Tuesday, 25 August 2015

Alternate Best Actor 1976: Clint Eastwood in The Outlaw Josey Wales

Clint Eastwood did not receive an Oscar nomination for portraying the title character of The Outlaw Josey Wales.

The Outlaw Josey Wales is a compelling western about a confederate soldier who refuses to let the war end well after it is over.

Looking at the role at a glance might cause one to believe it to be simply a standard Eastwood western role, which in itself is nothing to scoff at as Eastwood usually gives good performances in such circumstances. Eastwood's "standard" roles started out as the more sardonic badass in the Dollars trilogy as well as a other westerns he appeared in. When he started directing these himself there began a shift and Eastwood started to become a bit darker of a figure in the film, although that original iteration wasn't wiped away all that quickly. This certainly can be seen in the character of Josey Wales who we follow in his attempted escape to Mexico after every other member of the confederate army has surrendered except him. During this time we are treated to some classic Eastwood quips along the way, and Eastwood delivers these flawlessly as per usual. The one about pullin' pistols or whistlin' Dixie is particularly smooth and impeccably executed. As usual as well Eastwood brings the dead pan humor into the line deliveries brilliantly, and most often with just his often rather hilarious reactions to anyone possibly buffoonery around him, it is all indeed some classic Eastwood.

To continue on this point Eastwood once again finds that particular way that only he can quite do. Eastwood has considerable charisma, and even charm, but it's all in his own way and on his own terms. A Eastwood performance never feels like it's purposefully trying to charm you, but nevertheless he just kinda does anyways. Eastwood does not make any exceptions for old Josey Wales in fact in this film in particular Eastwood makes no excuses for his character, and does not make an obvious attempts at an obvious likability really, which I will get to in more detail a little later on. Again though that Eastwood presence is so remarkable in the way carry every scene so effortlessly while being so minimalist at the same time. Eastwood is a master of this, and Eastwood as a director knows how to amplify it all the more as he always holds attention in every scene even when Wales might only have a single action. Eastwood is an actor who really does just so much with just a twitch of the eye, and of course this could not be more fitting to the character of Wales who is all about his rather simple actions or his few words just before he draws his guns.

Now being an Eastwood directed western the character is much darker than his earlier characters like the man with no name. Of course this is a requirement for the role of Josey Wales, given his past which I will be getting to soon. Eastwood though is outstanding though in the sheer viciousness he realizes in his character. The potential for violence for the man always feels possible, and it's quite interesting what Eastwood is able to accomplish with his performance. Eastwood creates much of the tension of the film with his performance, of course he creates all of it being the director as well, but he does so much as a performer. In his realization of Josey Wales's personal style he presents essentially a ticking time bomb in every scene where it appears that Josey might face someone, or even some when he might not. There's a calm insurance in Eastwood's work fitting for a man who's being killing for so long that now that's all that he really knows how to do. In this calmness though Eastwood realizes such an intensity by making death seemingly one of the few ways in which Josey knows how to end an a conversation with. Although he's our hero for the film, there is something chilling Eastwood finds in this method, particularly in one cold interaction with a bounty hunter with a case of temporary cold feet.

Now much of what I have written so far can be skewed as more typical Eastwood, although that should not be taken for granted considering the effectiveness of that to begin with as well as this is one of the very best example of it. Nevertheless this role is a bit different as opposed to many a Eastwood western hero we actually find out what compels Josey Wales to be such an efficient killer. The film opening Eastwood is terrific in presenting just an average optimistic man who in just a couple of minutes. What's even more amazing though is how affecting Eastwood actually is in making the quick deaths of Josey's family meaningful, as the grief he portrays is quite palatable, and there is never a question that it could lead Josey to become the bitter man we meet after the opening credits. We don't see the whole transformation, as we come back after the civil war is already over, but we do see the end result. Eastwood's characters tend to be sardonic and not really care about the men he kills, though with Wales Eastwood takes it a tad further through his portrayal of the character's personal vendetta. When he kills the men there is a particular powerful hate that Eastwood exudes, particularly in the uncaring way he mocks all his kills with a spit of messy tobacco where their corpses lie.

This is not Eastwood portraying a soulless killer by any means. Not only because he's the hero, but the most remarkable aspect of his work here is how emotional he makes the character actually. Of course this is in the emotion more becoming of killer which is hate, that Eastwood portrays as quite abundant, but that's not really who Wales in Eastwood's portrayal of him. During his journey to Mexico to escape the authorities there are people Wales connects with in more way than giving them an extra bit of lead. One of these relationships is with a younger rebel who happened to be part of a botched surrender, and goes some of the way with Josey. The boy is injured though and eventually succumbs to his wounds. Eastwood is incredible in the moment of the boy's death as Eastwood reveals perhaps the true Josey in that there is such sadness in the man, as one of his few friends have gone, and seems to suggest that the man's callousness is at least partially a facade. In that moment, and a few others where Josey is pressed to care, Eastwood is quite moving revealing a vulnerability in the man as though he needs to be such a sardonic killer or else he would simply break down crying from the memories of all that he's lost. Instead of the film ending in an arbitrary fashion of the outlaw merely getting away from his pursuers, Eastwood rather wonderfully reveals a return of the heart of the character by the end. Although it is clear that he will never be the same man he was in the opening scene, Eastwood earns the way a more outward returns to the man, and that death no longer seems to be the man's only belief in regards to life. This is a great performance by Eastwood as he brings depth and also a surprising amount of poignancy to his portrait of this hardened old west outlaw.

168 comments:

Calvin Law said...

Hm. Looks like he'll come second, or even first, after all. Hoping Redford gets a 5 too. Hopefully.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Are you saving Chief Dan George?

Anonymous said...

One of my favorite performances from Eastwood.
Also, your thoughts and ratings on:
Robert Mitchum in Crossfire and Angel Face
Gregory Peck in The Gunfighter (I know he's a 4, but your thoughts) and The Snow of Killimanjaro
William Holden in The Country Girl and Born Yesterday
Lugosi, Abbott, Costello, Strange, Ferguson in Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein
Fonda and Wayne in Fort Apache

Anonymous said...

Oh, and Chaney Jr in Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein

Anonymous said...

Just another one, Laurence Olivier in The Bounty.

Calvin Law said...

What's everyone's thoughts and ratings on the films about the Mutiny on the Bounty, they've seen.

Mutiny on the Bounty (1935)
Laughton: 4
Gable: 3.5
Toche: 3
Everyone else is a 3.5, no one stands out as being particularly good or bad but they're all a bit bland.

Mutiny on the Bounty (1962)
Brando: 2
Howard: 4.5
Harris: 3.5

The Bounty (1984)
Hopkins: 4
Gibson: 3.5
Day-Lewis: 4
Olivier: 3
Fox: 3
Neeson: 3

Calvin Law said...

Also, Louis: Thoughts and ratings on the cast of the Red Shoes, plus your thoughts on the film itself.

Calvin Law said...

Luke: My Lecter review is up :)

luke higham said...

Louis: Your Female Lead/Supporting Top 5s with ratings and any other 4+ performances for 1976.

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Calvin: I was never aware that there was a second Bounty remake. Still have to see the other two as well. By the way, when do you think Brando's "bad years" started? Personally, I think it was in 1957 with Sayonara (admitedlly, I really like that movie) and most notably in The Teahouse of the August Moon.

Psifonian said...

*slow Eastwood nod*

Calvin Law said...

1957 I would agree, with Sayonara. Although to be fair I thought after On the Waterfront in 1954 he was already very quickly going downhill already. I've never been a huge Brando fan outside of that one great performance.

Anonymous said...

Ruthiehenshallfan99: Louis still has to see Desirée, Guys and Dolls, The Teahouse of the August Moon, The Fugitive Kind, The Ugly American, Reflections on a Golden Eye and many more of Brando's trash movies.
Brando should have bothered with his career, but no, he just kept on embarrasing himself.

tahmeed chowdhury said...

Brando's career was a huge graph of immense highs (On the Waterfront, Streetcar, Godfather) to incredible lows (Sayonara, Mutiny on the Bounty). However, I don't think his skill as an actor (when he's at his best) can be doubted. He gave my 4th favorite performance ever in a film.

Michael McCarthy said...

Speaking of embarrassing Brando performances, Louis, I hope you get around to seeing The Missouri Breaks before you're done with this year. It's got a really strong lead performance from Jack Nicholson and very good supporting work from Harry Dean Stanton, but Brando gives one of the most absurd performances of his career.

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Everyone: Your ranking of Marlon Brando's performances

Well here is my ranking for his performances that I have seen. This in no way reflects my overall rankings of his movies.

1. On the Waterfront (excellent performances across the board)
2. A Streetcar Named Desire (Favorite Brando movie and third favorite Vivien Leigh movie)
3. Julius Caesar (supporting role but stands out above most of the cast)
4. Apocalypse Now ( a little long, and another supporting role but great job from him over all)
5. Guys and Dolls (Actually this might be the beginning of his decline. I actually love this movie. His singing is ok at best (all his numbers are actually pieced together from multiple audio takes), and he is not bad, but I feel like Sinatra would do better in the role of Sky (Oddly enough, Sinatra wanted the part but when it was given to Brando, leading Frank to despise him)).
6. Sayonara ( I also love this movie, but Brando's accent is a little off. He is not awful, but not excellent either. Good at best.)
7. The Young Lions (I like this movie as well (More for Clift). His accent is way too distracting and awkward, especially when you hear Schell).
8. The Teahouse of the August Moon (The movie overall is not good. I don't mind Glenn Ford, but Brando is offensive. Not sure why couldn't hire a Japanese actor instead.

Anonymous said...

ruthiehenshallfan99:
1. On the Waterfront
2. A Streetcar Named Desire
3. The Godfather
4. Apocalypse Now
5. Viva Zapata!
6. Julius Caesar
7. Last Tango in Paris
8. The Wild One
9. The Men
10. One-Eyed Jacks

luke higham said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
luke higham said...

1. On The Waterfront
2. A Streetcar Named Desire
3. The Godfather
4. Apocalypse Now
5. Julius Caesar
6. Viva Zapata!
7. Last Tango In Paris
8. The Wild One
9. The Men
10. One-Eyed Jacks

Anonymous said...

I'm just going to predict the ratings that Louis will give to these performances.
Desireé (3/3,5)
Guys and Dolls (3,5)
The Teahouse of the August Noon (2,5)
The Fugitive Kind (4)
The Ugly American (4)
Reflections on a Golden Eye (2)
The Missouri Breaks (2,5)
The Formula (2) (Scott even gave a better performance)

Calvin Law said...

1. On The Waterfront (5/5)
2. A Streetcar Named Desire (4.5/5)
3. Julius Caesar (4.5/5)
4. The Godfather (4.5/5)
5. Apocalypse Now (4/5)
6. Last Tango In Paris (3.5/5)
7. The Wild One (3.5/5)
8. Guys and Dolls (3/5)
9. Sayonara (2/5)
10. Mutiny on the Bounty (2/5)

Anonymous said...

Oh, and Louis should see Brando in the Freshman (1990), a parody of his character in the Godfather.

Michael McCarthy said...

Brando really shouldn't get higher than a 1.5 for The Missouri Breaks.

Anonymous said...

Appearantly 1976 was not a good year for actors... The alternative nominees -apart from Gregory Peck- are famous for portraying nothing but unrealistic versions of themselves; John Wayne is a terrible actor even when he is imitating himself and the same goes for Redford, Eastwood and Carradine.

Instead I would go for Donald Sutherland in Casanova, David Bowie in The Man Who Fell Onto Earth, Tatsuya Fuji in In the Realm of Senses, Alain Delon in Mr. Klein and/or Roman Polanski in The Tennant.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous: And an actor playing himself is a bad thing? Well, is it?

Matt Mustin said...

"Playing yourself" is a misnomer.

Anonymous said...

Calvin: I'll give my ratings on the cast for the three Mutiny in the Bounty films.
1935:
Laughton: 4
Gable: 3,5
Loche: 3
1962
Brando: 2 or 2,5
Howard: 4,5
Harris: 4
1984
Hopkins: 4
Day-Lewis: 4
Gibson: 4
Neeson: 3
Olivier: 3

Anonymous said...

Calvin: I'll give my ratings on the cast for the three Mutiny in the Bounty films.
1935:
Laughton: 4
Gable: 3,5
Loche: 3
1962
Brando: 2 or 2,5
Howard: 4,5
Harris: 4
1984
Hopkins: 4
Day-Lewis: 4
Gibson: 4
Neeson: 3
Olivier: 3

Anonymous said...

Oops, I posted my comment twice, lol.

Anonymous said...

Michael: Brando is a 1,5 for you in the Missouri Breaks?

Michael McCarthy said...

For me he's a 1 actually.

Anonymous said...

Bonus 1965 Supporting:
Robert Shaw in The Battle of the Bulge
Bonus 1973 Lead:
Donald Sutherland in Don't Look Now
Robert Shaw in The Hireling

Calvin Law said...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g14JKVF24Dc

Just found this trailer for Spotlight. Don't know about you guys but I have a feeling Keaton could carry on his awards momentum to this year, so long as he's campaigned in supporting (which I think he will be; this looks very much like an ensemble piece). Ruffalo, Schreiber and Slattery look good too.

My renewed predictions for 2015 Supporting Actor Oscars:

Tom Hardy in The Revenant
Samuel L. Jackson in The Hateful Eight
Michael Keaton in Spotlight
Mark Rylance in Bridge of Spies
Seth Rogen in Steve Jobs (a Moneyball-esque nom but who knows he could be good)

Michael McCarthy said...

I think they're gonna campaign Jason Segel in supporting for The End of the Tour, I see him over Rogen.

Calvin Law said...

Mm I have heard that too, Segel has been getting nothing but praise all around so that is likely.

Robert MacFarlane said...

From what I hear Segel would be unambiguous category fraud if that happened.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

The Red Shoes is a film I probably should revisit. As with all of their films it is gorgeous to look at in every regard, and not a single technical aspect can be faulted. I found that dramatic aspects to not be nearly as flawless, of course that's quite the high standard. Not bad at all though, but I never found it became that compelling of a story and I felt there was something to be desired in its depiction of either of the main characters' obsession. Don't misunderstand me though I certainly liked it quite a bit still, I just wasn't wholly engrossed by it.

Walbrook - 3.5(Walbrook does the imposing director with appropriate menace while always exuding the certain diligence and intelligence needed as well. He's also quite good though in portraying his character's own mental decay a bit, and is fairly effective in depicting the change in the man in the last act of the film)

Goring - 3(He's just fine in portraying the confident upstart sort. I did not feel he made too much of an impact overall, but certainly fulfilled the needs of the part)

Spotlight appears to have potential and Keaton apparently has the best role. As long as he goes supporting I could see him making it in again. I'm not sure of the win at the moment. Even though Hardy was my prediction I don't believe it for a second.

Robert:

Yes.

Anonymous:

Mitchum - Crossfire - 3(He really does not get enough of a role to work with. Mitchum's naturally engaging presence adds something to his simple role though)

Angel Face - 2.5(Jean Simmons apparently did not want to do the film and you can tell. It almost feels that her indifference made everything feel a bit phoned in. Mitchum can almost get away with it again just through his natural presence that brings something to a film even when he's not trying. This is still just a very low energy and uninteresting performance from him)

Gregory Peck - The Gunfighter - (It's a charming bit of work for the most part from Peck, but also a fairly moving portrayal of the wear that comes from being "the best" that everyone wants to top for so long. Peck realizes this tension rather well in his performance, within a more standard depiction of a likable hero)

Louis Morgan said...

The Snow of Killimanjaro - 2.5(This is one of Peck's that just never quite adds up to much. He never brings enough internally in his work to create any sort of actual transition for the character. He just is sorta there)

Holden - The Country Girl - 2.5(Holden is unable to give his role any more depth than as written keeping his character unfortunately thin. It does not help that he does not have particularly good chemistry with Grace Kelly, which leaves their whole romantic subplot feeling very tacked on.)

Born Yesterday - 3(The more I see of Holden the more that it seems that he really needs his character's to have a bit of a darker edge as he seems just a bit lost without that. He's fine here, I like his chemistry with Holiday well enough, but it isn't anything too remarkable)

Lugosi - 3.5(There's considerably less intrigue and mystery to this rendition. Lugosi though still is quite good in the part still bringing that quiet menace to the part, and being a master of the stare)

Chaney - 3.5(Again there's a bit less pathos here, but Chaney again is such a great sorrowful lug that's it's hard not to feel sorry for the poor lug)

Strange - 2(It's a good example to show that Boris Karloff's work should not be taken for granted. And of course this is mostly just an imitation of that performance, a weak imitation of it)

Costello - 1.5(I have to admit I really don't care for his shtick that just is a poor imitation of Curly Howard anyways. I find him more annoying and obnoxious than endearing or funny)

Abbott - 2.5(Abbott on the other hand I do find is a reliable enough straight man, I really just wish he had a funnier funny man to work with)

Fonda - 3.5(A re-watch could move him up as I found Fonda quite effective in realizing the excessive structure and coldness of the man without ever feeling one note, or just a caricature)

Wayne - 3.5(Rock solid Wayne turn)

Olivier - 3(He's there just for some extremely strict exposition nothing more. He does it better than anyone probably could, but he's really there just because Olivier naturally gives a character a bit of stature)

Luke:

Save that for the results, as I tend to watch a few more performances before then.

Michael:

I've seen Missouri Breaks, and I have to say that's probably Nicholson's most underrated performance.

Anonymous said...

Louis: So what are your ratings and thoughts on Brando in that film? And also, your thoughts on Mitchum, Holden and Kirk Douglas as actors. Oh, and thoughts on Lana Turner in The Postman Always Rings Twice.
Would Cagney and Woods be great choices for Gittes in versions of Chinatown in the 1930's and 80's for you?

luke higham said...

Louis: Rating & Thoughts on Nicholson in The Missouri Breaks.

Michael McCarthy said...

TOTALLY agree on Nicholson. Especially every scene where he has to confront Brando.

Anonymous said...

Brando's worst performance in my opinion has got to be The Island of Dr. Moreau (1998).

Anonymous said...

Oops, it's 1996.

luke higham said...

Youth Trailer
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-T7CM4di_0c

luke higham said...

Louis: I know it's still a bit early, but is there any chance of you doing 10 alternate reviews for Supporting this year.

Anonymous said...

Spotlight's trailer is damn great. Keaton could land another nomination. Ruffalo seems to be really good in this movie too.
Luke: Looks...promising.

luke higham said...

Louis: I'm referring to 2015.

Calvin Law said...

Youth looks good, definitely not gonna count Keitel or Caine out of the awards race.

luke higham said...

Calvin: How sure are you of McKellen getting a 5 for Mr. Holmes and what ratings would you predict for Caine & Keitel.

Caine - 4.5/5
Keitel - 4.5

Robert MacFarlane said...

A few critics I know saw it at Cannes and HATED it.

Calvin Law said...

Caine: 4.5
Keitel: 5

I have a feeling Louis might not be as enamoured with Mr Holmes as myself, nevertheless I do think he will get at least a strong 4.5, and a 5 if he likes/loves the film and doesn't find too much issue with McKellen not being a 'classic' Holmes, so to speak.

Anonymous said...

Another contender for Best Actress might be Rampling in 45 Years.

luke higham said...

Calvin & Anonymous: Do you both want extended alternate Lead/Supporting lineups for 2015, because for supporting, I'm sure someone will request Nicholas Hoult in Mad Max: Fury Road (i.e. Robert or Michael) and I'm thinking of requesting Oscar Isaac in Ex Machina.

Anonymous said...

Luke: Yes.

Michael McCarthy said...

I see a 4.5 for McKellen. It's a strong performance, but it's very actory in a lot of ways and I think Louis might take issue with how much of a vehicle for McKellen it is.

Also as much as I want to see a review for Hoult, I'll only request him (or anyone from this year) if there's a weak to moderate field of alternates to choose from.

Anonymous said...

I've seen Youth in Italy where I live and really I loved it. I liked it much more than Sorrentino's previous movie, The Great Beauty, because I thought it was not only gorgeously looking but also extremely moving. Caine gives a fantastic performance and a 5 from me, but the real MVP is Keitel who is both funny and heartbreaking. Weisz starts off as a little off, but then relaxes into a fairly moving performance, while Dano gives an interesting and memorable performance too (both 4s). Jane Fonda shines in her cameo and really finds the humanity within the grotesque monster she portrays (4.5 bordering on a 5). I loved the movie, it was beautiful and touching with some really incredible scenes.

luke higham said...

Louis: Have you seen any new films recently.

Calvin Law said...

Louis: thoughts and rating on Kathleen Ryan in Odd Man Out? Also, is Mason a 5 or a 4.5 for that film, just watched it again today and realised two things: one, he doesn't actually have that much screentime or indeed, focus in many scenes, and two he's superb nevertheless, it's very close to being my favourite performance of his now.

Calvin Law said...

It's a shame so many of those 40's British thespians aren't more well known today. Roger Livesey, Trevor Howard, Kathleen Byron, Dennis Price, John Mills, Valerie Hobson. I mean even those who became stars like Deborah Kerr and Laurence Olivier or respected character actors like Michael Redgrave, Richard Attenborough often have their strong 40's work neglected.

Anonymous said...

Calvin: Mason is a 5 for Odd Man Out. You can find his thoughts on Mason in his review of Steve Martin's performance in Little Shop of Horrors.

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Calvin: I am honestly really interested in what Kathleen Byron would have done if she had a bigger film career.

Calvin Law said...

She could've become as big a star as the likes of Kerr, Jean Simmons. A blend of villainous roles like Black Narcissus alongside great dramatic roles she flashed potential in The Small Black Room.

Anonymous said...

Louis, can I have your thoughts on Yeoh/Ziyi and your thoughts/rating on Pei-Pei in Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon?

Calvin Law said...

Everyone: retroactive supporting casts for Harry Potter?

1960s
Dumbledore: Roger Livesey
Snape: Dirk Bogarde
Voldemort: Richard Attenborough
McGonagall: Celia Johnson
Hagrid: Anthony Quinn
Remus Lupin: Richard Burton
Sirius Black: Trevor Howard
Bellatrix: Maggie Smith
Slughorn: Laurence Olivier

luke higham said...

Calvin: Who would be your perfect choice for each role and the main trio, irrespective of each decade. :)

Michael McCarthy said...

I think Rex Harrison would've made a great Slughorn in the 60's.

Michael McCarthy said...

70's
Dumbledore: Laurence Olivier
Snape: Terence Stamp
Voldemort: Christopher Lee
McGonagall: Angela Lansbury
Hagrid: Robert Morley
Sirius: Oliver Reed
Lupin: Alan Bates
Bellatrix: Jacqueline Bisset
Slughorn: Richard Attenborough

Michael McCarthy said...

80's
Dumbledore: Alec Guinness (duh)
Snape: Jeremy Irons
Voldemort:
McGonagall: Judith Anderson
Hagrid: Albert Finney
Sirius: Patrick Stewart
Lupin: Ian McKellan
Bellatrix: Jacqueline Bisset (I'm changing the 70's one to Julie Christie)
Slughorn: James Mason
Peter Pettigrew: Bob Hoskins

luke higham said...

Michael: You forgot about Voldemort.

Calvin Law said...

Michael: Yes, Harrison is a good shout. I particularly like the idea of Albert Finney as Hagrid; I'd always wished the series had found some way to put him in. I think Irons could've easily played Snape in the actual series as well, and in some ways I might have preferred him to Rickman.

I know, blasphemous.

Calvin Law said...

Luke:

I think Daniel Radcliffe was actually the perfect choice for Harry. No, he's not a perfect actor at all, and has several awkward moments throughout the series, but I don't know it's like Stallone as Rocky, or Heston as Ben-Hur for me. He just feels right as Harry, and though I have tons of complaints about the series as a whole I felt Radcliffe really did carry it well enough, in terms of just being a believable Boy Who Lived and delivering in the right moments.

Hermione, Watson is fine enough I guess, but I would have liked a young Pamela Franklin to have taken on the role.

Ron: I've always rather disliked his portrayal of Ron, technically speaking he nails the more obnoxious aspects of the character, problem being he can't quite seem to get the hang on the more sympathetic and endearing aspects of the character. A young Domnhall Gleeson would've been the perfect Ron.

luke higham said...

Calvin: Agreed on Gleeson. :)

RatedRStar said...

I have been catching up with all these comments, one comment however shocked me =D Louis Morgan of all people, you really didnt care for WAOWW =) how could you man lol.

Anonymous said...

RatedRStar: Unfortunately, it's the truth, Daniel.

RatedRStar said...

LOUISSSSSS.....

Michael McCarthy said...

Shit, I was on my way to a class but I spaced out. I had an idea for him in my head but I forgot, I'll let you know if it comes back.

Anonymous said...

RatedRStar: He doesn't care about West Side Story, either.

Michael McCarthy said...

I think Irons would be just as good if not better as Snape, and in the 80's he actually would've been age appropriate, as opposed to Rickman who was about 25 years older than the character he was playing.

Anonymous said...

RatedRStar: What are your thoughts on the 5 Hong Kong best actor nominees for 2003?

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Brando - 2(Michael will probably find this to be generous, but I did not quite find him grating, although I can see why someone would. I guess this is Brando doing Richard Harris after Harris did Brando in This Sporting Life. The problem is Brando's not even consistent with that approach. I think there could have been a great performance out of this character, but Brando never quite makes him feel as a whole. It feels like different mannerisms, and eccentricities that never quite add up to one man, instead it just feels like a self-indulgent acting showcase from Brando)

Mitchum - (Mitchum simply was one of the best at doing haggard worldly men, as just his image you felt like this guy's being through some things. Past simply his presence though Mitchum was actually even more talented, than being one of the best tough guys of old. In the roles where he stretched more he usually succeeded such as The Night of the Hunter which is actually very flamboyant and atypical for him, and he completely knocks it out of the park.)

Holden - (From what I've seen the last thing Holden needed to play was a nice guy, or just a simple guy of any sort. Any roles like that Holden actually comes off as bit wooden at times, and is not an interesting performer. If the role had a darker edge and some complexity though Holden never wasted it, and would always give a good if not great performance)

Douglas - (Douglas was simply one of the best from his period. I would have even said that I had not seen a single bad performance from him, but I did see his work Vikings. Nevertheless Douglas had such an effortless charm when he needed it, but also was capable of seemingly just as effortless intensity. He was great in more traditional leading man roles, but also could spread himself to great success as well particularly in Lust For Life)

Turner - (I think this is a good performance though shows that physical appearance alone does not create allure. This only works for her first appearance which is quite memorable, but when she starts speaking she loses much of the mystic of that introduction. I suppose I'm sounding a bit too harsh, but her work just does not have that cutting edge of the great femme fatales. It's not a bad performance really, but like Garfield's work it feels always a bit muted and forgettable for such a character.)

Yes both we be a great Gittes.

Luke:

Nicholson - 4.5(Interesting that no way really talks about this film considering it's the only team up between Brando and Nicholson, I suppose Brando's performance does not help, but this is actually a very strong performance from Nicholson. As with his more legendary work from the 70's Nicholson knows exactly how to temper himself as a performer. This actually is a fairly subdued work for the most part though and he's actually rather quietly charming here. There are a few Nicholson touches, but in this case only in an effective fashion. Most importantly though he never let's it overwhelm the rest of his performance, managing as well to actually give a rather honest and moving depiction of his character's struggle particularly when his friends are murdered one by one)

Still no new films. As for 10 alternates, I have no idea at the moment, since I have no idea about the strength of the year yet.

Louis Morgan said...

Calvin:

Ryan - 4.5(I think this is a very interesting performance as she actually given the far more active role than Mason. At first she works in the right warmth that you'd imagine from the supportive wife/girlfriend role. What's intriguing though is she is very effective in the way she gradually reveals the less passive side to her character that naturally builds to the tragic climax of the film)

Mason would actually take my win if I pushed him supporting, and I think there is a valid argument to be made there as the film feels just as much as the way the community reacts to his situation as it is about his character's personal struggle.

Irons would have been a great Snape as long as he tried. I have to say his performance from the trailer is giving me excitement for Batman v Superman.

Anonymous:

Yeoh - (Yeoh I think is very interesting since she's playing a typical part in a less typical way. That of the warrior woman is usually played in often a fairly one note fashion, but Yeoh is great by playing her part as basically a realistic woman who just happens to know how to fly through trees and fight rather insanely with a sword. Through this she brings much earned humor through the part, and nicely grounds the film within all its literal high flying action)

Zhang - (Well she's less grounded to be sure, but she manages to be quite entertaining as well. She's quite enjoyable in the way that she doesn't quite hide the bratty qualities that might come from someone being that skilled while at a young age. She allows this which is quite amusing, but she never becomes unlikable as there is a charm to this mischievous qualities. I would say that she does not bridge the dramatic parts of her performance as well as Yeoh does, but she's good in those scenes as well)

Pei-Pei - 3(She's fine in being just kinda one note and evil, but I don't feel as though her work adds anything past that)

RatedRStar:

Wait..... what didn't I like?

Robert MacFarlane said...

Concerning the Batman v Superman trailer, I'm still only really interested in seeing Eisenberg camp it up as Luthor. Even if he's bad he should at least be fascinating.

luke higham said...

Louis: RatedRStar was referring to Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf?.

Calvin Law said...

I have to say despite him having arguably the least range out of the three, there's just something about William Holden that just puts him above Douglas and Mitchum as actors. Those two were often good and sometimes great, and had really strong screen presences, but I don't know. Holden just had this vibe about him which, for me, made even his lackluster performances worth watching.

luke higham said...

Louis: Also, in regards to the 10 alternates question, it's a case of willing to do it if the field's incredibly strong, as well as depending on the overall quality of the nominees for the year.

Matt Mustin said...

So, I don't know if anyone else feels this way, but I'm starting to see Tommy Lee Jones as co-lead in The Fugitive.

Robert MacFarlane said...

@Matt: I could see that argument. I don't really care either way since I thought he was just okay, but I wouldn't object.

Louis Morgan said...

Luke: I'd be wiling to do it if the lineup is strong enough.

luke higham said...

Louis: Thanks. :)

Anonymous said...

Louis: So apparently Paul Muni wanted to play Beethoven but never did.

luke higham said...

Louis: Your Female Lead/Supporting Top 5s with ratings and any other 4+ performances for 1976.

You can post it either before, during Redford's review or on the results page.

Psifonian said...

https://psifonian.wordpress.com/2015/08/28/tale-of-tales-matteo-garrone-2015/

Saw this tonight. Toby Jones is my current Supporting Actor win now.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Oh good, I was looking forward to that one. Plus I always liked Jones. Very underrated character actor.

Calvin Law said...

Anyone seen Jones in 'Infamous'? He plays a pretty good Truman Capote, I would say actually that he disappears into the role even more than Hoffman, but the script simply wasn't strong enough to get deep into the psyche of Capote like 'Capote' did.

Anonymous said...

Calvin: No, but it seems to be okay according to your statement on how the script isn't strong enough.

Anonymous said...

Oh, Louis, you forgot to post Turner's rating.

Anonymous said...

Louis: Wasn't Bogart a 4 for Angels With Dirty Faces? If he is a 4, then you forgot to put him on your top 10 performances of him.

Anonymous said...

Tale of Tales is terrific! The technical aspects are all masterful (the score in particular is beautiful) and there are some great performances (Toby Jones, Bebe Cave, Shirley Henderson are the best of the cast for me). Really a beautiful movie, it can be even quite funny at times but that doesn't compromise at all the dark tone of the movie itself.

RatedRStar said...

Louis: Where is that Virginia Woolf comment, Luke help me lol either I banged my head and mistakenly dreamt that I saw a comment stating that you didn't really care for Taylor or the film or the reputation it has, and that Segal stands as the best while Burton may get worse, Louis tell me I didn't see that comment and I am obviously imagining it lol.

luke higham said...

RatedRStar: I'm sure Burton will remain a 5.

'Virginia Woolf is a film that I feel does quickly become tiresome as don't think the material is nearly as special as it's often made out to be. I think it frankly works better for a setup for performances, though even in that case I find the histrionics of Taylor and Dennis to be also a bit tiresome after a while. Burton ends up working for me anyways, but I'm starting to feel Segal's far more subdued work is the best in the film'.

RatedRStar said...

Louissssss how could you do this to me lol.

Calvin Law said...

Burton is really overrated for WAOVW in my opinion, he would not even make my top 5 for 1966. I just can't help every time watching the film how much better the original casting choice James Mason, or Trevor Howard or say an interesting choice like Anthony Quayle, Peter Finch, would've been.

No offense RatedRStar. Do you think Claude Rains would've been great in Burton's role had WAOVW been written and filmed in the 40s :)

tahmeed chowdhury said...

Virginia Woolf is a hella depressing film....and i've seen it 5 times xD. Burton's performance always works for me, as he takes many risks which pay off in my opinion. However, Louis may not feel the same way about Burton anymore. But, here's my ratings for the entire cast

Burton-5
Taylor- An incredibly strong 4.5, could become a 5 on rewatch.
Segal- 5 (his understated work is impressive)
Dennis- 4 (she gets annoying by the end for me, but she does play her part well).

luke higham said...

Calvin: I might watch Love & Mercy, sometime today.

Tahmeed:
I could definitely see Burton going down a bit on the rankings, but I still think his five will remain intact.

Calvin Law said...

For me:

Burton, 4.5
Taylor, 3
Segal, 4.5 (verging on a 5)
Dennis, 2.5

My ideal cast would've been

George: James Mason
Martha: Bette Davis (Edward Albee's ideal choice too)
Nick: George Segal
Honey: Elizabeth Hartman

Calvin Law said...

Luke: I would recommend it, good performance from Dano. Also Dano and Cusack are Psifonian's favourite leading male performances of the year so far, based on experience this bodes well for Louis' opinions on them.

Calvin Law said...

Now Paul Dano and John Cusack winning 2015 overall, that'd be a shocker :D

luke higham said...

Calvin: No Chance. :)

luke higham said...

Calvin: I wouldn't trust Psifonian completely, as he placed Taraji P. Henson 4th on his Top 10 Fincher performances list, and she's a 3 or 3.5 at best for me.

RatedRStar said...

Calvinnnnnnnnnnnn lol how could you, and um Rains um, possibly.

RatedRStar said...

The main reason I love Virginia Woolf and why it is by far my favourite film of 1966, is that its like I am a spectator watching this explosive go off on screen and I just love how ballsy and daring it all is, especially Burton, its like I am watching the real Burton, completely full of hate but also self hatred and what his life became.

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

RatedRStar: I love it for the same reasons, and I love all the performances! It's really no wonder Elizabeth Taylor is in my top 10.

RatedRStar said...

I understand though that people think its tiring, its one of those depressing films that I feel works because that is what I feel it is trying to be in general, I mean lets face it, when Louis or anyone sees Suicide Room, I am at least 70 percent certain at least half of u will dislike it lol but its very, its very personal to me for the obvious reasons, I mean I have Suicide Room as my favourite film of 2011 even though its probably not the most well made film, plus the main character (who is almost a doppelganger of me) is love or hate lol.

Michael McCarthy said...

Liz Taylor may be the one performer who I find difficult to criticize just because of how awesome she was as a person. I mean the woman climbed into the backseat of a car that had just been totaled and pulled several teeth that had broken off out of Monthomery Clift's throat to save his life. She was a badass.

Calvin Law said...

I guess I just never really fell for Burton's grandiose style of acting. I am actually looking forward to checking out Suicide Room, from what I've read it's quite a thought provoker.

Calvin Law said...

Although to be fair a lot of my animosity towards Burton as an actor stems from how often he's praised in the UK as the sole benchmark of great acting. Had a former drama teacher who called Burton the greatest British actor of all time. And called Tom Courtenay a 'chronic overactor' and Trevor Howard a 'coarse one-trick pony'.

Robert MacFarlane said...

WAOVW is actually a movie I could totally see people hating. I love it, but I can see how it can get grating.

RatedRStar said...

Suicide Room is a very easy film to find, literally type it on YouTube and you will find it instantly lol be prepared though to love or hate it lol.

Montgomery Clift is just one actor I can never criticize, he always tried his best, even in lonelyhearts, he just always gave it his all, unlike his rival and yes that crash really surmented Taylor as heroic and great.

Louis can I ask, do you any thoughts going into Suicide Room at all, like what are you expecting it to be like?

RatedRStar said...

Here is the link to Suicide Room if anyones interested, keep in mind I said the main character was so so similar to me, aside from me being Scottish, me having slightly poorer parents lol.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xc9QsmJ7bwQ


RatedRStar said...

Well maybe I am not quite as mean to people lol and I am not that snobbish but still I think its a good enough resemblance.

Anonymous said...

I always find Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf entertaining everytime I watch it. It's just gets better and better everytime I see it. It's my 2# of 1966, with The Good, the Bad and the Ugly as my 1#. I can see why Louis doesn't care for it. I love his honesty to give controversial opinions and be honest about them. At Gary Cooper's IMDB message boards, some of his fans even defend his performance in Sergeant York.
Calvin: Wouldn't Rains be a little too old for the part? In the early 40's, he would be more than 50 and by the end of the decade he would be 60. But I'm sure he would be terrific for the part, same with Mason, who is your choice. Even though Burton made his share of clunkers in the 70's, I always think of him as a great British actor, along with Courtenay and Howard, who are hated by your teacher.

RatedRStar said...

=D omg Gary Cooper in Sergent York has my favorite ever Louis insult lol =D

"In this scene a friend of his is killed by a hand grenade. York quickly sums up all his anger and asks rather kindly who did that."

Anonymous said...

RatedRStar: That's my favorite insult of Louis as well. I know that in his time, Cooper was considered one of the most naturalistic actors by many of his peers such as Chaplin, Barrymore, Laughton, Harrison (The worst Best Actor winner, he's a 1 for me), Bergman, Fonda, Stewart...but it looks like they were too blind to notice that Cooper wasn't emoting and that natural means realistic. Emotion is the most important element in acting, but I guess they thought he was better than all of them because he wasn't shouting like them, even if they were able to underplay sometimes. Real people express anger, happiness and sadness, but Cooper didn't display such emotions. I would say it's impossible to defend Cooper's performance in Sergeant York, but a Cooper fanboy in IMDB (who is the craziest Judy Garland fan ever and treats her like a saint) would defend it to the death. I'm waiting to see a review of Cooper's performance in Man of the West. He'll likely give him a 3,5 or a 4. What I can't believe is that this Judy Garland fantard posted a topic of American vs British actors and posted Charlton Heston in the list of Great American actors. Heston was more of a movie star than actor, like Cooper and Gregory Peck (despite some good performances).

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Anonymous: I love Judy as well. She is in my top 10 for my favorite actresses (I don't have a "best" list, since that would take far too long) but I do not see her as a saint. Trust me, there are crazier fan bases. Try the 1 Direction fanbase. They will defend anything. Sadly my cousins are apart of that....


As for Sergeant York, I would probably like it less if I see it again. I really liked Cooper then, but maybe not now. I am too lazy to buy the movie and re watch it, so it, and Cooper's placement, stays where it is.

Calvin Law said...

Come on guys. Sergeant York is the only time I've ever seen Cooper give a bad performance. He's my win for 1941 Lead and in my nominations for 1936 and 1952. I have a fondness for them that kinda resembles my love for Donald Sutherland; they underplay to the extent that it might not work for everyone, but when it really clicks there's no one better at conveying those silent looks that speak volumes.

Anonymous said...

Ruthiehenshallfan99: You'd be surprised at this lunatic's posts at Judy's message boards. He made like 59 topics about Judy in her message boards at IMDB. Most people never reply to many of his topics. In one of his topics, he was basically replying to himself. In a topic (not made by him) where a rational Judy fan said that her beauty was underrated, this moron (his username is metalman091, by the way) was attacking Lana Turner in order to make Judy look better than her. This guy is basically a moron who will do everything to make Judy look perfect. If Judy was still alive, she would probably be annoyed by his obsession with her. In most of the topics, he almost posts the same shit in several of the topics in Judy's message boards.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I'm sorry if this sounds rude or indelicate, but why even bring up IMDB message boards? It's the 4chan of cinephiles.

Anonymous said...

Calvin: You preferred Cooper to Bogart in Maltese Falcon and Welles in Citizen Kane? To each his own, I guess. You even liked him in Pride of the Yankees? Teresa Wright was better than him in that film. Funny, Louis hasn't stated his thoughts on her. I'll ask him anyway.
Hey, Louis. Your ratings and thoughts on Wright in Pride of the Yankees?

Anonymous said...

Robert: Well, I was just explaining to Ruthiehenshallfan99 the horrors of Judy Garland's message boards of IMDB. But ehh, whatever. But Jennifer Lawrence's message boards seem to be more toxic than Garland's.

Calvin Law said...

Bogart I'd give a solid 4.5, Sam Spade is not my favourite cinematic private eye but I think Bogie does an excellent job with him. Welles too would be a 4.5, he does go a bit broad sometimes but it's mostly sterling work. My nominees would be:

1. Cooper (4.5 verging on a 5)
2. Cagney
3. McCrae
4. Bogart
5. Powell

Calvin Law said...

I liked Cooper in Pride of the Yankees well enough although I agree Wright did more with her role.

As for 1941 lead my choice keeps switching between Stanwyck, Kerr and Fontaine.

RatedRStar said...

Oh I wasn't dissing Cooper but I'm sure you knew that hehe lol I just love the sardonic insult Louis used in the review =D lol, I like Cooper as an actor, about 50 percent of the time =). My problem with IMDB is that every single film has a person who just goes on there for the sake of it and just puts " this film sucked" or something along those lines but with no backing the statement up lol

Also to the person who sent me that Hong Kong message, I will have to watch some of those again at some point.

Anonymous said...

RatedRStar: What I was trying to say was that I also liked his sardonic insult. What I was also trying to say is how the actors who praised Cooper for being understated also seemed to be blind because it seemed like they forgot that real life people also emote and Cooper didn't do uch. I like Cooper in High Noon, Mr. Deeds Goes To Town, A Farewell to Arms and his two comedies with Stanwyck.

Calvin Law said...

RatedRStar and Anonymous: That's fine :) I like to think those guys were all good mates though. Stewart, Fonda, Cooper, and maybe their brit buddies Harrison, Laughton and Chaplin.

Calvin Law said...

And of course Laurence Olivier and his favourite actor Mickey Rooney.

Anonymous said...

Calvin: What about Peck? Most critics, like Kael, considered him wooden. Maybe his peers said he was a good actor because they wouldn't want to insult him because he was a nice, easygoing guy. And likely sensitive.

Calvin Law said...

Peck gave his fair share of lackluster/poor performances. But anyone who can give such a spellbinding rendition of an iconic character like Atticus Finch is kind of a good actor. He was fairly limited I guess but like many other limited actors, he knew how to use his talents perfectly. His bad performances usually stemmed from him being miscast, i.e. Spellbound, Moby Dick.

Calvin Law said...

Apparently he was also the nicest guy in Hollywood so I don't imagine he'd have gotten flack on a regular basis.

Anonymous said...

Calvin: I'm not his biggest fan (Stewart and Fonda (despite his off-screen persona) played decent men better than him IMHO), but I greatly admire his Atticus Finch. I never understood why a great director such as Huston would want to cast him as Captain Ahab. Walter Huston (who died in 1950) and Orson Welles would be better choices. I respect Peck a lot for reciting Unending Love as a tribute to Audrey Hepburn after her death.

Anonymous said...

Calvin: He was miscast as Mengele but he was entertaining.

Anonymous said...

@Anonymous: He gave a 3 to Wright in The Pride of the Yankees, he said that she had a limited part but was charming as usual. You didn't ask me, but I'd give her a 3.5 actually as she's rather moving in the end.

As for the Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? discussion, I can get why people don't like it but I looooove it. It's just so unforgettable, visceral and powerful I was in awe when I first saw it. All the main actors are a 5 for me. Burton delivered an amazing performance, as did Segal who had a potentially thankless role yet he made it unforgettable. But I feel the two ladies are underrated on this blog. Taylor gives a showboating performance but rightfully so, she never goes too far and her quiet monologue is terrific. As for Dennis, here she's really really underrated. She's incredible and one of the best supporting performances ever, she probably has the most difficult role as she's totally drunk all of the time and doesn't have moments of "sanity" yet she conveys perfectly her character's desperation while being darkly funny as well. I adore her. They're all very easy 5s for me.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous: Well, thanks for giving me Wright's rating.

Robert MacFarlane said...

Once again I must beg at least one of the Anonymous posters to please just use a screen name. This is confusing.

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Calvin: About Cooper, he is one of my favorites and I in no way meant any harm in what I said.

Anonymous: I will agree on that poster that Judy is an underrated beauty. I also love Lana Turner and think she was very beautiful. Though I will agree, IMDB does have some really crazy people. I use it all the time myself, but I rarely use the message boards for reasons like that.

RatedRStar said...

Too be fair even though I think Peck didnt really quite work for me in Moby Dick, I didnt think he was too bad, I mean the movie is actually quite interesting, especially the special effects and look of the film =).

luke higham said...

Love & Mercy - (As far as Musical Biopics go, I liked it quite a bit. I thought Dano gave a really good performance and Cusack gives one of his better ones as well).

Ratings
Dano - 4.5
Cusack - 3.5/4
Giamatti - 2.5
Banks - 3

Michael McCarthy said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Michael McCarthy said...

Am I the only one who was completely uncharmed by Love & Mercy?

Anonymous said...

@Robert: Actually I wouldn't mind commenting with a nickname, but I don't know how to create one that doesn't lead to a Google+ account or a blogspot account. A nick like RatedRStar I mean.

luke higham said...

Michael: Well, I didn't say I love it. The Cusack portion of the film, was not particularly interesting in my view (Giamatti's partly to blame) and I liked Dano's section very much.

Michael McCarthy said...

Dano's was definitely better, Cusack's section was tonally very awkward in my opinion. Although I did think Dano had some occasional moments of overacting and he didn't altogether get past how generic of a biopic his section was. It was as if someone watched Walk Hard and was like "I'm gonna do that...but without jokes."

luke higham said...

Michael: Fair enough. :)

luke higham said...

Michael: At the moment, Dano's my lowest 4.5 in Lead this year, so a re-watch might hurt his rating.

Michael McCarthy said...

He's a 3.5 for me. Giamatti's a 1.5.

luke higham said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
luke higham said...

Michael: On second thought, I'll put Giamatti down to a weak 2.

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Everyone: Your Oscar Winners for the 1950s.

1950: William Holden and Gloria Swanson in Sunset Boulevard, Celeste Holm (or Anne Baxter if she is supporting) and George Sanders in All About Eve
1951: Marlon Brando, Vivien Leigh, Kim Hunter, and Karl Malden in A Streetcar Named Desire
1952: Kirk Douglas and Lana Turner in The Bad and the Beautiful, Jean Hagen and Donald O'Connor in Singin' in the Rain
1953: Montgomery Clift in From Here to Eternity, Audrey Hepburn in Roman Holiday or Ava Gardner in Mogambo, Donna Reed in From Here to Eternity, Marlon Brando in Julius Caesar
1954: Marlon Brando in On the Waterfront, Judy Garland in A Star is Born, Eva Marie Saint and Rod Steiger, Karl Malden, or Lee J. Cobb in On the Waterfront (I am indecisive)
1955: Robert Mitchum in The Night of the Hunter, Susan Hayward in I'll Cry Tomorrow, Julie Harris and Raymond Massey in East of Eden
1956: Charlton Heston in The Ten Commandments, Deborah Kerr in The King and I or Carroll Baker in Baby Doll, Anne Baxter and Yul Brynner in The Ten Commandments
1957: Charles Laughton in Witness for the Prosecution, Lana Turner in Peyton Place, Marlene Dietrich in Witness for the Prosecution, Lee J. Cobb in 12 Angry Men
1958: Paul Newman, Elizabeth Taylor, Judith Anderson, and Burl Ives in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof
1959: Cary Grant in North by Northwest, Audrey Hepburn in The Nun's Story, Juanita Moore in Imitation of Life, Stephen Boyd in Ben-Hur

Anonymous said...

Ruthiehenshallfan99:
1950: Mifune (Rashomon), Davis (All About Eve) and Swanson (Sunset Boulevard) (TIE), Sanders (All About Eve), Kyo (Rashomon)
1951: Brando (Streetcar) and Clift (A Place in the Sun) (TIE), Leigh (Streetcar), Malden (Streetcar), Hunter (Streetcar) and Winters (A Place in the Sun) (TIE)
1952: Shimura (Ikiru), O'Hara (The Quiet Man), Fitzgerald (The Quiet Man), N/A
1953: Clift (FHTE), haven't decided yet, Gielgud (Julius Caesar), Ritter (Pickup on South Street)
1954: Brando (Waterfront), Garland (A Star is Born), Cobb and Steiger (Waterfront) (TIE), Marie Saint (Waterfront)
1955: Mitchum (Night of the Hunter), Magnani (Rose Tattoo), Massey (East of Eden) and Gish (Night of the Hunter)
1956: Mason (Bigger than Life), Hepburn (Rainmakers), Quinn (Lust For Life), Baxter (The Ten Commandments)
1957: Guinness (Bridge on the River Kwai), Woodward (Three Faces of Eve), Hayakawa (Bridge on the River Kwai), Lanchester (Witness for the Prosecution)
1958: Stewart (Vertigo) and Novak (Vertigo), Welles and Dietrich (Touch of Evil)
1959: Grant (North by Northwest), Riva (Hiroshima Mon Amour), Scott and Remick (Anatomy of a Murder)

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Lillian Gish could also be my winner for 1955 Supporting Actress.

Robert MacFarlane said...

I actually saw Witness for the Prosecution for the first time last week and HATED Dietrich. Can someone explain how she wasn't terrible?

RatedRStar said...

Robert: Well it was Marlene being Marlene, for better or worse lol, I think I quite liked how she actually fooled me with that second character which at the time I did not know that was her, I will say I actually really enjoyed Witness for the Prosecution just because it was quite fun.

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Robert: Maybe I could have Turner as Supporting, but I am not sure which category she would go to. If not her, then I have no idea who. Anyways, I could have either her or Hope Lange (Or Dorothy McGuire in Old Yeller) for supporting, which leaves Elizabeth Taylor of Raintree County, Deborah Kerr in Affair to Remember, Audrey Hepburn for Funny Face or Love in the Afternoon, and Diane Varsi in Peyton Place for the lead. Tough year for me.

Anonymous said...

Oh, my 1952 supporting win is De Havilland in My Cousin Rachel.

Robert MacFarlane said...

She didn't fool me for a second with that atrocious Cockney accent. That scene was so bad it bordered on surreal. Then again, I seemed to more or less dislike the film outside of Laughton.

Calvin Law said...

1950: James Stewart (Harvey), Gloria Swanson (Sunset Boulevard), Masayuki Mori (Rashomon), Josephine Hull (Harvey)

1951: Trevor Howard (Outcast of the Islands, Redgrave in The Browning version is incredibly close though), Vivien Leigh, Karl Malden and Kim Hunter (A Streetcar Named Desire)

1952: Takashi Shimura (Ikiru), Shirley Booth (Come Back Little Sheba), Yūnosuke Itō and Miki Odagiri (Ikiru)

1953: William Holden (Stalag 17), N/A, John Gielgud (Julius Caeser), Gloria Grahame (The Big Heat, Kerr from FHTE is close)

1954: Marlon Brando (On the Waterfront), Audrey Hepburn (Sabrina), Rod Steiger and Eve Marie Saint (On the Waterfront)

1955: Ernest Borgnine (Marty), Katherine Hepburn (Summertime), Herbert Lom (The Ladykillers), Betsy Blair (Marty)

1956: Kirk Douglas (Lust for Life), Carroll Baker (Baby Doll), Deborah Kerr (Tea and Sympathy), Yul Brynner and Anne Baxter (The Ten Commandments) 

1957: Alec Guinness (Bridge on the River Kwai), Deborah Kerr (Heaven Knows Mr Allison), Sessue Hayakawa (Bridge on the River Kwai, Lancaster's not far off nor is Cobb), Peggy Cummins (Hell Drivers)

1958: James Stewart (Vertigo), Ingrid Bergman (The Inn of Sixth Happiness), Anthony Quayle and Sylvia Syms (Ice Cold in Alex)

1959: James Stewart (Anatomy of a Murder), Riva (Hiroshima Mon Amour), Joseph Schildkraut (Diary of Anne Frank), Lee Remick (Anatomy of a Murder)

Calvin Law said...

Ruthiehenshallfan99: For your 1957 tiebreaker I'd recommend Deborah Kerr in Heaven Knows Mr Allison. She's good in An Affair to Remember but she's amazing in Mr Allison.

ruthiehenshallfan99 said...

Calvin: I have never seen Heaven Knows Mr. Allison, so I guess I will have to choose Kerr for An Affair to Remember for now. And Lana Turner can have the win for Supporting Actress.

Louis Morgan said...

Anonymous:

Muni as Beethoven could have worked, as long as it was directed by someone willing to reign him in.

RatedRStar:

None whatsoever in regards to Suicide Room.