman in Leon (not exactly a year of subtlety but I love it, also Landau is an incredibly close #2)
1995: Nicolas Cage in Leaving Las Vegas/Richard Harris in Cry the Beloved Country
1996: Kenneth Branagh in Hamlet/Steve Buscemi in Fargo
1997:  Ian Holm in The Sweet Hereafter/James Cromwell in LA Confidential information
1998: Edward Norton in American History X/Elias Koteas in The Thin Red Line
1999: Russell Crowe in The Insider/Tom Cruise in Magnolia (the most irritating thing about this year is deciding between Toni Collette and Melora Walters)

luke higham said...

Calvin:
1990: Rooker/Pesci
1991: Turturro/Goodman
1992: Keitel/Hackman
1993: Hopkins (Shadowlands)/Fiennes
1994: Oldman/Landau
1995: Freeman & McKellen (Tie)/Spacey (Seven)
1996: Branagh/Buscemi
1997: Winstone/Blake
1998: Gleeson/Koteas
1999: Farnsworth/Cruise

Calvin Law said...

Oh yeah McKellen would be my win in 1995 actually, forgot about him...save my soul :)

Calvin Law said...

Haven't seen either Shadowlands or Nil by Mouth. Would you recommend them? Also ratings for the casts of both films.

Anonymous said...

Calvin:
1990: Liotta/Pesci (Irons is 2, Caan is 3)
1991: Turturro/Goodman and Hopkins (TIE)
1992: Keitel/Hackman
1993: Neeson/Fiennes
1994: Oldman/Landau
1995: Freeman/Spacey
1996: Macy (Branagh's my 2#)/Buscemi
1997: Crowe/Blake
1998: Norton/Goodman (Koteas's my 2#)
1999: Farnsworth/Cruise

Robert MacFarlane said...

Let's see...

90's Lead

1990: James Caan in Misery
1991: Anthony Hopkins in Silence of the Lambs (he's lead for now)
1992: Jack Lemmon in Glengarry Glenn Ross
1993: Daniel Day-Lewis in In the Name of the Father
1994: Samuel L. Jackson in Pulp Fiction
1995: Ethan Hawke in Before Sunrise (might switch to Cage or Freeman)
1996: William H. Macy in Fargo
1997: Al Pacino in Donnie Brasco
1998: Edward Norton in American History X
1999: Brad Pitt in Fight Club (VERY tempted to switch to Crowe)

90's Supporting

1990: Joe Pesci in Goodfellas
1991: Ice Cube in Boyz N the Hood
1992: Harvey Keitel in Reservoir Dogs (I consider it an ensemble)
1993: Ralph Fiennes in Schindler's List (Actually pretty close between him and Sam Neill)
1994: Martin Landau in Ed Wood
1995: Kevin Sapcey in Se7en
1996: Steve Buscemi in Fargo
1997: Kevin Spacey in L.A. Confidential
1998: John Goodman in The Big Lebowski
1999: Philip Baker Hall in Magnolia.

luke higham said...

Calvin: I would recommend both, especially Nil By Mouth.
Shadowlands
Hopkins - 5 (His more emotional performance from 1993 and he's fantastic)
Winger - 4.5
Mazzello - 3.5
Hardwicke - 3.5

Nil By Mouth
Winstone - 5
Burke - 4.5/5
Creed-Miles - 3.5/4
Morse (Oldman's Sister) - 4

Anonymous said...

Looks like we have nominees for the bonus 1993 and 1997.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: They're Dead Certs. :)

Calvin Law said...

I think Anthony Hopkins, whenever he's in the mood, is one of the greatest actors of all-time.

Michael McCarthy said...

I'll bite

Lead:
1990- James Caan in Misery
1991- John Turturro in Barton Fink
1992- Jack Lemmon in Glengarry Glen Ross
1993- David Thewlis in Naked
1994- Samuel L. Jackson in Pulp Fiction
1995- James Earle Jones in Cry, the Beloved Country
1996- Jeffrey Wright in Basquiat
1997- Russell Crowe in L.A. Confidential
1998- Anthony Wong in Beast Cops
1999- Richard Farnsworth in The Straight Story

Supporting:

1990- Joe Pesci in Goodfellas
1991- Anthony Hopkins in The Silence of the Lambs
1992- Gene Hackman in Unforgiven
1993- Ralph Fiennes in Schindler's List
1994- Martin Landau in Ed Wood
1995- Richard Harris in Cry, the Beloved Country
1996- Derek Jacobi in Hamlet
1997- Kevin Spacey in L.A. Confidential
1998- John Goodman in The Big Lebowski
1999- Tom Cruise in Magnolia

Calvin Law said...

Michael McCarthy: I really really want to give Jones the win for 1995. It's just such a powerful performance. I was a bit uncertain about placing Harris in supporting so your agreement makes me feel more assured about it.

What are your thoughts on Jeffrey Wright as Basquiat? I really need to see that performance. I have a friend who never runs out of praises for David Bowie as Andy Warhol, is he great too?

luke higham said...

Calvin: What are your two favourite moments from Peck's work in The Omen. :)

luke higham said...

Calvin: Same for Whitelaw and for the film as a whole. :)

Calvin Law said...

Peck: his reactions to Bugenhagen's proposition to murder the child, and his last scene.

Whitelaw: the hospital scene, and the bike scene.

Overall: David Warner's demise, the ending.

Anonymous said...

Luke: I'm dying to wonder what rating will Louis give Whitelaw.

Anonymous said...

I guess that Peck was trying to improve on his facial expressions in The Omen.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: I'm praying that she gets a five. :)

Calvin: Peck - Reactions to Warner's Decapitation and finding the mark of the beast on Damien's head.

Whitelaw - Same. The Hospital scene is chilling to the bone.

Overall: Poor David, didn't stand a chance and Breaking the fourth wall.

Anonymous said...

Luke: Even though I'm not a fan of Peck, I thought he was the best thing of Boys From Brazil.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: I know I said, that apart from TKAM and The Omen, he was usually bland, but I do think he was very good there as well. :)

Anonymous said...

Luke: It's kind of weird thinking of Peck as an evil Nazi scientist, but he's so damn entertaining in that film with his bad German accent.

Anonymous said...

Luke: Most of my classmates loved 50 Shades of Grey, by the way.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: It's quite an odd film in itself (Multiple Young Hitlers WTF). It was entertaining and utterly absurd to see two old men fight it out.

Calvin Law said...

Luke: after a long hiatus I'm gonna go back to working on my blog tomorrow. I will probably be doing a Superman head to head first, then a Hannibal Lecter one :)

luke higham said...

Anonymous: I saw about 10 minutes of it and was bored already. :)

luke higham said...

Calvin: Yessssssssssssss! So Happy. :)

Anonymous said...

Louis, apparently Olivier was the first choice for Vito Corleone in The Godfather. He mastered an Italian accent for the role, but got sick, and then Brando came on board. How do you feel about Olivier as Vito? I know for sure the film would feel a lot different.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: The role probably would've been less iconic, though I could see Olivier giving a more nuanced and less mannered work, which might've been more effective.

Calvin Law said...

I think Olivier would've been amazing actually, but as it was so was Brando too. I will say though, that the portrayal of Vito would've been colder and more incisive, and the part II would've had someone else cast as young Vito, who knows a young F. Murray Abraham maybe.

Calvin Law said...

I have to admit 1976 supporting intrigued me more than lead. I can't wait to see what Carl Weathers, Hal Hobrook and Robert Duvall get.

luke higham said...

Calvin: And Robert Shaw. :)

Anonymous said...

Calvin:
Well, here's my predictions:
Weathers: 4
Hal Holbrook: 4,5
Robert Duvall: 4,5
Robert Shaw: 5

Robert MacFarlane said...

I actually think Chief Dan George might end up being a surprise 5. I know a few die hard fans of him in Outlaw Josey Wales.

luke higham said...

Calvin:
Weathers - 4/4.5
Duvall - 4.5
Holbrook - 4.5/5
Shaw - 5
Marty Feldman in Silent Movie - 4/4.5
James Stewart in The Shootist - 4

Anonymous said...

Luke: I wouldn't bet on Weathers getting a 4,5.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: I'm uncertain about it, I personally give him a 4 though. :)

Anonymous said...

Luke: A silent comedy with Chaplin, Keaton and Lloyd together would be interesting.

luke higham said...

Anonymous: That would be interesting and quite special to see. :)

Anonymous said...

It would be like The Hangover of the 20's. The Tramp, the Stunt Guy and the Glass Man

RatedRStar said...

for 1976 supporting I will happily add the final performance of Oskar Werner as well.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Just saw Straight Outta Compton and loved it. Here's my ratings on the main cast:

Jason Mitchell - 4
Corey Hawkins - 5
O'Shea Jackson Jr. - 4
Paul Giamatti - 3.5/4
R. Marcus Taylor - 3.5

luke higham said...

Robert: Thoughts on Hawkins.

Matt Mustin said...

I have no interest in Straight Outta Compton because I'm really not at all into Hip-Hop.

Robert MacFarlane said...

@Matt: Neither am I and I loved it. I barely knew much about NWA outside of some stuff from their first album and who were in it.

@Luke: First of all Hawkins looks and sounds like Dre to a T. Second, the film demands the most from him emotionally and internally, and he does not disappoint at all. He never choses to shy away from the negative or more vulnerable qualities of Dre, creating the most interesting portrait in a film full of them. If Hollywood isn't giving him tons of offers, then fuck show biz.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

I've always seen Harris as leading in that film, as it follows both men's story of dealing with the fate of their sons.

Michael:

I see Isaac as supporting.

Lloyd - 3.5(I quite like Lloyd's performance even though he's rarely the focus of the film, as he presents a certain type of mental patient as he seems fairly sane at times, but he effectively realizes almost the bursts of insanity of his man as they spring from certain circumstances. Plus I've always loved his demented reaction at seeing Chief's escape at the end)

Henriksen - 3.5(Really I could go higher with him as this really is quite brilliant work from him. Where Sonny and Sal talk about like killing is nothing to them Henriksen is great because he shows someone where that's actually the case. There's something so eloquently menacing about the soullessness in his smile when he tells Sal to keep his gun up, since in his eyes he's already marked Sal for death)

Luke:

1973:

Actress:

Sissy Spacek - Badlands
Ellen Burstyn - The Exorcist
Linda Blair - The Exorcist - 3.5

(Need to see quite a bit once again)

Supporting Actress:

Mercedes McCambridge - The Exorcist
Eileen Brennan - The Sting
Yvonne Elliman - Jesus Christ Superstar - 3.5
Katy Jurado - Pat Garrett and Billy The Kid - 3.5
Laurie Heineman - Save the Tiger - 3.5

1974:

Actress:

Faye Dunaway - Chinatown
Gena Rowlands - A Woman Under the Influence

(Again that's all I got)

Supporting Actress:

Valerie Perrine - Lenny
Cloris Leachman - Young Frankenstein - 4.5
Madeline Kahn - Young Frakenstein - 4
Jennifer Jones - The Towering Inferno
Madeline Kahn - Blazing Saddles

Anonymous:

In regards to Olivier as Corleone I have a feeling he would have been great, though his performance might have ended being considered less iconic, I personally probably would have preferred it.

luke higham said...

Louis: Your rating for Brennan in The Sting.

Anonymous said...

Louis: If Taxi Driver was made in the 1930's (Pre-Code), would James Cagney be your choice for Travis?

Anonymous said...

Louis: What are your ratings and thoughts on Gish and Peck in Duel in the Sun?

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Hello everyone. I am sort of new to this whole thing! I discovered this about a month ago by accident, and let me say it was a brilliant mistake! I love this! I am also a fan of films, but have not seen as many films as you guys probably have (I am only 19). I honestly never be able to rate performances and go into detail the way all of you can, but I find this very interesting!

Anonymous said...

ruthiehenshallfan99: Well, welcome aboard.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke:

3.5

Anonymous:

Yes I'd say so.

Anonymous:

Gish - 2.5(She's okay but really doesn't have enough of a part to really make anything out of her role. She's at least at Joseph Cotten's level which means avoiding some embarrassment.)

Peck - 2(Unlike Peck who just is way over the top in his portrayal. There's no nuance in his performance playing the role just far too excessively evil, but not even in a primal way that might have worked. He just comes off as mustache twirling which just feels extremely wrong)